How to use River in a sentence

river
  • Everything west of the river was blank.

    310
    135
  • Everything west of the river is fine.

    192
    111
  • It was on these byways that Dean opted to travel, rolling along the river with the down of cottonwoods filling the air like a winter snowstorm, past the occasional farm house, fields, and ever-present vista of mountains wrapping around him.

    197
    159
  • He continued to trudge forward, leaving the river and crowds behind.

    144
    110
  • Let's go up river a way and you can hold my rope.

    57
    39
    Advertisement
  • The size of the river made Lana tick off one of her alternatives.

    48
    30
  • I have seen our river, when, the landscape being covered with snow, both water and ice were almost as green as grass.

    80
    63
  • The chasm appeared to Dean to be a hundred feet or more to the river below.

    66
    50
  • While she despised the man, her feelings still lacked a motive to sever his rope in cold blood and watch him plummet down to the rocks and churning river below.

    39
    26
  • Brady could've lost it in the river, but she should still pick up some electromagnetic fluctuation, if he was anywhere except the bottom of the river.

    36
    23
    Advertisement
  • There's no river feeding into this lake.

    42
    30
  • He did not notice the sound of the bullets whistling from every side, or the projectiles that flew over him, did not see the enemy on the other side of the river, and for a long time did not notice the killed and wounded, though many fell near him.

    19
    7
  • She sat on the river bank across from a series of wide, large steps leading up a hill to the park where the Arch stood, framed against a black sky.

    24
    13
  • We'll have to risk flying past the river if we want to find her.

    26
    15
  • Now, mostly bound to its banks by ice, the river looked much less menacing as it wound its way downward.

    26
    16
    Advertisement
  • It climbed gently along the escarpment above the river and was devoid of traffic.

    21
    14
  • All the cities along the Mississippi River had been marked as contaminated to some extent.

    17
    10
  • The submarine bumped against the dock on the other side of the river, and the soldier turned it off.

    12
    5
  • The officer pointed with his hand to the smoke visible on the left beyond the river, and the same stern and serious expression that Pierre had noticed on many of the faces he had met came into his face.

    20
    13
  • Moscow seen from the Poklonny Hill lay spaciously spread out with her river, her gardens, and her churches, and she seemed to be living her usual life, her cupolas glittering like stars in the sunlight.

    16
    9
    Advertisement
  • Her anger at him slid away as she huddled against a large river rock, alone.

    14
    11
  • We formed our own networks along the river and joined forces with the Twelfth Army.

    13
    10
  • After the junction of the two branches the river pursues a winding course, generally south-east, for about Boo m.

    4
    1
  • The couple strolled down Seventh Street to the bridge that crossed the Uncompahgre River as it spilled its way down from the mountains.

    44
    42
  • She struggled to pull herself out of the cabin, against the flow of cold river water.

    16
    14
    Advertisement
  • With one last look at the river, she turned away and climbed the bank clumsily before heading towards the road leading from the bridge to her home.

    10
    8
  • Tipperary, Ireland, finely situated in a rich though hilly country near the river Nenagh, 962 m.

    2
    0
  • There are capacious docks on the river, which is crossed by a wrought-iron bridge, 1000 ft.

    2
    0
  • The Via Domitiana from Sinuessa to Puteoli crossed the river at this point, and some remains of the bridge are visible.

    1
    0
  • It is picturesquely situated in the hilly district of the upper valley of the river Aire, the course of which is followed by the Leeds and Liverpool canal.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The difficulties of the harbour were increased by the continued silting up, produced by the enormous amount of solid material brought down by the river.

    1
    0
  • For the first time the Volga became a Russian river.

    1
    0
  • Two lines of steamers, an English and a Turkish, furnish an inadequate service between Basra and Bagdad, but there is no steam navigation on the river above the latter city.

    1
    0
  • This part of the river's course, the ancient Assyria, is also a rich agricultural region.

    1
    0
  • From a little above the confluence of the Great Zab downward, the banks of the river are absolutely uninhabited, and the river flows through a desert until Tekrit is reached.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Beginning shortly below Tekrit there are indications of considerable canalization, both for the purpose of irrigating country remote from the river, and also of shortening the course of the river for navigation.

    1
    0
  • Here the palm groves begin also, and from this point to a little beyond Bagdad the shores of the river are well cultivated.

    1
    0
  • The mud brought down by it, calculated at 7150 lb an hour at Bagdad, is not deposited in marshes to form alluvium, as in the case of the Euphrates, but although in flood time the river becomes at places an inland sea, rendering navigation extremely difficult and uncertain, the bulk of the mud is deposited in banks, shoals and islands in the bed of the river, and is finally carried out into the Persian Gulf.

    1
    0
  • Below the Shatt-el-Hai the country on both sides of the river is practically a swamp, except where the palm groves have formed land.

    1
    0
  • Just as in 335 he had crossed the Danube, so he now made one raid across the frontier river, the Jaxartes (Sir Dania), to teach the fear of his name to the outlying peoples of the steppe (summer 328).

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Alexander reached the Hydaspes just as the rains broke, when the river was already swollen.

    1
    0
  • Alexander left the conquered portion of India east of the Indus to be governed under Porus, Omphis of Taxila, and Abisares, the country west of the Indus under Macedonian governors, and set out to explore the great river The g ?

    1
    0
  • The neighbouring country is pleasant enough, particularly along the river, but the town itself is purely industrial, and contains no pre-eminent buildings.

    1
    0
  • The exiles dwelt at Tell-abib (" Hill of the flood "), one of the mounds or ruins made by the great floods that devastated the country,1 near the " river " Chebar (Kebar), probably a large canal not far south of the city of Babylon.

    1
    0
  • The total length of the river is estimated at 2860 m.

    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • On the S., Albanian territory was curtailed owing to the acquisition of the Arta district by Greece (May 1881), the river Arta now forming the frontier.

    1
    0
  • Central Albania differs from the northern and southern regions in the more undulating and less rugged character of its surface; it contains considerable lowland tracts, such as the wide and fertile plain of Musseki, traversed by the river Simen.

    1
    0
  • At its falls from Lake of the Woods is one of the greatest and most easily utilized water-powers in the world, and from falls lower down the river electric power for the city of Winnipeg is obtained.

    1
    0
  • The Red river is at intervals subject to freshets.

    1
    0
  • The loose soil on the banks of the river is every year carried away in great masses, and the channel has so widened as to render the recurrence of an overflow unlikely.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is a mighty river, rising in the Rocky Mountains, and crossing eighteen degrees of longitude.

    1
    0
  • Steamers run from Grand Rapids, through Lake Winnipeg, up Red river to the city of Winnipeg, important locks having been constructed on the river at St Andrews.

    1
    0
  • The river banks, however, are fringed with trees, and in the more undulating lands the timber belts vary from a few hundreds of yards to 5 or 10 m.

