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roanoke

roanoke

roanoke Sentence Examples

  • Burnside took possession of Roanoke island on the North Carolina coast (7th February).

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  • The Roanoke river provides water-power.

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  • the steam frigates "Minnesota," and "Roanoke," the sailing frigate "St Lawrence," and several gun-boats, anchored off Fortress Monroe.

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  • courses wholly within the state, and, with the Roanoke, drain the Coastal Plain Region.

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  • direction from the Falls of Roanoke between Halifax and Northampton counties to Anson county on the South Carolina border and marks a rapid increase in elevation of about 200 ft.

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  • ROANOKE, a city in (but administratively independent of) Roanoke county, Virginia, on the Roanoke river, about 55 m.

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  • Roanoke is served by the Virginian railway, by the main line and the Shenandoah and the Winston-Salem divisions of the Norfolk & Western railway, and by electric railway to Vinton and to Salem.

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  • His colony at Roanoke, in what is now the state of North Carolina, was unsuccessful, and after his fall his patent reverted to the crown, but the new Virginia Company carried on his schemes.

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  • His colony at Roanoke, in what is now the state of North Carolina, was unsuccessful, and after his fall his patent reverted to the crown, but the new Virginia Company carried on his schemes.

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  • Making his way up the Roanoke as far as Plymouth he there sank the ironclad at her wharf by exploding a spar-torpedo (October 27).

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  • John Randolph, of Roanoke, lived in Virginia one hundred years ago.

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  • Roanoke was the town of Big Lick (founded about 1852; incorporated in 1874; pop. in 1880, 669) until 1882, when it received its present name; in 1884 it was chartered as a city.

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  • The ironclad ram "Albemarle," built at Edwards' Ferry on the Roanoke river, had done considerable damage to the Federal vessels which, since Burnside's expedition to Newberne, had cruised in Albemarle Sound, and in 1864 a force of double-enders and gunboats, under Captain Melancton Smith, U.S.N., was given the special task of destroying the rebel ram.

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  • The principal cities of the state are: Richmond (the capital), Norfolk, Petersburg, Roanoke, Newport News, Lynchburg, Portsmouth and Danville.

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  • Other institutions of higher learning which are not under state control are: Washington and Lee University (nonsectarian, 1749), at Lexington; Hampden-Sidney College (Presbyterian, 1776), at Hampden-Sidney; Richmond College (Baptist, 1832), at Richmond; Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, 1832), at Ashland; Emory and Henry College (Methodist Episcopal, 1838), at Emory; Roanoke College (Lutheran, 1853), at Salem; Bridgewater College (German Baptist, 1879), at Bridgewater; Fredericksburg College (Presbyterian, 1893), at Fredericksburg; Virginia Union University (Baptist, 1899), at Richmond; and Virginia Christian College (Christian, 1903), at Lynchburg.

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  • It has a city hall, a general hospital, a Masonic temple, and a number of educational institutions, including the Roanoke College (1860; Baptist), for young women; the RandolphMacon Institute (1897; Methodist Episcopal, South), for girls; and a commercial college.

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  • course crosses the boundary into Virginia, where it becomes a tributary of the Roanoke, in which its waters are returned to North Carolina near the " Fall Line."

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  • In the Mountain Region and in the Piedmont Plateau Region the rivers have numerous falls and rapids which afford a total water power unequalled perhaps in any other state than Maine on the Atlantic Coast, the largest being on the Yadkin, Roanoke and Catawba; and in crossing some of the mountains, especially the Unakas, the streams have carved deep narrow gorges that are much admired for their scenery.

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  • Calvin Henderson Wiley (1819-1887), the author of several romances dealing with life in North Carolina, such as Roanoke: or, Where is Utopia?

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  • The colony was established at the north end of Roanoke Island on the 17th of August, and about a week later Grenville returned to England.

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  • They arrived at Roanoke Island on the 2 2nd of July 1587 and were forced to remain there by the refusal of the sailors to carry them farther.

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  • The Federal steam frigates, "Roanoke," "St Lawrence" and "Minnesota" had all gone aground in their trip from Old Point Comfort toward the scene of battle, and only the "Minnesota" was near enough (about i m.) to take any part in the fight.

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  • Goldsborough captured Roanoke Island, and the troops penetrated inland as far as Newbern (actions of February 8 and March 14).

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  • Making his way up the Roanoke as far as Plymouth he there sank the ironclad at her wharf by exploding a spar-torpedo (October 27).

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  • A portion of this province in which weak rocks predominate gives an unusually broad valley region, known as the Valley of Virginia, drained by the Shenandoah river, and the headwaters of the James, Roanoke, New, and Holston rivers, which dissect the broad valley floor into gently rolling low hills.

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  • SALEM, a town and the county-seat (since 1838) of Roanoke (disambiguation)|Roanoke county, Virginia, U.S.A., on the Roanoke river, about 60 m.

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  • SALEM, a town and the county-seat (since 1838) of Roanoke (disambiguation)|Roanoke county, Virginia, U.S.A., on the Roanoke river, about 60 m.

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  • " Randolph of Roanoke " is one of the most pathetic and most elevated of memorial tributes.

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  • Roanoke's factory product in 1905 was valued at $5,544,907 (2.7% more than in 1900).

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  • The feat by which he will be remembered was the destruction of the Confederate ironclad "Albemarle" in the Roanoke river on the 27th of October in 1864.

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  • direction from the Falls of Roanoke between Halifax and Northampton counties to Anson county on the South Carolina border and marks a rapid increase in elevation of about 200 ft.

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  • course crosses the boundary into Virginia, where it becomes a tributary of the Roanoke, in which its waters are returned to North Carolina near the " Fall Line."

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  • courses wholly within the state, and, with the Roanoke, drain the Coastal Plain Region.

