This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

rienzi

rienzi

rienzi Sentence Examples

  • Emerging from his solitude Rienzi journeyed to Prague, which he reached in July 1350, and threw himself upon the protection of the emperor Charles IV.

    0
    0
  • At Avignon, where he appeared in August 1352, Rienzi was tried by three cardinals, and was sentenced to death, but this judgment was not carried out, and he remained in prison in spite of appeals from Petrarch for his release.

    0
    0
  • Giving him the title of senator, he sent him to Italy with the legate, Cardinal Albornoz, and having collected a few mercenary troops on the way, Rienzi entered Rome in August 13 54.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi attempted to address them, but the building in which he stood was fired, and while trying to escape in disguise he was murdered by the mob.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi's life and fate have formed the subject of a famous novel by Bulwer Lytton, of an opera by Wagner and of a tragedy by Julius Mosen.

    0
    0
  • At the time of Rienzi's unfortunate enterprise it sent ten ambassadors to pay him honour; and, when papal legates sought to coerce it by foreign soldiers, or to exact contributions, they met with vigorous resistance.

    0
    0
  • Accepting this, he remained actively employed until 1839, when he made his first visit to Paris, taking with him an unfinished opera based on Bulwer Lytton's Rienzi, and, like his earlier attempts, on his own libretto.

    0
    0
  • Wagner failed to gain a footing, and Rienzi, destined for the Grand Opera, was rejected.

    0
    0
  • But though in Rienzi Wagner had shown energy and ambition, that work was far from representing his preconceived ideal.

    0
    0
  • The piece was warmly received at Dresden on the 2nd of January 1843; but its success was by no means equal to that of Rienzi.

    0
    0
  • In Rienzi Wagner would already have been Meyerbeer's rival, but that his sincerity, and his initial lack of that musical savoir faire which is prior to the individual handling of ideas, put him at a disadvantage.

    0
    0
  • Though Meyerbeer wrote much that is intrinsically more dull and vulgar than the overture to Rienzi, he never combined such serious efforts with a technique so like that of a military bandmaster.

    0
    0
  • The step from Rienzi to Der fliegende Hollander is without parallel in the history of music, and would be inexplicable if Rienzi contained nothing good and if Der fliegende Hollander did not contain many reminiscences of the decline of Italian opera; but it is noticeable that in this case the lapses into vulgar music have a distinct dramatic value.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi, der letzte der Tribunen: grosse tragische Oper; 5 acts (1838-1840).

    0
    0
  • His mother, Anna Prosperi, is said to have been a descendant of Rienzi, and was a member of the third order of St Francis.

    0
    0
  • In 1350 Cola di Rienzi, "the last of the tribunes," was confined by the emperor Charles IV.

    0
    0
  • But his purely political action was very restricted, and not to be compared with that of a Rienzi or a Savonarola.

    0
    0
  • In the month of May 1347 Cola di Rienzi accomplished that extraordinary revolution which for a short space revived the republic in Rome, and raised this enthusiast to titular equality with kings.

    0
    0
  • Petrarch, who in politics was no less visionary than Rienzi, hailed the advent of a founder and deliverer in the self-styled tribune.

    0
    0
  • He was clamorous for the freedom of the Roman people; yet at one time he called upon the popes to re-establish themselves in the Eternal City; at another he besought the emperor to make it his headquarters; at a third he hailed in Rienzi the founder of a new republic. He did not perceive that all these plans were incompatible.

    0
    0
  • His odes to Giacomo Colonna, to Cola di Rienzi and to the princes of Italy display him in another light.

    0
    0
  • At first in Sicily and afterwards throughout Italy the Ghibellines gave them a warm welcome; the rigorists and the malcontents who had either left the church or were on the point of leaving it, were attracted by these communities of needy rebels; and the tribune Rienzi was at one time disposed to join them.

    0
    0
  • COLA DI RIENZI (c. 13131 354), tribune of the Roman people, was born in Rome, being the son of a tavern-keeper named Lorenzo Gabrini.

    0
    0
  • His father's Christian name was shortened to Rienzo, and his own, Nicholas, to Cola; hence the Cola di Rienzi, or Rienzo, by which he is generally known.

    0
    0
  • Without striking a blow the nobles left the city or went into hiding, and a few days later Rienzi took the title of tribune (Nicholaus, severus et clemens, libertatis, pacis justiciaeque tribunus, et sacre Romane Reipublice liberator).

    0
    0
  • On the appointed day a number of representatives appeared, and after some elaborate and fantastic ceremonials Rienzi, as dictator, issued an edict citing the emperor Louis the Bavarian and his rival Charles, afterwards the emperor Charles IV., and also the imperial electors and all others concerned in the dispute, to appear before him in order that he might pronounce judgment in the case.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi's power, however, was recognized in Naples, whence both Queen Joanna and her bitter foe, King Louis of Hungary, appealed to him for protection and aid, and on the 15th of August he was crowned tribune with great pomp, wreaths of flowers being placed on his head.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi obtained aid from Louis of Hungary and others, and on the 20th of November his forces defeated the nobles in a battle just outside the gates of Rome, a battle in which the tribune himself took no part, but in which his most distinguished foe, Stephen Colonna, was killed.

    0
    0
  • Emerging from his solitude Rienzi journeyed to Prague, which he reached in July 1350, and threw himself upon the protection of the emperor Charles IV.

    0
    0
  • At Avignon, where he appeared in August 1352, Rienzi was tried by three cardinals, and was sentenced to death, but this judgment was not carried out, and he remained in prison in spite of appeals from Petrarch for his release.

