Richmond sentence example

richmond
  • I finally got a hold of him at the airport in Richmond that afternoon.
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  • A weekly market on Wednesdays was granted to John, earl of Richmond, in 1308 together with an eight days' fair beginning on the vigil of St Margaret's day, and in 1445 John de la Pole, earl of Suffolk, one of his successors as lord of the manor, received a further grant of the same market and also two yearly fairs, one on the feast of St Philip and St James and the other at Michaelmas.
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  • However, when ravaging the country near Alnwick, William was taken prisoner in July 1174, and after a short captivity at Richmond was carried to Normandy, where he soon purchased his release by assenting in December 1174 to the treaty of Falaise.
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  • Here Morton encouraged Buckingham's designs against Richard, and put him into communication with the queen dowager, Elizabeth Woodville, and with Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond.
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  • He escaped from Brecknock Castle to Flanders, avoided Buckingham's fate, and devoted his energies during the next two years to creating a party in England and abroad in the interests of the earl of Richmond.
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  • When Richmond secured the crown as Henry VII.
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  • Taking them from north to south, the principal rivers are the Richmond, Clarence, Macleay, Hastings, Manning, Hunter, Hawkesbury and Shoalhaven.
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  • He was educated at Richmond, Yorkshire, and entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1809.
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  • It is served by the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac railway, and is a favourite resort from Richmond.
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  • He took part in the siege of Yorktown, the battle of Fair Oaks, the seven days' battle before Richmond, and the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, where he was wounded, and Chancellorsville, where his brigade was reduced in numbers to less than a regiment, and General Meagher resigned his commission.
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  • The road was leased in 1871 to the Richmond & Danville for thirty years at 6%; and in 1905 to the Southern Railway Company for ninety-nine years at 61.
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  • 's son, Geoffrey of Brittany, and is sometimes called duke of Brittany and earl of Richmond.
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  • Richmond is served by the Atlantic Coast Line, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Seaboard Air Line, the Southern and the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac railways, and by the Old Dominion, the Virginia Navigation and the Chesapeake steamship lines.
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  • Of Richmond's public buildings, several have great historic interest.
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  • Smith and fifty-nine others lost their lives; and St Paul's Church, where Jefferson Davis was attending services, on the 2nd of April 1865, when he received news from 1 As built in Richmond in 1845 by Luther Libby, it was a brick structure, three storeys high in front and four in the rear.
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  • It had six rooms, each about 100 X45 ft., was used as a tobacco warehouse and a ship-chandlery until 1861, and then until the capture of Richmond was used as a prison, chiefly for Federal officers.
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  • General Lee that General Grant had broken through the lines at Petersburg and that Richmond must be evacuated.
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  • Richmond has many fine monuments and statues of historic interest and artistic merit, the most noteworthy of the former being the Washington Monument, in Capitol Square.
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  • Two miles north-east of the city is the National Cemetery, with graves of 6571 Federal soldiers (5700 unknown) most of whom were killed in the actions near Richmond.
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  • Many periodicals (including several religious weeklies) are published in Richmond.
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  • Richmond is the leading manufacturing city of Virginia, the value of its factory products in 1905 being 828,202,607, an increase of 22.4% since 1900 and nearly 19% of the value of the state's factory products in this year.
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  • Richmond is the port of entry for the District of Richmond; in 1907 its imports were valued at 8913,234 and its exports at 8158,275; in 1909, its imports at $693,822 and its exports at $ 2 4,39 0.
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  • Richmond is governed under a charter of 1870 with amendments.
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  • In 1676, during " Bacon's Rebellion," a party of Virginians under Bacon's command killed about 150 Indians who were defending a fort on a hill a short distance east of the site of Richmond in the " Battle of Bloody Run," so called because the blood of the slain savages is said to have coloured the brook (or " run ") at the base of the hill.
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  • He was succeeded by his nephew, William Byrd (1652-1704), who was born in London, went to Virginia about 1670, became a successful Indian trader, was a member of the House of Burgesses in 16 771682, was a supporter of Nathaniel Bacon at the beginning of James river, at the falls, visited: the tract in September 1733, and decided to found there the town of Richmond, at the same time selecting and naming the present site of Petersburg.
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  • The name Richmond was suggested probably by the similarity of the site to that of Richmond on the Thames.
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  • The public records of the state were removed thither in 1777 from Williamsburg, and in May 1779 Richmond was made the capital.
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  • Richmond was first chartered as a city in 1782, and in 1788 it was allowed a representative in the House of Delegates.
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  • The importance of Richmond during the Civil War was principally due to its having been made the capital of the Confederate States (by act of the Provisional Government on the 8th of May 1861).
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  • There was much confusion and lawlessness in Richmond during the earlier stages of the war.
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  • His residence, within the limits of the present city of Richmond, was preserved until about 1850.
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  • His son William (1674-1744), the founder of Richmond - and above referred to - was educated in England; returned to Virginia in 1696; succeeded his father as auditor-general of the colony, and was receiver-general in 1705-1716.
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  • Unsuccessful attempts were made in February and March 1864 to free the Federal prisoners in Richmond by means of cavalry raids.
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  • Sheridan's cavalry, during the " Richmond Raid," carried the city's outer defences (May 12), but found, the river line too strong to be taken by assault and moved away.
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  • Then followed many months of unintermittent pressure upon both Petersburg and Richmond.
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  • Butler captured the southern outer line of the Richmond defences on the 29th of September 1864.
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  • During the war the principal iron foundry of the Confederacy (Tredegar Iron Works) was in Richmond, and here most of the cannon used by the Confederate armies were cast.
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  • Henry, " Richmond on the James " in Historic Towns of the Southern States (New York, 1900), edited by Lyman P. Powell; and Samuel Mordecai, Richmond in By-Gone Days (Richmond, 1856; 2nd ed., 1860).
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  • A fall in rents was the necessary sequel of the agricultural distress, to inquire into which a royal commission was appointed in 1879, under the chairmanship of the duke of Richmond and Gordon.
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  • In 1485 Henry, earl of Richmond, disembarked here on his return from France, and was welcomed on landing by Sir Rhys ap Thomas and much of the chivalry of Wales.