    1
    0
  • The region of the Red River and Assiniboine valleys was opened up by the fur traders, who came by the waterways from Lake Superior, and afterwards by the water communication with Hudson Bay.

    1
    0
  • While these early traders used the canoe and the York boat,' yet the steam-boat played an important part in the early history of the region from 1868 till 1885, when access from the United States was gained by steamers down the Red River.

    1
    0
  • The first connexion with the United States was by two railways coming down the Red River valley.

    1
    0
  • It stands in a level plain on the left bank of the river Ouse, by which communication is provided with the Humber.

    1
    0
  • The river is crossed by two bridges, and its banks are bordered by picturesque old houses.

    1
    0
  • Denver is an important railway centre, being served by nine railways, of which the chief are the Atchison, ' Topeka & Santa Fe; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy; the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific; the Denver & Rio Grande; the Union Pacific; and the Denver, North-Western & Pacific, Denver lies on the South Platte river, at an altitude exactly m.

    1
    0
  • Altro Park, on an island a short distance down the river, is a pleasure resort in summer.

    1
    0
  • It lies on either side of the formerly natural, now artificial outlet of the river Waveney to the North Sea, while to the west the river forms Oulton Broad and Lothing Lake.

    1
    0
  • The bridge by which the Via Aemilia crossed the river Parma, from which it probably takes its name, is still preserved, but has been much altered.

    1
    0
  • The Correggio family never managed to keep possession of it for long, and in 1346 they sold it to the Visconti (who constructed a citadel, La Rocchetta, in 1356, of which some remains exist on the east bank of the river, while the later ate du Pont may be seen on the west bank), and from them it passed to the Sforza.

    1
    0
  • He makes the sunshine; the wind is his breath; river valleys are hollowed out at his command.

    1
    0
  • At the foot of the hill flows the river See, which at high tide is navigable from the sea.

    1
    0
  • It is a very rapid river, and subject to sudden swellings and overflowings, which cause great damage to the surrounding country.

    1
    0
  • The Adige has a course of about 220 m., and, after the Po, is the most important river in Italy.

    1
    0
  • Hayes in 1878, forms the boundary between Argentina and Paraguay from the Paraguay river north-west to the Bolivian frontier.

    1
    0
  • The river flowing into the valley caused a great, muddy morass.

    1
    0
  • Another river of this class is the Carcaranal, about 300 m.

    1
    0
  • The best-known among them are Puerto Deseado (Port Desire) at the mouth of the Deseado river (1253 m.), Santa Cruz, at the mouth of the Santa Cruz river (1481 m.), and Ushuaia, on Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego.

    1
    0
  • North of Buenos Aires, on the Parana river, is the port of Rosario, the outlet for a rich agricultural district, ranking next to the federal capital in importance.

    1
    0
  • Other river ports, of less importance, are Concordia on the Uruguay river, San Nicolas and Campana on the Parana river, Santa Fe on the Salado, a few miles from the Parana, the city of Parana on the Parana river, and Gualeguay on the Gualeguay river.

    1
    0
  • The steamships under the national flag are almost wholly engaged in the traffic between Buenos Aires and Montevideo, the river traffic, and port services.

    1
    0
  • At the time when further armaments were suspended, the effective strength of the Argentine navy consisted of 3 ironclads, 6 first-class armoured cruisers, 2 monitors (old), 4 second-class cruisers, 2 torpedo cruisers, 3 destroyers, 3 high-sea torpedo boats, 14 river torpedo boats, 1 training ship, 5 transports, and various auxiliary vessels.

    1
    0
  • There is also a dockyard and torpedo arsenal at La Plata, an artillery depot at Zarate, above Buenos Aires, and naval depots on the island of Martin Garcia and at Tigre, on the Lujan river.

    1
    0
  • Magellan, as soon as he had satisfied himself that there was no passage to the west, left the river without landing.

    1
    0
  • The first attempt to penetrate by way of the river Plate and its affluents inland, with a view to effecting settlements in the interior, was made in 1526 by Sebastian Cabot.

    1
    0
  • Arrived in the river Plate in 1527, rumours reached Cabot of mineral wealth and a rich and civilized empire in the far interior, and he resolved to abandon surveying for exploration.

    1
    0
  • He built a fort a short distance up the river Uruguay, and despatched one of his lieutenants, Juan Alvarez Ramon, with a separate party upon an expedition up stream.

    1
    0
  • Cabot, with a large following, entered the Parana and established a settlement just above the mouth of the river Carcaranal, to which he gave the name of San Espiritu, among the Timbu Indians, with whom he formed friendly relations.

    1
    0
  • He continued the ascent of the Parana as far as the rapids of Apipe, and finding his course barred in this direction, he afterwards explored the river Paraguay, which he mounted as far as the mouth of the affluent called by the Indians Lepeti, now the river Bermejo.

    1
    0
  • The arrival of these first-fruits of the mineral wealth of the southern continent gained for the estuary of the Parana the name which it has since borne, that of Rio de la Plata, the silver river.

    1
    0
  • As Cabot was descending the stream to his settlement of San Espiritu, he encountered an expedition which had been despatched from Spain for the express purpose of exploring the river discovered by Solis, under the command of Diego Garcia.

    1
    0
  • In January 1535 he entered the river Plate, where he followed the northern shore to the island of San Gabriel, and then crossing over he landed by a little stream, still called Riachuelo.

    1
    0
  • Finding their comrades did not return, Irala and his companions determined to descend the river, and on their downward journey opposite the mouth of the river Pilcomayo, finding a suitable site for colonizing, they founded (1536) what proved to be the first permanent Spanish settlement in the interior of South America, the future city of Asuncion (15th August 1536).

    1
    0
  • The canal and river system attains its greatest utility in the north, northeast and north-centre of the country; traffic is thickest along the Seine below Paris; along the rivers and small canals of the rich departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais and along the Oise and the canal of St Quentin whereby they communicate with Paris; along the canal from the Marne to the Rhine and the succession of waterways which unite it with the Oise; along the Canal de lEst (departments of Meuse and Ardennes); and along the waterways uniting Paris with the Sane at Chalon (Seine, Canal du Loing, Canal de Briare, Lateral canal of the Loire and Canal du Centre) and along the Sane between Chalon and Lyons.

    1
    0
  • Descending rapidly from its source, sometimes over cascades, the river soon enters deep gorges through which it flows as far as Beaulieu (department of Correze) where it debouches into a wide and fertile valley and is shortly after joined by the Cere.

    1
    0
  • One of the richest has been found at Greta in the Hunter river district; it contains an average thickness of 41 ft.

    2
    1
  • The ship was steered into the river, and there careened and thoroughly repaired.

    1
    0
  • He found the country peopled partly by tribes of Gallo-Celtic, partly by tribes of Germanic stock, the river Rhine forming roughly the line of demarcation between the races.

