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ridicule

ridicule

ridicule Sentence Examples

  • His judgments had to wait the event before they were absolved from ridicule or delivered from neglect.

    67
    28
  • The ridicule that greeted the revelation of the Pop-gun Plot marked the beginning of a reaction that found a more serious expression in the trials of Thomas Hardy, John Home Tooke and John Theiwall (October and November 1794).

    47
    46
  • The new practice was received at first with contempt and even ridicule, and afterwards by Stoll and Peter Frank with only grudging approval.

    29
    34
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.

    25
    27
  • She could ridicule him for the aspirations which he had not and for those which he had; on the other hand, he never heard from her a tender word "though she lived to be eighty."

    17
    18
  • It was his good fortune that he did go back, for he was subjected to a wholesome course of ridicule by the other boys, and was flogged by Dr Barnard, the headmaster.

    17
    24
  • The comparison of the will unable to act between two equally balanced motives to an ass dying of hunger between two equal and equidistant bundles of hay is not found in his works, and may have been invented by his opponents to ridicule his determinism.

    14
    13
  • From the 20th of November 1797, till the 9th of July 1798, he was one of the most active, and was certainly the most witty of the contributors to the Anti-Jacobin, a weekly paper started to ridicule the frothy philanthropic and eleutheromaniac rant of the French republicans, and to denounce their brutal rapacity and cruelty.

    14
    16
  • His parts were good and he could speak and write six languages at a very early age, but the zeal of his guardians and tutors to make a man of him betimes nearly ruined his feeble constitution, while the riotous life led by him and his young consort, Maria of Austria, whom he wedded on the 13th of January 1522, speedily disqualified him for affairs, so that at last he became an object of ridicule at his own court.

    12
    13
  • The opposition and ridicule with which Booth's work was for many years received gave way, towards the end of the 19th century, to very widespread sympathy as his genius and its results were more fully realized.

    12
    17
  • The exposure of these facts turned the whole thing into ridicule, and gave parliament an excuse for postponing measures of organic reform which might otherwise have been brought forward.

    11
    11
  • He saw that his championship of the doctor's wife in her queer trap might expose him to what he dreaded more than anything in the world--to ridicule; but his instinct urged him on.

    10
    18
  • He also formed a splendid aviary which, under the name of the "hencoop," was a favourite subject of ridicule with his enemies.

    10
    31
  • He was not deterred by the fear of ridicule or the reproach of Utopianism from associating himself openly, and with all the ardour of his nature, with the peace party in England.

    9
    10
  • He was not deterred by the fear of ridicule or the reproach of Utopianism from associating himself openly, and with all the ardour of his nature, with the peace party in England.

    9
    10
  • The publication of Doctor Akakia, which brought down upon the president of the Academy a storm of ridicule, finally alienated Frederick; while Voltaire's wrongs culminated in the famous arrest at Frankfort, the most disagreeable elements of which were due to the misunderstanding of an order by a subordinate official.

    9
    11
  • It would be particularly pleasant to him to dishonor my name and ridicule me, just because I have exerted myself on his behalf, befriended him, and helped him.

    9
    17
  • Du Bellay did not actually introduce the sonnet into French poetry, but he acclimatized it; and when the fashion of sonneteering became a mania he was one of the first to ridicule its excesses.

    9
    24
  • Prince Andrew gaily bore with his father's ridicule of the new men, and drew him on and listened to him with evident pleasure.

    8
    16
  • All blasphemies against God, as denying His being, or providence, all contumelious reproaches of Jesus Christ, all profane scoffing at the Holy Scriptures, or exposing any part thereof to contempt or ridicule, are punishable by the temporal courts with fine, imprisonment and also infamous corporal punishment.

    7
    10
  • By the outside world the affair was greeted with mingled ridicule and indignation, and the new Messiah had to be protected by the police from the violence of an angry mob.

    7
    11
  • The name of Pietists was given to the adherents of the movement by its enemies as a term of ridicule, like that of "Methodists" somewhat later in England.

    7
    11
  • Galileo seems, at an early period of his life, to have adopted the Copernican theory of the solar system, and was deterred from avowing his opinions - as is proved by his letter to Kepler of August 4, 1 597 - b y the fear of ridicule rather than of persecution.