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  • The Union Theological School was established in connexion with the college in 1812, but in 1898 was removed to Richmond, Virginia.
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  • Her eldest son by this marriage, Edmund, was created earl of Richmond in 1452, and was the father of Henry VII.
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  • Cosmo Gordon Lang, 1908 Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in York is St Mary's Abbey, situated in Museum Gardens, founded for Benedictines by Alan, lord of Richmond, in 1078, its head having the rank of a mitred abbot with a seat in parliament.
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  • It is the commonest cetacean in the seas round the British Isles, and not infrequently ascends the Thames, having been seen as high as Richmond; it has also been observed in the Seine at Neuilly, near Paris.
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  • Passing Richmond (16) and Kew the river flows through London and its suburbs for a distance of about 25 m., till it has passed Woolwich.
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  • The uppermost lock is St John's, below Lechlade; the lowest is Richmond, but this is a half-tide lock, keeping the water above at a level corresponding to half that of flood tide.
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  • He was captured at Shiloh and was imprisoned for a time at Madison, Ga., and in Libby prison, Richmond, Va., and in 1865 was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers.
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  • Montgomery, in Alabama, was the first Confederate capital, but after Virginia joined her sister states, the seat of government was removed to Richmond, on the 29th of May 1861.
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  • With him was associated Robert Ould of Richmond, a lawyer of great ability.
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  • Zolnay, and erected by the Daughters of the Confederacy, was unveiled in Hollywood cemetery, Richmond, Va, on the 9th of November 1899.
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  • Early in the year a farmer who had insisted that the Kaffirs on his farm should pay the poll-tax was murdered, and on the 8th of February some forty natives in the Richmond district forcibly resisted the collection of the tax and killed a subinspector of police and a trooper at Byrnetown.
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  • In 1858, the centennial year of his birth, his remains were reinterred with impressive ceremonies at Richmond, Virginia.
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  • The well itself is covered by a fine Gothic building, said to have been erected by Margaret, countess of Richmond and mother of Henry VII., with some portions of earlier date.
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  • Richmond has broad well-shaded streets, several parks, including Glen Miller (139 acres), and handsome public buildings.
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  • Richmond was for many years the centre, west of Philadelphia, of the activities of the Society of Friends.
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  • In 1806 Friends from North Carolina and Pennsylvania settled near here, and Richmond was platted in 1816.
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  • Richmond was incorporated as a village in 1818 and chartered as a borough in 1834 and as a city in 1840.
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  • During the Civil War the city ranked next to Richmond in the manufacture of supplies for the Confederate army.
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  • South of the Thames a broken amphitheatre of low hills, approaching the river near Greenwich and Woolwich on the east and Putney and Richmond on the west, encloses a tract flatter than that to the north, and rises more abruptly in the southern districts of Streatham, Norwood and Forest Hill.
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  • Brick earth overlies it from Kensington to Brentford and west thereof, and appears in Chelsea and Fulham, Hornsey and Stoke Newington, and in patches south of the Thames between Battersea and Richmond.
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  • Gravel is found on the high ground about Richmond Park and Wimbledon.
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  • In this aspect the principal extension of London has been into the counties of Kent and Surrey, to the pleasant hilly districts about Sydenham, Norwood and Croydon, Chislehurst and Orpington, Caterham, Redhill and Reigate, Epsom, Dorking and Leatherhead; and up the valley of the Thames through Richmond to Kingston and Surbiton, Esher and Weybridge, and the many townships on both the Surrey and the Middlesex shores of the river.
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  • The other most notable open spaces wholly or partly within the county are Hampstead Heath in the north-west, a wild, high-lying tract preserved to a great extent in its natural state, and in the south-west Wimbledon Common, Putney Heath and the royal demesne of Richmond Park, which from its higher parts commands a wonderful view up the rich valley of the Thames.
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  • The company possesses running powers over the lines of various other companies: thus its trains run as far north as Potter's Bar on the Great Northern line, while it serves Richmond on the west and Poplar on the east.
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  • Another line serves the western outskirts (Hammersmith, Richmond, &c.) from the city.
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  • The Metropolitan District (commonly called the District) system serves Wimbledon, Richmond, Ealing and Harrow on the west, and passes eastward by Earl's Court, South Kensington, Victoria and Mansion House (City) to Whitechapel and Bow.
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  • Rugby football is upheld by such notable teams as Blackheath and Richmond.
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  • Banished from France for this crime (1322), Robert of Artois took refuge in England, where he became earl of Richmond, and incited Edward III.
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  • By his wife, Margaret of Bavaria, he had one son, Philip the Good, who succeeded him; and seven daughters - Margaret, who married in 1404 Louis, son of Charles VI., and in 1423 Arthur, earl of Richmond and afterwards duke of Brittany; Mary, wife of Adolph of Cleves; Catherine, promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou; Isabella, wife of Olivier de Chatillon, count of Penthievre; Joanna, who died young; Anne, who married John, duke of Bedford, in 1423; and Agnes, who married Charles I., duke of Bourbon, in 1425.
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  • At Cold Harbor six thousand men fell in one useless assault lasting an hour, and after two months the Union armies lay before Richmond and Petersburg indeed, but had lost no fewer than 72,000 men.
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  • In 1877 he was elected to represent the Richmond district of Virginia in Congress.
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  • In 1844 his portrait was painted by Richmond, and the same year he published a volume of university sermons, in which, however, was not included the one on the Gunpowder Plot.
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  • Henry conferred great honours on Peter, creating him earl of Richmond, and gave him a palace on the Thames, known as Savoy House.
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  • In the ensuing trial at Richmond the prisoners were released for lack of sufficient evidence to convict, and Wilkinson himself emerged with a much damaged reputation.
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  • But before he could take the field Richmond had fallen and Lee had surrendered.
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  • He died in Richmond, Virginia, on the 14th of March 1862.
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  • The death of his patrons, the duke of Richmond and the marquess of Hamilton, and of King James put an end to his hopes of political preferment; moreover he probably distrusted the conduct of affairs under the new reign.
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  • The "On to Richmond" appeal, which appeared day after day in The Tribune, was incorrectly attributed to him, and it did not wholly meet his approval; but after the defeat in the first battle of Bull Run he was widely blamed for it.