    1
    0
  • It stands near the border of Victoria, on the right bank of the Murray river, here crossed by two bridges, one built of wood carrying a road, the other of iron bearing the railway.

    1
    0
  • About half-way between `Ana and Hit, in the neighbourhood of Haditha, the river has a breadth of 300 yds., with a depth of r8 ft., and a flood speed of 4 knots.

    1
    0
  • Thence the river flows S.E.

    1
    0
  • The river Nuon also is situated 20 or 30 m.

    1
    0
  • There is a salt lake or lagoon between the Cape Palmas river and the vicinity of the Cavalla.

    1
    0
  • Between the western bend of the Cavalla river and the coast there is a somewhat broken mountain range with altitudes of from 2000 to 5000 ft.

    1
    0
  • The Pa range to the west of the St Paul's river may reach in places to 3000 ft.

    1
    0
  • Notably it traced the upper Cavalla, proving that that river was not connected either with the Nuon on the west or the Ko or Zo on the east.

    1
    0
  • The upper river and the left bank of the lower river of the Cavalla are in French territory.

    1
    0
  • The Nuon (or Nipwe), which up to 1908 was described sometimes as the western Cavalla and sometimes as the upper course of the St John's river, has been shown to be the upper course of the Cestos.

    1
    0
  • The St Paul, though inferior to the Cavalla in length, is a large river with a considerable volume of water.

    1
    0
  • The important river Lofa flows nearly parallel with the St Paul's river and enters the sea about 40 m.

    1
    0
  • The Dukwia and Farmington are tortuous rivers entering the sea under the name of the river Junk (Portuguese, Junco).

    1
    0
  • The St John's river of the Basa country appears to be of considerable importance and volume.

    1
    0
  • The Sino river rises in the Niete mountains and brings down a great volume of water to the sea, though it is not a river of considerable length.

    1
    0
  • The Moa or Makona river is a fine stream of considerable volume, but its course is perpetually interrupted by rocks and rapids.

    1
    0
  • In a general way it is supposed that the lands lying between the lower St Paul's river and the Sierra Leone frontier are not much mineralized, except that in the vicinity of river mouths there are indications of bitumen.

    1
    0
  • If they are to cross the river, hang two.

    8
    7
  • It was no longer, as before, a dark, unseen river flowing through the gloom, but a dark sea swelling and gradually subsiding after a storm.

    2
    1
  • Yes, I told you--the whole quarter beyond the river, and so it is.

    3
    2
  • It lies in a hilly well-wooded district above the valley of the small river Wye, a tributary of the Thames.

    0
    0
  • Large stretches of marsh occur on each side of this river, as well as here and there among the hills where inland lakes formerly existed, as, for instance, near Bandung.

    0
    0
  • These lakes are expansions of the river Erne, which enters the county from Cavan at Wattle Bridge.

    0
    0
  • The "Marble Arch" cave near Florencecourt, with its emerging river, is a characteristic example of the subterranean waterways in the limestone.

    0
    0
  • A small expedition sent by Cromwell in February 1654 to capture New Amsterdam (New York) from the Dutch was abandoned on the conclusion of peace, and the fleet turned to attack the French colonies; Major Robert Sedgwick taking with a handful of men the fort of St John's, Port Royal or Annapolis, and the French fort on the river Penobscot, the whole territory from this river to the mouth of the St Lawrence remaining British territory till its cession in 1667.

    0
    0
  • From the junction of these three streams below Yeste the river winds in an easterly and south xxiv.

    0
    0
  • He was identified with the Hudson River School, and excelled in pictures of autumn scenery.

    0
    0
  • Half a mile east of Kabul it is joined by the Logar, a much larger river, which rises beyond Ghazni among the slopes of the Gul Koh (14,200 ft.), and drains the rich and picturesque valleys of LGgar and Wardak.

    0
    0
  • Soon afterwards it receives the Swat river from the north and the Bara river from the south, and after a further course of 40 m.

    0
    0
  • From Jalalabad downwards the river is navigable by boats or rafts of inflated skins, and is considerably used for purposes of commerce.

    0
    0
  • It is situated on the canal from Bruges to Sluys (Ecluse), but in the middle ages a navigable channel or river called the Zwyn gave ships access to it from the North Sea.

    0
    0
  • In prehistoric times the river ran straight on along the valley of the Chiana and joined the Tiber near Orvieto; and there was a great lake, the north end of which was at Incisa and the south at the lake of Chiusi.

    0
    0
  • South and east of the range the country, apart from that watered by the coast streams, drains to the Mono river.

    0
    0
  • The Hockanum River provides a good water power, and Manchester has various manufactures.

    0
    0
  • This dockyard covers an area of 516 acres, and has a river frontage of over 3 m.

    0
    0
  • In 374 the Quadi, a German tribe in what is now Moravia and Hungary, resenting the erection of Roman forts to the north of the Danube in what they considered to be their own territory, and further exasperated by the treacherous murder of their king, Gabinius, crossed the river and laid waste the province of Pannonia.

    0
    0
  • Thence its northern and northeastern frontier marches with the Punjab and the United Provinces until it touches the river Chambal, where it turns south-eastward for about 200 m., dividing the states of Dholpur, Karauli, Jaipur and Kotah from Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • But Augustus, who was the first to give to Italy a definite political organization, carried the frontier to the river Varus or Var, a few miles west of Nice, and this river continued in modern times to be generally recognized as the boundary between France and Italy.

    0
    0
  • Of these the Dora (called for distinctions sake Dora Riparia), which unites with the greater river just below Turin, has its source in the Mont Genèvre, and flows past Susa at the foot of the Mont Cenis.

    0
    0
  • But immediately east of that inlet (a remarkable instance of a deep landlocked gulf with no river flowing into it) the Magra, which descends from Pontremoli down the valley known as the Lunigiana, is a large stream, and brings with it the waters of another considerable stream, the Vara.

    0
    0
  • The Tiber, a much more important river than the Arno, and the largest in Italy with the exception of the Po, rises in the Apennines, about 20 m.

    0
    0
  • It was separated from Apulia on the south by the river Tifernus, and from Picenum on the north by the Matrinus.

    0
    0
  • The seventh region consisted of Etruria, which preserved its ancient limits, extending from the Tiber to the Tyrrhenian Sea, and separated from Liguria on the north by the river Macra.

    0
    0
  • The eighth region, termed Gallia Cispadana, comprised the southern portion of Cisalpine Gaul, and was bounded on the north (as its name implied) by the river Padus or P0, from above Placentia to its mouth.

    0
    0
  • It was separated from Etruria and Umbria by the main chain of the Apennines; and the river Ariminus was substituted for the far-famed Rubicon as its limit on the Adriatic.

