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rise

rise

rise Sentence Examples

  • She started to rise from her chair.

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  • Lisa started to rise from her chair, but Giddon was faster.

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  • He started to rise from his chair.

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  • She breathed out fog, watching it rise to the dark grey skies.

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  • Taxes will rise, and social programs will grow.

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  • Because human ability is distributed unevenly and technology multiplies ability of the talented, the spread between the rich and poor will rise more and more.

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  • Pierre looked over his spectacles with naive surprise, now at him and now at her, moved as if about to rise too, but changed his mind.

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  • Shocked and horrified, she scrambled to rise from the floor.

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  • Shocked and horrified, she scrambled to rise from the floor.

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  • Memories of the massacre made bile rise and her chest clench.

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  • She started to rise but her son tugged her down, indicating he wanted to remain.

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  • My thoughts would often rise and beat up like birds against the wind, and I persisted in using my lips and voice.

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  • The vision disappeared in a moment, after someone stepped in front of Dean and helped him steady his legs and rise to his feet.

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  • She struggled to rise and Alex helped her to her feet.

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  • Now, suppose I am right and incomes effectively rise dramatically.

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  • and not to rise from it till 5 A.M.

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  • But over time, as incomes around the world rise, people will migrate more and more to products associated with social practices that match their own ideals.

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  • And I think that helps explain why no one quite foresaw the rise of the Internet: because it doesn't have an offline corollary of its own.

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  • The 2000s saw the rise of commercially viable seeds created by transgenesis, that is, the insertion of DNA from one species into another species.

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  • Rise free from care before the dawn, and seek adventures.

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  • His rise was rapid.

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  • Who would not be early to rise, and rise earlier and earlier every successive day of his life, till he became unspeakably healthy, wealthy, and wise?

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  • She started to rise but a serious look crossed her face.

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  • The headstreams of the Bakhoy rise between 11° 30' and 12° N.

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  • He liked trying to get a rise out of her, and he really did want to know where they stood in her mind and whether or not he had to worry about her running off to make more deals with Darkyn.

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  • She started to rise and he motioned her to remain seated.

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  • She started to rise and he motioned her to remain seated.

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  • of Lake Tsana, unites its waters with a number of other rivers which also rise in the Abyssinian highlands, and flows north-west Boo m.

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  • Two medieval castles rise above the town, and there are some churches of interest.

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  • This is not to say that if another Pearl Harbor or another 9/11 occurred, people in any country wouldn't rise to the occasion and make great sacrifices if needed.

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  • The decline of military alliances and the rise of economic ones.

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  • He felt the rise and fall of each breath and was inches from the slightly parted full lips just begging for a kiss.

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  • The first rise in the lower Senegal is due to the rains in the source region of the Faleme, the flood water passing down that stream more quickly than down the Bafing owing to its shorter course.

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  • The house sits on a slight rise, at the end of a long driveway and I had never visited at night.

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  • The overall economic output of the planet, GWP (gross world product), will rise dramatically in the years to come, but its distribution will be quite skewed.

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  • I think that incomes will rise dramatically to many times what they presently are, in real dollars.

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  • I suspect it is both; GNP rises, so we buy more energy, allowing GNP to rise so we can buy more energy.

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  • She felt tears rise at his soft words.

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  • The flasks were then well shaken, and the yeast cell or cells settled to the bottom, and gave rise to a separate yeast speck.

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  • She recognized tips came in all over the country; giving rise to her feeling there might be many different tipsters.

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  • With the rise of her anger came another emotion: gratitude for finding Jule, the one man who had accepted her.

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  • Your brother will never be what he was, but he will rise again as the Grey God.

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  • It was dark by the time the cab dropped her off in front of the high rise where she shared an apartment with Logan.

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  • The news that no one had survived the strikes on her condo building made tears rise for a different reason.

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  • An exception worth noting is that the poor who get better products at cheaper prices will see their wealth rise accordingly.

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  • Sirian's gaze returned to hers, and the two exchanged a look that made the hair on the back of Taran's neck rise once more.

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  • In the prosperous future, one group of people will rise to this challenge.

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  • Rostov also tried to rise but fell back, his sabretache having become entangled in the saddle.

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  • Elsewhere local surface currents are developed, either drifts due to the direct action of the winds, or streams produced by wind action heaping water up against the land; but these nowhere rise to the dignity of a distinct current system, although they are often sufficient to obliterate the feeble tidal action characteristic of the Mediterranean.

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  • The rise of public opinion as the most powerful political force in the world.

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  • Maybe I'll get a room in a high rise hotel, away from street noise.

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  • As I tried to rise to my knees I was grabbed from behind and once again, I felt a knife at my throat!

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  • Astonished, she leaned back and watched it rise, thick and plush, to a height of several inches.

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  • Vinnie started to rise but Winston bounced him back down on the bed.

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  • He felt the familiar sense of desire rise just looking at her plump lips and bright blue eyes.

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  • Vinnie started to rise but Winston bounced him back down on the bed.

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  • I had let so much gas out of my balloon that I could not rise again, and in a few minutes the earth closed over my head.

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  • Josh wasn't as fast to rise this time, and when he finally regained his footing, he shook his head.

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  • Josh wasn't as fast to rise this time, and when he finally regained his footing, he shook his head.

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  • While the walk was less than a half-mile, Ouray's 7,800-foot elevation and the uphill rise caused Dean to quicken his breathing—one more reminder to get in shape.

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  • Those cells are accurately marked, the position of which is such that the colonies, to which they give rise, can grow to their full size without coming into contact with other colonies.

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  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.

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  • As the group trudged up a small rise in the road, the awesome creations of the ice park came into view.

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  • He must have reached an arm across the warmth next to him and her nearly soundless mewl began his slow but steady rise to the surface of consciousness.

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  • If any dreams disturbed his much-needed slumber, he had no recollection of them when Fred tapped on his door telling him to rise and shine.

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  • It may rise this year higher than man has ever known it, and flood the parched uplands; even this may be the eventful year, which will drown out all our muskrats.

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  • When the Emperor's health was drunk, Pierre, lost in thought, did not rise or lift his glass.

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  • The terrified wolf pressed back her ears and tried to rise, but the borzois stuck to her.

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  • Toward midnight the voices began to subside, a cock crowed, the full moon began to show from behind the lime trees, a fresh white dewy mist began to rise, and stillness reigned over the village and the house.

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  • The count was the first to rise, and with a loud sigh crossed himself before the icon.

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  • Finally, after ten minutes of silence passed, they heard the sound of feet running down the slope on the other side of the rise above them.

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  • The full- blooded demon was slow to rise, and he waited.

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  • You can't lie, and I can tell when you're trying to get a rise out of me.

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  • Kiera felt her ire rise at the blatant appraisal.

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  • Kiera felt her ire rise at the blatant appraisal.

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  • She started to rise but Fred O'Connor rose to his feet.

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  • She started to rise but Fred O'Connor rose to his feet.

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  • Flustered, Yully started to rise.

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  • Absorbed by the horse, she didn't feel the hair on the back of her neck rise.

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  • I don't want to, she said, trying to rise.

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  • She was frustrated to feel more tears rise.

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  • The outer wall of the Sanctuary appeared over a rise.

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  • He struggled to rise.

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  • They waited a short time longer before the prisoner shifted to rise.

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  • Prepare yourself to move before the suns rise.

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  • The sound of a muffled explosion from beyond the door made her rise.

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  • "Well, he acts retarded," Claire grumbled disgustedly as she started to rise.

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  • As they strolled along, Ryland discussed the recent rise of interest in the sport.

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  • He sat up and started to rise.

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  • Dean looked at her but made no effort to rise.

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  • She tugged at his collar and he tried in vain to rise.

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  • He began to rise.

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  • Stretching his arms and yawning, he leaned forward to rise.

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  • In Asia they gave rise to the elephants, while they themselves originated in Africa from ungulates of more normal type.

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  • Simpson got similar results at Karasjok; the rise in a + and a_ with increased wind velocity seemed, however, larger in winter than in summer.

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  • per hour no further decided rise was observed.

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  • Gockel found a diminution of ionization with rise of relative humidity.

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  • Table Potential, Dissipation, Ioniz If we regard the potential gradient near the ground as representing a negative charge on the earth, then if the source of supply of that charge is unaffected the gradient will rise and become high when the operations by which discharge is promoted slacken their activity.

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  • A diminution in the number of positive ions would thus naturally be accompanied by a rise in potential gradient.

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  • In states such as Wyoming and the Dakotas the population is largely rural, and the deaths by lightning rise in consequence.

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  • The common mushroom (Agaricus campestris) is propagated by spores, the fine black dust seen to be thrown off when a mature specimen is laid on white paper or a white dish; these give rise to what is known as the "spawn" or mycelium, which consists of whitish threads permeating dried dung or similar substances, and which, when planted in a proper medium, runs through the mass, and eventually develops the fructification known as the mushroom.

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  • Along the Ohio river, these hills rise to an elevation of 800 to 1,000 ft.

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  • In India, the (still unexplained) rise of the doctrine of transmigration hindered belief.

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  • Their power extended far into Arabia, particularly along the Red Sea; and Petra was a meeting-place of many nations, though its commerce was diminished by the rise of the Eastern trade-route from Myoshormus to Coptos on the Nile.

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  • Physically its continuity is broken by Monte Urticu and several smaller hills which rise within it, but these are all composed of volcanic rock and are the remains of Tertiary volcanoes.

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  • Another difficulty is that Italian and foreign capitalists, have produced a great rise in prices which has not been compensated by a rise in wages.