    7
    11
  • The name of Pietists was given to the adherents of the movement by its enemies as a term of ridicule, like that of "Methodists" somewhat later in England.

    7
    11
  • For many years it was the fashion to speak of Lamarck with ridicule, while Treviranus was altogether ignored.

    7
    13
  • Valla by one vigorous effort destroyed the False Decretals and exposed the Donation of Constantine to ridicule, paving the way for the polemic carried on against the dubious pretensions of the papal throne by scholars of the Reformation.

    7
    28
  • Yet the feelings of dismay and even ridicule with which this proclamation was received by the Mussulmans in many parts of the country show how great a change it instituted, and how strong was the opposition which it encountered among the ruling race.

    6
    9
  • The main events in that long struggle were the victory of Argues over Charles, duke of Mayenne, on the 28th of September 1589; 9f Ivr_y, on the 14th of March 1590; the siege of Paris (1590); of Rouen (1592); the meeting of the Estates of the League (1593), which the Satire Menippee turned to ridicule; and finally the conversion of Henry IV.

    6
    11
  • The main events in that long struggle were the victory of Argues over Charles, duke of Mayenne, on the 28th of September 1589; 9f Ivr_y, on the 14th of March 1590; the siege of Paris (1590); of Rouen (1592); the meeting of the Estates of the League (1593), which the Satire Menippee turned to ridicule; and finally the conversion of Henry IV.

    6
    11
  • The offer was too good to be refused, but the poet hated himself on the banks of the fiere Tamise, and wrote in bitter ridicule of "Les Anglais.

    6
    12
  • The same dignity appeared in the grave beauty of his features, though the abnormal height of his cranium afforded an opportunity for ridicule of which the comedians made full use.

    6
    13
  • Anticipation that the failure of the Petersburg Berezina plan would be attributed to Kutuzov led to dissatisfaction, contempt, and ridicule, more and more strongly expressed.

    6
    14
  • In spite of his absent-mindedness and good nature, Pierre's personality immediately checked any attempt to ridicule him to his face.

    6
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  • of the Christian - which attracted attention, gave them distinction, and even aroused ridicule and opposition.

    5
    11
  • Hence his scorn of the doctrine of the resurrection of the body held then in a very crude form, and his ridicule of any attempt to raise the vulgar masses from their degradation.

    5
    11
  • Then trouble came upon him; complaints were made to the fathers of the alleged licentiousness of his verses, the real cause of complaint being the ridicule which Vert Vert seemed to throw upon the whole race of nuns and the anti-clerical tendency of the other poems. An example, it was urged, must be made; Gresset was expelled the order.

    5
    11
  • In the succeeding year he showed, in the same journal, that if the elements be arranged in the order of their atomic weights, those having consecutive numbers frequently either belong to the same group or occupy similar positions in different groups, and he pointed out that each eighth element starting from a given one is in this arrangement a kind of repetition of the first, like the eighth note of an octave in music. The Law of Octaves thus enunciated was at first ignored or treated with ridicule as a fantastic notion unworthy of serious consideration, but the idea, subsequently elaborated by D.

    5
    12
  • Its affectations were burlesqued in Gilbert and Sullivan's travesty Patience (1881), which practically killed by ridicule the absurdities to which it had grown.

    5
    13
  • The report of them can hardly be doubted; and as the last relation was made (to the writer of this article) not with intent to ridicule Mr Disraeli's taste but to illustrate his conquering abilities, the story is repeated here.

    4
    7
  • But the new creative effort in language was accompanied by considerable crudeness of execution, and the novel word-formations and varieties of inflexion introduced by Pacuvius exposed him to the ridicule of the satirist Lucilius, and, long afterwards, to that of his imitator Persius.

    4
    12
  • In Homer Ares is the lover of Aphrodite, the wife of Hephaestus, who catches them together in a net and holds them up to the ridicule of the gods.

    4
    12
  • In Homer Ares is the lover of Aphrodite, the wife of Hephaestus, who catches them together in a net and holds them up to the ridicule of the gods.

    4
    13
  • His rough person and manners are the constant theme of ridicule in the royalist ballads, and he is caricatured in Butler's Hudibras and in the Parable of the Lion and Fox.