    0
    0
  • In the same month it was joined by the Cispadane Republic; and the terms of the treaty of Campo Formio (October 17, 1797), while fatal to the political life of Venice, awarded to this now considerable state the Venetian territories west of the river Adige.

    0
    0
  • The Austriai general, Melas, signed an armistice whereby he was to retir with his army beyond the river Mincio.

    0
    0
  • Thq latter retreated south of the river Mareb, leaving the whole of the cis-Mareb territory, including the provinces of Hamasen, Agameh, Sera and Okul-Kusai, in Italian hands.

    0
    0
  • It received a colony under Augustus, but appears to have suffered much from floods of the river Clanis.

    0
    0
  • John undertakes to disforest all forests which have been made in his time, and also to give up such river banks as he has seized for his own use when engaged in sport.

    0
    0
  • Limnocnida tanganyicae was discovered first in Lake Tanganyika, but has since been discovered also in Lake Victoria and in the river Niger.

    0
    0
  • The burgh, which stretches for a mile along the south shore of the Firth of Forth, is intersected by the Esk and embraces the village of Fisherrow on the left bank of the river.

    0
    0
  • Its original name is said to have been Eskmouth, its present one being derived from a bed of mussels at the mouth of the river.

    0
    0
  • Its name, derived from the small river Cor, a tributary of the Tyne, is said to be associated with the Brigantian tribe of Corionototai.

    0
    0
  • A river only separated Ohio from a slave-holding community.

    0
    0
  • Delfzyl, which was formerly an important fortress for the protection of the ancient sluices on the little river Delf (hence its name), has greatly benefited by the construction of the Ems (Eems) shipcanal connecting it with Groningen, and has a good harbour with a considerable import trade in wood.

    0
    0
  • Simetite, or Sicilian amber, takes its name from the river Simeto or Giaretta.

    0
    0
  • Chemawinite or cedarite is an amber-like resin from the Saskatchewan river in Canada.

    0
    0
  • This tree, the "liard" of the Canadian voyageur, abounds on many of the river sides of the northwestern plains; it occurs in the neighbourhood of the Great Slave Lake and along the Mackenzie River, and forms much of the driftwood of the Arctic coast.

    0
    0
  • About three-quarters of a mile away, on the banks of the river Ganges, is the Massacre Ghat.

    0
    0
  • On the river bank is a temple to Siva, of hexagonal shape, old and going to ruin.

    0
    0
  • The remaining 200 victims, who had escaped the bullets of the siege and survived the butchery of the river bank, were massacred afterwards and cast down the famous well of Cawnpore, which is now marked by a memorial and surrounded by gardens.

    0
    0
  • The river flows in exquisite wooded reaches, navigable only for small boats.

    0
    0
  • The river is crossed at Stratford by a stone bridge of 14 arches, built by Sir Hugh Clopton in the reign of Henry VII.

    0
    0
  • It is beautifully placed near the river, and is a fine cruciform structure, partly Early English and partly Perpendicular, with a central tower and lofty octagonal spire.

    0
    0
  • The memorial stands by the river above the church, and above again lie the Bancroft or Bank croft gardens where, in.

    0
    0
  • The river valleys abound in natural pasture, and sainfoin, lucerne and other forage crops are largely grown; cattle-raising is an important source of wealth, and the cheeses of Troyes are well known.

    0
    0
  • The river Aube is navigable for 28 m.

    0
    0
  • It was natural, if not strictly logical, that the ocean river should be extended from a narrow stream to a world-embracing sea, and here again Greek theory, or rather fancy, gave its modern name to the greatest feature of the globe.

    0
    0
  • In 1541 Francisco de Orellana discovered the whole course of the Amazon from its source in the Andes to the Atlantic. A second voyage on the Amazon was made in 1561 by the mad pirate Lope de Aguirre; but it was not until 1639 that a full account was written of the great river by Father Cristoval de Acufia, who ascended it from its mouth and reached the city of Quito.

    0
    0
  • One of the chief problems the association wished to solve was that of the exist ence and course of the river Niger, which was believed by some authorities to be identical with the Congo.

    0
    0
  • Five years later he accepted an offer from the government to command an expedition into the interior of Africa, the plan being to cross from the Gambia to the Niger and descend the latter river to the sea.

    0
    0
  • Leaving Fort Churchill in July 1742, he discovered the Wager river and Repulse Bay.

    0
    0
  • He started once more in December 1771, and at length reached the Coppermine river, which he surveyed to its mouth, but his observations are unreliable.

    0
    0
  • With the same object Alexander Mackenzie, with a party of Canadians, set out from Fort Chippewyan on the 3rd of June 1789, and descending the great river which now bears the explorer's name reached the Arctic sea.

    0
    0
  • The Cossack Simon Dezhneff is thought to have made a voyage, in the summer of 1648, from the river Kolyma, through Bering Strait (which was rediscovered by Vitus Bering in 1728) to Anadyr.

    0
    0
  • It is usual to distinguish between the general coast-line measured from point to point of the headlands disregarding the smaller bays, and the detailed coast-line which takes account of every inflection shown by the map employed, and follows up river entrances to the point where tidal action ceases.

    0
    0
  • More mobile and more searching than ice or rock rubbish, the trickling drops are guided by the deepest lines of the hillside in their incipient flow, and as these lines converge, the stream, gaining strength, proceeds in River its torrential course to carve its channel deeper and en- t trench itself in permanent occupation.

    0
    0
  • Thus new land forms are created - valleys of curious complexity, for example by the " capture " and diversion of the water of one river by another, leading to a change of watershed.'

    0
    0
  • The slope of the river bed diminishes until the plain compels the river to move slowly, swinging in meanders proportioned to its size, and gradually, controlled by the flattening land, ceasing to transport material, but raising its banks and silting up its bed by the dropped sediment, until, split up and shoaled, its distributaries struggle across its delta to the sea.

    0
    0
  • This is the typical river of which there are infinite varieties, yet every variety would, if time were given, and the land remained unchanged in level relatively to the sea, ultimately approach to the type.

    0
    0
  • There is nothing more striking in geography than the perfection of the adjustment of a great river system to its valleys when the land has remained stable for a very lengthened period.

    0
    0
  • Before full adjustment has been attained the river bed may be broken in places by waterfalls or interrupted by lakes; after adjustment the bed assumes a permanent outline, the slope diminishing more and more gradually, without a break in its symmetrical descent.

    0
    0
  • Excellent examples of the indecisive drainage of a new land surface, on which the river system has not had time to impress itself, are to be seen in northern Canada and in Finland, where rivers are separated by scarcely perceptible divides, and the numerous lakes frequently belong to more than one river system.

    0
    0
  • Phillipson, Studien uber Wasserscheiden (Leipzig, 1886); also I.C. Russell, River Development (London, 1898) (published as The Rivers of North America, New York, 1898).

    0
    0
  • A well-developed river system has in fact many equally important and widely-separated sources, the most distant from the mouth, the highest, river or even that of largest initial volume not being necessarily of greater geographical interest than the rest.