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  • In the division of provinces made by The large number of slaves is said to have given rise to the phrase Sardi venales for anything cheap or worthless.

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  • The existence of such mixed matters gives rise to inevitable conflicts of jurisdiction, which may lead, and sometimes have led, to civil war.

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  • Since concordats are contracts they give rise to that special mutual obligation which results from every agreement freely entered into; for a contract is binding on both parties to it.

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  • (1465-1521) succeeded in 1 512 his father Bayezid II., whom he dethroned, and whose death, following immediately afterwards, gave rise to suspicions which Selim's character certainly justified.

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  • He appears to have entered into consultation of a treasonable kind with Monmouth and others; he himself had, he declared, ten thousand brisk boys in London ready to rise at his bidding.

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  • The only stream passing through the district is the Kirni or Saki, which takes its rise in a marsh in the Gurdaspur district, and after traversing part of the district empties itself into the Ravi.

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  • When Albany returned to Scotland in 1521 his association with Margaret gave rise to the accusation that it was with the intention of marrying her himself that he favoured her divorce from Angus, and it was even suggested that she was Albany's mistress.

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  • A mixture of the melanistic with the albinistic type will of course give rise to parti-coloured cats.

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  • The earth, or other planet, does not actually move round the sun; yet it is carried round the sun in the subtle matter of the great vortex, where it lies in equilibrium, - carried like the passenger in a boat, who may cross the sea and yet not rise from his berth.

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  • We note here that though Ritschl gives Jesus a unique and unapproachable position in His active relation to the kingdom, he declines to rise above this relative teaching.

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  • 8 and 9) and the report of the French Commission, 1859, the rise in pitch began at the Congress of Vienna in 1816, the military bands being the cause.

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  • In 1874 a further rise in the fork to a' 454 was instigated by Sir Charles Halle.

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  • His divergencies from the Pentateuchal code gave rise to serious doubts, but, after prolonged study, the discrepancies were explained, and the book was finally canonized (Shah.

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  • Practically all the company's servants were traders in their private capacity, and as they claimed various privileges and exemptions this system was detrimental to the interests of the native princes and gave rise to an enormous amount of corruption.

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  • The automatic inlet of cold water to the hot water system from the main house tank or other source is controlled by a ball valve, which is so fixed as to allow the water to rise no more than an inch above the bottom of the tank, thus leaving the remainder of the space clear for expansion.

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  • Fusible plugs are little used; they consist of pieces of softer metal inserted on the side of the boiler, which melt should the heat of the water rise above a certain temperature.

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  • This appeared in 1860 and gave rise to a strange outbreak of fanaticism.

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  • The pulpit of St Mary's was no longer closed to him, but the success of Balliol in the schools gave rise to jealousy in other colleges, and old prejudices did not suddenly give way; while a new movement in favour of " the endowment of research " ran counter to his immediate purposes.

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  • and reaching back a mile or so from the river to highlands which rise to a height of 400 ft., with Mt Ida (240 ft.

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  • On the west the shore is perfectly flat, so that a slight rise in the water causes the inundation of a considerable area - a fact not without its influence on the estimates made at varying periods as to the size of the lake.

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  • The flood water brought down by the Shari in December and January causes the lake to rise to a maximum of 24 ft., the water spreading over low-lying ground, left dry again in May or June.

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  • In 1870 the lake rose to an exceptional height, but since then, save in 1897, there has been only the normal seasonal rise.

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  • westward, 132 ft.; of Junin (160 m.), 267 ft.; and of Paunero (400 m.) it is 1250 ft., showing an average rise of about 3 ft.

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  • The three great rivers that form the La Plata system - the Paraguay, Parana and Uruguay - have their sources in the highlands of Brazil and flow southward through a great continental depression, two of them forming eastern boundary lines, and one of them, the Parana, flowing across the eastern part of the republic. The northern part of Argentina, therefore, drains eastward from the mountains to these rivers, except where some great inland depression gives rise to a drainage having no outlet to the sea, and except, also, in the " mesopotamia " region, where small streams flow westward into the Parana and eastward into the Uruguay.

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  • The Cordillera, which bounds them on the west, is formed of folded beds, while the Sierras which rise in their midst, consist mainly of gneiss, granite and schist.

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  • All these affluents are on the right, and with the exception of the Arige, which descends from the eastern Pyrcnees, rise in the mountaitis of Auvergne and the southern Cvennes, their sources often lying close to those of the rivers of the Loire and Rhone basins.

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  • The earlier deposits of that sea now rise to the surface in Brittany, the Ardennes, the Montagne Noire and the Cvennes, and in all these regions they arc intensely folded.

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  • The political trials over which he presided, although they gave rise to numerous accusations against him, were conducted with singular fairness and propriety.

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  • They are coral islands of comparatively recent elevation, and in no place rise more than 250 ft.

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  • Two miles north-east is the famous Silla de Caracas, whose twin summits, like a gigantic old-fashioned saddle (silla), rise to an elevation of 8622 ft.; and the Naiguete, still farther eastward, overlooks the valley from a height of 9186 ft.

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  • It was the middlemost and the highest of the three steep crags which rise from the valley of the Kur, at some distance to the west or north-west of Nakshi Rustam.

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  • The rules of the Scribes enumerated thirty-nine main kinds of work forbidden on the Sabbath, and each of these prohibitions gave rise to new subtilties.

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  • They naturally take their rise among an agricultural folk.

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  • Then there is a gentle rise to the low steppes, 500 to woo ft.

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  • A further gentle rise in the high steppes leads to the mountains of the West Australian coast, and another strip of low-lying coastal land to the sea.

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  • Taking the Lachlan as one type of Australian river, we find it takes its rise amongst the precipitous and almost unexplored valleys of the Great Dividing Range.

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  • The chemical characters of the well-waters, the irregular distribution of the water-pressure, the distribution of the underground thermal gradients, and the occurrence in some of the wells of a tidal rise and fall of a varying period, are facts which are not explained on the simple hydrostatic theory.

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  • Its congeners even then lived in England, as is proved by the fact that their relics have been found in the Stonesfield oolitic rocks, the deposition of which is separated from that which gave rise to the Paris Tertiary strata by an abyss of past time which we cannot venture to express even in thousands of years.

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  • By means of bond labour roads and bridges were con structed, and a route opened into the interior beyond Rise of the Blue Mountains.

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  • In 1873 there was an important rise in wages, in the following year there was a further advance, and another in 1876; but in 1877 wages fell back a little, though not below the rate of 1874.

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  • These rise generally only a few feet above the level of the sea, and are crowned by a single house standing on an artificial mound and protected by a surrounding dike or embankment.

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  • The hot spring which still survive from the period of volcanic activity, rise at a temperature of 147° Fahr.

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  • They first brought the products and arts of the Orient into western Europe; and in the Netherlands, by the impulse that they gave to commerce, they were one of the primary causes of the rise of the chartered towns.

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  • No place was reckoned to be a town unless it had received a Rise of charter from its sovereign or its local lord.

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  • The Taconic Mountains rise in very irregular masses to1500-2000ft., and reach their maximum elevation in Mount Equinox at 3816 ft.

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  • The extension of the southern boundary line by this decision due westward until it met His Majesty's other governments gave rise, however, to a controversy with New York.

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  • It gives rise to various decomposition products such as pyridine, picoline, &c., when its vapour is passed through a red-hot tube.

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  • The shores are covered with coral; earthquakes and tidal waves are frequent, the latter not taking the form of bores, but of a sudden steady rise and equally sudden fall in the level of the sea; the climate is rather tropical than temperate, but sickness is almost unknown among the residents.

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  • The trade winds give rise, in the region most exposed to their influence, to two westward-moving drifts - the equatorial currents, which are separated in parts of their course by currents moving in the opposite direction along the equatorial belt.

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  • The souls which remember their pre-existing state can attain to this contemplation of unity, and thereby rise superior to all the ordinary doctrines of religion or life.

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  • These rivers rise on the eastern versant of a chain of mountains which traverse the country in a south-westerly to north-easterly direction.

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  • The claims made by Germany to large areas of the hinterland gave rise to considerable negotiation with France and Great Britain, and it was not until 1899 that the frontiers were fixed on all sides.

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  • The rise of Neapolis (Shechem) in the neighbourhood caused the decay of Sebaste.

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  • Richard Strauss, in his edition of Berlioz's works on Instrumentation, paradoxically characterizes the classical orchestral style as that which was derived from chamber-music. Now it, is true that in Haydn's early days orchestras were small and generally private; and that the styles of orchestral and chamber music were not distinct; but surely nothing is clearer than that the whole history of the rise of classical chamber-music lies in its rapid differentiation from the coarse-grained orchestral style with which it began.

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  • The eggs of the female give rise to embryos within the body of the mother; her other organs undergo a retrogressive change and serve as food for the young, until the body-wall only of the mother remains as a brown capsule.

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  • Banas and the Sabarmati, which rise among the south-west hills of Udaipur and take a south-westerly course.

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  • For working " double current," two sets of accumulators are provided, one set to send the positive and the other set the negative currents; that is to say, when, for example, a double current Morse key is pressed down it sends, say, a positive current from one set, but when it is allowed to rise to its normal position then a negative current is transmitted from the second set of accumulators.

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  • Now if the values of the rheostat and condenser are adjusted so as to make the rise and fall of the outgoing current through both windings of the relay exactly equal, then no effect is produced on the armature of the relay, as the two currents neutralize each other's magnetizing effect.

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  • The general principle on which the instruments for working long submarine cables are based is that of making the moving parts very light and perfectly free to follow the comparatively slow rise and fall of the electric impulses or waves.