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  • In the Mountain Region and in the Piedmont Plateau Region the rivers have numerous falls and rapids which afford a total water power unequalled perhaps in any other state than Maine on the Atlantic Coast, the largest being on the Yadkin, Roanoke and Catawba; and in crossing some of the mountains, especially the Unakas, the streams have carved deep narrow gorges that are much admired for their scenery.

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  • The Roanoke river is navigable to Weldon and the Cape Fear river to Fayetteville; the Neuse is navigable for small vessels only to Newbern.

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  • Calvin Henderson Wiley (1819-1887), the author of several romances dealing with life in North Carolina, such as Roanoke: or, Where is Utopia?

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  • The colony was established at the north end of Roanoke Island on the 17th of August, and about a week later Grenville returned to England.

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  • They arrived at Roanoke Island on the 2 2nd of July 1587 and were forced to remain there by the refusal of the sailors to carry them farther.

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  • In Hollywood Cemetery (dedicated in 1849) are the graves of many famous men, including presidents James Monroe and John Tyler; Jefferson Davis, John Randolph of Roanoke, the Confederate generals, A.

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  • ROANOKE, a city in (but administratively independent of) Roanoke county, Virginia, on the Roanoke river, about 55 m.

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  • Roanoke is served by the Virginian railway, by the main line and the Shenandoah and the Winston-Salem divisions of the Norfolk & Western railway, and by electric railway to Vinton and to Salem.

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  • Roanoke's factory product in 1905 was valued at $5,544,907 (2.7% more than in 1900).

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  • Roanoke was the town of Big Lick (founded about 1852; incorporated in 1874; pop. in 1880, 669) until 1882, when it received its present name; in 1884 it was chartered as a city.

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  • the steam frigates "Minnesota," and "Roanoke," the sailing frigate "St Lawrence," and several gun-boats, anchored off Fortress Monroe.

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  • The Federal steam frigates, "Roanoke," "St Lawrence" and "Minnesota" had all gone aground in their trip from Old Point Comfort toward the scene of battle, and only the "Minnesota" was near enough (about i m.) to take any part in the fight.

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  • Goldsborough captured Roanoke Island, and the troops penetrated inland as far as Newbern (actions of February 8 and March 14).

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  • The ironclad ram "Albemarle," built at Edwards' Ferry on the Roanoke river, had done considerable damage to the Federal vessels which, since Burnside's expedition to Newberne, had cruised in Albemarle Sound, and in 1864 a force of double-enders and gunboats, under Captain Melancton Smith, U.S.N., was given the special task of destroying the rebel ram.

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  • Burnside took possession of Roanoke island on the North Carolina coast (7th February).

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  • A portion of this province in which weak rocks predominate gives an unusually broad valley region, known as the Valley of Virginia, drained by the Shenandoah river, and the headwaters of the James, Roanoke, New, and Holston rivers, which dissect the broad valley floor into gently rolling low hills.

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  • The principal cities of the state are: Richmond (the capital), Norfolk, Petersburg, Roanoke, Newport News, Lynchburg, Portsmouth and Danville.

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  • Other institutions of higher learning which are not under state control are: Washington and Lee University (nonsectarian, 1749), at Lexington; Hampden-Sidney College (Presbyterian, 1776), at Hampden-Sidney; Richmond College (Baptist, 1832), at Richmond; Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, 1832), at Ashland; Emory and Henry College (Methodist Episcopal, 1838), at Emory; Roanoke College (Lutheran, 1853), at Salem; Bridgewater College (German Baptist, 1879), at Bridgewater; Fredericksburg College (Presbyterian, 1893), at Fredericksburg; Virginia Union University (Baptist, 1899), at Richmond; and Virginia Christian College (Christian, 1903), at Lynchburg.

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  • It has a city hall, a general hospital, a Masonic temple, and a number of educational institutions, including the Roanoke College (1860; Baptist), for young women; the RandolphMacon Institute (1897; Methodist Episcopal, South), for girls; and a commercial college.

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  • Mason, with some Personal History (Roanoke, Va., 1903), by his daughter, Virginia Mason; Sir Theodore Martin, Life of the Prince Consort.

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  • " Randolph of Roanoke " is one of the most pathetic and most elevated of memorial tributes.

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  • Salem is the seat of a Lutheran Orphan Home (1888), of the Baptist Orphanage of Virginia (1892) and of Roanoke College (co-educational; Lutheran; chartered, 1853).

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  • The Roanoke river provides water-power.

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  • This part of Roanoke county was granted in 1767 to General Andrew Lewis, to whom there is a monument in East Hill Cemetery, where he is buried.

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  • One day John Randolph, of Roanoke, [Footnote: Ro'a noke.] set out on horseback to ride to a town that was many miles from his home.

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  • Additionally, some zoos, like the Virginia Zoo in Norfolk and the Mill Mountain Zoo in Roanoke, might participate in a reciprocal program.

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  • Mason, with some Personal History (Roanoke, Va., 1903), by his daughter, Virginia Mason; Sir Theodore Martin, Life of the Prince Consort.

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  • It is served by the Norfolk & Western and the Virginian railways, and has electric railway connexion with Roanoke, about 6 m.

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  • Salem is the seat of a Lutheran Orphan Home (1888), of the Baptist Orphanage of Virginia (1892) and of Roanoke College (co-educational; Lutheran; chartered, 1853).

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  • This part of Roanoke county was granted in 1767 to General Andrew Lewis, to whom there is a monument in East Hill Cemetery, where he is buried.

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  • It is served by the Norfolk & Western and the Virginian railways, and has electric railway connexion with Roanoke, about 6 m.

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  • The Roanoke river is navigable to Weldon and the Cape Fear river to Fayetteville; the Neuse is navigable for small vessels only to Newbern.

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