    0
    0
  • Giving him the title of senator, he sent him to Italy with the legate, Cardinal Albornoz, and having collected a few mercenary troops on the way, Rienzi entered Rome in August 13 54.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi attempted to address them, but the building in which he stood was fired, and while trying to escape in disguise he was murdered by the mob.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi was the hero of one of the finest of Petrarch's odes, Spirit() gentil, and also of some beautiful verses by Lord Byron.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi's life and fate have formed the subject of a famous novel by Bulwer Lytton, of an opera by Wagner and of a tragedy by Julius Mosen.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi (Amiens, 1885); E.

    0
    0
  • Rodocanachi, Cola di Rienzi (Paris, 1888); Kuhn, Die Entwickelung der Bundnisplane Cola di Rienzos im Jahre 1347 (Berlin, 1905); A.

    0
    0
  • At the time of Rienzi's unfortunate enterprise it sent ten ambassadors to pay him honour; and, when papal legates sought to coerce it by foreign soldiers, or to exact contributions, they met with vigorous resistance.

    0
    0
  • Accepting this, he remained actively employed until 1839, when he made his first visit to Paris, taking with him an unfinished opera based on Bulwer Lytton's Rienzi, and, like his earlier attempts, on his own libretto.

    0
    0
  • Wagner failed to gain a footing, and Rienzi, destined for the Grand Opera, was rejected.

    0
    0
  • But though in Rienzi Wagner had shown energy and ambition, that work was far from representing his preconceived ideal.

    0
    0
  • The piece was warmly received at Dresden on the 2nd of January 1843; but its success was by no means equal to that of Rienzi.

    0
    0
  • In Rienzi Wagner would already have been Meyerbeer's rival, but that his sincerity, and his initial lack of that musical savoir faire which is prior to the individual handling of ideas, put him at a disadvantage.

    0
    0
  • Though Meyerbeer wrote much that is intrinsically more dull and vulgar than the overture to Rienzi, he never combined such serious efforts with a technique so like that of a military bandmaster.

    0
    0
  • The step from Rienzi to Der fliegende Hollander is without parallel in the history of music, and would be inexplicable if Rienzi contained nothing good and if Der fliegende Hollander did not contain many reminiscences of the decline of Italian opera; but it is noticeable that in this case the lapses into vulgar music have a distinct dramatic value.

    0
    0
  • Rienzi, der letzte der Tribunen: grosse tragische Oper; 5 acts (1838-1840).

    0
    0
  • His mother, Anna Prosperi, is said to have been a descendant of Rienzi, and was a member of the third order of St Francis.

    0
    0
  • Cola di Rienzi >>

    0
    0
  • Besides showing talent as a poet, he has also written some good plays, as "The Jew" (Zid), Cola di Rienzi, and Kiejstut.

    0
    0
  • In 1350 Cola di Rienzi, "the last of the tribunes," was confined by the emperor Charles IV.

    0
    0
  • Beethoven's Nine Symphonies; Berlioz's " Symphonie fantastique," " Harold en Italie "; Benediction et Serment (Benvenuto Cellini); Danse des Sylphes (Damnation de Faust); Weber's overtures, Der Freischiitz, Euryanthe, Oberon, Jubilee; Beethoven's and Hummel's Septets; Schubert's Divertissement a la Hongroise; Beethoven's Concertos in C minor, G and E flat (orchestra for a second piano); Wagner's Tannhauser overture, march, romance, chorus of pilgrims; Lohengrin, Festzug and Brautlied, Elsa's Brautgang, Elsa's Traum, Lohengrin's Verweiss an Elsa; Fliegender Hollander, Spinnlied; Rienzi, Gebet; Rheingold, Walhall; Meistersinger, " Am stillen Herd "; Tristan, Isolde's Liebestod; Chopin's six Chants Polonais; Meyerbeer's Schillermarsch; Bach's six organ Preludes and Fugues; Prelude and Fugue in G minor; Beethoven, Adelaide; 6 miscellaneous and 6 Geistliche Lieder; Liederkreis; Rossini's Les Soirees musicales; Schubert, 59 songs; Schumann, 13 songs; Mendelssohn, 8 songs; Robert Franz, 13 songs.

    0
    0
  • But his purely political action was very restricted, and not to be compared with that of a Rienzi or a Savonarola.

    0
    0
  • In the month of May 1347 Cola di Rienzi accomplished that extraordinary revolution which for a short space revived the republic in Rome, and raised this enthusiast to titular equality with kings.

    0
    0
  • Petrarch, who in politics was no less visionary than Rienzi, hailed the advent of a founder and deliverer in the self-styled tribune.

    0
    0
  • He was clamorous for the freedom of the Roman people; yet at one time he called upon the popes to re-establish themselves in the Eternal City; at another he besought the emperor to make it his headquarters; at a third he hailed in Rienzi the founder of a new republic. He did not perceive that all these plans were incompatible.

    0
    0
  • His odes to Giacomo Colonna, to Cola di Rienzi and to the princes of Italy display him in another light.

    0
    0
  • Next in importance rank the epistles and eclogues in Latin verse, the Italian poems and the rhetorical addresses to popes, emperors, Cola di Rienzi and some great men of antiquity.

    0
    0
  • At first in Sicily and afterwards throughout Italy the Ghibellines gave them a warm welcome; the rigorists and the malcontents who had either left the church or were on the point of leaving it, were attracted by these communities of needy rebels; and the tribune Rienzi was at one time disposed to join them.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →