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rock-salt

rock-salt

rock-salt Sentence Examples

  • S.E., there are deposits of rock salt.

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  • Many of the old chambers, some of which are of enormous size, are embellished with portals, candelabra, statues, &c., all hewn in rock-salt.

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  • There are also two large chapels, containing altars, ornaments, &c., in rock-salt, a room called the dancing saloon (Tanzsaal), where the objects of interest found in the mines are kept; the Kronleuchtersaal, and the chamber Michatovice are also worth mention.

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  • The country has a great wealth of minerals, silver having been found, and copper, lead, iron, coal and rock-salt being wrought with profit.

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  • It is celebrated for the extensive deposit of rock salt in its vicinity.

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  • Glauber showed how to prepare hydrochloric acid, spiritus salis, by heating rock-salt with sulphuric acid, the method in common use to-day; and also nitric acid from saltpetre and arsenic trioxide.

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  • The deposit of rock salt on Petite Anse Island, in the coast swamp region, has been extensively worked since its discovery during the Civil War.

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  • A large and remunerative export trade in salt to India is now established, whereas formerly not one grain found its way there; the first steps in this direction were taken in 1892 when works were begun to place the great rock-salt salines of Salif, on the coast of the Red Sea, on a commercial footing.

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  • Rock-salt occurs at several places on the Lena and in Transbaikalia, and salt-springs are numerous - those of Ust-kutsk on the Lena and of Usolie near Irkutsk being the most noteworthy.

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  • Large beds of rock-salt also occur in the neighbourhood, in which shafts have been sunk to a depth of more than 1200 ft.

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  • Besides the rock-salt, which is excavated by blasting, the saline deposits of Stassfurt yield a considerable quantity of deliquescent salts and other saline products, which have encouraged the foundation of numerous chemical factories in the town and in the neighbouring village of Leopoldshall, which lies in Anhalt territory.

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  • The rock-salt works are mainly government property, while the chemical factories are in private hands.

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  • Tirgu Ocna is built among the Carpathian Mountains, on bare hills formed of rock salt.

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  • in length by a quarter of a mile in breadth there exists an exposed mass of rock-salt with several large hillocks of salt on either side.

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  • four series of "Researches on Heat," in the course of which he described the polarization of heat by tourmaline, by transmission through a bundle of thin mica plates inclined to the transmitted ray, and by reflection from the multiplied surfaces of a pile of mica plates placed at the polarizing angle, and also its circular polarization by two internal reflections in rhombs of rock-salt.

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  • There are mines of chrome, mercury, cinnabar, argentiferous lead and rock salt.

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  • From 1880 to 1885 the first brines were obtained in Wyoming and Genesee counties by boring deep wells into beds of rock salt, and in 1885 the mining of the extensive deposits of rock salt in Livingston county was begun.

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  • There are also in the neighbourhood rock-salt works and mines, as well as boracic acid works.

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  • Rock-salt some 80 ft.

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  • 126), in mentioning sal ammoniac, makes use of a phrase quite irreconcilable with the description of Pliny, and rather applicable to rock-salt than to our sal ammoniac. Sal ammoniac, he says, is peculiarly prized if it can be easily split into rectangular fragments.

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  • Natural sulphate occurs in an anhydrous condition as thenardite, Na2SO 4, at Tarapaca, Chile, and in the rock-salt deposits at Espartinas near Aranjuez, Spain.

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  • These form the principal natural sources of sodium compounds - the chloride as rock salt and in sea-water being of, such predominating importance as quite to outweigh all the others.

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  • Rock-salt is procured, as well as that obtained from the brine-pools.

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  • It is celebrated for its extensive mines of rock-salt, which were worked as early as 1174.

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  • The total yield of mined salt amounted in 1905 to 6,209,000 tons, including 1,165,000 tons of rock salt.

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  • from the town, rock salt of remarkable purity and in large quantity is found in the Triassic sandstone.

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  • The one is probably derived from the other, most rock salt deposits bearing evidence of having been formed by the evaporation of lakes or seas.

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  • - Assuming that each gallon of sea water contains 0.2547 lb of salt, and allowing an average density 2.24 for rocksalt, it has been computed that the entire ocean if dried up would yield no less than four and a half million cubic miles of rock-salt, or about fourteen and a half times the bulk of the entire continent of Europe above high-water mark.