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  • In July 1861 he accepted from Lord Palmerston the office of solicitor-general, a knighthood, and a safe seat for the borough of Richmond in Yorkshire, secured for him through the friendly action of Lord Zetland, and thus began the second spell of Palmer's membership of the House of Commons, which continued till his elevation to the woolsack and the peerage.
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  • At the election of November 1868 Palmer was again returned for Richmond, and Gladstone offered him the office of lord chancellor or the office of a lord justice with a peerage; both offers were declined by Palmer, and he assumed a position of independent opposition to the measure relative to the Irish Church.
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  • In 1246 Nicholas obtained a grant of a Saturday market and a fair at the feast of the Assumption (both maintained up to the present day), and in 1275 South Molton appears for the' first time as a mesne borough under his overlordship. The borough subsequently passed to the Audleys, the Hollands, and in 1487 was granted for life to Margaret, duchess of Richmond, who in 1490 obtained a grant of a fair (which is still held) at the nativity of St John the Baptist.
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  • The principal villages are New Brighton, West New Brighton, Port Richmond, Stapleton, and Tompkinsville on the north coast, and Tottenville (or Bentley Manor) on the south-west coast.
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  • Richmond, the county-seat since 1727, is a small village near the centre of the island.
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  • Under the direction of General Hugh Mercer some American troops reached Richmond on the morning of the 16th of October 1776, and in an engagement which immediately followed they were victorious; but, as they were retreating with their prisoners, British reinforcements arrived and in a second engagement at Fresh Kill (now Green Ridge) they were routed with considerable loss.
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  • A second raid was made against Richmond early in August 1777; and on the 22nd of the same month American troops under General John Sullivan fought the British at several places, inflicted a loss of about 200 killed, wounded and prisoners and destroyed considerable quantities of stores.
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  • In the War of 1812 Fort Richmond was built at the Narrows and Fort Tompkins in the rear of it.
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  • In 1898 Staten Island became the borough of Richmond in Greater New York.
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  • He died at Richmond, Va., on the 12th of September 1876.
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  • He was arrested in 1807 on the charge of treason, was brought to trial before the United States circuit court at Richmond, Virginia, Chief-Justice Marshall presiding, and he was acquitted, in spite of the fact that the political influence of the national administration was thrown against him.
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  • He died at Port Richmond, Staten Island, New York, on the 14th of September 1836.
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  • Virginia, separating the two hostile capitals, Richmond and Washington, was the theatre of the great campaigns of the east, where the flower of both armies fought.
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  • It was eventually decided that General Banks was to oppose "Stonewall" Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley, Fremont to hold western Virginia against the same general's enterprise, and McDowell with a strong corps to advance overland to meet McClellan, who, with the main army, was to proceed by sea to Fortress Monroe and thence to advance on Richmond.
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  • Johnston fell severely wounded, and in the end a properly connected and combined advance of the Army of the Potomac drove back his successor into the lines of Richmond (May 31 - June 1).
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  • But the second advance on Richmond was clearly a strategical failure.
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  • Halleck (at the Washington headquarters) began by withdrawing McClellan from the James to assist Pope in central Virginia; Lee, thus released from any fear for the safety of Richmond, turned swiftly upon Pope.
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  • He began his campaign by cancelling McClellan's operation, and, his own plan being to strike at Richmond from Fredericksburg, he moved the now augmented army to Falmouth opposite that place, hoping to surprise the crossing of the Rappahannock.
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  • Butler with the new Army of the James was to move up that river towards Richmond and Petersburg.
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  • Corps to a strength of 120,000 men, crossed the Rapidan on the 4th of May with the intention of attacking Lee's inner flank, that nearer Richmond.
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  • The Army of the James moved towards Richmond on the same day on which the Army of the Potomac crossed the Rapidan.
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  • Butler and the Army of the James at the same time won some successes in front of the Richmond works.
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  • Thereupon Lee and Longstreet evacuated the Petersburg and Richmond lines and began their retreat.
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  • The Federal Army of the Potomac, advancing from the sea and the river Pamunkey over the Chickahominy on Richmond, had come to a standstill after the battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks), and General Robert Lee, who succeeded Joseph Johnston in command of the Confederates, initiated the series of counter attacks upon it which constitute the "Seven Days."
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  • McClellan lingered north of Richmond, despite President Lincoln's constant demand that he should "strike a blow" with the force he had organized and taken to the Yorktown peninsula in April, until General Lee had concentrated 73,000 infantry in his front; then the Federal commander, fearing to await the issue of a decisive battle, ended his campaign of invasion in the endeavour to "save his army"; and he so far succeeded that on July 3 he had established himself on the north bank of the James in a position to which reinforcements and supplies could be brought from the north by water without fear of molestation by the enemy.
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  • Lee 's other divisions under Magruder, Huger and Holmes were to defend the lines which covered Richmond from the east, and so prevent McClellan effecting a counterstroke.
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  • Stuart afterwards moved farther down the James, and shelled McClellan's supply vessels in the river until recalled by General Lee, who on July 8 withdrew his army towards Richmond.
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  • In the north a feeling of despondency overtook Congress at the "lame and impotent conclusion" of a campaign of invasion which was expected to terminate the war by the defeat of the Confederate army, the capture of Richmond and the immediate overthrow of the Confederacy.
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  • The state maintains for the whites two State Normal Schools, which were established in 1906 - one, for the eastern district, at Richmond, and the other, for the western district, at Bowling Green.
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  • Nelson near Richmond and threatened Cincinnati.
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  • As to the great question at issue in 1861, Major Jackson's ruling motive was devotion to his state, and when Virginia seceded, on the 17th of April, and the Lexington cadets were ordered to Richmond, Jackson went thither in command of the corps.
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  • While the forces of the North were still scattered, Jackson secretly left the Valley to take a decisive part in Lee's campaign before Richmond.
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  • In the "Seven Days" Jackson was frequently at fault, but his driving energy bore no small part in securing the defeat of McClellan's advance on Richmond.
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  • The work of the Kew Observatory, at the Old Deer Park, Richmond, has also been placed under the direction of the N.P.L.