    0
    0
  • These are places where the mode of travelling or of transport is changed, such as seaports, river ports and railway termini, or natural resting-places, such as a ford, the foot of a steep ascent on a road, the entrance of a valley leading up from a plain into the mountains, or a crossing-place of roads or railways.'

    0
    0
  • The river is navigable to Quibdo (250 m.), and for the greater part of its course for large vessels, but the bars at its mouth prevent the entrance of sea-going steamers.

    0
    0
  • The gold and platinum mines of Choco were on some of its affluents, and the river sands are auriferous.

    0
    0
  • In 1904-1905 the city built on the Scioto river a concrete storage dam, having a capacity of 5,000,000,000 gallons, and in 1908 it completed the construction of enormous works for filtering and softening the water-supply, and of works for purifying the flow of sewage - the two costing nearly $5,000,000.

    0
    0
  • It stood on the river Iris (Tozanli Su or Yeshil Irmak), and from its central position was a favourite emporium of Armenian and other merchants.

    0
    0
  • There is a mound; and a few inscriptions are built into a bridge, which here spans the river, carrying the road from Niksar to Tokat.

    0
    0
  • The department takes its name from the river Ain, which traverses its centre in a southerly direction and separates it roughly into two wellmarked physical divisions - a region of mountains to the east, and of plains to the west.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Helen stands near the river, and its fine Early English tower with Perpendicular spire is the principal object in the pleasant views of the town from the river.

    0
    0
  • The most important were the Ulai or Eulaeus (Kuran) with its tributary the Pasitigris, the Choaspes (Kerkhah), the Coprates (river of Diz called in the inscriptions), the Hedyphon or Hedypnus (Jerrahi), and the Croatis (Hindyan), besides the monumental Surappi and Ukni, perhaps to be identified with the Hedyphon and Oroatis, which fell into the sea in the marshy region at the mouth of the Tigris.

    0
    0
  • Kampen is surrounded by beautiful gardens and promenades in the place of the old city walls, and has a fine river front.

    0
    0
  • It is beautifully situated in the valley of the river Eger, an affluent of the Theiss, and on the eastern outskirts of the Matra mountains.

    0
    0
  • We do not know, and are not likely to know, how religion first arose, and the probability is that many springs went to feed that immense river.

    0
    0
  • The rivers of the state include a number of small plateau streams flowing southward to the Sao Francisco River, and several large streams in the eastern part flowing eastward to the Atlantic. The former are the Moxoto, Ema, Pajehu, Terra Nova, Brigida, Boa Vista and Pontai, and are dry channels the greater part of the year.

    0
    0
  • The Dzungarian Ala-tau Mountains, which separate it from Kulja, extend south-west towards the river Ili, with an average height of 6000 ft.

    0
    0
  • The most important river is the Ili, which enters the province from Kulja and drains it for 250 m.

    0
    0
  • The Winnipeg River has at this point a fall of 16 ft., which, with the lake as a reservoir, furnishes an abundant and unfailing waterpower.

    0
    0
  • It is a rapid river of considerable volume, and below Erzingan is navigable, down stream, for rafts.

    0
    0
  • The river now runs W.S.W.

    0
    0
  • Three or four piers or sometimes bridges of masonry are run out into the bed of the river, frequently from both sides at once, raising the level of the stream and thus giving a water power sufficient to turn the gigantic wheel or wheels, sometimes almost 40 ft.

    0
    0
  • In this part of its course the rocky sides of the valley, which sometimes closely approach the river, are composed of marls and gypsum, with occasional selenite, overlaid with sandstone, with a topping of breccia or conglomerate, and rise at places to a height of 200 ft.

    0
    0
  • On either side of the river valley a steppe-like desert, covered in the spring with verdure, the rest of the year barren and brown, stretches away as far as the eye can see.

    0
    0
  • Anciently the country on both sides of the Euphrates was habitable as far as the river Khabur; at the present time it is all desert from Birejik downward, the camping ground of Bedouin Arabs, the great tribe of Anazeh occupying esh-Sham, the right bank, and the Shammar the left bank, Mesopotamia of the Romans, now called elJezireh or the island.

    0
    0
  • To these the semi-sedentary Arabs who sparsely cultivate the river valley, dwelling sometimes in huts, sometimes in caves, pay a tribute, called kubbe, or brotherhood, as do also the riverain towns and villages, except perhaps the very largest.

    0
    0
  • The Turkish government also levies taxes on the inhabitants of the river valley, and for this purpose, and to maintain a caravan route from the Mediterranean coast to Bagdad, maintains stations of a few zaptiehs or gens d'armes, at intervals of about 8 hours (caravan time), occupying in general the stations of the old Persian post road.

    0
    0
  • The only riverain towns of any importance on this stretch of the river to-day are Samsat, Birejik, Deir, `Ana and Hit.

    0
    0
  • Until the advent of the nomads from central Asia, and the devastation of Mesopotamia and the opposite Syrian shore of the river, there were many flourishing cities along its course, the ruins of which, representing all periods, still dot its banks.

    0
    0
  • Samsat itself represents the ancient Samosata, the capital of the Seleucid kings of Commagene (Kuinukh of the Assyrian inscriptions), and here the Persian Royal Road from Sardis to Susa is supposed to have crossed the river.

    0
    0
  • Below Samsat the river runs S.W.

    0
    0
  • From this point the river runs rather east of south for about 25 m.

    0
    0
  • Here the river turns quite sharply eastward.

    0
    0
  • Half a day's journey beyond Sura, on the Mesopotamian side of the river, are the extensive ruins of Haragla (Heraclea) and Rakka, once the capital of Harun al-Rashid (Nicephorium of Alexander; Callinicus of the Seleucids and Romans).

    0
    0
  • Here the Belikh (Bilechas) joins the Euphrates, flowing southward through the biblical Aram Naharaim from Urfa (Edessa) and Harran (Carrhae); and from this point to el-IKaim four days' below Deir, the course of the river is south-easterly.

    0
    0
  • Twentysix miles farther down lies the town of Deir, where the river divides into two channels and the river valley opens out into quite extensive plains.

    0
    0
  • At this point the river turns sharply a little north of east, continuing on that course somewhat over 40 m.

    0
    0
  • Just above `Ana are rapids, and from this point to Hit the river is full of islands, while the bed is for the most part narrow, leaving little cultivable land between it and the bluffs.

    0
    0
  • At Hit the river is from 30 to 35 ft.

    0
    0
  • Through this part of its course the current of the river, except where restricted by floating bridges - at Feluja, Mussaib, Hillah, Diwanieh and Samawa - does not normally exceed a mile an hour, and both on the main stream and on its canals the jerd or oxbucket takes the place of the naoura or water-wheel for purposes of irrigation.