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  • It lies partly on a peninsula between the river and the sea, partly on the wooded uplands which enclose the valley and rise gradually to the high moors beneath Heytor.

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  • In Reis's lecture an apparatus was described which has given rise to much discussion as to priority in the invention of the telephone.

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  • The vast number of microphonic contacts present give rise to very strong electrical undulations, and hence to a loud sound.

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  • The Aegean itself is naturally divided by the island-chains and the ridges from which they rise into a series of basins or troughs, the deepest of which is that in the north, extending from the coast of Thessaly to the Gulf of Saros, and demarcated southward by the Northern Sporades, Lemnos, Imbros and the peninsula of Gallipoli.

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  • In its fourth year its training as a beast of burden begins, when it is taught to kneel and to rise at a given signal, and is gradually accustomed to bear increasing loads.

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  • When too heavily laden the camel refuses to rise, but on the march it is exceedingly patient under its burden, only yielding beneath it to die.

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  • There is no other instance in Europe of a basin of similar extent equally clearly characterized—the perfectly level character of the plain being as striking as the boldness with which the lower slopes of the mountain ranges begin to rise on each side of it.

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  • The Apennines (q.v.), as has been already mentioned, here traverse the whole breadth of Italy, cutting off the peninsula properly so termed from the broader mass of Northern Italy by a continuous barrier of considerable breadth, though of far inferior elevation to that of the Alps The Ligurian Apennines may be considered as taking their rise in the neighborhood of Savona, where a pass of very moderate elevation connects them with the Maritime Alps, of which they are in fact only a continuation.

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  • From the neighbourhood of Savona to that of Genoa they do not rise to more than 3000 tO 4000 ft., and are traversed by passes of less than 2000 ft.

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  • by the undulating volcanic plain of the Roman Campagna, from which the mountains rise in a wall-like barrier, of which the highest point, the Monte Gennaro, attains 4165 ft.

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  • This mountainous tract, which has an average breadth of from 50 to 60 m., is bounded west by the plain of Campania, now called the Terra di Lavoro, and east by the much broader and more extensive tract of Apulia or Puglia, composed partly of level plains, but for the most part of undulating downs, contrasting strongly with the mountain ranges of the Apennines, which rise abruptly above them.

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  • The Crati, which flows from Cosenza northwards, and then turns abruptly eastward to enter the same gulf, is the only stream worthy of notice in the rugged peninsula of Calabria; while the arid limestone hills projecting eastwards to Capo di Leuca do not give rise to anything more than a mere streamlet, from the mouth of the Ofanto to the south-eastern extremity of Italy.

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  • The illegitimate births show a decrease, having been 6.95 per 100 births in 1872 and 5.72 in 1902 with a rise, however, in the intermediate period as high as 7.76 ir 1883.

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  • Emigration has, however, recently assumed such proportions as to lead to scarcity of labor and rise of wages in Italy itself.

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  • Since 1895, however, the heavy import corn duty has caused a slight rise in the income from corn lands.

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  • The rise of the industry has been favored by protective tariffs and by a system of excise which allows a considerable premium to manufacturers.

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  • In 1898 it was 105, on account of the rise In the price of wheat, and since then up till 19o2 it oscillated between 105 and 95.

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  • Women are, as a rule, paid less than men, and though their wages have also increased, the rise has been slighter than in the case of men.

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  • The number of industrial strikes has risen from year to year, although, on account of the large number of persons involved in some of them, the rise in the number of strikers has not sUlk always corresponded to the number of strikes, During, es.

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  • The increase is partly covered by contravvenzioni, but almost every class of penal offence shows a rise except homicide, and even in that the diminution is slow, 5418 in 1880, 3966 in 1887, 4408 in 1892, 4005 in 1897, 3202 in 1902; and Italy remains, owing to the frequent use of the knife, the European country lit which it is most frequent.

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  • From 1890 to 1900 the actual number rose by one-third (from 30,108 to 43,684), the proportion to the rest of those sentenced from one-fifth to one-fourth; while in 1905 the actual number rose to 67,944, being a considerable proportionate rise also.

    0
    0
  • - In 1885, however, rates tended to rise, and though they fell in I 88(they subsequently increased to such an extent as to reach 1IoA at the end of August 1894.

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    0
  • The rise of the Lombard communes produced a sympathetic revolution in Rome, which deserves to be mentioned in this place.

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  • New houses rise into importance; a new commercial aristocracy is formed.

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    0
  • There is not a burgh of northern Italy but can trace the rise of a dynastic house to the vicissitudes of this period.

    0
    0
  • It must further be noticed that the rise of mercenaries was synchronous with a change in the nature of Italian despotism.

    0
    0
  • Rienzis revolution in Rome (3471354), and hi~ establishment of a republic upon a fantastic basis, half classical half feudal, proved the temper of the times; while the rise of dynastic families in the cities of the church, claiming the title of papal vicars, but acting in their own interests, Tb weakened the authority of the Holy See.

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  • Very many of them, distrusting both of these kings, sought to act independently in favor of an Italian republic. Lord William Bentinck with an AngloSicilian force landed at Leghorn on the 8th of March 1814, and issued a proclamation to the Italians bidding them rise against Napoleon in the interests of their own freedom.

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    0
  • The Lombard republicans had been greatly weakened by the events of 1848, but Mazzini still believed that a bold act by a few revolutionists would make the people rise en masse and expel the Austrians.

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  • The decline of Mazzinis influence was accompanied by the rise of a new movement in favor of Italian unity under Victor Emmanuel, inspired by the Milanese marquis Giorgio New Pallavicini, who had spent 14 years in the Spielberg, Unio~lsi and by Manin, living in exile in Paris, both of them moveex-republicans who had become monarchists.

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  • During the same period the assumption of the Venetian and Roman debts, losses on the issue of loans and the accumulation of annual deficits, had caused public indebtedness to rise from 92,000,000 to 328,000,000, no less than f 100,000,000 of the latter sum having been sacrificed in premiums and commissions to bankers and underwriters of loans.

    0
    0
  • The Irredentist agitation had left profound traces at Berlin as well as at Vienna, and had given rise to a distrust of Depretis which nothing had yet occurred to allay.

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    0
  • His death gave rise to an Abyssinian war of succession between Mangash, natural son of John, and Menelek, grandson of the Negus Sella-Sellassi.

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    0
  • The effect was seen in May 1898, when, in consequence of a rise in the price of bread, disturbances occurred in southern Italy.

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    0
  • The action of the tsar of Russia in convening the Peace Conference at The Hague in May 1900 gave rise to a question as to the right of the Vatican to be officially represented, and Admiral Canevaro, supported by Great Britain and Germany, succeeded in prevent~ ing the invitation of a papal delegate.

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  • The fall of Signor Sonnino, the disappointment caused by the non-fulfilment of the expectations to which his advent to power had given rise throughout Italy and the dearth of influential statesmen, made the return to power of Signor Giolitti inevitable.

    0
    0
  • Small leeches taken into the mouth with drinking-water may give rise to serious symptoms by attaching themselves to the fauces and neighbouring parts and thence sucking blood.

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    0
  • He was introduced to public life and to court by his neighbour in Yorkshire, George, 2nd duke of Buckingham, was elected M.P. for York in 1665, and gained the "first step in his future rise" by joining Buckingham in his attack on Clarendon in 1667.

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    0
  • The historian observes and records, in different lands and ages, the rise or explicit utterance of belief in one God.

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  • The hills rise, especially on the east coast, to a considerable elevation: the chief heights being in the North Andaman, Saddle Peak (2400 ft.); in the Middle Andaman, Mount Diavolo behind Cuthbert Bay (1678 ft.); in the South Andaman, Koiob (1505 ft.), Mount Harriet (1193 ft.) and the Cholunga range (1063 ft.); and in Rutland Island, Ford's Peak (1422 ft.).

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  • These are of great age, and rise sometimes to a height exceeding 15 ft.

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  • A, A hydriform person giving rise to medusiform person by budding from th margin of the disk; B, free swimming medusa (Steenstrupia of Forbes) detached from the same, with manubrial genitali.

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  • The buds may all become detached after a time and give rise to separate and independent individuals, as in the common Hydra, in which only polyp-individuals are produced and sexual elements From Allman's Gymnoblastic Hydroids, by permission of are developed the Council of the Ray Society.

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  • Or a polyp on the main stem, after having budded a second time to form a pinnule, may give rise to a third bud, which starts a new biserial FIG.

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    0
  • In Tubularia by a process of decapitation the hydranths may separate off and give rise to a separate individual, while the remainder of the body grows a new hydranth.

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    0
  • It is convenient to distinguish buds that give rise to polyps from those that form medusae.

    0
    0
  • If the bud, however, is destined to give rise not to a free medusa, but to a gonophore, the development is similar but becomes arrested at various points, according to the degree to which the gonophore is degenerate.

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    0
  • the entocodon, however developed, gives rise at first to a closed cavity, representing a closing over of the umbrella, temporary in the bud destined to be a free medusa, but usually permanent in the sessile gonophore.

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    0
  • The buds of Margellium are produced on the manubrium in each of the four interradii, and they arise from the ectoderm, that is to say, the germinal epithelium, which later gives rise to the gonads.

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    0
  • The spore cell gives rise to a " sporelarva," which is set free in the coelenteron and grows into a medusa.

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    0
  • The planula may fix itself (I) by one end, and then becomes the hydrocaulus and hydranth, while the hydrorhiza grows out from the base; or (2) partly by one side and then gives rise to Modified from a plate by L.

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  • The two ends of the planula become greatly lengthened and give rise to the two primary tentacles of the actinula, of which the mouth arises from one side of the planula.

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    0
  • This is in some degree parallel to the cases described above, in which a planula gives rise to the hydrorhiza, and buds a polyp laterally.

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    0
  • The pneumato phore arises from the ectoderm as a pit or invagination, part of which forms a gas-secreting gland, while the rest gives rise to an air-sack lined by a chitinous cuticle.

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    0
  • Woltereck [59], on the other hand, have shown that the ectodermal pit which gives rise to the pneumatophore represents an entocodon.

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    0
  • Next the pit closes up to form a vesicle with a pore, and so gives rise to the pneumatophore.

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    0
  • The endoderm of the planula now acquires a cavity, and at the narrower pole a mouth is formed, giving rise to the primary siphon.

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    0
  • Thus from the original planula three appendages are, as it were, budded off, while the planula itself mostly gives rise to coenosarc, just as in some hydroids the planula is converted chiefly into hydrorhiza.

    0
    0
  • The planula develops, on the whole, in a similar manner, but the ectodermal invagination arises, not at the pole of the planula, but on the side of its broader portion, and gives rise, not to a pneumatophore, but to a nectocalyx, the primary swimming bell or protocodon (" Fallschirm ") which is later thrown off and replaced by secondary swimming bells, metacodons, budded from the coenosarc.

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  • The Siphonula produced buds on the manubrium, as many Anthomedusae are known to do, and these by reduction or dislocation of parts gave rise to the various appendages of the colony.

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    0
  • It was the Paris building that gave rise to the generic use of the term for a building where a nation's illustrious dead rest.

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    0
  • The position of a disestablished or an unestablished Church is comparatively modern, and has given rise to new jural con j - ceptions.

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    0
  • The political factor was the rise during the 7th century B.C. of the Kosala power.

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    0
  • 14-16), owed its employment to the fact that the root often divides into branches resembling the arms and legs of a man, and this resemblance gave rise to the belief that it conferred strength and virility.

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    0
  • The confessions of sin which he introduced descend to minute ritual details and rise to the most exalted aspects of social and spiritual life.

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    0
  • At Snitterfield to the north, where the low wooded hills begin to rise from the valley, lived Shakespeare's grandfather and uncle.

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    0
  • This type of stern is therefore often spoken of as protoslelic. In the Ferns there is clear evidence that the amphiphloic haplostele or protostele succeeded the simple (ectophloic) protostele in evolution, and that this in its turn gave rise to the solenostele, which was again succeeded by the dictyostele.

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  • In other species, however, a peculiar type of polystely is met with, in which the original diarch stele gives rise to se-called dorsal and ventral stelar cords which at first lie on the surface of the primary stele, but eventually at a higher level separate from it and form distinct secondary steles resembling the primary one.

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  • The protoxylem and protophloem are developed a few cells from the inner and outer margins respectively of the desmogen strand, the desmogenic tissue left over giving rise to the segments of endocycle and pericycle capping the bundle.

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  • The outermost is the caiyptrogen, which gives rise to the root-cap, and in Dicotyledons to the piliferous layer as well.

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    0
  • The periblem, one cell thick at the apex, produces the cortex, to which the piliferous layer belongs in Monocotyledons; and the plerome, which is nearly always sharply separated from the periblem, gives rise to the vascular cylinder.

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  • The branches of the stem arise by multiplication of the cells 01 the epidermis and cortex at a given spot, giving rise to a protuber ance, at the end of which an apical meristem is established.

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  • This is known as exogenous branch-formation In the root, on the other hand, the origin of branches is endogenous The cells of the pericycle, usually opposite a protoxylem strand divide tangentially and give rise to a new growing-point.

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  • stems. But in nearly all perennial Dicotyledons, in all dicotyledonous and gymnospermous trees and shrubs and in fossil Pteridophytes belonging to all the great groups, certain layers of cells remain meristematic among the permanent tissues, or after passing through a resting stage reacquire menstematic properties, and give rise to secondary tissues.

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  • A tissue mother-cell of the xylem may, in the most advanced types of Dicotyledons, give rise to(I) a tracheid; (2) a segment of a vessel; (3) a xylem-fibre; or (4) a vertical file of xylem-parenchyma cells.

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  • A tissue mother-cell of the phloem may give rise to (i) a segment of a sieve-tube with its companion cell or cells; (2) a phloem fibre; (3) a single phloem-parenchyma (cambiform) cell, or a ve~rtical file of short parenchyma cells.

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  • An ordinary cambium is scarcely ever found in the Monocotyledons, but in certain woody forms a secondary meristem is formed outside the primary bundles, and gives rise externally to a little secondary cortex, and internally to a secondary parenchyma in which are developed numerous zones of additional bundles, usually of concentric structure, with phloem surrounded by xylem.

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  • and the whole of the tissue it gives rise to is known as periderm.

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  • In other cases, a similar formation of spongy but dead periderm tissue may occur for the same purpose in special patches, called pneumatodes, on the roots of certain trees living in marshy places, which rise above the soil in order to obtain air.

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  • Very soon the single cell gives rise to a chain of cells, and this in.

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  • This pressure leads to the filling of the vessels of the wood of both root and stem in the early part of the year, before the leaves have expanded, and gives rise to the exudation of fluid known as bleeding when young stems are cut in early spring.

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  • The fate of these inorganiccompounds has not been certainly traced, but they give rise later on to the presence in the plant of various amino acid amides, such as leucin, glycin, asparagin, &c. That these are stages on the way to proteids has been inferred from the fact that when proteids are split up by various means, and especially by the digestive secretions, these nitrogen-containing acids are among the products which result.

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  • The protoplasm is in a condition of instability and is continually breaking down to a certain extent, giving rise to various substances of different degrees of complexity, some of which are again built up by it into its own substances, and others, more simple in composition, are given off.

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  • Such healing by cork formation is accompanied by a rise of temperature: the active growth of the dividing cells is accompanied by vigorous metabolism and respiration, and a state of wound fever supervenes until the healing is completed.

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  • Such frost-cracks, sun-cracks, &c., may then be slowly healed over by callus, but if the conditions for necrosis recur the crack may be again opened, or if Fungi, &c., interfere with occlusion, the healing is prevented; in such cases the local necrosis may give rise to cankers.

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  • The occurrence of xerophytic characters in plants of this type has given rise to.

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  • It is true that in the unicellular plants all the vital activities are performed by a single cell, but in the multicellular plants there is a more or less highly developed differentiation of physiological activity giving rise to different tissues or groups of cells, each with a special function.

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  • This body has been called a blepharoplast, and in the Pteridophytes, Cycads and Ginkgo it gives rise to the spiral band on which the cilia are formed.

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  • from the coast rise the chains of the mountains, through which some steep passes lead into the interior valleys (called Kock)) Ilepais, Strabo xv.

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  • The applications of anthropogeography to human uses give rise to political and commercial geography, in the elucidation of which all the earlier departments or stages have to be considered, together with historical and other purely human conditions.

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    0
  • The Romans did not encourage navigation and commerce with the same ardour as their predecessors; still the luxury of Rome, The which gave rise to demands for the varied products Romans.

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  • second great series of crust waves from north to south, giving rise by their interference to six great elevated masses (the continents), arranged in three groups, each consisting of a northern and a southern member separated by a minor depression.

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  • wide areas, giving rise to oceanic depressions and leaving the continents protuberant; the other, folding along comparatively narrow belts, giving rise to mountain ranges.

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  • The discovery of the insularity of Greenland might again give rise to the argument as to the distinction between island and continent.

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  • The latter rise abruptly from the oceanic abysses.

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  • An elevation of great extent which rises at a very gentle angle from a surrounding depression is termed a " rise," one which is relatively narrow and steep-sided a " ridge," and one which is approximately equal in length and breadth but steep-sided a " plateau," whether it springs direct from a depression or from a rise.

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  • On the fertile low grounds along the margins of rivers or in clearings of forests, agricultural communities naturally take their rise, dwelling in villages and cultivating the wild grains, which by careful nurture and selection have been turned into rich cereals.

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  • In South America strictly defined boundaries are still the exception, and the claims of neighbouring nations have very frequently given rise to war, though now more commonly to arbitration.'

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  • and Liege - Brussels and Maestricht-Antwerp on the W., has favoured its rise to one of the most prosperous commerical towns of Germany.

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  • The Ratitae branched off, probably during the Eocene period, from that still indifferent stock which gave rise to the Tinami+Galli+Gruiformes, when the members of this stock were still in possession of those archaic characters which distinguish Ratitae from Carinatae.

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  • Before the rise of the First Dynasty of Babylon, however, Elam had recovered its independence, and in 2280 B.C. the Elamite king Kutur-Nakhkhunte made a raid in Babylonia and carried away from Erech the image of the goddess Nana.

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  • In some cases a single corm produces several new plants during its second spring by giving rise to immature corms.

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    0
  • In the intervening space (the object-box) are contained a number of fragments of brilliantly coloured glass, and as the tube is turned round its axis these fragments alter their positions and give rise to the various patterns.

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  • By the "fathers," then, we understand the whole of extant Christian literature from the time of the apostles to the rise of scholasticism or the beginning of the middle ages.

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    0
  • The fact that many of the most important works were written in Arabic, the vernacular of the Spanish Jews under the Moors, which was not understood in France, gave rise to a number of translations into Hebrew, chiefly by the family of Ibn Tibbon (or Tabbon).

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  • In this part of its course the rocky sides of the valley, which sometimes closely approach the river, are composed of marls and gypsum, with occasional selenite, overlaid with sandstone, with a topping of breccia or conglomerate, and rise at places to a height of 200 ft.

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  • The river begins to rise in the end of March and attains its greatest height between the 21st and the 28th of May.

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    0
  • In the districts bordering on the coast the thermometer seldom falls below 37°; and only for a few moments and at long intervals has it been known to rise as high as 105°.

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  • It should be noted that the oxidation of sulphur itself by atmospheric influence may give rise to sulphuric acid, which in the presence of limestone will form gypsum: thus the sulphur-deposits of Sicily suffer alteration of this kind, and have their outcrop marked by a pale earthy gypseous rock called briscale.

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  • It is a yellowish-brown liquid which dissociates rapidly with rise of temperature.

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  • Nowhere else did nobility so distinctly rise out of wealth, and that wealth gained nobility.

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  • It is in these only that we can see nobility in its purest form - nobility to which no man can rise and from which no man can come down except by the will of the noble class itself.

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  • The Old-English laws point out ways by which the churl might rise to thegn's rank, and in the centuries during which the change went on we find mention - complaining mention - both in England and elsewhere, at the court of Charles the Simple and at the court of 'Ethelred, of the rise of new men to posts of authority.

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  • The story that Earl Godwine himself was of churlish birth, whether true or false, marks the possibility of such a rise.

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  • Stories like these prove even more than the real rise of Hagano and Eadric. In England the nobility of the thegns was to a great extent personally displaced, so to speak, by the results of the Norman Conquest.

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  • in the Nimba mountains, where also rise the Nuon, St John's and Dukwia rivers.

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  • P. phegopteris (beechfern) is a graceful species with a black, slender root-stock, from which the pinnate fronds rise on long stalks, generally about 12 in.

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  • He wrote for that work the Discours preliminaire on the rise, progress and affinities of the various sciences, which he read to the French Academy on the day of his admission as a member, the 18th of December 1754.

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  • From the plain rise isolated granitic hills, attaining heights of loon to 2000 ft.

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  • The miasmatic exhalations caused by the sun playing on stagnant waters after the floods give rise to the "Sennar fever," which drives even the natives from the plains to the southern uplands.

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  • The upper surface of the elytron is sharply folded inwards at intervals, so as to give rise to a regular series of external longitudinal furrows (striae) and to form a set of supports between the two chitinous layers forming the elytron.

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  • The noises made by some Ptinidae (Anobium) tapping on the walls of their burrows with their mandibles give rise to the "death tick" that has for long alarmed the superstitious.

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  • Recently emerged from the Post-Pliocene sea, or freed from their mantle of ice, they persistently maintain the self-same features over immense areas; and the few portions that rise above the general elevation have more the character of broad and gentle swellings than of mountain-chains.

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  • Russia; the Valdai tablelands, where all the great rivers of Russia take their rise; the broad and gently sloping meridional belt of the Ural Mountains; and lastly the Taimyr, Tunguzka and Verkhoyansk ranges in Siberia, which, notwithstanding their sub-Arctic position, do not reach the snow-line.

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  • Taking their rise on the plateau formation, or in its outskirts, they flow first along lofty longitudinal valleys formerly filled with great lakes, next they cleave their way through the rocky barriers, and finally they enter the lowlands, where they become navigable, and, describing wide curves to avoid here and there the minor plateaus and hilly tracts, they bring into watercommunication with one another places thousands of miles apart.

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  • The deposits of the Post-Glacial period are represented throughout Russia, Poland and Finland, as also throughout Siberia and Central Asia, by very thick lacustrine deposits, which show that, after the melting of the ice-sheet, the country was covered with immense lakes, connected by broad channels (the fjarden of the Swedes), which later on gave rise to the actual rivers.

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  • The round flattened summits of the Valdai plateau do not rise above 1100 ft., and they present the appearance of mountains only in consequence of the depths of the valleys - the rivers which flow towards the depression of Lake Peipus being only 200 to 250 ft.

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  • This swelling includes the Donets coal-measures and the middle granitic ridges which give rise to the rapids of the Dnieper.

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    0
  • Dvina, the Dnieper, and even the Lovat and the Oka, take their rise (in the N.W.

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  • which give rise to the Volga and the W.

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    0
  • There is no place in Russia, Archangel and Astrakhan included, where the thermometer does not rise in summer nearly to 86° Fahr.

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    0
  • The temperature drops so rapidly that a month later, about October the oth on the middle Urals and November the 15th throughout Russia, the thermometer ceases to rise above the freezing-point.

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  • throughout Russia; in the west only does it rise above 22°.

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    0
  • On the whole, February and March continue to be cold, and their average temperatures rise above zero nowhere except on the Black Sea coast.

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    0
  • This question has given rise to an enormous amount of discussion among learned men, and some of the disputants have not yet laid down their arms; but for impartial outsiders who have carefully studied the evidence there can be little doubt that 1 See Researches into the State of Fisheries in Russia (9 vols.), edited by Minister of Finance (1896, Russian); Kusnetzow's Fischerei and Thiererbeutung in den Gewassern Russlands (1898).

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  • Munro, Rise of the Russian Empire (Boston, 1900); F.

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  • He published in 1911 The Rise and Development of Presbyterianism in Scotland.

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    0
  • The slopes of the sides vary according to the nature of the ground, the amount of moisture present, &c. In solid rock they may be vertical; in gravel, sand or common earth they must, to prevent slipping, rise r ft.

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    0
  • - Gradients are measured either by stating the number of feet horizontally, G say, in which the vertical rise is I ft., or by the vertical rise in too ft.

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  • grade or a rise of 26.4 ft.

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  • per second, the vertical rise per second is V/G ft.

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  • In both the four-wheeled and the six-wheeled types the axles were free to rise and fall on springs through a limited range, but not to turn with respect to the body of the carriage, though the middle axle of the six-wheeled coach was allowed a certain amount of lateral play.

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  • The spring tides rise upwards of 30 ft., and in a channel usually so shallow form a serious danger to shipping.

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  • Whiteway, Rise of the Portuguese Power in India (London, 1898), appendix A.

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  • so that a known animal may give rise to another known animal of a different race, species, genus, or even family, or to a plant, or vice versa.

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    0
  • But after dinner (or breakfast), and when we rise from table, we use the prayer given above, viz.

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    0
  • - The rise of the order of prophets, who gradually emerged out of and became distinct from the old Hebrew " seer " or augur (r Sam.

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    0
  • Motley, Rise of the Dutch Republic; M.

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    0
  • These differences have given rise to a supposed multiplicity of species, expressed by the names C. lycaon (Central Europe), C. laniger and C. niger (Tibet), the C. occidentalis, C. nubilus, C. mexicanus, &c., of North America, and the great blackish-brown Alaskan C. pambasileus, the largest of them all.

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  • Such drainage as had at one time existed was allowed to get choked up, giving rise to typhoid fever of a virulent type.

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    0
  • William Gilpin calls the cypress an architectural tree: "No Italian scene," says he, "is perfect without its tall spiral form, appearing as if it were but a part of the picturesquely disposed edifices which rise from the middle ground against the distant landscape."

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  • The lower part of the trunk bears huge buttresses, each of which ends in a long branching far-spreading; root, from the branches of which spring the peculiar knees which, rise above the level of the water.

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    0
  • It must be added that the pages on the Slavonic peoples and their relations to the empire are conspicuously insufficient; but it must be taken into account that it was not till many years after Gibbon's death that Slavonic history began to receive due attention, in consequence of the rise of competent scholars among the Sla y s themselves.

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  • sand-hills rise to a height of 300 ft.

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    0
  • The islands rise to a height of about 70 ft.

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    0
  • He edited in 1860 The Atonement, a collection of essays by various hands, prefaced by his study of the "Rise of the Edwardean Theory of the Atonement."

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    0
  • 1915, on behalf of his party against the rise in prices, which he attributed mainly to contractors and dealers exploiting the needs of the people.

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    0
  • But his conduct giving rise to suspicions, an expedition under the earl of Essex was sent against him, which met with such doubtful success that in 1575 a treaty was arranged by which O'Neill received extensive grants of lands and permission to employ three hundred Scottish mercenaries.

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    0
  • Its origin and character have given rise to endless surmises.

    0
    0
  • Its small principalities were entirely dominated by the great Powers, whose weakness or acquiescence alone enabled them to rise above dependence or vassalage.

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    0
  • The heroic figure who stands at the head is Saul (" asked "), and two accounts of his rise are recorded.

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    0
  • Although the rise of the Hebrew state, at an age when the great powers were quiescent and when such a people as the Philistines is known to have appeared upon the scene, is entirely intelligible, it is not improbable that legends of Saul and David, the heroic founders of the two kingdoms, have been put in a historical setting with the help of later historical tradition.

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    0
  • Many attempts have been made to present a satisfactory sketch of the early history and to do justice to (a) the patriarchal narratives, (b) the exodus from Egypt and the Israelite invasion, and (c) the rise of the monarchy.

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    0
  • In the present narratives, however, the stories in which he possesses influence with king and court are placed before the rise of Jehu, and some of them point to a state of hostility with Damascus before he foresees the atrocities which Hazael will perpetrate.

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    0
  • A vaunting challenge to Joash (of Israel) gave rise to one of the two fables that are preserved in the Old Testament (Judg.

    0
    0
  • Tradition, in fact, is concentrated upon the rise of the Judaean dynasty under David, but there are significant periods before the rise of both Jehoash and Uzziah upon which the historical records maintain a perplexing silence.

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  • The part played by Egypt proper in the ensuing anti-Assyrian combinations is not clearly known; with a number of petty dynasts fomenting discontent and revolt, there was an absence -of cohesion in that ancient empire previous to the rise of the Ethiopian dynasty.