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  • Round the city lies a circle of populous suburbs - to the north-east Fitzroy (pop. 31,687) and Collingwood (32,749), to the east Richmond (37,824), to the south-east Prahran (40,441), to the south South Melbourne (40,619), to the south-west Port Melbourne (12,176), and to the north-west North Melbourne (18,120).
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  • Between Whitworth and Richmond bridges stands the "Four Courts" (law courts), on the site of the ancient Dominican monastery of St Saviour.
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  • The Richmond lunatic asylum, erected near the House of Industry, and placed under the care of officers appointed by government, receives patients from a district consisting of the counties of Dublin, Louth, Meath and Wicklow, each of these contributing towards its expenses in proportion to the number of patients sent in.
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  • Cooper's other works are The Memorials of Cambridge, (1858-1866) and a Memoir of Margaret, Countess of Richmond and Derby (1874).
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  • Wit continued decrease of altitude south-eastward, the crystalline belt dips under the coastal plain, near a line marked by the Delaware river from Trenton to Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, and thence south-south-westward through Maryland and Virginia past the cities of Baltimore, Washington and Richmond.
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  • There is in some places an unconformity between the Richmond beds (or their equivalent) and underlying formations, and this unconformity, together with certain palaeontological considerations, has raised the question whether the uppermost part of the system, as outlined above, should not be classed as Silurian (Upper Silurian).
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  • St Peters sandstone 100,, Oneota formation (includes Shakopee, New Richmond and Oneota proper).
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  • This weir retains the river above it at half-tide level, in order to cover the mud-banks which had been bared at low tide between Richmond and Teddington by the lowering of the low-water level, owing to the removal of various obstructions in the river below.
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  • Newport News is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, of which it is a terminus; by river boats to Richmond and Petersburg, Va.; by coastwise steamship lines to Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Providence; by foreign steamship lines to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Dublin, Belfast, Rotterdam, Hamburg and other ports; and by electric lines to Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Portsmouth.
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  • Both in 1900 and in 1905 Newport News ranked second to Richmond among the cities of the state in the value of factory products.
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  • At the dissolution in the spring of 1768 he was returned by Sir Lawrence Dundas for Richmond as a Tory, but in the questions that arose over John Wilkes he took the popular side of "Wilkes and liberty," and resigned his seat in May 1769.
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  • Didsbury College was opened in 1842, Richmond in 1843.
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  • The Centenary of Methodism was celebrated in 1839 and £221,939 was raised as a thank-offering: £71,609 was devoted to the colleges at Didsbury and Richmond; £70,000 was given to the missionary society, which spent £30,000 on the site and building of a missionhouse in Bishopsgate Within; £38,000 was set apart for the removal of chapel debts, &c.
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  • In 1813 he raised a company for the defence of Richmond against the British, serving subsequently in minor operations elsewhere.
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  • On the 13th of February, while absent in Washington on this mission, he was elected to the Virginia convention at Richmond, and took his seat on the Ist of March.
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  • He was also a member of the provisional Confederate Congress from May 1861, when the capital of the Confederacy was removed from Montgomery, Alabama, to Richmond.
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  • He was elected a member of the House of Representatives of the permanent Congress, but died on the 18th of January 1862, in Richmond, before that body assembled.
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  • He was educated in his native town, and, after spending a few years in business, at the Wesleyan College, Richmond.
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  • Her son, ancestor of the dukes of Richmond, was born in 1672.
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  • Under William III., Governors Sloughter and Fletcher worked for a law (passed in 1693 and approved in 1697) for the settling of a ministry in New York, Richmond, Westchester and Queen's counties; but the Assembly foiled Fletcher's purpose of establishing a Church of England clergy, although he attempted to construe the act as applying only to the English Church.
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  • During the Chancellorsville campaign he made an unsuccessful cavalry raid toward Richmond.
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  • The surrounding country is devoted largely to the cultivation of tobacco, Indian corn and wheat, and the breeding of fine horses and cattle; and Richmond is an important live-stock market.
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  • Yonge, The Site of Old" James Towne," 1607-1698 (Richmond, 1904), embodying the results of the topographical investigations of the engineer in charge of the river-wall built in 1900-1901.
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  • Thence, when the well-drilled Army of be so or not, Lee took part in preparing for the divorce pro Potomac was about to descend upon Richmond, he was ceedings against Catherine of Aragon, and in January 1534 the hurriedly recalled to Richmond.
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  • The college remained unaltered until 1496, when Margaret, countess of Richmond, obtained letters patent from her son, Henry VII., to found a chantry, in connexion with which she established a school.
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  • On the 29th of September 1342 he was made earl of Richmond; as a child he was present at the sea fight with the Spaniards in August 1350, but his first military service was in 1355, when he was knighted.
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  • On the 18th of April 1861, the day after Virginia passed her ordinance of secession, when a considerable force of Virginia militia under General Kenton Harper approached the town - an attack having been planned in Richmond two days before - the Federal garrison of 45 men under Lieutenant Roger Jones set fire to the arsenal and fled.
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  • By a treaty concluded by Philip at Amiens in April 1423 with the dukes of Brittany and Bedford, John, duke of Bedford, married Philip's sister Anne, and Arthur of Brittany, earl of Richmond, became the husband of Philip's sister Margaret.
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  • In 1852 Lincoln attempted with little success to reply to a speech made by Douglas in Richmond.
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  • M'Clellan's campaign against Richmond was made abortive by his timorous generalship, and compelled the withdrawal of his army.
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  • A partisan coterie which surrounded M'Clellan loudly charged the failure of his Richmond campaign to official interference in his plans.
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  • Grant, at the head of the Army of the Potomac, followed Lee to Richmond and Petersburg, and held him in siege to within a few days of final surrender.
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  • Lee evacuated Richmond on the 2nd of April, and was overtaken by Grant and compelled to surrender his entire army on the 9th of April 1865.
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  • Lincoln being at the time on a visit to the army, entered Richmond the day after its surrender.
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  • His brother, Arthur of Brittany, earl of Richmond (comte de Richemont), was reconciled with the king, and became constable in 1425, with the avowed intention of making peace between Charles VII.
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  • To 1508 belongs the life-sized "Virgin with the Iris," a piece remarkable for the fine romantic invention of its background, but plainly showing the hand of an assistant, perhaps Hans Baldung, in its execution: the best version is in the Cook collection at Richmond, an inferior one in the Rudolphinum at Prague.