    4
    13
  • His extravagant pretensions only served to excite ridicule.

    3
    0
  • Others had been carried off into slavery, and a deputation of clergy which Patrick had sent to ask for their release had been subjected to ridicule.

    3
    0
  • Disraeliwhose oriental imagination was excited by the triumph incurred some ridicule by his bombastic declaration that the standard of St George was hoisted upon th~ mountains of Rasselas.

    3
    8
  • Disraeliwhose oriental imagination was excited by the triumph incurred some ridicule by his bombastic declaration that the standard of St George was hoisted upon th~ mountains of Rasselas.

    3
    8
  • Desborough himself became an object of ridicule, his regiment even revolted against him, and on the return of the Rump he was ordered to quit London.

    3
    9
  • The Dynamics of a Particle was written on the occasion of the contest between Gladstone and Mr Gathorne Hardy (afterwards earl of Cranbrook); and The New Belfry in ridicule of the erection put up at Christ Church for the bells that were removed from the Cathedral tower.

    3
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  • He was exposed to some natural ridicule on the ground that the "Kladderadatsch," which he often spoke of as imminent, failed to make its appearance.

    3
    11
  • But a little consideration showed that, though Lamarck had seized what, as far as it goes, is a true cause of modification, it is a cause the actual effects of which are wholly inadequate to account for any considerable modification in animals, and which can have no influence at all in the vegetable world; and probably nothing contributed so much to discredit evolution, in the early part of the 29th century, as the floods of easy ridicule which were poured upon this part of Lamarck's speculation.

    3
    12
  • first to endure bitter opposition and ridicule from the academic writers then in power, but they supported this with cheerfulness, and answered back in their magazines Polyfem and Fosforos (1810-1813).

    3
    12
  • But the new creative effort in language was accompanied by considerable crudeness of execution, and the novel word-formations and varieties of inflexion introduced by Pacuvius exposed him to the ridicule of the satirist Lucilius, and, long afterwards, to that of his imitator Persius.

    3
    13
  • Julius is simply held up to ridicule, while the life of Joseph is almost wholly based on the book of Scioppius and the Scaligerana.

    3
    13
  • He subsequently fell under the spell of the rising impressionist movement and threw in his lot with Monet and his friends, who were at that time the butt of public ridicule.

    2
    0
  • In one he aimed at being brilliant; and becoming merely laboured and pedantic, he was covered with ridicule by Sheridan, from whom he received a lesson which he did not fail to turn to account.

    2
    6
  • As the leading "aesthete," Oscar Wilde became one of the most prominent personalities of the day; apart from the ridicule he encountered, his affected paradoxes and his witty sayings were quoted on all sides, and in 1882 he went on a lecturing tour in the United States.

    2
    7
  • He had been the target of constant attack during his life, and his personal foibles, careless dress and mental eccentricities were the theme of endless ridicule.

    1
    0
  • Thus it remained a school for the " wise and prudent "; and when Julian tried to enlist the sympathies of the common rude man for the doctrines and worship of this school, he was met with scorn and ridicule.

    1
    0
  • The young poet wooed the girl with poems, romances, dramas and mute worship, but received nothing except chilling indifference and lively ridicule.

    1
    0
  • Moreover, he had brought from Europe a new manner, full of the affections of ardent youth, and this he wore without ease in a society highly satisfied with itself; the young knight-errant was therefore subjected to considerable ridicule.

    1
    0
  • In spite of the peace of 1389 the cities had again begun to form leagues for peace; but, having secured a certain amount of recognition in the south and west of Germany, the new king turned aside from the pressing problems of government and in 1401 made a futile attempt to reach Rome, an enterprise which covered him with ridicule.

    1
    0
  • While the larger proposals of the bill were thus open to grave objection, its subsidiary features provoked ridicule.

    1
    0
  • At any other time this attempt would have covered its author with ridicule.

    1
    0
  • 1401), in which the Franciscan order is held up to ridicule.

    1
    0
  • We could be accused of giving false information, subject to ridicule, god knows what else!

    1
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  • She'd born untold ridicule from everyone she'd ever met and believed her father to be the only one who understood and protected her.

    1
    0
  • He'd never hurt her, ridicule her, or think she was the freak of nature her father called her.