    0
    0
  • As main arteries for this circulation of water through its system great canals, constituting in reality so many branches of the river, connected all parts of Babylonia, and formed a natural means both of defence and also of transportation from one part of the country to another.

    0
    0
  • The first of these canals, taken off on the right bank of the river a little below Hit, followed the extreme skirt of the alluvium the whole way to the Persian Gulf near Basra, and thus formed an outer barrier, strengthened at intervals with watch-towers and fortified posts, to protect the cultivated land of the Sawad against the incursions of the desert Arabs.

    0
    0
  • The Nahr Malk or royal river, modern Radhwaniya, leaves the Euphrates five leagues below this and joins the Tigris three leagues below Ctesiphon; while the Kutha, modern Habl-Ibrahim, leaving the Euphrates three leagues below the Malk joins the Tigris ten leagues below Ctesiphon.

    0
    0
  • Just below Mussaib there has been for all ages a great bifurcation of the river.

    0
    0
  • Under the Arabs the old designation again prevailed and the Euphrates is always described by the Arabian geographers as the river which flows direct to Kufa, while the present stream, passing along the ruins of Babylon to Hillah and Diwanieh, has been universally known as the Nahr Sura.

    0
    0
  • Occidental geographers, however, have followed the Greek use, and so to-day we call the river of Babylon or Nahr Sura the Euphrates and the older westerly channel the Hindieh canal.

    0
    0
  • But it frequently happens that the dam at the head of the Hindieh is carried away, and, a free channel being thus opened for the waters of the river to the westward, the Hillah bed shoals to 2 or 3 ft., or even dries up altogether, while the country to the west of the river is turned into lakes and swamps.

    0
    0
  • Below the bifurcation the river of Babylon was again divided into several streams, and indeed the most famous of all the ancient canals was the Arakhat (Archous of the Greeks and Serrat and Nil of the Arabs), which left that river just above Babylon and ran due east to the Tigris, irrigating all the central part of the Jezireh, and sending down a branch through Nippur and Erech to rejoin the Euphrates a little above the modern Nasrieh.

    0
    0
  • The swamps are full of huge reeds, bordered with tamarisk jungles, and in its lower reaches, where the water stretches out into great marshes, the river is clogged with a growth of agrostis.

    0
    0
  • To obtain a correct idea of this region it must be borne in mind also that the course of the river and the features of the country on both banks are subject to constant fluctuation.

    0
    0
  • From this point downward, and to some extent above this as far as Samawa, the river forms a succession of reedy lagoons of the most hopeless character, the Paludes Chaldaici of antiquity, el Batihat of the Arabs.

    0
    0
  • Along this part of its course the river is apt to be choked with reeds and, except where bordered by lines of palm trees, the channel loses itself in lakes and swamps.

    0
    0
  • The inhabitants of this region are wild and inhospitable and utterly beyond the control of the Turkish authorities, and navigation of the river between Korna and Suk-esh-Sheiukh is unsafe owing to the attacks of armed pirates.

    0
    0
  • From Garmat Ali, where the Tigris and Euphrates at present unite,' under the title of Shattel-Arab, the river sweeps on to Basra, Ex p o yds.

    0
    0
  • From Korna to Basra the banks of the river are well cultivated and the date groves almost continuous; indeed this is the greatest date-producing region of the world.

    0
    0
  • Twenty-five miles below Basra the river Karun from Shushter and Dizful throws off an arm, which seems to be artificial, into the Euphrates.

    0
    0
  • The left bank of the river from this point belongs to Persia.

    0
    0
  • The river begins to rise in the end of March and attains its greatest height between the 21st and the 28th of May.

    0
    0
  • Chesney was sent out at the head of an expedition with instructions to transport two steamers from the Mediterranean to the Euphrates, and, after putting them together at Birejik, to attempt the descent of the river to the sea.

    0
    0
  • Following on this first experiment, the East India Company, in 1841, proposed to maintain a permanent flotilla on the Tigris and Euphrates, and set two vessels, the " Nitocris " and the " Nimrod," under the command of Captain Campbell of the Indian navy, to attempt the ascent of the latter river.

    0
    0
  • The experiment was so far successful that, with incredible difficulty, the two vessels did actually reach Meskene, but the result of the expedition was to show that practically the river could not be used as a high-road of commerce, the continuous rapids and falls during the low season, caused mainly by the artificial obstructions of the irrigating dams, being insurmountable by ordinary steam power, and the aid of hundreds of hands being thus required to drag the vessels up the stream at those points by main force.

    0
    0
  • At the present time the river is navigated by sailing craft of some size from Hit downward.

    0
    0
  • Above that point there is no navigation except by the native rafts (kellek), which descend the river and are broken up on arrival at their point of destination.

    0
    0
  • It contains a description of the southern coast of the Euxine from the Thracian Bosporus to the river Iris in Pontus.

    0
    0
  • The first of these extended from the Pyrenees to the Garumna (Garonne); the second, from that river to the Sequana (Seine) and its chief tributary the Matrona (Marne), reaching eastward presumably as far as the Rhenus (Rhine); and the third, from this bounding Iline to the mouth of the last-named river, thus bordering on the Germans.

    0
    0
  • A crowded native quarter built round a picturesque lake lies close to the river with the European quarter to the south of it.

    0
    0
  • The river is embanked and is crossed by the Pont Doumer, a fine railway bridge over i m.

    0
    0
  • Lee and South Lee are on, and East Lee is near, the Housatonic river.

    0
    0
  • The river was also canalized, a telephone service introduced, and extensive drainage works carried out.

    0
    0
  • Orihuela is situated in a beautiful and exceedingly fertile huerta, or tract of highly cultivated land, at the foot of a limestone bridge, and on both sides of the river Segura, which divides the city into two parts, Roig and San Augusto, and is spanned by two bridges.

    0
    0
  • It is built among picturesque hills on both sides of the river, and is in the midst of the famous Kentucky "blue grass region" and of a rich lumber-producing region.

    0
    0
  • Although the northern and southern extremities of Goyaz lie within two great river systems - the Tocantins and Parana - the upper courses of which are navigable, both of them are obstructed by falls.

    0
    0
  • In the following year they concluded a peace with the zamorin and were allowed to build a fortified factory on the north bank of the Kallayi river, which was however again, and finally, abandoned in 1525.

    0
    0
  • It derives its designation from the settlements on the Gabun river or Rio de Gabao.

    0
    0
  • From this point the boundary between France and Liberia would be the course of the Cavalla river from near its source to the sea.

    0
    0
  • From this point the frontier shall leave the line of the Makona and be carried in a south-easterly direction to the source of the most north-westerly affluent of the Nuon river or Western Cavalla.

    0
    0
  • If the ultimate destination of the Nuon is not the Cavalla river, then the boundary shall follow the right bank of the Nuon down stream as far as the town of Tuleplan.