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  • The comte de Paris again retired to England, taking up his abode at Sheen House, near Richmond Park.
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  • He removed to Richmond in 1803, and during his last years was a leader of the Virginia bar; in 1807 he was one of Aaron Burr's counsel.
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  • At any rate he was brought into contact with the earl of Richmond, who was then beginning his quest for the English throne, and was taken into his service.
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  • He was a leader of the Federalist party in Virginia until his death at Richmond, Va., on the 23rd of October 1803.
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  • In the neighbouring Richmond Old Park is the important Kew Observatory.
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  • Sheridan's corps took part in the battles of the Wilderness and Spottsylvania Court House (see the article Wilderness), incidents of which led to a bitter quarrel between Sheridan and Meade and to Sheridan's being despatched by General Grant on a farreaching cavalry raid towards Richmond.
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  • The existence of this mineral in the vicinity of Richmond was known as early as 1770, and the mining of it there began in 1775, but it was practically discontinued about the middle of the 19th century.
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  • Connexion between Richmond and Washington is by a union line (Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac and Washington Southern railways) operated jointly by the Southern, Atlantic Coast line, Seaboard Air line, Chesapeake & Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore & Ohio railways.
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  • Petersburg and Richmond on the James are connected with regular steamship lines with Norfolk, Richmond's water trade being chiefly in coal, oil, logs and fertilizer.
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  • The principal cities of the state are: Richmond (the capital), Norfolk, Petersburg, Roanoke, Newport News, Lynchburg, Portsmouth and Danville.
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  • The General Assembly meets regularly at Richmond on the second Wednesday in January of each even-numbered year, and the governor must call an extra session on the application of two-thirds of the members of both houses, and may call one whenever he thinks the interests of the state require it.
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  • The court sits at Richmond, Staunton and Wytheville.
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  • The State Penitentiary is at Richmond.
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  • Some of them are employed on a state farm at Lassiter, Goochland county, on which there is a tuberculosis hospital, and some of them on the public roads; in 1909 there were 350 men at the state farm, 14 road camps with about 630 men, and 1273 men and 96 women in the penitentiary at Richmond.
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  • Other institutions of higher learning which are not under state control are: Washington and Lee University (nonsectarian, 1749), at Lexington; Hampden-Sidney College (Presbyterian, 1776), at Hampden-Sidney; Richmond College (Baptist, 1832), at Richmond; Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, 1832), at Ashland; Emory and Henry College (Methodist Episcopal, 1838), at Emory; Roanoke College (Lutheran, 1853), at Salem; Bridgewater College (German Baptist, 1879), at Bridgewater; Fredericksburg College (Presbyterian, 1893), at Fredericksburg; Virginia Union University (Baptist, 1899), at Richmond; and Virginia Christian College (Christian, 1903), at Lynchburg.
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  • In January 1781 Benedict Arnold captured Richmond and compelled governor and legislature to flee beyond the Blue Ridge mountains, where one session of the Assembly was held.
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  • Richmond soon became the capital of the Confederacy.
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  • The principal battles were: the first Manassas, or Bull Run (July 21, 1861); those around Richmond (June 26-July 2, 1862); second Manassas (August 29-30); Fredericksburg (December 12, 1862); Mechanicsville (May 2 and 3, 186 3); the Wilderness (May 5 and 6); Spottsylvania (May 8); North Anna and Bethesda church (May 29-30); Cold Harbor (June 3); the battles around Petersburg (June 15, July 30 and November 1, 1864); and Five Forks (April 1) and Appomattox (April 8-9, 1865).
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  • Pierpont set up in Richmond a government, based upon the Lincoln plan and supported by President Johnson, which continued till the 2nd of March 1867, when the famous reconstruction order converting the state into Military District No.
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  • On fisheries see the Report of the Commission of Fisheries, 1908-9 (Richmond, 1909).
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  • To Danville, after the evacuation of Richmond on the 2nd of April 1865, the archives of the Confederacy were carried, and here President Jefferson Davis paused for a few days in his flight southward.
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  • He was tail, rawboned and awkward; his early instruction was scant; but he "read books," talked well, and so, after his admission to the bar at Richmond, Virginia, in 1797, and his removal next year to Lexington, Kentucky, he quickly acquired a reputation and a lucrative income from his law practice.
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  • In 1435 he and Dunois defeated the English near Meulan, and in 1436 he helped the constable Arthur, earl of Richmond (de Richmond), to expel them from Paris.
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  • Through the instrumentality of the celebrated Sir Rhys ap Thomas (1451-1527), the wealthiest and the most powerful personage in South Wales, Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond, on his landing at Milford Haven in 1485 found the Welsh ready to rise in his behalf against the usurper Richard III.
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  • In most cases they became members of the churches of the white Baptists; but in Richmond, Savannah and some other towns they were encouraged to have churches of their own.
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  • He began to preach when he was fourteen, and in 1865 entered Richmond College to study for the Wesleyan Methodist ministry under the Rev. Alfred Barrett, one of whose daughters he married in 1873.
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  • The defeat of Sir Thomas Kyriel, one of Bedford's veteran captains, at Formigny in 1450, and the taking of Cherbourg, completed the conquest of the 1 Arthur, earl of Richmond, afterwards Arthur III., duke of Brittany.
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  • By Barbara Villiers, Mrs Palmer, afterwards countess of Castlemaine and duchess of Cleveland, mistress en titre till she was superseded by the duchess of Portsmouth, he had Charles Fitzroy, duke of Southampton and Cleveland, Henry Fitzroy, duke of Grafton, George Fitzroy, duke of Northumberland, Anne, countess of Sussex, Charlotte, countess of Lichfield, and Barbara, a nun; by Louise de Keroualle, duchess of Portsmouth, Charles Lennox, duke of Richmond; by Lucy Walter, James, duke of Monmouth and Buccleuch, and a daughter; by Nell Gwyn, Charles Beauclerk, duke of St Albans, and James Beauclerk; by Catherine Peg, Charles Fitz Charles, earl of Plymouth; by Lady Shannon, Charlotte, countess of Yarmouth; by Mary Davis, Mary Tudor, countess of Derwentwater.