    1
    0
  • Perhaps it's my past but I am more able to do so without the infliction of scorn and ridicule poured upon the other girls of my profession by the town's less sinful inhabitants.

    1
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  • More ridicule of the Savior There is little doubt that Jerry Springer the Opera is motivated by hatred of Christianity.

    1
    0
  • For all groups to be subject to open criticism, including mockery and ridicule, has been a great leveler.

    1
    0
  • He said as much to everyone in the cafe as they enjoyed an evening pastis, and endured their ridicule at this preposterous idea.

    1
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  • In Dr. Hynek's words " Instead of having UFO a synonym for crackpot and ridicule, let's make it scientifically respectable.

    1
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  • ridicule the idea that a battle took place here in 1066?

    1
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  • God says: 0 believers, no people shall ridicule another people.

    1
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  • ridicule heaped on the UFO subject.

    0
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  • To get no further than the foundation is to invite ridicule.

    0
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  • He did not wish to throw ridicule and obloquy upon the petition, but he did throw ridicule and obloquy upon the hon.

    0
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  • Most people opposing the system could be silenced by financial pressure, or suffer public ridicule.

    0
    0
  • I mean, running is the kind of thing that could attract public ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Now my bizarre tastes are open for public ridicule.

    0
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  • Jenner found a great deal of skepticism to his ideas and was subject to much ridicule.

    0
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  • In the face of domestic hostility and international ridicule and condemnation, Mr Blair took us to war with Iraq last spring.

    0
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  • Unfortunately grown ups will often dismiss this as a normal attachment to an imaginary friend and may even ridicule the child.

    0
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  • The best way to deal with Holocaust deniers is to let them say their piece and then ridicule them for the nuts they are.

    0
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  • ridicule by the British press.

    0
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  • He covers each subject extraordinarily well and isn't afraid to ridicule the frankly ridiculous while finding merit in the strangely compelling.

    0
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  • scruple to employ the weapons of ridicule and sarcasm in defense of free speech and reason.

    0
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  • The trick was discovered, and Heraclides received only ridicule instead of divine honours (Diogenes Laertius v.

    0
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  • His extravagant pretensions only served to excite ridicule.

    0
    0
  • The same dignity appeared in the grave beauty of his features, though the abnormal height of his cranium afforded an opportunity for ridicule of which the comedians made full use.

    0
    0
  • of the Christian - which attracted attention, gave them distinction, and even aroused ridicule and opposition.

    0
    0
  • His corruption, his mean submission to a tyrant wife, his greed, his pale face and lean person, which had succeeded to the handsome features and comeliness of earlier days,' were the subject of ridicule, f:om the witty sneers of Halifax to the coarse jests of the anonymous writers of innumerable lampoons.

    0
    0
  • For many years it was the fashion to speak of Lamarck with ridicule, while Treviranus was altogether ignored.

    0
    0
  • But a little consideration showed that, though Lamarck had seized what, as far as it goes, is a true cause of modification, it is a cause the actual effects of which are wholly inadequate to account for any considerable modification in animals, and which can have no influence at all in the vegetable world; and probably nothing contributed so much to discredit evolution, in the early part of the 29th century, as the floods of easy ridicule which were poured upon this part of Lamarck's speculation.

    0
    0
  • Among the Greeks the philosophers had come to use both argument and ridicule against the idea that the offering of material things could be needed by or acceptable to the Maker of them all.

    0
    0
  • All blasphemies against God, as denying His being, or providence, all contumelious reproaches of Jesus Christ, all profane scoffing at the Holy Scriptures, or exposing any part thereof to contempt or ridicule, are punishable by the temporal courts with fine, imprisonment and also infamous corporal punishment.

    0
    0
  • A striking feature was the preamble, setting forth the doctrines on which the edict was based, which won the praise of the philosophes and the ridicule of the wits; this Turgot rewrote three times, it is said, in order to make it" so clear that any village judge could explain it to the peasants."The opposition to the edict was strong.

    0
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  • They are great talkers, keenly sensitive to ridicule, and quick-tempered.

    0
    0
  • Yet the feelings of dismay and even ridicule with which this proclamation was received by the Mussulmans in many parts of the country show how great a change it instituted, and how strong was the opposition which it encountered among the ruling race.