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  • In England and Scotland the industry has greatly fallen off under the competition of the rock-salt works of Cheshire.

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  • Generally speaking this salt, which may contain up to 15% of impurities, goes into commerce just as it is, but in some cases it is taken first to the refinery, where it either is simply washed and then stove-dried before being sent out, or is dissolved in fresh water and then boiled down and crystallized like white salt from rock-salt brine.

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  • To mineralogists rock-salt is often known as halite - a name suggested in 1847 by E.

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  • The word halite, however, is sometimes used not only for the species rock-salt but as a group-name to include a series of haloid minerals, of which that species is the type.

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  • Halite or rock-salt crystallizes in the cubic system, usually in cubes, rarely in octahedra; the cubes being solid, unlike the skeleton-cubes obtained by rapid evaporation of brine.

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  • Rock-salt commonly occurs in cleavable masses, or sometimes in laminar, granular or fibrous forms, the finely fibrous variety being known as " hair-salt."

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  • Rock-salt when pure is colourless and transparent, but is usually red or brown by mechanical admixture with ferric oxide or hydroxide.

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  • Deposits of rock-salt have evidently been formed by the evaporation of salt water, probably in areas of inland drainage or enclosed basins, like the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, or perhaps in some cases in an arm of the sea partially cut off, like the Kara Bughaz, which forms a natural salt-pan on the east side of the Caspian.

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  • In England extensive deposits of rock-salt are found near the base of the Keuper marl, especially in Cheshire.

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  • Deeper down there are successively strata of polyhalite, MgS04 K2S04.2CaS04.2H20, and anhydrite, CaSO 4, interspersed with regular layers of rock-salt; whilst below the anhydrite we have the main rock-salt deposits.

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  • A bed of rock-salt in the Zechstein at Sperenberg near Berlin has been proved by boring to have a thickness of upwards of 4000 ft.

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  • The extensive mines at Wieliczka are in this rock-salt, as also is the salt of Kalusz in Galicia, which is associated with sylvite, KCI.

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  • Rock-salt is mined in several states, as New York, Kansas and Louisiana; but American salt is mostly obtained from brine.

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  • Cubic pseudomorphs representing rock-salt are sometimes seen in strata which have been deposited in shallow water, especially on the margin of a salt-lake.

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  • Although brine springs have been known to exist in both these counties ever since the Roman occupation, and salt had been made there from time immemorial, it was not till 1670 that rock-salt about 30 yds.

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  • In 1779 three beds of rock-salt were discovered at Lawton, separated from one another by layers of indurated clay.

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  • thick, a layer of rock-salt 33 to 37 yds.

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  • Rock-salt is the origin of the greater part of the salt manufactured in the world.

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  • The purer rock-salt is often simply ground for use, as at Wieliczka and elsewhere, but it is more frequently pumped as brine, produced either by artificial solution as at Middlesbrough and other places, or by natural means, as in Cheshire and Worcestershire.

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  • One great drawback to the use of even the purest rock-salt simply ground is its tendency to revert to a hard unwieldy mass, when kept any length of time in sacks.

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  • One difference between the manufacture of salt from rock-salt brine as carried on in Britain and on the Continent lies in the use in the latter case of closed or covered pans, except in the making of fine salt, whereas in Britain open ones are employed.

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  • It includes diamonds, the majority of which, however, are of a somewhat yellow colour, gold, quicksilver, cinnabar, copper, iron, tin, antimony, mineral oils, sulphur, rock-salt, marble and coal.

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  • In 1352 the restless man started for Central Africa, passing by the oases of the Sahara (where the houses were built of rock-salt, as Herodotus tells, and roofed with camel skins) to Timbuktu and Gogo on the Niger, a river which he calls the Nile, believing it to flow down into Egypt, an opinion maintained by some up to the date of Lander's discovery.

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  • Chlorine is never found in nature in the uncombined condition, but in combination with the alkali metals it occurs widely distributed in the form of rock-salt (sodium chloride); as sylvine and carnallite, at Stassfiirt; and to a smaller extent in various other minerals such as matlockite and horn-mercury.

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  • There are also many quarries of rock-salt, gypsum, lime and some of marble, alabaster, soapstone, &c. The annual revenue of ~he government from the leases, rents and royalties of mines does not amount to more than 15,000, and about 6000 of this amount is derived from the turquoise mines near Nishapur.