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  • On the 10th of July 1359 Wykeham was made chief keeper and surveyor, not only of Windsor, but of the castles of Dover, Hadley and Leeds (Kent), and of the manors of Foliejohn, Eton, Guildford, Kennington, Sheen (now Richmond), Eltham and Langly and their parks, with power to repair them and to pay for workmen and materials.
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  • Anne spent the rest of her life happily in England at Richmond or Bletchingley, occasionally visiting the court, and being described as joyous as ever, and wearing new dresses every day!
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  • His last appearance in the House of Lords was on the 7th of April 1778, on the occasion of the duke of Richmond's motion for an address praying the king to conclude peace with America on any terms. In view of the hostile demonstrations of France the various parties had come generally to see the necessity of such a measure.
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  • After the duke of Richmond had replied, he rose again excitedly as if to speak, pressed his hand upon his breast, and fell down in a fit.
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  • It is generally introduced near mansion-houses for ornament and shade, and the celebrated avenues at Richmond and Bushey Park in England are objects of great beauty at the time of flowering.
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  • Driven out by the Armagnacs, they recovered their influence after the return of the Burgundians to Paris in 1418, but had to flee again in 1436 when the constable, Arthur, earl of Richmond, took the city.
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  • Towards the west, along the Upper Richmond and Kingston roads, there is considerable open country, undulating and well wooded.
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  • It is to a great extent preserved in the public grounds of Putney Heath, which adjoins Wimbledon Common, outside the borough, on the north; and Richmond Park and Barnes Common, parts of which are in the borough.
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  • He became chaplain to Margaret, countess of Richmond and Derby, and was employed by her to forward the schemes for securing the English throne for her son, Henry of Richmond, afterwards Henry VII.
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  • Danville is the seat of several educational institutions, the most important of which is the Central University of Kentucky (Presbyterian), founded in 1901 by the consolidation of Centre College (opened at Danville in 1823), and the Central University (opened at Richmond, Ky., in 1874).
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  • North of Sydney the secondary ports are at the mouths of the Hawkesbury, Manning, Hastings, Macleay, Nambucca, Bellingen, Clarence, Richmond and Tweed rivers.
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  • The Richmond drains an area of 2400 sq.
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  • An occurrence of Upper Cretaceous beds occurs in the coastal district at Nimbin on the Richmond river.
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  • Parramatta, Richmond and Windsor had indeed been founded within the first decade of the colony's existence; Newcastle, Maitland and Morpeth, near the coast to the north of Sydney, had been begun during the earlier years of the 19th century; but the towns of the interior, Goulburn, Bathurst and others, were not commenced till about 1835, in which year the site of Melbourne was first occupied by Batman and Fawkner.
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  • He found a patron in Mary Fitzroy, duchess of Richmond, and having been ordained deacon by Ridley in 1550, he settled at Reigate Castle, where he acted as tutor to the duchess's nephews, the orphan children of Henry Howard, earl of Surrey.
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  • (1393-1458), earl of Richmond, constable of France, and afterwards duke of Brittany, was the third son of John IV., duke of Brittany, and Joan of Navarre, afterwards the wife of Henry IV.
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  • His brother, John V., gave him his earldom of Richmond in England.
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  • The peace concluded between the duke of Brittany and the English in September 1427 led to his expulsion from the court, where Georges de la Tremoille, whom he himself had recommended to the king, remained supreme for six years, during which Richmond tried in vain to overthrow him.
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  • Gruel entered the service of the earl of Richmond about 1425, shared in all his campaigns, and lived with him on intimate terms. The chronicle covers the whole period of the duke's life, but the earlier part, up to 1425, is much less full and important than the later, which is based on Gruel's personal knowledge and observation.
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  • He later distinguished himself at Cold Harbor, and commanded a division in Grant's final campaign in Virginia (1864-65), his troops being the first to occupy Richmond after its fall.
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  • Keppel was by family connexion and personal preference a strong supporter of the Whig connexion, led by the Marquess of Rockingham and the Duke of Richmond.
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  • At Burr's trial at Richmond in 1807 Eaton was one of the witnesses, but his testimony was unimportant.
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  • To the men of the town which grew up outside the castle walls he gave, about the middle of the 12th century, a charter making them burgesses and granting them the same privileges as the town of Richmond in Yorkshire.
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  • But he soon showed petulance towards the civil authorities, from whom he came to differ concerning the political ends in view; and he now found severe critics, who doubted his capacity for directing an offensive war; but the government yielded to his plans for an oblique, instead of a direct, movement upon Richmond and the opposing army.
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  • McClellan followed up the Confederate rearguard and approached Richmond, using White House on the Pamunkey as a base of supplies; this entailed a division of his forces on either bank of the Chickahominy.
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  • After a pause in the operations McClellan felt himself ready to attack at the moment when Lee, leaving a bare handful of men in the Richmond lines, despatched twothirds of his entire force to the north of the Chickahominy to strike McClellan's isolated right wing.
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  • But in little more than two years Richard was slain at Bosworth by the earl of Richmond, who, being proclaimed king as Henry VII., shortly afterwards fulfilled his pledge to marry the eldest daughter of Edward IV.
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  • The most important manufacturing centres are Indianapolis, Terre Haute, Evansville, South Bend, Fort Wayne, Anderson, Hammond, Richmond, Muncie, Michigan City and Elwood, each having a gross annual product of more than $6,000,000.
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  • Other educational institutions of college rank include Vincennes University (non-sectarian), at Vincennes; Hanover College (1833, Presbyterian), at Hanover; Wabash College (1832, non-sectarian), at Crawfordsville; Franklin College (1837, Baptist), at Franklin; De Pauw University (1837, Methodist Episcopal), at Greencastle; Butler University (1855, Christian), at Indianapolis; Earlham College (1847, Friends), at Richmond; Notre Dame University (1842, Roman Catholic), at Notre Dame; Moore's Hill College (r856, Methodist Episcopal), at Moore's Hill; the University of Indianapolis (nonsectarian), a loosely affiliated series of schools at Indianapolis, centring around Butler University; and Rose Polytechnic Institute (1883, non-sectarian), at Terre Haute.
