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rock-garden

rock-garden

rock-garden Sentence Examples

  • In these days the rock-garden is a most important feature, and it requires a good deal of care and skill to arrange the boulders, walks, pools or streams in natural and artistic fashion.

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  • high, also trailing, are suitable for the rock garden.

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  • This plant was recommended for a preliminary commendation by the Joint Rock Garden Plant Committee.

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  • tortoiseshell tom watched her accusingly from the rock garden.

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  • In these days the rock-garden is a most important feature, and it requires a good deal of care and skill to arrange the boulders, walks, pools or streams in natural and artistic fashion.

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  • high, also trailing, are suitable for the rock garden.

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  • He was born in London and brought up in Ingleborough where he became interested in rock garden plants.

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  • The tortoiseshell tom watched her accusingly from the rock garden.

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  • O. vulgatum is a native Fern not often seen in gardens; found in most meadows; and the best position for it therefore is in colonies in the hardy fernery or the moist stiff soil in the rock garden.

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  • They grow freely in borders of well-drained sandy loam, but their home is the rock garden.

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  • A very distinct little plant, most useful for a choice corner in a rock garden.

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  • It is useful from its distinct aspect on the rough rock garden or in the mixed border.

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  • Woody spots near a fernery or a rock garden suit it; it grows readily among shrubs, and in the mixed border.

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  • The rock garden and raised borders; supposed to require sunny positions, in sandy, well-drained soil, but I find it fine on stiffish cool soils.

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  • It is of easy culture, succeeding in an ordinary border, though seen to best advantage on shady parts of the rock garden in a well-drained soil.

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  • A sheltered situation in a well-drained part of the rock garden suits it.

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  • Both kinds flourish in dryish soil, on dry sunny parts of the rock garden.

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  • It succeeds best in peaty or sandy soil, in sheltered shady nooks on well-drained parts of the rock garden.

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  • Caesius), and R. saxatilis, are pretty in partially-shaded spots in the rock garden in moist peaty soil.

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  • It is best in the rougher parts of the rock garden or for the wild garden, and grows well under trees or in under-wood.

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  • It is a plant for the rock garden in free peaty soils.

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  • In fine peat it grows well, and is best on the rock garden or among dwarf alpine shrubs.

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  • Among the known kinds are Breweri, glanduliflorus, gmelini, all peat and rock garden plants.

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  • Butterwort (Pinguicula) - These interesting dwarf bog-plants are pretty in the bog garden or moist spots in the rock garden.

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  • It roots firmly, by means of strong woody fibres, and prefers peaty soil mingled with shale or rough gravel, and shady humid positions, such as are afforded by a high rock garden with a north aspect, or by the shelter of a north wall.

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  • America. It succeeds in half-shady spots on the margin of the rock garden or bog, or in a select spot among choice shrubs in light, moist vegetable soil, covered with Cocoa fibre to keep the surface open.

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  • Few alpine plants are more worthy of general culture, either in the rock garden or the mixed border, for the front of which it is well suited.

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  • Its hardiness is doubtful, and it should, therefore, be planted on sunny spots in the rock garden or on banks in light soil, and wintered in frames.

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  • It does not possess the vigour of the other evergreen Iberises, but it is fitted for grouping with dwarf alpine flowers on warm parts of the rock garden in well-drained sandy loam.

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  • Iberis Semperflorens - A shrubby plant, with dense corymbs of whit flowers, and not suited for border culture, though hardy enough to stand our winters when grown at the foot of a south wall or in a very sunny corner of the rock garden.

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  • It has not, however, the hardiness of the white kinds, and perishes on heavy soils in winter; on light sandy soils in the rock garden it is pretty.

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  • These are good rock garden plants, and the pretty little rosy heads of one form of the Mountain Everlasting may often be seen in the cottage gardens of Warwickshire.

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  • It should be used freely in every rock garden.

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  • This beautiful "Catchfly" is not often seen even among the choicer alpines, while colonies of it in the rock garden are, rare.

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  • The Fire Pink succeeds in a well-drained rock garden.

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  • They are excellent for the rock garden and the margins of a loamy border.

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  • Centranthus - C. macrosiphon, a hardy Spanish annual of the Valerian order, with pretty rose-colored flowers, is useful for the rock garden or flower border.

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  • Both are suitable for warm spots in the rock garden in loamy soils, but C. sibirica, also a dwarf species with pink flowers, requires a damp peaty soil.

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  • It cannot be relied on as quite hardy, and requires a sheltered position, such as is afforded by a snug nook in the rock garden.

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  • Coprosma - Dwarf evergreen shrubs from New Zealand, best seen in shore and southern gardens, and most at home on a bold rock garden.

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  • Coronilla Cappadocica - Berica) is a vigorous trailer well suited to the larger rock garden.

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  • Easily grown in any soil, on open banks or sunny places in the rock garden.