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  • Salt, obtained principally from brine but also as rock-salt, is an important object of industry in Cheshire, the output from that county and Staffordshire exceeding a million tons annually.

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  • Coal, iron, sulphur, gypsum, rock-salt, lacustrine salt and naphtha are all known to exist, but only the last two are extracted.

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  • Rock-salt is obtained from the province of Tigre.

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  • Until the end of the 19th century the usual currency was the Maria Theresa dollar, bars of rock-salt and cartridges.

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  • Bars of rock-salt, after serving as coins, are, when broken up, used as food.

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  • SALT RANGE, a hill system in the Punjab and North-West Frontier Provinces of India, deriving its name from its extensive deposits of rock-salt.

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  • Deposits of rock-salt, a valuable government monopoly, stretch from the department of Suceava in northern Moldavia to that of Gorjiu in Walachia, and are mined in the departments of Bacau, Prahova and Ramnicti Sarat.

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  • At Kanopolis in Ellsworth county, at Lyons in Rice county and at Kingman, Kingman county, the salt is mined and sold as rock-salt.

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  • The development has been mainly since 1887 at Hutchinson and since about 1890 in the rock-salt mines.

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  • Both rock salt and white salt obtained by evaporation from brine are exported.

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  • In front of the aperture were placed a plate of transparent rock-salt, and a flat cell of thin glass containing a solution of iodine in carbon bisulphide.

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  • Both rock-salt and carbon bisulphide are extremely transparent to the luminous and also to the infra-red rays The iodine in the solution, however, has the property of absorbing the luminous rays, while transmitting the infra-red rays copiously, so that in sufficient thicknesses the solution appears nearly black.

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  • Owing to the inflammable nature of carbon bisulphide, the plate of rock-salt was found to be hardly a sufficient protection, and Tyndall surrounded the iodine cell with an annular vessel through which cold water was made to flow.

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  • The rock-salt and cold water circulation can then be dispensed with.

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  • For it is easy to see that if, by means of lenses of rock-salt or mirrors, we focused all or nearly all the rays from a small surface on to another surface of equal area, this would not raise the temperature of the second surface above that of the first; and we could not obtain a greater concentration of rays from a large heated surface, since we could not have all parts of the surface simultaneously in focus.

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  • Notwithstanding the salt springs of Ferghana and Syr-darya, the salt lakes of the region, and the rock-salt strata of the Alexander Mountains, salt is imported.

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  • Rock-salt occurs in these beds north of Carrickfergus.

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  • Gypsum, limestone, freestone and marble are quarried; there are also mines of copper, lead, iron, zinc and rock salt.

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  • Spanish salt is partly marine, partly derived from brine-springs and partly from rock-salt, of which last there is an entire mountain at Cardona in Barcelona.

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  • By the law of the 6th of July I 859, a large number of important mines, including all the salt-works and rock-salt mines, were reserved as state property, but financial necessities compelled the government to surrender one mine after another, so that at present the state possesses only the mercury mines and some salt-works.

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  • The chief rock-salt mines and brine springs are at Stassfurt, Schonebeck and Halle.

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  • anchovyocal specialities are anchovies marinated in vinegar and garlic, fish baked in rock salt and sword fish.

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  • We use small granules of crushed rock salt to treat.

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  • keep rock salt handy to put on external paths in cold weather.

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  • S.E., there are deposits of rock salt.

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  • Many of the old chambers, some of which are of enormous size, are embellished with portals, candelabra, statues, &c., all hewn in rock-salt.

    0
    0
  • There are also two large chapels, containing altars, ornaments, &c., in rock-salt, a room called the dancing saloon (Tanzsaal), where the objects of interest found in the mines are kept; the Kronleuchtersaal, and the chamber Michatovice are also worth mention.

    0
    0
  • The country has a great wealth of minerals, silver having been found, and copper, lead, iron, coal and rock-salt being wrought with profit.

    0
    0
  • It is celebrated for the extensive deposit of rock salt in its vicinity.

    0
    0
  • Glauber showed how to prepare hydrochloric acid, spiritus salis, by heating rock-salt with sulphuric acid, the method in common use to-day; and also nitric acid from saltpetre and arsenic trioxide.

    0
    0
  • The deposit of rock salt on Petite Anse Island, in the coast swamp region, has been extensively worked since its discovery during the Civil War.

    0
    0
  • A large and remunerative export trade in salt to India is now established, whereas formerly not one grain found its way there; the first steps in this direction were taken in 1892 when works were begun to place the great rock-salt salines of Salif, on the coast of the Red Sea, on a commercial footing.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt occurs at several places on the Lena and in Transbaikalia, and salt-springs are numerous - those of Ust-kutsk on the Lena and of Usolie near Irkutsk being the most noteworthy.

    0
    0
  • Large beds of rock-salt also occur in the neighbourhood, in which shafts have been sunk to a depth of more than 1200 ft.

    0
    0
  • Besides the rock-salt, which is excavated by blasting, the saline deposits of Stassfurt yield a considerable quantity of deliquescent salts and other saline products, which have encouraged the foundation of numerous chemical factories in the town and in the neighbouring village of Leopoldshall, which lies in Anhalt territory.

    0
    0
  • The rock-salt works are mainly government property, while the chemical factories are in private hands.

    0
    0
  • Tirgu Ocna is built among the Carpathian Mountains, on bare hills formed of rock salt.

    0
    0
  • in length by a quarter of a mile in breadth there exists an exposed mass of rock-salt with several large hillocks of salt on either side.

    0
    0
  • four series of "Researches on Heat," in the course of which he described the polarization of heat by tourmaline, by transmission through a bundle of thin mica plates inclined to the transmitted ray, and by reflection from the multiplied surfaces of a pile of mica plates placed at the polarizing angle, and also its circular polarization by two internal reflections in rhombs of rock-salt.

    0
    0
  • There are mines of chrome, mercury, cinnabar, argentiferous lead and rock salt.

    0
    0
  • From 1880 to 1885 the first brines were obtained in Wyoming and Genesee counties by boring deep wells into beds of rock salt, and in 1885 the mining of the extensive deposits of rock salt in Livingston county was begun.

    0
    0
  • There are also in the neighbourhood rock-salt works and mines, as well as boracic acid works.

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  • Rock-salt some 80 ft.

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  • 126), in mentioning sal ammoniac, makes use of a phrase quite irreconcilable with the description of Pliny, and rather applicable to rock-salt than to our sal ammoniac. Sal ammoniac, he says, is peculiarly prized if it can be easily split into rectangular fragments.

    0
    0
  • Natural sulphate occurs in an anhydrous condition as thenardite, Na2SO 4, at Tarapaca, Chile, and in the rock-salt deposits at Espartinas near Aranjuez, Spain.

    0
    0
  • These form the principal natural sources of sodium compounds - the chloride as rock salt and in sea-water being of, such predominating importance as quite to outweigh all the others.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt is procured, as well as that obtained from the brine-pools.

    0
    0
  • It is celebrated for its extensive mines of rock-salt, which were worked as early as 1174.

    0
    0
  • The total yield of mined salt amounted in 1905 to 6,209,000 tons, including 1,165,000 tons of rock salt.

    0
    0
  • from the town, rock salt of remarkable purity and in large quantity is found in the Triassic sandstone.

    0
    0
  • The one is probably derived from the other, most rock salt deposits bearing evidence of having been formed by the evaporation of lakes or seas.

    0
    0
  • - Assuming that each gallon of sea water contains 0.2547 lb of salt, and allowing an average density 2.24 for rocksalt, it has been computed that the entire ocean if dried up would yield no less than four and a half million cubic miles of rock-salt, or about fourteen and a half times the bulk of the entire continent of Europe above high-water mark.

    0
    0
  • In England and Scotland the industry has greatly fallen off under the competition of the rock-salt works of Cheshire.

    0
    0
  • Generally speaking this salt, which may contain up to 15% of impurities, goes into commerce just as it is, but in some cases it is taken first to the refinery, where it either is simply washed and then stove-dried before being sent out, or is dissolved in fresh water and then boiled down and crystallized like white salt from rock-salt brine.

    0
    0
  • To mineralogists rock-salt is often known as halite - a name suggested in 1847 by E.

    0
    0
  • The word halite, however, is sometimes used not only for the species rock-salt but as a group-name to include a series of haloid minerals, of which that species is the type.