    0
    0
  • The Dynamics of a Particle was written on the occasion of the contest between Gladstone and Mr Gathorne Hardy (afterwards earl of Cranbrook); and The New Belfry in ridicule of the erection put up at Christ Church for the bells that were removed from the Cathedral tower.

    0
    0
  • Others had been carried off into slavery, and a deputation of clergy which Patrick had sent to ask for their release had been subjected to ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Although some of his quatrains are purely mystic and pantheistic, most of them bear quite another stamp; they are the breviary of a radical freethinker, who protests in the most forcible manner both against the narrowness, bigotry and uncompromising austerity of the orthodox ulema and the eccentricity, hypocrisy and wild ravings of advanced Sufis, whom he successfully combats with their own weapons, using the whole mystic terminology simply to ridicule mysticism itself.

    0
    0
  • The new practice was received at first with contempt and even ridicule, and afterwards by Stoll and Peter Frank with only grudging approval.

    0
    0
  • The opposition and ridicule with which Booth's work was for many years received gave way, towards the end of the 19th century, to very widespread sympathy as his genius and its results were more fully realized.

    0
    0
  • Though people might disbelieve in his visions, they feared to ridicule them in his presence.

    0
    0
  • It was his good fortune that he did go back, for he was subjected to a wholesome course of ridicule by the other boys, and was flogged by Dr Barnard, the headmaster.

    0
    0
  • The offer was too good to be refused, but the poet hated himself on the banks of the fiere Tamise, and wrote in bitter ridicule of "Les Anglais.

    0
    0
  • He also formed a splendid aviary which, under the name of the "hencoop," was a favourite subject of ridicule with his enemies.

    0
    0
  • He subsequently fell under the spell of the rising impressionist movement and threw in his lot with Monet and his friends, who were at that time the butt of public ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Hence his scorn of the doctrine of the resurrection of the body held then in a very crude form, and his ridicule of any attempt to raise the vulgar masses from their degradation.

    0
    0
  • He had been the target of constant attack during his life, and his personal foibles, careless dress and mental eccentricities were the theme of endless ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Dymock appeared with the title of Le Vice ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Thus it remained a school for the " wise and prudent "; and when Julian tried to enlist the sympathies of the common rude man for the doctrines and worship of this school, he was met with scorn and ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Du Bellay did not actually introduce the sonnet into French poetry, but he acclimatized it; and when the fashion of sonneteering became a mania he was one of the first to ridicule its excesses.

    0
    0
  • The young poet wooed the girl with poems, romances, dramas and mute worship, but received nothing except chilling indifference and lively ridicule.

    0
    0
  • By the Irish Nationalists it was received with contemptuous ridicule, for none suspected Mr Balfour's immense strength of will, his debating power, his ability in attack and his still greater capacity to disregard criticism.

    0
    0
  • He was an able, terse, forcible speaker, master of bitter sarcasm, irony, stinging ridicule, and, less often used, good-humoured wit.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, he had brought from Europe a new manner, full of the affections of ardent youth, and this he wore without ease in a society highly satisfied with itself; the young knight-errant was therefore subjected to considerable ridicule.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the peace of 1389 the cities had again begun to form leagues for peace; but, having secured a certain amount of recognition in the south and west of Germany, the new king turned aside from the pressing problems of government and in 1401 made a futile attempt to reach Rome, an enterprise which covered him with ridicule.

    0
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  • turn the ridicule of their foulness upon the Christians."

    0
    0
  • The publication of Doctor Akakia, which brought down upon the president of the Academy a storm of ridicule, finally alienated Frederick; while Voltaire's wrongs culminated in the famous arrest at Frankfort, the most disagreeable elements of which were due to the misunderstanding of an order by a subordinate official.

    0
    0
  • It was written from the point of view of a Quaker who did not believe in revealed religion, but who held that "all religions are in their nature mild and benign" when not associated with political systems. Intermixed with the coarse unceremonious ridicule of what he considered superstition and bad faith are many passages of earnest and even lofty eloquence in favour of a pure morality founded on natural religion.

    0
    0
  • In the succeeding year he showed, in the same journal, that if the elements be arranged in the order of their atomic weights, those having consecutive numbers frequently either belong to the same group or occupy similar positions in different groups, and he pointed out that each eighth element starting from a given one is in this arrangement a kind of repetition of the first, like the eighth note of an octave in music. The Law of Octaves thus enunciated was at first ignored or treated with ridicule as a fantastic notion unworthy of serious consideration, but the idea, subsequently elaborated by D.

    0
    0
  • Valla by one vigorous effort destroyed the False Decretals and exposed the Donation of Constantine to ridicule, paving the way for the polemic carried on against the dubious pretensions of the papal throne by scholars of the Reformation.

    0
    0
  • Its affectations were burlesqued in Gilbert and Sullivan's travesty Patience (1881), which practically killed by ridicule the absurdities to which it had grown.

    0
    0
  • As the leading "aesthete," Oscar Wilde became one of the most prominent personalities of the day; apart from the ridicule he encountered, his affected paradoxes and his witty sayings were quoted on all sides, and in 1882 he went on a lecturing tour in the United States.

    0
    0
  • He was exposed to some natural ridicule on the ground that the "Kladderadatsch," which he often spoke of as imminent, failed to make its appearance.

    0
    0
  • first to endure bitter opposition and ridicule from the academic writers then in power, but they supported this with cheerfulness, and answered back in their magazines Polyfem and Fosforos (1810-1813).

    0
    0
  • Julius is simply held up to ridicule, while the life of Joseph is almost wholly based on the book of Scioppius and the Scaligerana.

    0
    0
  • In one he aimed at being brilliant; and becoming merely laboured and pedantic, he was covered with ridicule by Sheridan, from whom he received a lesson which he did not fail to turn to account.

    0
    0
  • By the outside world the affair was greeted with mingled ridicule and indignation, and the new Messiah had to be protected by the police from the violence of an angry mob.

    0
    0
  • Desborough himself became an object of ridicule, his regiment even revolted against him, and on the return of the Rump he was ordered to quit London.

    0
    0
  • His rough person and manners are the constant theme of ridicule in the royalist ballads, and he is caricatured in Butler's Hudibras and in the Parable of the Lion and Fox.

    0
    0
  • From the 20th of November 1797, till the 9th of July 1798, he was one of the most active, and was certainly the most witty of the contributors to the Anti-Jacobin, a weekly paper started to ridicule the frothy philanthropic and eleutheromaniac rant of the French republicans, and to denounce their brutal rapacity and cruelty.

    0
    0
  • His parts were good and he could speak and write six languages at a very early age, but the zeal of his guardians and tutors to make a man of him betimes nearly ruined his feeble constitution, while the riotous life led by him and his young consort, Maria of Austria, whom he wedded on the 13th of January 1522, speedily disqualified him for affairs, so that at last he became an object of ridicule at his own court.

    0
    0
  • The ridicule that greeted the revelation of the Pop-gun Plot marked the beginning of a reaction that found a more serious expression in the trials of Thomas Hardy, John Home Tooke and John Theiwall (October and November 1794).

    0
    0
  • The exposure of these facts turned the whole thing into ridicule, and gave parliament an excuse for postponing measures of organic reform which might otherwise have been brought forward.

    0
    0
  • While the larger proposals of the bill were thus open to grave objection, its subsidiary features provoked ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Then trouble came upon him; complaints were made to the fathers of the alleged licentiousness of his verses, the real cause of complaint being the ridicule which Vert Vert seemed to throw upon the whole race of nuns and the anti-clerical tendency of the other poems. An example, it was urged, must be made; Gresset was expelled the order.

    0
    0
  • She could ridicule him for the aspirations which he had not and for those which he had; on the other hand, he never heard from her a tender word "though she lived to be eighty."

    0
    0
  • The report of them can hardly be doubted; and as the last relation was made (to the writer of this article) not with intent to ridicule Mr Disraeli's taste but to illustrate his conquering abilities, the story is repeated here.

    0
    0
  • His judgments had to wait the event before they were absolved from ridicule or delivered from neglect.

    0
    0
  • The comparison of the will unable to act between two equally balanced motives to an ass dying of hunger between two equal and equidistant bundles of hay is not found in his works, and may have been invented by his opponents to ridicule his determinism.