    0
    0
  • The river Makona takes a much more northerly course than had been estimated.

    0
    0
  • Gold is present in some abundance in the river sand of central Liberia, and native reports speak of the far interior as being rich in gold.

    0
    0
  • In 1462 de Sintra returned with another Portuguese captain, Sueiro da Costa, and penetrated as far as Cape Palmas and the Cavalla river.

    0
    0
  • There are three custom-houses, or ports of entry on the Sierra Leone land frontier between the Moa river on the north and the Mano on the south, and nine ports of entry along the coast.

    0
    0
  • Another English company has constructed motor roads in the Liberian hinterland to connect centres of trade with the St Paul's river.

    0
    0
  • This area is divided into nearly two equal parts - one, the Lei river coal-fields, yielding anthracite, and the other the Siang river coal-fields, yielding bituminous coal.

    0
    0
  • Almost all the traffic is conveyed through Hu-nan by water-ways, which lead northward to Han-kow on the Yangtsze Kiang, and Fan-cheng on the Han River, eastward to Fu-kien, southward to Kwang-tung and Kwang-si and westward to Sze-ch'uen.

    0
    0
  • Yo Chow, the treaty port of the province, stands at the outlet of the river Siang into this lake.

    0
    0
  • It is pleasantly situated at the junction of several small streams forming the river Lune, in a deep valley surrounded by high-lying moors.

    0
    0
  • On the river Dinder is the town of Singa.

    0
    0
  • The probable origin of the story is the part traditionally taken in the foundation of Syracuse by the Iamidae of Olympia, who identified the spring Arethusa with their own river Alpheus, and the nymph with Artemis Alpheiaia, who was worshipped at Ortygia.

    0
    0
  • The subterranean passage of the Alpheus in the upper part of its course (confirmed by modern explorers), and the freshness of the water of Arethusa in spite of its proximity to the sea, led to the belief that it was the outlet of the river.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the orographical structure of the East-European plains, the river systems have become more than usually prominent and.

    0
    0
  • The river is navigable for 770 m.; grain and a variety of goods conveyed from the upper Kama are floated down, while furs, fish and other products of the sea are shipped up the river to be transported to Cherdyn on the Kama.

    0
    0
  • The surface is undulatory; marshy meadow lands no longer exist on the flat watersheds, and only a few in the deeper and broader river valleys.

    0
    0
  • The fauna of the scrub in the river valleys is decidedly rich, and includes aquatic birds.

    0
    0
  • Taking the Lake Aral and Siberian river fisheries into account, it is estimated that altogether the fishing industries yield a revenue to the state of £330,000 annually.'

    0
    0
  • Lake Ilmen and the river Volkhov, on which stands Novgorod, Rurik's capital, formed part of the great waterway from the Baltic to the Black Sea, and we know that by this route travelled from Scandinavia to Constantinople the tall fair-haired Northmen who composed the famous Varangian bodyguard of the Byzantine emperors.

    0
    0
  • To escape this danger many of them moved down the river and settled on the waste lands beyond the rapids.

    0
    0
  • Railways had their origin in the tramways (q.v.) or wagon-ways which at least as early as the middle of the 16th century were used in the mineral districts of England round Newcastle for the conveyance of coal from the pits to the river Tyne for shipment.

    0
    0
  • It may be supposed that originally the public roads, when worn by the cartage of the coal, were repaired by laying planks of timber at the bottom of the ruts, and that then the planks were laid on the surface of special roads or ways' formed between the collieries and the river.

    0
    0
  • In Canada the Canadian Pacific was the only transcontinental line, extending from St John, on the bay of Fundy, and from Quebec, on the river St Lawrence, to Vancouver, on the strait of Georgia, the distance from St John to Vancouver being approximately 3379 m.

    0
    0
  • Before that time the St Paul had been a great local railway, operating primarily in the Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois; but by the construction of a long arm from the Missouri river to Spokane, Seattle and Tacoma, it became a transcontinental line of the first importance, avoiding the mistakes of earlier railway builders by securing a line with easy gradients through the most favourable regions.

    0
    0
  • In cases where the route of a line runs across a river or other piece of water so wide that the construction of a bridge is either impossible or would be more costly than is warranted by the volume of traffic, the expedient is sometimes adopted of carrying the wagons and carriages across bodily with their loads on train ferries, so as to avoid the inconvenience and delay of transshipment.

    0
    0
  • In the Langen mono-rail the cars are hung from a single overhead rail; a line on this system works between Barmen and Elberfeld, about 9 m., the cars for a portion of the distance being suspended over the river Wupper.

    0
    0
  • Navigation on the river is open from April to early in November.

    0
    0
  • Lafone, a wealthy cattle and hide merchant on the river Plate, obtained from government a grant of the southern portion of the island, a peninsula 600,000 acres in extent, and possession of all the wild cattle on the island for a period of six years, for a payment of £10,000 down, and £20,000 in ten years from January 1, 1852.

    0
    0
  • The Great Bear river discharges its waters into the Mackenzie river.

    0
    0
  • The river furnishes water-power, and among the manufactures of the town are shoes, machinery, cottons, brass, &c.

    0
    0
  • It lies on an open plain on the river Regnitz, 2 m.

    0
    0
  • The upper town is built on seven hills, each crowned by a church, while the lower, still partially surrounded by walls and ditches, is divided by the river and Ludwigskanal into three districts.

    0
    0
  • The industries of the town include cotton spinning and weaving, silk spinning, the manufacture of tobacco, ropes, metal-ware, furniture, &c. The market gardens of the neighbourhood are famous, and there is a considerable shipping trade by the river and the Ludwigskanal.

    0
    0
  • In the neighbourhood are the ruins of Fort St David situated on the river Gadilam, which has been as stirring a history as any spot in the Presidency.

    0
    0
  • The largest river is the Kan Kiang, which rises in the mountains in the south of the province and flows north-east to the Po-yang Lake.

    0
    0
  • It was over the Meiling Pass and down this river that, in old days, embassies landing at Canton proceeded to Peking.

    0
    0
  • Another river of note is the Chang Kiang, which has its source in the province of Ngan-hui and flows into the Po-yang Lake, connecting in its course the Wuyuen district, whence come the celebrated "Moyune" green teas, and the city of King-to-chen, celebrated for its pottery, with Jao-chow Fu on the lake.

    0
    0
  • The black "Kaisow" teas are brought from the Ho-kow district, where they are grown, down the river Kin to Juy-hung on the lake, and the Siu-ho connects by a navigable stream I-ning Chow, in the neighbourhood of which city the best black teas of this part of China are produced, with Wu-ching, the principal mart of trade on the lake.

    0
    0
  • Kiu-kiang, the treaty port of the province, opened to foreign trade in 1861, is on the Yangtsze-kiang, a short distance above the junction of the Po-yang Lake with that river.

