How to use Rice-flour in a sentence

rice-flour
  • Japanese cement, for uniting surfaces of paper, is made by mixing rice-flour with water and boiling it.

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  • Young men are pounding rice flour in mortars using heavy wooden pestles.

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  • You can substitute the whole wheat flour for rice flour or any other flour you would like to, especially if you have a dog with allergies.

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  • Authentic Foods crust is made with rice flour and almond meal flours.

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  • Ezekiel gluten-free bread products use alternative grains such as white rice flour and brown rice flour.

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  • Some of the alternative flours used such as brown rice flour taste best when fresh.

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  • For a delicious nutty taste, try adding brown rice flour to your recipe.

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  • Gluten-Free Pantry Yankee Cornbread Mix is another option which uses corn meal and white rice flour.

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  • The addition of white rice flour will give your corn bread a light, airy quality.

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  • Because of the sweet element, you may want to stick with flours which do not have a strong savory flavor such as brown rice flour.

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  • Brown or white rice flour or a pre-mixed gluten free bread offer some good options.

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  • If you have ever tried to make your own gluten-free bread by simply substituting rice flour for wheat flour, you know how disappointing the result can be.

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  • Food for Life is the maker of the famous Ezekiel bread that is made from rice flour.

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  • Egg-free, rice-flour free, no white sugar, and all sorts of modifications now mark the disparities between gluten-free recipes.

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  • Decades ago, white rice flour used in a combination mix of complementary flours dominated the gluten-free market.

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  • However, white rice flour or any rice flour is usually very powdery in texture and must be used in conjunction with binders such as xanthan gum in order for the flour to bind properly.

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  • White rice flour is amongst the least nutritious of the gluten-free flours, and many chefs now prefer to experiment with more nourishing flours such as almond and coconut, or even buckwheat.

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  • White rice flour is very low in fiber, though it is a common ingredient in gluten-free baked goods.

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  • Brown rice flour is only slightly more fibrous, and corn flour, though more fibrous, can produce a very dense product when not used in a mix.

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  • White rice flour is a common ingredient in all-purpose gluten-free flour mixtures.

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  • Brown rice flour is considerably heavier and more nutritious than white rice flour.

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  • While white rice flour can be used alone, brown rice flour is too heavy for most recipes.

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  • Mochiko flour is similar to white rice flour but is derived from mocha rice.

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  • Due to its texture, you should plan on using the rice flour up to a one-half of the total amount of flour for which your recipe needs.

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  • The taste of rice flour can add some interesting nuances to savory rice flour recipes as well.

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  • A blend of coconut flour and sweet rice flour can make a scrumptious coating for coconut shrimp.

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  • For recipes that call for flour-based topping, you can substitute rice flour.

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  • You can also try a delicious topping for your favorite sweet potato recipe by cutting butter into a mixture of brown sugar and rice flour.

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  • You can also use rice flour to thicken sauces or as an emulsifying agent.

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  • For a light, delicious biscuit, you can use white rice flour to lend a light, airy quality to your recipe.

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  • You can also use white rice flour in your favorite crepe or pancake recipe.

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  • The possibilities are endless once you get used to the way rice flour handles.

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  • You can take full advantage of the versatility of using rice flour in your favorite recipes by incorporating it into a gluten-free, all-purpose blend.

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  • Proper storage of your rice flour is essential.

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  • While white rice flour has reasonably long shelf life, whole grain flours like brown rice flour are best used fresh.

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  • Rice flour recipes show how versatile and workable rice flour is for gluten-free cooking and baking.

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  • While not very nutritious, white rice flour adds its own light texture and also offers a relatively long shelf life.

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  • Making your own rice flour can be a complicated process.

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  • However, there is more than one way to make rice flour and some methods are far more difficult than others.

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  • You can also ensure that your rice flour is a fresh, gluten-free product when you prepare the flour in your own kitchen.

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  • These factors aside, it is a much simpler act to buy rice flour in a health food store than to grind it yourself.

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  • Moreover, freshness and quality are not usually a big issue with store-bought rice flour as it stores easily and safely in a cool dry place.

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  • The simplest method of preparing rice flour is to purchase whole grain white, wild, or brown rice and grind it in either a flour mill or a sturdy coffee grinder.

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  • A weak coffee grinder will simply break from the pressure of the task and for this reason, some individuals employ a more "wet" method of grinding rice flour.

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  • Another way to prepare rice flour is to purchase your rice and soak it overnight so that any dirt or dark particles rise to the surface and can be removed.

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  • It is very important to ensure that your rice flour has been dried thoroughly before you move it into a storage container.

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  • Also, rice flour can be ground into a cornmeal texture or even more finely into a very powdery form.

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  • Fine rice flour may be better for pie crusts and certain baked goods, but a coarser flour is better for pancakes, breads, and hot cereals.

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  • Brown rice flour has a nutty taste, whereas amaranth flour has more of a grassy, pepper-like taste.

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  • The Six Food Intolerance Living website includes a whole grain blend of gluten-free flours including brown rice flour and flaxseed meal which works well in most biscuit recipes.

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