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  • The sequel shows how a Jew might rise to power in the civil service of the Egyptian Empire and yet remain a hero to some of the Jews - provided that he did not intermarry with a Gentile.

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  • And the passive resistance of those who refused to conform at length gave rise to active opposition.

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  • Such incidents as the rise of Joseph Nasi to high position under the Turkish government as duke of Naxos mark the coming change.

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  • Anti-Semitism.-It is saddening to be compelled to close this record with the statement that the progress of the European Jews received a serious check by the rise of modern anti-Semitism in the last quarter of the 19th century.

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  • The rise of the mineral saltworks of Cheshire led to its decline in the 18th century, and later the renewed importance of Southampton completed its decay.

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  • The town dates from 1780 and owes its rise to the granite quarries at Craignair and elsewhere in the vicinity, from which were derived the supplies used in the construction of the Thames Embankment, the docks at Odessa and Liverpool and other works.

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  • slope of the Blue Ridge is almost imperceptible, or confused with the numerous mountain slopes that rise above it.

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  • slope of the Blue Ridge rise the Broad, the Catawba and the Yadkin, which flow for some distance a little N.

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  • The other principal rivers - the Cape Fear, the Neuse and the Tar - rise in the N.E.

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  • Until nearly a century after the founding of the Carolinas there was not a town in North Carolina that had a population of 1000, and the urban population of the state was exceptionally small at the beginning of the rapid rise of the manufacturing industries about 1880.

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  • Since that time the most interesting feature in the political history has been the rise and fall of the People's party.

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  • These sides are stiffened, and when the mitre is worn, they rise in front and behind like two horns pointed at the tips (cornua mitrae).

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  • In general it rather resembles a closed crown, consisting of a circlet from which rise two arches intersecting each other at right angles.

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  • Before the rise of Neoplaton ism proper we meet with various mystical or semimystical expressions of the same religious craving.

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  • the influence of the pseudo-Dionysian writings were transmitted to the West in the 9th century by Erigena, in whose speculative spirit both the scholasticism and the mysticism of the middle ages have their rise.

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  • Reason has three stages, in the highest of which the mind is able, by abstraction from earthly things, to rise to contemplatio or the vision of the divine.

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  • Quietism, name and thing, became the talk of all the world through the bitter and protracted controversy to which it gave rise between F&.nelon and Bossuet.

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  • In many of those ants whose third abdominal segment forms a second " node," the basal dorsal region of the fourth segment is traversed by a large number of very fine transverse striations; over these the sharp hinder edge of the third segment can be scraped to and fro, and the result is a stridulating organ which gives rise to a note of very high pitch.

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  • But the ovaries of worker ants are in some cases sufficiently developed for the production of eggs, which may give rise parthenogenetically to male, queen or worker offspring.

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  • The highest point is the Monte Solaro (1920 ft.) on the west, while at the east end the cliffs rise to a height of 900 ft.

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  • These mountains, which include the highest peaks in the world, rise, along their entire length, far above the line of perpetual snow, and few of the passes across the main ridges are at a less altitude than 15,000 or 16,000 feet.

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  • The two great rivers of China, the Hwang-ho and the Yang-tsze-kiang take their rise from the eastern face of Tibet, the former from the north-east angle, the latter from the south-east.

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  • south wards is a table-land, having its greatest elevation on the British west, where the highest points rise to over 8000 ft., though India.

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  • West of Ararat high hills extend along the Black Sea, between which and the Taurus range lies the plateau of Asia Minor, reaching to the Aegean Sea; the mountains along the Black Sea, on which are the Olympus and Ida of the ancients, rise to 6000 or 7000 ft.; the Taurus is more lofty, reaching 8000 and 10,000 ft.; both ranges decline in altitude as they approach the Mediterranean.

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  • In northern Syria the mountains of Lebanon rise to about to,000 ft., and with a more copious water supply the country becomes more productive.

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  • The highest known peaks rise to 8000 ft., some of them being volcanic.

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  • mountains are said to rise to 20,000 ft., having the appear ance of being permanently covered with snow; the surface seems generally to be clothed with thick wood.

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  • The highest land does not rise to a greater height than 10,250 ft.; the climate is well suited for agriculture, and the islands generally are fertile and fairly cultivated, though not coming up to the standard of Java either in wealth or population.

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  • We know now for certain that the great Tsanpo of Tibet and the Brahmaputra are one and the same river; that north of the point where the great countermarch of that river from east to west is effected are to be found the sources of the Salween, the Mekong, the Yang-tsze-kiang and the Hwang-ho, or Yellow river, in order, from west to east; and that south of it, thrust in between the extreme eastern edge of the Brahmaputra basin 94 23" 94°48' 94°49' 94° 58' and the Salween, rise the dual sources of the Irrawaddy.

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  • The isothermals of mean annual temperature lie over northern Asia on curves tolerably regular in their outline, having their western branches in a somewhat higher latitude than their eastern; a reduction of I° of latitude corresponds approximately - and irrespective of modifications due to elevation - to a rise of 2 ° Fahr., as far say as 30° N., where the mean temperature is about 75° Fahr.

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  • The south-westerly winds which prevail north of the equator during the hot half of the year, to which navigators have given the name of the south-west monsoon (the latter word being a corruption of the Indian name for season), arise from the great diminution of atmospheric pressure over Asia, which begins to be strongly marked with the great rise of temperature in April and May, and the simultaneous relatively higher pressure over the equator and the regions south of it.

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  • Such a reduction of temperature is brought about along the greater part of the coasts of India and of the BurmoSiamese peninsula by the interruption of the wind current by continuous ranges of mountains, which force the mass of air to rise over them, whereby the air being rarefied, its specific capacity for heat is increased and its temperature falls, with a corresponding condensation of the vapour originally held in suspension.

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  • A distinct connexion between the flora of the peninsula and Ceylon and that of eastern tropical Africa is observable not only in the great similarity of many of the more truly tropical forms, and the identity of families and genera found in both regions, but in a more remarkable manner in the likeness of the mountain flora of this part of Africa to that of the peninsula, in which several species occur believed to be identical with Abyssinian forms. This connexion is further established by the absence from both areas of oaks, conifers and cycads, which, as regards the first two families, is a remarkable feature of the flora of the peninsula and Ceylon, as the mountains rise to elevations in which both of them are abundant to the north and east.

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  • The higher mountains rise abruptly from the plains; on their slopes, clothed below almost exclusively with the more tropical forms, a vegetation of a warm temperate character, chiefly evergreen, soon begins to prevail, comprising Magnoliaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, subtropical Rosaceae, rhododendron, oak, Ilex, Symplocos, Lauraceae, Pinus longifolia, with mountain forms of truly tropical orders, palms, Pandanus, Musa, Vitis, Vernonia, and many others.

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  • Among the more mountainous regions of the south-western part of Arabia, known as Arabia Felix, the summits of which rise to 6000 or 7000 ft., the rainfall is sufficient to develop a more luxuriant vegetation, and the valleys have a flora like that of similarly situated parts of southern Persia, and the less elevated parts of Afghanistan and Baluchistan, partaking of the characters of that of the hotter Mediterranean region.

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  • This race is believed to form the basis of the people of the Indian peninsula, and of some of the hill tribes of central India, to whom the name Dravidian has been given, and by its admixture with the Melanochroic group to have given rise to the ordinary population of the Indian provinces.

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  • The spoken languages of northern India are very various, differing one from another in the sort of degree that English differs from German, though all are thoroughly Sanskritic in their vocables, but with an absence of Sanskrit grammar that has given rise to considerable discussion.

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  • The second half of the 16th century was a period of ferment and anarchy, marked by the arrival of the Portuguese and the rise of some remarkable adventurers, one of whom, Hideyoshi, conquered Korea and apparently meditated the invasion of China.

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  • This sudden development of the Japanese is perhaps the most important event of the second half of the 19th century, since it marks the rise of an Asiatic power capable of competing with Europe on equal terms. Their history is so different from that of the rest of Asia that it is not surprising if the result is different.

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  • - The Arabs have hardly any history before the rise of Islam, although their name is mentioned by surrounding nations from the 9th century B.C. onwards.

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  • With the rise of Mahommedanism occurred a sudden effervescence of the Arabs, who during some centuries threatened to impose not only their political authority but their civilization and new religion on the whole known world.

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  • His dismissal along with other officers was the occasion of another paper controversy in which Conway was defended by Horace Walpole, and gave rise to much constitutional dispute as to the right of the king to remove military officers for their conduct in parliament - a right that was tacitly abandoned by the Crown when the Rockingham ministry of 1765 reinstated the officers who had been removed.

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  • The fall and rise of the road across the valley before the construction of the viaduct (1869) was abrupt and inconvenient.

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  • The sole difference is therefore that in Eudrilus the ovarian sac gives rise to a tube which bifurcates, one branch meeting a corresponding branch of the other ovary of the pair, while the second branch reaches the exterior.

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  • The Lancelot story, in its rise and development, belongs exclusively to the later stage of Arthurian romance; it was a story for the court, not for the folk, and it lacks alike the dramatic force and human appeal of the genuine "popular" tale.

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  • The Guadiana was long believed to rise in the lowland known as the Campo de Montiel, where a chain of small lakes, the Lagunas de Ruidera (partly in Ciudad Real, partly in Albacete), are linked together by the Guadiana Alto or Upper Guadiana.

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  • Barth, however, concluded that the present town does not date earlier than the second half of the 1 6th century, and that before the rise of the Fula power (c. 1800) scarcely any great Arab merchant ever visited Kano.