    0
    0
  • Halite or rock-salt crystallizes in the cubic system, usually in cubes, rarely in octahedra; the cubes being solid, unlike the skeleton-cubes obtained by rapid evaporation of brine.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt commonly occurs in cleavable masses, or sometimes in laminar, granular or fibrous forms, the finely fibrous variety being known as " hair-salt."

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt when pure is colourless and transparent, but is usually red or brown by mechanical admixture with ferric oxide or hydroxide.

    0
    0
  • Deposits of rock-salt have evidently been formed by the evaporation of salt water, probably in areas of inland drainage or enclosed basins, like the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, or perhaps in some cases in an arm of the sea partially cut off, like the Kara Bughaz, which forms a natural salt-pan on the east side of the Caspian.

    0
    0
  • In England extensive deposits of rock-salt are found near the base of the Keuper marl, especially in Cheshire.

    0
    0
  • Deeper down there are successively strata of polyhalite, MgS04 K2S04.2CaS04.2H20, and anhydrite, CaSO 4, interspersed with regular layers of rock-salt; whilst below the anhydrite we have the main rock-salt deposits.

    0
    0
  • A bed of rock-salt in the Zechstein at Sperenberg near Berlin has been proved by boring to have a thickness of upwards of 4000 ft.

    0
    0
  • The extensive mines at Wieliczka are in this rock-salt, as also is the salt of Kalusz in Galicia, which is associated with sylvite, KCI.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt is mined in several states, as New York, Kansas and Louisiana; but American salt is mostly obtained from brine.

    0
    0
  • Cubic pseudomorphs representing rock-salt are sometimes seen in strata which have been deposited in shallow water, especially on the margin of a salt-lake.

    0
    0
  • Although brine springs have been known to exist in both these counties ever since the Roman occupation, and salt had been made there from time immemorial, it was not till 1670 that rock-salt about 30 yds.

    0
    0
  • In 1779 three beds of rock-salt were discovered at Lawton, separated from one another by layers of indurated clay.

    0
    0
  • thick, a layer of rock-salt 33 to 37 yds.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt is the origin of the greater part of the salt manufactured in the world.

    0
    0
  • The purer rock-salt is often simply ground for use, as at Wieliczka and elsewhere, but it is more frequently pumped as brine, produced either by artificial solution as at Middlesbrough and other places, or by natural means, as in Cheshire and Worcestershire.

    0
    0
  • One great drawback to the use of even the purest rock-salt simply ground is its tendency to revert to a hard unwieldy mass, when kept any length of time in sacks.

    0
    0
  • As usually made, white salt from rock-salt may be classified into two groups: (I) boiled: known as fine, table, lump, stoved lump, superfine, basket, butter and cheese salt (Fr.

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    0
  • One difference between the manufacture of salt from rock-salt brine as carried on in Britain and on the Continent lies in the use in the latter case of closed or covered pans, except in the making of fine salt, whereas in Britain open ones are employed.

    0
    0
  • It includes diamonds, the majority of which, however, are of a somewhat yellow colour, gold, quicksilver, cinnabar, copper, iron, tin, antimony, mineral oils, sulphur, rock-salt, marble and coal.

    0
    0
  • In 1352 the restless man started for Central Africa, passing by the oases of the Sahara (where the houses were built of rock-salt, as Herodotus tells, and roofed with camel skins) to Timbuktu and Gogo on the Niger, a river which he calls the Nile, believing it to flow down into Egypt, an opinion maintained by some up to the date of Lander's discovery.

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    0
  • The minerals known to exist are - alum, antimony, arsenic, asbestos, boracide, chrome, coal, copper, emery, fuller's earth, gold, iron, kaolin, lead, lignite, magnetic iron, manganese, meerschaum, mercury, nickel, rock-salt, silver, sulphur and zinc. The vegetation varies with the climate, soil and elevation.

    0
    0
  • Chlorine is never found in nature in the uncombined condition, but in combination with the alkali metals it occurs widely distributed in the form of rock-salt (sodium chloride); as sylvine and carnallite, at Stassfiirt; and to a smaller extent in various other minerals such as matlockite and horn-mercury.

    0
    0
  • There are also many quarries of rock-salt, gypsum, lime and some of marble, alabaster, soapstone, &c. The annual revenue of ~he government from the leases, rents and royalties of mines does not amount to more than 15,000, and about 6000 of this amount is derived from the turquoise mines near Nishapur.

