Rochet sentence example

rochet
  • The name rochettum is first traceable in England; in Germany and northern France the rochet was also called saroht (sarrotus) or sarcos (sarcotium).

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  • The pope, John XXII., made him his principal chaplain, and presented him with a rochet in earnest of the first vacant bishopric in England.

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  • This latter was reserved for the more important canons, and was worn over surplice or rochet in choir.

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  • In the additional explanatory notes at the end of the book, after directions as to the wearing of surplice and hood in quire, in cathedral and collegiate churches (they are not made obligatory elsewhere), bishops are directed to wear, besides the rochet, a surplice or alb, and a cope or vestment, with a pastoral staff borne either by themselves or their chaplains.'

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  • In the Roman Catholic Church the rochet is a tunic of white, and usually fine linen or muslin (battiste, mull) reaching about to the knee, and distinguished from the surplice by the fact that its arms are narrow and tight-fitting.

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  • The earliest notice of the use of the rochet is found in an inventory of the vestments of the Roman clergy, dating from the 9th century.

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  • At the beginning of the 12th century the rochet is mentioned, under the name of camisia, by Gilbert of Limerick and by Honorius, and, somewhat later, by Gerloh of Reichersperg as tunica talaris.

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  • Outside Rome the rochet was, until well into the, 4th century, a vestment common to all the clergy, and especially to those of the lower orders; and so it remained, in general, until the 16th century, and even, here and there, so late as the 19th.

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  • The rochet was originally a robe-like tunic, and was therefore girdled, like the liturgical alb.

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  • A good example of the camisia of the 12th century is the rochet of Thomas Becket, preserved at Dammartin in the Pas de Calais, the only surviving medieval example remarkable for the pleating which, as was the case with albs also, gave greater breadth and more elaborate folds.

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  • In the 15th century the rochet only reached half-way down the shin; in the 16th and 17th to the knee; in the 18th and 19th often only to the middle of the thigh.

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  • The rochet is unknown in the Eastern Churches.

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  • In general it has retained the medieval form more closely than the Roman rochet, in so far as it is of plain, very fine linen (lawn), and reaches almost to the feet.

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  • The portrait of Archbishop Warham at Lambeth, for instance, shows a rochet with fairly wide sleeves narrowing towards the wrists, where they are confined by fur cuffs.

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  • About the same period, too, arose the custom of making the rochet sleeveless and attaching the "lawn sleeves" to the chimere.

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  • This fashion survived throughout most of the 19th century, but there has since been a tendency to revert to the earlier less exaggerated form, and the sleeves have been reattached to the rochet.

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  • The rochet is worn without the chimere under the cope by those bishops who use this vestment.

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  • At his consecration the bishop-elect is, according to the rubric, presented to the consecrating bishops vested in a rochet only; after the "laying on of hands" he retires and puts on "the rest of the episcopal habit," i.e.

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  • After this the new bishop, who has so far been vested only in a rochet, retires and puts on the rest of the episcopal habit, viz.

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  • The insignia of the Anglican bishop are the rochet and the chimere, and the episcopal throne on the gospel side of the chancel of the cathedral church.

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  • Rochet d'Hericourt, sent by Louis Philippe (1843), with both of whom he concluded friendly treaties on behalf of their respective governments.

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  • It is worn over the rochet by the pope, cardinals, bishops and prelates, the colours varying as in the case of the cappa magna.

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  • Besides the strictly liturgical vestments there are also numerous articles of costume worn at choir services, in processions, or on ceremonial occasions in everyday life, which have no sacral character; such are the almuce, the cappa and mozzetta (see Cope), the rochet (q.v.), the pileolus, a skullcap, worn also sometimes under mitre and tiara.

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