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  • The latter is fringed throughout its whole length by a chain of dunes, which rise in places to a height of nearly 200 ft.

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  • - a relationship which does much to explain his early rise in the navy.

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  • The range of the Western Ghats enabled the Mahrattas to rise against their Mahommedan conquerors, to reassert their Hindu nationality against the whole power of the Mogul Empire, and to establish in its place an empire of their own.

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  • Ranade, Rise of the Maratha Power (Bombay, 1900).

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  • From it rise double or triple ranges connected by cross-ridges and spined with outer spurs.

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  • The most conspicuous features of the entire region, Mount Ararat (16,930 ft.) and Mount Alagoz (13,440 ft.), are both solid masses of trachyte; and both rise above the limits of perpetual snow.

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  • But Turgot's worst enemy was the poor harvest of 1774, which led to a slight rise in the price of bread in the winter and early spring of 1774-1775.

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  • Towards the centre the almost treeless plain presents a monotonous aspect, broken only by a few rocky elevations that rise abruptly from the black soil.

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  • After the Trent the most important river is the Derwent, one of its tributaries, which, taking its rise in the lofty ridges of the High Peak, flows southward through a beautiful valley, receiving a number of minor streams in its course, including the Wye, which, rising near Buxton, traverses the fine Millersdale and Monsal Dale.

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  • The 18th century saw the rise of numerous manufactures.

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  • This stage in the life-history was formerly regarded as a distinct fungus with the name Roestelia cancellata; it is now known, however, that the spores germinate on young juniper leaves, in which they give rise to this other stage in the plant's history known as Gymnosporangium.

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  • The gelatinous, generally reddish-brown masses of spores - the teleutospores - formed on the juniper in the spring germinate and form minute spores - sporidia - which give rise to the aecidium stage on the pear.

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  • Under the manorial system, the rise of which preceded the Norman Conquest, communal methods of husbandry remained, but the position of the cultivator was radically altered.

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  • This change led to the gradual disappearance of tenants in villeinage - the villeins and cottiers - and the rise on the one hand of the small independent farmer, on the other of the hired labourer.

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  • The author, writing from the landowner's point of view, ascribes the rise in rents and the rise in the price of corn' to the " emulation " of tenants in competing for holdings, a practice implying that the agriculture of the period was prosperous.

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  • On the other hand, the small farmers who occupied separated holdings were deterred from improving by the fear of a rise in rent.

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  • These scales breed very rapidly; Howard states one may give rise to a progeny of 3,216,080,400 in one year.

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  • Normal expenditure might therefore be calculated to rise rather than fall.

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  • This reasoning of Fechner's has given rise to a great mass of controversy, but the fundamental mistake in it is simple.

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  • Laterally the foot gives rise to a pair of mobile fleshy lobes, the parapodia (ep), which can be thrown up so as to cover in the dorsal surface of the animal.

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  • Joseph Bonaparte was now advised to take the throne of Naples, and without any undue haggling as to terms, for "those who will not rise with me shall no longer be of my family.

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  • On the 27th of March he offered the crown of Spain to his brother Louis, king of Holland, in these terms: "The climate of Holland does not suit you; besides Holland can never rise from its ruins.

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  • This humane privilege was grossly abused, and thus gave rise to the slang phrase "to sham Abraham."

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  • Alongside of Mana rabba frequent mention is made of D'mutha, his "image," as a female power; the name "image of the father" arises out of the same conception as that which gives rise to the name of 'vvota among the Greek Gnostics.

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  • Petrunkevich (1901-1903), the second polar nucleus uniting with one daughter-nucleus of the first polar body gives rise to the germ-cells of the parthenogenetically-produced male.

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  • These two endoderm-rudiments embryonic membrane formed by delamination from the blastoderm, ultimately grow together and give rise to the epithelium of the midwhile in a few insects, including the wingless spring-tails, the emgut.

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  • The first segmentation of the ventral rise to the mid-gut.

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  • Fragmentary as the records are, they show that the Exopterygota preceded the Endopterygota in the evolution of the class, and that among the Endopterygota those orders in which the greatest difference exists between imago and larva - the Lepidoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera - were the latest to take their rise.

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  • It is most unlikely that wings have been acquired independently by various orders of Hexapoda, and if we regard the Thysanura as the slightly modified representatives of a primitively wingless stock, we must postulate the acquisition of wings by some early offshoot of that stock, an offshoot whence the whole group of the Pterygota took its rise.

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  • From the thysanuroid stock of the Apterygota, the Exopterygota took their rise.

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  • These views he shared more or less with Vigors and Swainson, and to them attention will be immediately especially invited, while consideration of the scheme gradually developed from 1831 onward by Charles Lucien Bonaparte, and still not without its influence, is deferred until we come to treat of the rise and progress of what we may term the reformed school of ornithology.

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  • It is now for us to trace the rise of the present more advanced school of ornithologists, whose labours yet give signs of far greater promise.

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  • Many of the peaks upon them rise higher than 12,000 ft., and the passes lie at altitudes of 11,000 ft.

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  • high rise at the north-west angle.

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  • The mean rise and fall of the tide is about 2 ft., but under certain conditions of wind the variation amounts to 5 ft.

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  • With the rise and fall of the tide the discharge pipes are flushed at the bottom.

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  • A rise in culture often results in an increase in the number of spiritual beings with whom man surrounds himself.

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  • All true wisdom is contained in the Scriptures, at least implicitly; and the true end of philosophy is to rise from the imperfect knowledge of created things to a knowledge of the Creator.

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  • The limits were altered subsequently, but the net debt has continued to rise.

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  • Sprague, City Government in Boston - its Rise and Development (Boston, 1890); E.

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  • The rise of Palmyra to a position of political importance may be dated from the time when the Romans established themselves on the Syrian coast.

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  • The bite, however, of any spider, strong enough to pierce the skin, may give rise to a certain amount of local inflammation and pain depending principally upon the amount of poison injected.

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  • The effect of partial destruction has given rise to some uncertainty.

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  • Its final fall was due to the rise of the Arabic city of Fostat on the right bank of the Nile almost opposite the northern end of the old capital; and its ruins, so far as they still lay above ground, gradually disappeared, being used as a quarry for the new city, and afterwards for Cairo.

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  • The roots also are affected, and instead of growing considerably in length, branch repeatedly and give rise to little tufts of rootlets.

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  • The seed was saved and gave rise to a row of plants all of which grew healthily in an infected field, whereas 95% of ordinary Sea Island cotton plants from seed from a non-infected field planted alongside as a control were killed.

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  • The issue of this circular by subscribing firms, on the basis of particulars collected by brokers appointed at a weekly meeting, gave rise in 1841 to the Cotton Brokers' Association, to which the development of the market by the systematizing of procedure is largely due.

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  • While quoted " spot " remained low, the prices paid by most spinners for the special kinds of cotton that they needed might rise.

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  • Then, whether prices rise or fall as a whole, he gains if the difference between the two prices becomes less than a d., but if it becomes more, he loses.

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  • would become more sensitive, but, other things being equal, the range of movement ought to diminish, and ultimately the average daily movement also, though at first the latter might not fall appreciably if, indeed, it did not rise, owing to the increased frequency of movement.

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  • Certainly it is due to this very much more than we commonly think, and the more it is due to this the more do moral therapeutics rise in possibility and importance " (Literature and Dogma, pp. 143-144).

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  • In this work Harnack traces the rise of dogma, by which he understands the authoritative doctrinal system of the 4th century and its development down to the Reformation.

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  • The mountains of this system reach their greatest height on the south-east of Kirin, where their snow-capped peaks rise to the elevation of 8000 ft.

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  • The Mutan-kiang takes its rise, like the Sungari, on the northern slopes of the Chang pai Shan range, and not far from the sources of that river.

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  • The earlier supporters of the organic theory held that it was a product of the natural distillation of coal or carbonaceous matter; but though in a few instances volcanic intrusions appear to have converted coal or allied substances into oil, it seems that terrestrial vegetation does not generally give rise to petroleum.

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  • It was, however, found that after the oil so purified had been burned in a lamp, for a short time, the wick became encrusted, and the oil failed to rise properly.

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  • But the real menace to the Latin kingdom lay in northern Syria; and here a power was eventually destined to rise, which outstripped the kings of Jerusalem in the race for Cairo, and then - with the northern and southern boundaries of Jerusalem in its control - was able to crush the kingdom as it were between the two arms of a vice.

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  • The king's oath to his men binds him to respect and maintain their rights, which are as prominent as are his duties; and if the men feel that the royal oath has not been kept, they may lawfully refuse military service (gager le roi), and may even rise in authorized and legal rebellion.

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  • 2 The only result of these appeals was the rise of a regular system of taxation in France and England, ad sustentationem Jerosolimitanae terrae, which starts about 1185 (though there had already been isolated taxes in 1147 and 1166), and which has been described as the beginning of modern taxation.

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  • On the 1 The Crusades in their course established a number of new states or kingdoms. The First Crusade established the kingdom of Jerusalem (I too); the Third, the kingdom of Cyprus (1195); the Fourth, the Latin empire of Constantinople (1204); while the long Crusade of the Teutonic knights on the coast of the Baltic led to the rise of a new state east of the Vistula.

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  • There is little in Arabic bearing on the First Crusade: the Arabic authorities only begin to be of value with the rise of the atabegs of Mosul (c. 1127).

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  • Ansariya, which presently springs up into a high chain of Jurassic limestone with basaltic intrusions, whose peaks rise to 10,000 ft.