    0
    0
  • Macaulay's ridicule has rescued from oblivion the criticism which pronounced the eloquence of Chatham to be more ornate than that of Demosthenes, and less diffuse than that of Cicero.

    0
    0
  • At any other time this attempt would have covered its author with ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Galileo seems, at an early period of his life, to have adopted the Copernican theory of the solar system, and was deterred from avowing his opinions - as is proved by his letter to Kepler of August 4, 1 597 - b y the fear of ridicule rather than of persecution.

    0
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  • 1401), in which the Franciscan order is held up to ridicule.

    0
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  • It seemed that in this company the insignificance of those people was so definitely accepted that the only possible attitude toward them was one of good humored ridicule.

    0
    0
  • Princess Mary had two passions and consequently two joys--her nephew, little Nicholas, and religion--and these were the favorite subjects of the prince's attacks and ridicule.

    0
    0
  • "But it's impossible..." declared the gentlemen of the suite, shrugging their shoulders but not venturing to utter the implied word--le ridicule...

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  • In Dr. Hynek 's words Instead of having UFO a synonym for crackpot and ridicule, let 's make it scientifically respectable.

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  • Is your new approach to try and ridicule the idea that a battle took place here in 1066?

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  • God says: 0 believers, no people shall ridicule another people.

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  • In any other walk of life, a 44-year-old man introducing his dental work to another might provoke ridicule or disgust.

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  • There certainly is ridicule heaped on the UFO subject.

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  • To get no further than the foundation is to invite ridicule.

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  • He did not wish to throw ridicule and obloquy upon the petition, but he did throw ridicule and obloquy upon the hon.

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  • Most people opposing the system could be silenced by financial pressure, or suffer public ridicule.

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  • I mean, running is the kind of thing that could attract public ridicule.

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  • Now my bizarre tastes are open for public ridicule.

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  • Jenner found a great deal of skepticism to his ideas and was subject to much ridicule.

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  • In the face of domestic hostility and international ridicule and condemnation, Mr Blair took us to war with Iraq last spring.

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  • Unfortunately grown ups will often dismiss this as a normal attachment to an imaginary friend and may even ridicule the child.

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  • The best way to deal with Holocaust deniers is to let them say their piece and then ridicule them for the nuts they are.

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  • The decision was greeted with surprise and some ridicule by the British press.

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  • He covers each subject extraordinarily well and is n't afraid to ridicule the frankly ridiculous while finding merit in the strangely compelling.

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  • Let us not scruple to employ the weapons of ridicule and sarcasm in defense of free speech and reason.

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  • Many teen girls are very self-conscious about their appearance, and being overweight invites ridicule.

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  • You might not want to ask and risk ridicule for not being up on text message lingo, but you cannot ignore something that could possibly be important.

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  • These strong opinions have opened him to ridicule by many of his contemporaries and fans, leading many to wonder if his consistently high box office draws will continue or if he is on a downward swing to one amazing career.

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  • There's no scoring, just the admiration or ridicule of your friends.

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  • Now you can proudly sing Britney Spears' Toxic without the ridicule.

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  • Still others will never participate in any other kind of artistic activity and may ridicule or disdain those who do.

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  • If the adolescent does not have a positive body image, then fear or ridicule from family and peers can affect his or her ability to interact with others.

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  • In Britain, red hair is called "ginger" and, when on an Irish head, is a subject for ridicule, part of the ongoing mistrust between the two nations.

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  • Big beautiful women can face challenges when it comes to dating.They may feel intimidated by the usual singles meeting scenes, avoiding bars and clubs because they fear ridicule and rejection.

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  • BBW singles are finding that the Internet has allowed them to find love, friendship and acceptance without the ridicule that often accompanies traditional dating venues.

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  • Many teen couples face ridicule from friends if their friends don't think they should be a couple.

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  • Some may experience social alienation or ridicule due to their peculiar behaviors and narrow interests.

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  • Viewers mock, criticize, ridicule, and judge those who can't get along with others, like to make fools of themselves, and do stupid things just to make a buck.

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  • Dymock appeared with the title of Le Vice ridicule.

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  • In any other walk of life, a 44-year-old man introducing his dental work to another might provoke ridicule or disgust.

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