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  • It thrives in shady spots on the rock garden or the hardy fernery, in sandy peat.

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  • In the open air these plants should have a warm spot in the rock garden.

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  • Dragons-head (Dracocephalum) - Plants of the Sage family, among them a few choice perennials suitable for the rock garden or the mixed border, succeeding in light garden soil and increased by division or seed.

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  • Ruyschianum. The most beautiful of all is D. grandiflorum, a rock garden plant, which is the earliest in flower.

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  • This grows all among the lower mountains and foothills, and in Britain is best on warm spots in the rock garden.

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  • Best suited to sunny positions in the rock garden.

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  • In light sandy soil of the rock garden it has never failed to bloom profusely.

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  • All of them are easy to grow, and delight in gritty soil and a well-drained and sunny position on the rock garden.

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  • The rock garden is most congenial to it; but it does very well on good level ground, though it is apt to get naked about the base, and may perish on heavy soils.

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  • European species with scentless yellow flowers, is also a neat alpine, and so is E. rupestre, which is desirable for the rock garden.

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  • It is precious for bare spots in the rock garden or the margins of choice beds.

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  • A fragile plant, 4 to 6 inches high, with broad leaves, it throws out long slender rhizomes, wholly above ground, and thrives in sandy earth, in borders, or on the rock garden.

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  • Suitable for the rock garden and well-drained borders.

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  • It is hardy, and thrives in ordinary sandy soil in the rock garden.

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  • It forms densely matted tufts in the open air, best perhaps on level spots in the rock garden.

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  • Corydalis Thalictrifolia - A charming addition to rock garden plants.

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  • In a large rock garden a few plants here and there give good color, and the plants bloom long.

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  • Globe Daisy (Globularia) - Interesting and dwarf alpine plants, good on the rock garden in light and peaty soils.

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  • It is hardy, and will be found most useful for the low or moist spots in the rock garden.

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  • A first-class plant for cool or moist places in the rock garden in rich vegetable soils.

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  • The best place for it is the rock garden in a sunny position, drained, with a good depth of soil, so that the plants may root strongly between the stones, the soil a good sandy loam, mixed with broken grit.

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  • Its shoots will fall down the sunny face of a rocky nook, to spread into flat tufts on level parts of the rock garden.

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  • The best position for it is in the rock garden somewhere near or on a level with the eye, on a well-drained, deep, rather dry sandy soil.

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  • These are hardy European plants of the easiest culture in the rock garden or border.

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  • It is 1 to 2 feet high, and often the same across, attributes which fit it well for certain positions in the rock garden.

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  • G. prostrata is a pretty species for the rock garden or the mixed border.

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  • It thrives in exposed positions in the rock garden in a moist, free, and sandy loam; dislikes limestone.

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  • Alpine Hairbell (Campanula Alpina) - Covered with stiff down, giving it a slightly grey appearance, 5 to 10 inches high; flowers of dark fine blue, scattered along the stems, margins of mixed border, and the rock garden.

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  • It should have a sandy or gritty and moist soil on the rock garden among the smallest plants.

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  • Gargano Hairbell (Campanula Garganica) - A compact plant of prostrate habit, the starry erect flowers in branching racemes, pale blue, shading off to white towards the centre in summer, thriving in a rock garden or a border.

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  • It spreads slowly by underground stems, and succeeds in crevices of the rock garden or border.

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  • Austrian Hairbell (Campanula Pulla) - One of the most beautiful of the Alpine Hairbells, a native of the Austrian Alps, on high mountain pastures; in the rock garden it should have a shelf of soil in which peat and sand have been mixed.

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  • Very gritty moist loam in the rock garden is best for it.

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  • These are all excellent border flowers, and also for the rock garden.

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  • Campanula Stansfieldi - A hybrid of unrecorded parentage, and one of the most charming of rock garden plants.

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  • It thrives best in sunny positions in loam freely intermingled with pieces of stone, and well watered in dry weather, and is a gem for the rock garden.

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  • It is rather tender, and requires a sheltered and well-drained spot in the rock garden.

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  • Utah, and is apparently quite hardy, as it thrives in ordinary soil in well-drained parts of the rock garden.

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  • It is deservedly popular for edgings in the flower garden, and also admirable for the rock garden.

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  • In an open spot, either in the rock garden or in good free border soil, it becomes a mass of white flowers.

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  • Cyclamen Daffodil (Hybrid Narcissi Cyclamineus) - A dainty but not showy species, easily grown in a peat-earth rock garden or in pots of peaty compost.

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  • The var. rupicola flowers and seeds annually in the Rock Garden at Edinburgh Botanical Gardens, and seems hardier than the type.

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  • They should be planted out in a well-drained rock garden in good soil, with plenty of water in summer, but they must be kept as dry as possible in the winter, as excessive moisture in cold weather soon kills them.

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  • Some place on a well-constructed rock garden should be chosen, where it will thrive in peat.

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  • Some of the perennials are good border and rock garden plants, and the best of these is H. olympicum, one of the largest flowered kinds, though not more than 1 foot high.

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  • H. nummularium and humifusum, both dwarf trailers, are also desirable for the rock garden.

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  • Owing to their dwarf compact growth, several of the shrubby species are well suited for the rock garden.

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  • A gem for the rock garden or choice border.

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  • They do well in the rock garden or border, in open sandy soils.

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  • Both the type and its variety are beautiful plants for the shady mossy flanks of the rock garden in free sandy and vegetable soil.

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  • Any of the Pyrolas are worth growing in thin mossy copses on light sandy vegetable soil, or in moist and half-shady parts of the rock garden or the fernery, where they make neat evergreen carpets, flowering in summer.

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  • D. cashmerianum is well suited for the border or for a large rockery; in either case perfect drainage is essential, and this is best attained in rock garden culture.

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  • The pale greenish-yellow flowers are small, not showy, but the plant is useful from its form and silvery hue for groups and edgings, growing readily in ordinary soil on the level border or on slopes of the rock garden.

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  • It grows in any soil, and may be used in the less important parts of the rock garden.

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  • They are all excellent border plants, and the dwarf kinds may be introduced into the rock garden.

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  • It grows in any situation or soil, and is a capital plant for quickly covering bare spaces in the rock garden where choicer subjects will not thrive.

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  • P. arvernense, with deep blue flowers, is of refined habit, and well suited to the rock-garden.

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  • Russia. It has in early summer a profusion of small white blossoms, and is suited for the rock garden or the margins of borders.

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  • It is excellent for the rock garden and for borders.

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  • It is best suited for the rock garden in deep moist soil and partial shade.

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  • In the rock garden among dwarf plants Colchicums thrive, and make a pretty show in autumn, when rock gardens are often flowerless.

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  • A pretty bush for the rock garden or for choice beds of dwarf plants, 4 to 6 inches high, with pinkish-lilac flowers, flowering rather late in summer and in autumn.

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  • Suitable for the rock garden and the bulb garden till plentiful enough for borders.

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  • A. monspessulanus is useful for the front of borders and for the rock garden.

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  • A. dasyglottis is well suited for the rock garden.

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  • The most suitable position is a level spot in the rock garden near the eye.

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  • This is a true evergreen, with thick glossy dark green leaves, sometimes variegated, and forms a neat carpet in the rock garden.

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  • Both have pretty white flowers pencilled with purple, and are suitable for the rock garden in summer or for drooping over the edges of vases.

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  • It is usually considered difficult to grow, but it may be easily kept on dry banks in the rock garden in a firm bed of calcareous soil, or of loam mixed with broken limestone.

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  • Orchis Laxiflora - A pretty species, 1 foot to 18 inches high, with loose spikes of rich purplish-red flowers, opening in May and June, and thriving in a moist spot in the rock garden.

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  • O. Halleri has charming, compact flowers, of as deep a blue as that of the Gentians, and proves a manageable plant in the rock garden in deep moist loam.

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  • Other kinds are-O. montana, foetida, strobilacea, campestris, and its several varieties; all of these are dwarf, and thrive in sandy loamy soil in open spots in the rock garden.

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  • Well-drained and sunny places of the rock garden in full sun.

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  • They are easily grown in the rock garden in ordinary soil, and increase by division.

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  • In the rock garden in cool spots it does well between large stones, with broken stones about its roots.

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  • Partridge Berry (Gaultheria) - Dwarf evergreen shrubs, G. procumbens having berries which give it a charm in winter, when it is one of the brightest plants in the rock garden.

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  • One kind, M. setosus, is best suited for the rock garden in dry soil.

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  • It is a precious shrub for the cooler parts of the rock garden and succeeds admirably in the more favourable coast gardens, and in moist peat or turfy loam.

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  • Asia and America; as yet little known in gardens and mostly fitted for the rock garden or dry banks.

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  • A. apennina is a later-blooming form, and is a good plant for moist spots on the rock garden.

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  • The rock garden or borders of sandy loam suits the perennial kinds well.

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  • Phyllodoce - A dwarf evergreen mountain shrub with pretty bell flowers, thriving only in cool parts of a good rock garden.

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  • Its graceful growth is well seen in the bolder arrangement of the rock garden.

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  • A beautiful effect, too, is got by their use as a carpet or setting to some of the plants in the rock garden.

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  • There is no more valuable border flower, and when well placed in the rock garden it is effective, especially if the luxuriant shoots are allowed to hang down.

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  • All these dwarf things are now very welcome when everybody is making a rock garden.

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  • The Darmstadt collection fills a large rock garden formed of limestone blocks, and Dr Purpus considers the use of limestone essential for these plants, all being found on soils of this nature.

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  • They are dwarf evergreen rock garden and choice border plants.

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  • It is hardy either on the rock garden or in a well-drained border, and prefers partial shade.

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  • It is quite hardy and suited either to the border or rock garden.

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  • It is a most desirable plant, thriving best in light warm soils, and is suited either for the rock-garden or dry banks.

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  • A Macedonica is a neat species with white flowers, excellent as a rock garden plant.

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  • A. petraa, a neat, sturdy little plant, with pure white flowers, is a native of some of the higher Scottish mountains, rare, but very pretty when well grown on a moist well-exposed spot on the rock garden.

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  • A. Stelleri, a Chinese species, is a much freer flowering plant than A. blepharophylla, ripening seed freely, and easily grown in the rock garden.

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  • Sometimes in mild districts these plants thrive in the rock garden or well-drained borders, in light warm soil.

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  • Dry and warm positions on the rock garden.

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  • A true perennial, valuable for borders, or the rougher parts of the rock garden in good loam.

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  • It thrives in the bog garden or moist spots in the rock garden in a peaty soil.

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  • A neat plant for the rock garden and fringes of borders, and thrives like a weed between the stones in a rough stone wall.

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  • Although earlier than S. sibirica, it does not so well withstand cold rains and storms, and therefore some tufts of it should be placed in warm sunny spots of the rock garden or sheltered border.

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  • Best for the rock garden in ordinary soil, among very dwarf herbs.

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  • The larger species require least care when in an open place, while some of them are happy on the rock garden.

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  • Selaginella - A few hardy kinds of this large family of Lycopods are valuable for carpeting the fernery or clothing shady spots in the rock garden.

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  • It is of easy culture in warm positions on the rock garden and the choice border, and where the climate is too cold to grow it in the open air it may be grown in a cold frame or in baskets in the greenhouse.

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  • J. perennis is taller, often above 1 foot high, with dense heads of bright blue flowers, from June to August; it is a rock garden plant, stronger than the preceding, thriving in good light loam, and a native of the mountains of C. and S.

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  • There is much beauty in the leaves, which are of rather oval shape, deep green, tinged with brownish-crimson, changing in winter to quite a crimson, when it forms a bright bit of color in the rock garden or border.

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  • If we could get these shrubs on their own roots, the best place for them would be the bold rock garden or dry banks.

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  • As far as now known, few are worth growing on the rock garden.

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  • Anthyllis Hermanniae - Not so pretty in color, is a grey bush of pleasant aspect, flowering in summer and fitted for a sunny place in the rock garden S.W.

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  • These few are handsome flowers for the border, and their dwarf neat growth is also suited to the rock garden in an open sunny situation in any soil.

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  • Its foliage resembles a Mimulus, creeping along the ground, and it is a very interesting dwarf rock garden plant.

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  • A crevice in the rock garden is the best situation for it.

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  • A warm situation in the rock garden is best, in a mixture of half soil and half-broken rock.

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  • In dry seasons it might wither too soon, but it is pretty for the rock garden or borders.

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  • Jatamansi, a pretty little perennial plant, hardy, and very attractive when well grown in the rock garden.

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  • E. chrysanthum, with lemon-yellow flowers, and E. guttatum, these being mostly fitted for the warmer parts of the rock garden.

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  • F. monophylla is a beautiful rock garden plant, with large white flowers.

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  • It is suited for warm ledges on the rock garden in well-drained sandy or calcareous soil.

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  • A good rock garden subject for cool situations.

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  • Tchihatchewia - A beautiful alpine plant, T. isatidea, native of Asia Minor, it is hardy and thrives on the rock garden.

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  • In some gardens it is well grown upon such parts of the rock garden as are devoted to hardy Cacti, where it can be sheltered by a glass roof in winter and kept dry while freely exposed to the air on all sides.

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  • I have often seen it thriving where the air was pure and the soil suitable; and it is excellent for a moist rock garden, growing rapidly, and forming a charming fringe to groups of small alpine shrubs, on cool parts of the rock garden.

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  • It is not fitted for the border, and is more suitable for the rock garden.

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  • Thrives in gritty loamy soil in a somewhat shaded position in the rock garden or hardy fernery.

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  • Mawi, glacialis, and bruniaefolia, all worth growing in a full collection of alpine flowers for a choice rock garden.

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  • Depressed shady nooks in the rock garden or the hardy fernery suit it admirably.

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  • These pretty deciduous hardy Ferns are admirably suited for a northern position in the alpine or rock garden.

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  • Best in the lower parts of the rock garden.

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  • S. grandiflora, from Asia Minor and Siberia, is a neat downy plant with showy spikes of reddish-purple or rosy flowers from May onwards, sometimes used in the rougher parts of the rock garden.

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