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  • Between these systems run the main rivers; and these naturally rise near the medial ridge, in the lacustrine district of el-Buka`a, or Coelesyria, and flow in opposite directions.

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  • From the tableland north of the Maluti several isolated hills rise, the most noted being the almost inaccessible Thaba Bosigo - the rallying place of the Basuto in many of their wars.

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  • Shut off from the adjacent Indian Ocean by its mountain barrier, the drainage of the country is westward to the distant Atlantic. As its name implies, the chief rivers rise in Mont aux Sources.

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  • A series 750.) I, The longitudinal of sacs lined with an epithelium, the proexcretory canal; 2, one liferation of which gives rise to the ova of the tags containing the or spermatozoa, alternate between the flame-cells.

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  • At the seaward end of this promontory is the 13thcentury cathedral; behind which the belfries of four churches, at least as ancient, rise in a row along the crest of the ridge; while behind these, again, are the castle and a background of desolate hills.

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  • This event, which took place on the 1st of April 1572, was the first blow in the long war of Dutch independence, and was followed by a general outbreak of the patriotic party (Motley, Rise of the Dutch Republic, part iii.

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  • Reinach (Revue archeologique, 1903), Tantalus was represented in a picture standing in a lake and clinging to the branches of a tree, which gave rise to the idea that he was endeavouring to pluck its fruit.

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  • The rise.

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  • The Rise of Athens.

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  • ANTI-MASONIC PARTY, an American political organization which had its rise after the mysterious disappearance, in 1826, of William Morgan (c. 1776 - c. 1826), a Freemason of Batavia, New York, who had become dissatisfied with his Order and had planned to publish its secrets.

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  • Its rise and development and decay deserve a more thorough study than they have yet received.

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  • It is reported by Josephus that, when Alexander Jannaeus, in the year 95 B.e., was acting as high-priest in the temple on the Feast of Tabernacles, instead of pouring the water libation on the altar, according to the Pharisaic custom, he poured it at his feet, giving rise to a riot in which 6000 men are said to have lost their lives (Ant.

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  • The minarets of the mosque of Aurangzeb rise above all.

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  • In 1904 the total number of factories was 391, almost entirely cotton presses and ginning factories, which received an immense impetus from the rise in cotton prices.

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  • The inscriptional records cease abruptly in the 12th century, and no more is known of the country until the rise of the Gond dynasties from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

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  • Under their peaceful rule their territories flourished, until the weakening of the Mogul empire and the rise of the predatory Bundela and Mahratta powers, with the organized forces of which their semi-barbarous feudal levies were unable to cope, brought misfortune upon them.

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  • The phlogistic theory, which pervaded the chemical doctrine of this period, gave rise to continued study of the products of calcination and combustion; it thus happened that the knowledge of oxides and oxidation products was considerably developed.

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  • The introduction of hydroxyl groups into the benzene nucleus gives rise to compounds generically named phenols, which, although resembling the aliphatic alcohols in their origin, differ from these substances in their increased chemical activity and acid nature.

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  • Thiophene also gives rise to triazsulphole, three nitrogen atoms being introduced.

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  • a-pyrone condenses with the benzene ring to form coumarin and isocoumarin; benzo-'y-pyrone constitutes the nucleus of several vegetable colouring matters (chrysin, fisetin, quercetin, &c., which are derivatives of flavone or phenyl benzo-y-pyrone); dibenzo--ypyrone is known as xanthone; related to this substance are fluorane (and fluorescein), fluorone, fluorime, pyronine, &c. The pyridine ring condenses with the benzene ring to form quinoline and isoquinoline; acridine and phenanthridine are dibenzo-pyridines; naphthalene gives rise to a-and /3-naphthoquinolines and the anthrapyridines; anthracene gives anthraquinoline; while two pyridine nuclei connected by an intermediate benzene nucleus give the phenanthrolines.

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  • Weber, who showed that with rise of temperature the specific (and atomic) heat increases, finally attaining a fairly constant value; diamond, graphite and the various amorphous forms of carbon having the value about 5.6 at moo°, and silicon 5.68 at 232°; while he concluded that boron attained a constant value of 5.5.

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  • Nilson and Pettersson's observations on beryllium and germanium have shown that the atomic heats of these metals increase with rise of temperature, finally becoming constant with a value 5.6.

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  • 185.8° Equal increments in the molecule are associated with an equal rise in the boiling-point, but this increment varies in different homologous series.

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  • The substitution of a hydrogen atom by the hydroxyl group generally occasions a rise in boiling-point at about Ioo°.

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  • Mag., 18 93 [5), 35, p. 45 8) has shown that, while an increase in molecular weight is generally associated with a rise in the boiling-point, yet the symmetry of the resulting molecule may exert such a lowering effect that the final result is a diminution in the boiling-point.

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  • An acetylenic or triple linkage is associated with a rise in the boiling-point; for example, propargyl compounds boil about 19.5° higher than the corresponding propyl compound.

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  • A comparatively slight injury affecting a portion of the body imperfectly supplied with blood may give rise to an inflammatory condition which in a healthy part might pass unnoticed,.

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  • Such increase would give rise to excessive reaction, which, in tissues already weakened, might actually produce.

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  • While rebellion was raging in Oudh he issued a proclamation declaring the lands of the province forfeited; and this step gave rise to much angry controversy.

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  • The ordinary rise and fall of the river is comparatively slight, but when the west wind blows steadily for a long time, or when Lake Ladoga sends down its vast accumulations of block-ice, inundations of a dangerous kind occur, as in 1777, 1824, 1879 and 1903.

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  • It lies on the northern shore of the beautiful Carlingford Lough; behind it rise the Mourne Mountains, while across the lough are the Carlingford Hills, with Slieve Gullion.

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  • At the eastern end steep cliffs rise from the water, and luxuriant vegetation covers the hills.

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  • The temple of Marduk in Babylon which had fallen began to rise again at his command.

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  • The title Belit was naturally transferred to the great mother-goddess Ishtar after the decline of the cult at Nippur, and we also find the consort of Marduk, known as Sarpanit, designated as Belit, for the sufficient reason that Marduk, after the rise of the city of Babylon as the seat of his cult, becomes the Bel or "lord" of later days.

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  • Thus on a relief on a scale of 1: i,000,000 a mountain like Ben Nevis would only rise to a height of 1.3 mm.

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  • Above this rise the walls of the heavens like unto the tent of the Tabernacle.

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  • (2) The head moderately elongated and the parietals diverging from each other for a certain space as they rise upon the side of the head, enlarging the cerebral cavity and the frontal sinus.

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  • During the whole time between their rise and the passing of the Toleration Act 1689, the Quakers were the object of almost continuous persecution which they endured with extraordinary constancy and patience; they insisted on the duty of meeting openly in time of persecution, declining to hold secret assemblies for worship as other Nonconformists were doing.

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  • Nevertheless, before the rise of the Quakers, these views were nowhere found in conjunction as held by any one set of people; still less were they regarded as the outcome of any one central belief or principle.

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  • On the contrary, they see that a manifest blessing has rested on women's preaching, and they regard its almost universal prohibition as a relic of the seclusion of women which was customary in the countries where Christianity took its rise.

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  • Their testimony in this respect is the better understood when we bear in mind the large amount of perjury in the law courts, and profane swearing in general which prevailed at the time when the Society took its rise.

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  • Quakerism was preached in Scotland; very soon after its rise in England; but in the north and south of Scotland there existed, independently of and before this, preaching, groups of persons who were dissatisfied with the national form of worship and who met together in silence fordevotion.

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  • The permanent standing committee of the Society is known as the " Meeting for Sufferings " (established in 1675), which took its rise in the days when the persecution of many Friends demanded the Christian care and material help of those who were able to give it.

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  • Edmund Harvey (The Rise of the Quakers) and by Mrs Emmott (The Story of Quakerism).

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  • Other works which may usefully be consulted are the Journals of John Woolman, Stephen Grellet and Elizabeth Fry; also The First Publishers of Truth, a reprint of contemporary accounts of the rise of Quakerism in various districts.

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  • The question of the union with the Greek church, especially, gave rise to a misunderstanding between them which soon led to a rupture.

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  • The greater part of the country is covered either with tall coarse grasses (these open plains being called ban), or more commonly with thick thorn-bush or jungle, among which rise occasional isolated trees.

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  • wide leads into the circular bay of GubbetKharab (Hell's Mouth), behind which rise a chaotic mass of volcanic rocks, destitute of vegetation and presenting a scene of weird desolation.

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  • From the table-land rise hills, such as Jebel Kurma, which have an altitude of 4000 ft.

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  • wide, annually inundated by the rise of the river.

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  • The writer already sees the Messianic kingdom established, under the sway of which the Gentiles will in due course be saved, Beliar overthrown, sin disappear from the earth, and the righteous dead rise to share fr1 the blessedness of the living.

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  • It became a permanent French settlement in 1688, but did not rise to any importance till the time of Dupleix, during whose administration more than two thousand brick houses were erected in the town and a considerable maritime trade was carried on.

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  • Massive towers rise at close intervals along them, and nearly forty are in good preservation.

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  • Alberta thus gives rise to the two great rivers Saskatchewan and Mackenzie.

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  • The rise of Christianity in the Roman world still further improved the condition of the slave.

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  • in 5 vols., 1819); Thomas Clarkson, History of the Rise, Progress, and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (2 vols., 1808); T.

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  • He calls this the second rise of Methodism, the first being at Oxford in November 1729.

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  • It has given rise to a false idea that he lived to a great age; some medieval authorities making him ninety when he died.

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  • Later sects sought to rise from it to a higher unity in other ways.

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