    0
    0
  • Salt, obtained principally from brine but also as rock-salt, is an important object of industry in Cheshire, the output from that county and Staffordshire exceeding a million tons annually.

    0
    0
  • Coal, iron, sulphur, gypsum, rock-salt, lacustrine salt and naphtha are all known to exist, but only the last two are extracted.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt is obtained from the province of Tigre.

    0
    0
  • Until the end of the 19th century the usual currency was the Maria Theresa dollar, bars of rock-salt and cartridges.

    0
    0
  • Bars of rock-salt, after serving as coins, are, when broken up, used as food.

    0
    0
  • SALT RANGE, a hill system in the Punjab and North-West Frontier Provinces of India, deriving its name from its extensive deposits of rock-salt.

    0
    0
  • Deposits of rock-salt, a valuable government monopoly, stretch from the department of Suceava in northern Moldavia to that of Gorjiu in Walachia, and are mined in the departments of Bacau, Prahova and Ramnicti Sarat.

    0
    0
  • At Kanopolis in Ellsworth county, at Lyons in Rice county and at Kingman, Kingman county, the salt is mined and sold as rock-salt.

    0
    0
  • The development has been mainly since 1887 at Hutchinson and since about 1890 in the rock-salt mines.

    0
    0
  • Both rock salt and white salt obtained by evaporation from brine are exported.

    0
    0
  • In front of the aperture were placed a plate of transparent rock-salt, and a flat cell of thin glass containing a solution of iodine in carbon bisulphide.

    0
    0
  • Both rock-salt and carbon bisulphide are extremely transparent to the luminous and also to the infra-red rays The iodine in the solution, however, has the property of absorbing the luminous rays, while transmitting the infra-red rays copiously, so that in sufficient thicknesses the solution appears nearly black.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the inflammable nature of carbon bisulphide, the plate of rock-salt was found to be hardly a sufficient protection, and Tyndall surrounded the iodine cell with an annular vessel through which cold water was made to flow.

    0
    0
  • The rock-salt and cold water circulation can then be dispensed with.

    0
    0
  • For it is easy to see that if, by means of lenses of rock-salt or mirrors, we focused all or nearly all the rays from a small surface on to another surface of equal area, this would not raise the temperature of the second surface above that of the first; and we could not obtain a greater concentration of rays from a large heated surface, since we could not have all parts of the surface simultaneously in focus.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding the salt springs of Ferghana and Syr-darya, the salt lakes of the region, and the rock-salt strata of the Alexander Mountains, salt is imported.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt occurs in these beds north of Carrickfergus.

    0
    0
  • Gypsum, limestone, freestone and marble are quarried; there are also mines of copper, lead, iron, zinc and rock salt.

    0
    0
  • Spanish salt is partly marine, partly derived from brine-springs and partly from rock-salt, of which last there is an entire mountain at Cardona in Barcelona.

    0
    0
  • By the law of the 6th of July I 859, a large number of important mines, including all the salt-works and rock-salt mines, were reserved as state property, but financial necessities compelled the government to surrender one mine after another, so that at present the state possesses only the mercury mines and some salt-works.

    0
    0
  • Less frequently present are the following: - rock salt (Triassic clays, and marls of Cheshire, &c.); gypsum (London Clay, Triassic clays); dolomite, phosphate of lime, vivianite (phosphate of iron), oxides of manganese, copper ores (e.g.

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  • The chief rock-salt mines and brine springs are at Stassfurt, Schonebeck and Halle.

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  • Use rock salt to write your class year on the grass where everyone can see it.

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  • Your regular routine for keeping access to your home clear should include adding sand or rock salt to slippery spots.

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  • Sprinkle some rock salt or cat litter on them to increase traction for cars and pedestrians.

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  • Putting a layer of rock salt (sodium chloride) on icy areas is an effective way to melt the ice.

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  • However, rock salt can cause damage to concrete and metal surfaces and is also harmful to plants.

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  • Once the driveway has been cleared, consider sprinkling some rock salt on it.

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  • The rock salt will help to melt ice and lower the risk of slipping.

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  • A saline bath involves little more than adding table, Epson, or rock salt to a bath.

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  • Process the mixture for about two minutes before adding the recommended amount of rock salt on top of the ice.

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  • If your shoes have fresh rock salt stains, dab the stain with a little bit of clear water to remove.

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