    0
    0
  • As lately as the middle of the 18th century the town stood a quarter of a mile from the river, but is now on the bank, the intervening space having been washed away, together with a large part of the town, by the stream continually encroaching on its left bank.

    0
    0
  • Between this ridge and the valley of the Colorado river lies all that portion of the Great Basin included within the state.

    0
    0
  • The highest point within the state is Wheeler Peak, near the centre of the eastern boundary, with an elevation of 13,058 ft.; the lowest points are along the Colorado river, where the altitudes range from 700 to Boo ft.

    0
    0
  • On its eastern slope the waters soon disappear within the bed of narrow canyons, but break out again at the foot in icecold springs that form the source of the Ruby and Franklin lakes; on its western side the descent is more gentle, and the waters form the South Fork of the Humboldt river.

    0
    0
  • From the valley of the Humboldt river southward the plateau gradually rises until the divide between this stream and the Colorado river, in the vicinity of the White Pine Mountains, is reached.

    0
    0
  • The region of the Colorado river is largely desert, with occasional buttes and spurs.

    0
    0
  • At no part of its course is it a large river, and near its mouth its waters are sub-alkaline.

    0
    0
  • Here the Virgin river enters the state after crossing the N.W.

    0
    0
  • The Truckee river and the western lakes abound in trout and black bass.

    0
    0
  • The valleys are treeless, except in the vicinity of the Truckee river, where considerable quantities of the cotton wood and a small amount of willow, birch, and wild cherry are found.

    0
    0
  • The mesquite grows some distance from water, and is especially common near the Colorado river.

    0
    0
  • At the head of the Humboldt river frosts are of almost nightly occurrence, and in the Carson Valley damaging frosts often occur in June.

    0
    0
  • The three principal areas in which irrigation is practicable are along the Humboldt river, in the plains watered by the Carson, Truckee and Walker rivers, and at the foot of the mountains along the western edge of the state.

    0
    0
  • Nevada, and thence past the Colorado river into Arizona, is one of the richest mineral belts in the world.

    0
    0
  • Half a century later a party of trappers of the Hudson's Bay Company entered Nevada and plied their trade along the Humboldt river.

    0
    0
  • The first settlement in what is now the state of Nevada was planted in the valley of the Carson river in 1849.

    0
    0
  • The root appears more or less disguised in a vast number of river names all over the Celtic area in Europe.

    0
    0
  • The river is of no commercial value for navigation.

    0
    0
  • The Avon finally enters the estuary of the Severn at Avonmouth, though it can hardly be reckoned as a tributary of that river.

    0
    0
  • After some preliminary manoeuvres the two armies drew up face to face on the left bank of the Roneo, the Spanish left and the French right resting on this river.

    0
    0
  • This was the end, but the remnant of the Spanish infantry retreated in order along the river causeway, keeping the pursuers at bay with their arquebuses.

    0
    0
  • The river furnishes considerable water-power and the total factory product in 1905 was valued at $8,357,993, an increase of 47.2% over that in 1900.

    0
    0
  • Demeter, at first enraged, afterwards calmed down, and washed herself in the river Ladon by way of purification.

    0
    0
  • The Sao Francisco forms its northern boundary, and the drainage of the northern part of the state is northward and eastward to that river.

    0
    0
  • The bar at the entrance to this river is exceptionally dangerous, and the port is frequented only by coasting vessels of light draught.

    0
    0
  • It is situated in the valley of the Aar, on the right bank of that river, and at the southern foot of the range of the Jura.

    0
    0
  • Gorinchem possesses several interesting old houses, and overlooking the river are some fortified gateways of the 17th century.

    0
    0
  • Across the river from the town ancient earthworks (Bucton Castle), of British origin, are seen, and a Roman road passing them, and running north and south is also traceable.

    0
    0
  • It is a district of poor streets, inhabited by a labouring population employed in leather and other factories, and in the Surrey Commercial Docks and the wharves bordering the river.

    0
    0
  • A tunnel connecting it with the opposite shore of the river was opened in June 1908.

    0
    0
  • The name is a corruption of St Olave, or Olaf, the Christian king of Norway, who in 994 attacked London by way of the river, and broke down London Bridge.

    0
    0
  • At the close of the war he was appointed by President Johnson secretary of Montana Territory, and there, in the absence of the territorial governor, he acted as governor from September 1866 until his death from accidental drowning in the Missouri River near Fort Benton, Montana, on the 1st of July 1867.

    0
    0
  • The most important river of the name is in southern Ireland, rising in the hills on the borders of the counties Cork and Kerry, and flowing nearly due east for the greater part of its course, as far as Cappoquin, where it turns abruptly southward, and discharges through an estuary into Youghal Bay.

    0
    0
  • The boundary line between the two counties is drawn lengthwise down the centre of the lake and is continued down the river Shiel to the sea.

    0
    0
  • The San Miguel river, which flows near, affords a means of transportation, and the town has considerable commerce.

    0
    0
  • It lies near the border of Somersetshire, on the southern slope of a hill overlooking the river Yeo, in a fertile, well-wooded district.

    0
    0
  • It was separated from Lucania on the north by a line drawn from the mouth of the river Laus on the west to a point a little south of the river Crathis on the east.

    0
    0
  • Baena is picturesquely situated near the river Marbella, on the slope of a hill crowned with a castle, which formerly belonged to the famous captain Gonzalo de Cordova.

    0
    0
  • The general slope of the southern part is southward to the river Balsas, or Mescala, which forms its boundary-line with Guerrero.

    0
    0
  • To the two viaducts across the valley of the Cuyahoga river were added three others, of which the most noteworthy is the High Level bridge, connecting Superior avenue on the east with Detroit avenue on the west.

    0
    0
  • The goddess, who embodied the idea of the city, was seated on a rock, crowned with towers, and having the river Orontes at her feet.

    0
    0
  • It is pleasantly situated in a wooded hollow, in the upper valley of the river Parret.

    0
    0
  • The Vicksburg formation lies next in order south-west, in a narrow strip of fairly regular width which alone of the Tertiary formations runs as far west as the Mississippi River; it is probably nowhere more than 110 ft.

    0
    0
  • Along the entire western border of the state the Mississippi River is navigable for river steamboats.

    0
    0
  • The Gulfport project reduced freight rates between Gulfport and the Atlantic seaboard cities and promoted the trade of Gulfport, which is the port of entry for the Pearl River customs district.

    0
    0
  • An agricultural experiment station established in 1887 under the Hatch Act, is at Agricultural College; and there are branch experiment stations at McNeill, Pearl River county (1906), near Holly Springs, and at Stoneville, near Greenville.

    0
    0
  • Hernando de Soto and a body of Spanish adventurers crossed the Tombigbee river, in December 1540, near the present city of Columbus, marched through the north part of the state, and reached the Mississippi river near Memphis in 1541.

    0