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  • The first State Hospital for the Insane was opened in Indianapolis in 1848 and became the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane in 1883; other similar institutions are the Northern Indiana Hospital at Logansport (1888), the Eastern at Richmond (1890), the Southern at Evansville (1890), and the South-eastern at North Madison (1905).
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  • Peter of Savoy, another uncle, was perhaps the most shameless of all the beggars for the kings bounty; not only was he made earl of Richmond, but his debts were repeatedly paid and great sums were given him to help his continental adventures.
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  • The sheriffdoms and most of the ministerial posts were left in the hands of Scots, though the supreme executive authority was put in.the hands of John of Brittany, earl of Richmond, the kings nephew.
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  • No one dreamed of raising against King Edward the claims of the Edward remoter heirs of John of Gauntthe your~g earl of Richmond, who represented the Beauforts by a female descent, or the king of Portugal, the grandson of Gaunts eldest daughter.
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  • His plan was to unite the causes of York and Lancaster by wedding the Lady Elizabeth, the eldest sister of the murdered princes, to Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond, a young exile who represented the very doubtful claim of the Beauforts to the Lancastrian heritage.
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  • When the queen was dead, and some rumours of the kings intentions got abroad, the public indignation was so great that Henry of Richards councillors had to warn him to disavow the Richmond projected marriage, if he wished to retain a single lands at adherenf.
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  • This time it was successfully carried out, and the earl of Richmond landed at Milford Haven with many exiles, both Yorkists and Lancastrians, and 1000 mercenaries lent him by the princess regent of France.
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  • The earl of Richmond had been selected by the conspirators as their figure-head mainly because he was known as a young man of ability, and because he was unmarried and could therefore take to wife the princess Elizabeth, and so absorb the Yorkist claim in his own.
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  • It also empowered the king to leave the crown by will if he had no legitimate issue; but the illegitimate son, the duke of Richmond, in whose favor this provision is said to have been conceived, died shortly afterwards.
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  • "Indeed, Burke," said the duke of Richmond, "you have more merit than any man in keeping us together."
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  • When he r: ached his lodgings at night after a day in the city or a skirmish in the House of Commons, Burke used to find a note from the d ke of Richmond or the marquess of Rockingham, praying him t draw a protest to be entered on the Journals of the Lords, and n fact he drew all the principal protests of his party between 17 7 and 1782.
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  • He died at his residence in Richmond Park on the 15th of February 1844, and was buried at Mortlake.
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  • Richard was a member of parliament in 1467; afterwards he joined Henry, earl of Richmond, in Brittany, returned with the earl to England, and fought at Bosworth, where he was knighted.
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  • After Lincoln's re-election in 1864 Blair thought that his former close personal relations with the Confederate leaders might aid in bringing about a cessation of hostilities, and with Lincoln's consent went unofficially to Richmond and induced President Jefferson Davis to appoint commissioners to confer with representatives of the United States.
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  • Their son Edmund, being half brother of Henry VI., was created by that king earl of Richmond, and having married Margaret Beaufort, only daughter of John, duke of Somerset, died more than two months before their only child, Henry, was born in Pembroke Castle in January 1457.
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  • The espousals had taken place at Richmond in 1502, and the marriage was celebrated in Scotland the year after.
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  • (old British history and Welsh, brought from Gloddaeth), a harp dated 1568, torques (torchau), &c. Henry VII., then earl of Richmond, is said to have been concealed here in the reign of Richard III., when the lord of Mostyn was Richard ap Howel.
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  • Richmond, the widow of Dean Richmond; the building contained in 1908 more than 14,000 volumes.
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  • Batavia was the home during his last years of Dean Richmond (1804-1866), a capitalist, a successful shipper and wholesaler of farm produce, vice-president (1853-1864) and president (1864-1866) of the New York Central railway, and a prominent leader of the Democratic party in New York state.
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  • A member of this house, Thomas White, whilst mayor of Tenby, did signal service to the Lancastrian cause in 1471 by harbouring Jasper Tudor, earl of Pembroke, and his nephew Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond (afterwards King Henry VII.), prior to their escape to France.
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  • During the latter part of the Siege of Richmond, the poor suffered very much indeed.
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  • The tower at Richmond probably replaced an earlier timber belfry.
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  • This began through staff's close observation of their community in Richmond and surrounding boroughs.
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  • In these the Richmond cachet is in black and the New Plymouth cachet in red as in the second example.
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  • Tucked away down cobbled Ryders Wynd in Richmond is the Richmondshire Museum.
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  • The joy and rejoicing of the colored people when the United States army marched into Richmond defies description.
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  • Richmond & Zetland Harriers Sports club involved in road running, track and field, fell running and multi discipline.
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  • It was built by Alan the earl of Richmond who also built Richmond Castle and it belonged to the earl's brother Ribald.
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  • New suburbs shot up around Richmond, whose residents are predominantly ethnic Chinese.
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  • Richmond Town Hall will host the photographic exhibition, showing the 2nd Battalion between 1952 and 1956.
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  • We also have the fiche for Croydon, Kingston and Richmond.
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  • It involves the construction of a dual carriageway flyover from Richmond Hill Bridge over Hunslet Road and on to the Hunslet Distributor.
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  • Awash with parks and green open space, Richmond seems idyllic.
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  • Conservative Richmond has reduced landfill by 20,000 tons a year.
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  • Despite consulting the linesman, referee Richmond adjudged that the goal would stand.
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  • On arrival at Apia, we found that the American man-of-war Richmond had come into port.
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  • I had a deep, almost primal urge to corpse Kevin Richmond.
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  • Organic World in Friars Stile Road, Richmond Hill, is to be renamed The Real Butchers to avoid misleading the public.
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  • Thursday 14th March Report says foot-and-mouth pyres pose no lasting risk The risks posed by foot-and-mouth pyres are to be discussed in Richmond.
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  • Some of the key team members Steve Eagle - General Manager I am based in the Richmond campus with overall responsibility for both campuses.
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  • Richmond An affluent suburb in South West London where Robin Dunstan lived with his parents.
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  • Two Early 18th century sundials restored at Richmond Yorkshire - Alan Smith 35.
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  • Gentlemen are required to wear jackets and either ties, cravats or polo neck sweaters in the Richmond Enclosure.
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  • Richmond man in court A RICHMOND, Whitehaven, man is to face trial at Carlisle Crown Court over an alleged sexual touching.
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  • The railroad and station buildings boosted tourist trade into Richmond, also gave the ordinary townsfolk better facility to travel.
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  • New Richmond Utilities - Locally owned and operated electric, water and wastewater utility, New Richmond, Wisconsin, USA.
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  • Kramer is fighting Richmond Park, the seat vacated by Dr. Jenny Tonge.
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  • A new purpose-built workhouse was erected on Grove Road in Richmond in 1786-7.
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  • J., founded in 1812 by the General Assembly; the Auburn Theological Seminary at Auburn, N.Y., founded in 1819 by the synod of Geneva, and afterwards associated with the New School; a school at Hampden Sidney, Virginia, founded by the synod of Virginia in 1824, named Union Theological Seminary in Virginia after 1826, supported after 1828 by the synods of Virginia and North Carolina, and in 1898 removed to Richmond, Va.; the Western Theological Seminary, founded at Allegheny (Pittsburg), Pa., in 1827 by the General Assembly; the Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Columbia, South Carolina, founded in 1828 by the synod of South Carolina; Lane Theological Seminary, founded independently in 1829 by the New School at Cincinnati, Ohio; and Union Theological Seminary, founded in 1836 by independent action of New School men, in New York City.
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  • The opening of M'Clellan's Peninsula Campaign (see Yorktown; Seven Days, &c.) in 1862 caused great apprehension in Richmond, and in May 1862 some of the government records were packed up and preparations made to ship them to a place of safety.
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  • Grant began the final campaign against Richmond in May 1864 (see Wilderness and Petersburg).
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  • The charm of the Thames is indeed maintained throughout its course; the view of the rich valley from Richmond Hill, of the outskirts of London, is celebrated; the river is practically the only physical attribute to the beauty of the metropolis itself, and the estuary, with its burden of shipping and its industrial activity, is no less admirable.
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  • Tactically the Confederates were almost always victorious, strategically, Grant, disposing of greatly superior forces, pressed back Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia to the lines of Richmond and Petersburg, while above all, in pursuance of his explicit policy of " attrition," the Federal leader used his men with a merciless energy that has few, if any, parallels in modern history.
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  • He was one of the commissioners to treat at the Hampton Roads Conference in 1865 (see Lincoln, Abraham), and after the surrender of General Lee was summoned by President Lincoln to Richmond to confer regarding the restoration of Virginia in the Union.
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  • Bute filled the offices of ranger of Richmond Forest, governor of the Charterhouse, chancellor of Marischal College, Aberdeen (1761), trustee of the British Museum (1765), president of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (1780) and commissioner of Chelsea hospital.
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  • Johnston had, long ere this, fallen back from Manassas towards Richmond, and the two armies were in touch when a serious check was given to McClellan by the brilliant successes of Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley.
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  • Richmond, though no longer of paramount importance, was no less firmly held than Petersburg, and along the whole long line fighting went on with little interruption.
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  • Between this and North Wall the river is crossed by twelve bridges, which, in order from west to east, are these: - Sarah Bridge, the bridge of the North Wall extension railway; King's, commemorating a visit of George IV.; Victoria or Barrack; Queen's; Whitworth, of interest as occupying the site where a bridge has stood since the 12th century; Richmond, Grattan and Wellington; O'Connell, Butt and a swivel bridge carrying a loop railway.
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  • Henry, the Duke of Richmond, made war upon him and defeated him in a great battle.
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  • In Richmond, Virginia, one Saturday morning, an old man went into the market to buy something.
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  • A thank you ceremony was held in the radiology department on Thursday 4th April in honor of the Richmond League of Friends.
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  • The first stage of these works will be the relining of the water main, which lies underneath Richmond Road.
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  • He reminds us that the seminal thinkers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century were Mahan, Corbett and Richmond, not Laughton.
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  • By Richmond I raised my knees Supine on the floor of a narrow canoe.
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  • A special thank-you to Sheila Richmond who has helped us at busy times.
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  • I have lived in Richmond, England the past two years doing my undergrad degree at the American University there.
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  • Upcoming elections in the London Boro of Richmond upon Thames Election Last Held Time between elections in years.
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  • First water closets, designed by Sir John Harrington, installed at the Queen 's Palace, Richmond.
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  • The March and Charlton Stands are situated in the Richmond Enclosure and there is access to the Winners ' Enclosure and Parade Ring.
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  • Emily Richmond is an award-winning journalist and co-host of The Pet Cast, a twice-weekly podcast and Internet radio program about companion animals.
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  • Richmond and her miniature schnauzer compete in agility trials, and serve as pet therapy volunteers at a local hospital.
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  • Her expertise has led to everything from speaking spots on TV shows to the founding of Face Works Day Spa in Richmond, Virginia.
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  • It is already flying off the shelves in his hometown of Richmond, Virginia.
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  • Fey is married to composer Jeff Richmond, and the couple has a daughter, Alice.
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  • Tina Fey married Jeff Richmond on June 3, 2001 and the couple has one daughter, Alice Zenobia Richmond, born September 10, 2005.
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  • Richmond was a composer on Saturday Night Live and provides the music for Fey's series, 30 Rock.
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  • Her husband Jeff Richmond told Vanity Fair that Fey had been shocked, but "she just thought somebody marked her with a pen."
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  • The University of Richmond website provides a list of interesting facts about the water cycle and an animated illustration to teach children about precipitation, evaporation, condensation, and saturation.
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  • During the Civil War, the South experienced the loss of its largest munitions lab in Richmond on Friday the 13th in an explosion that killed over sixty-eight people, most of them young female employees.
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  • Chair Yoga: A Seated Practice with Ann Richmond is a gentle practice that enhances all levels of fitness.
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  • Access America itself is headquartered in Richmond, Virginia.
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  • Cohn comes from Richmond, Vermont and lost his son in a car accident in 2006.
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  • When southern soldiers first showed up in Richmond, the uniforms of Confederate soldiers were anything but uniform.
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  • Richmond offers an abundance of international cuisine.
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