Rice sentence example

rice
  • The rice and beans were bland until mixed together.
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  • Then she used wild and long grain rice instead of stuffing.
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  • It smelled of chicken and rice and something sweet.
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  • Behind their villages the rice-fields usually spread, and rice, which is the staple food of the people, is the principal article of agriculture among them.
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  • "There's some rice..." she offered, "and the carrots…" but he continued to shoo her out of the room.
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  • Next to Kris's whiskey Andre kept at the wet bar was Tamer's favorite vodka, Kiki's rice wine, and Erik's diet soda.
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  • The staple crop is rice, which is grown on 77 per cent.
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  • When she returned, Lana identified rice and beans.
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  • The principal articles of its trade are rice and cotton, some sugar cane (nai shakar), flax (Katun) and hemp (Kanab) are also grown.
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  • The river highways bring down inexhaustible supplies of rice to Moulmein, the chief town of the district, as also of the province of Tenasserim.
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  • Rice is cultivated in low-lying, moist lands, where spring and summer temperatures are high.
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  • In Lombardy a six-year shift is common: either wheat, clover, maize, rice, rice, rice (the last year manured with lupines) or maize, wheat followed by clover, clover, clover ploughed in, and rice, rice and rice manured with lupines.
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  • Wheat and the date palm seem to have been indigenous, and the latter is still one of the chief poductions of the country, but in later years rice has taken the place of wheat as the staff of life.
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  • The country, mountainous in its southern portion, possesses extensive forests, fertile valleys, producing rice, wheat and other grains in abundance, and rich pasturages.
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  • In Europe a number of " long-snouted " beetles, such as the raspberry weevils (Otiorhynchus picipes), the apple blossom weevil (Anthonomus pomorum), attack fruit; others, as the " corn weevils " (Calandra oryzae and C. granaria), attack stored rice and corn; while others produce swollen patches on roots (Ceutorhynchus sulcicollis), &c. All these Curculionidae are very timid creatures, falling to the ground at the least shock.
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  • When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, I was an undergraduate at Rice University.
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  • Panama has had an important trade: its imports, about twice as valuable as its exports, include cotton goods, haberdashery, coal, flour, silk goods and rice; the most valuable exports are gold, india-rubber, mother of pearl and cocobolo wood.
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  • The chief seaport is Negapatam, and the principal export is rice to Ceylon.
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  • The cocoa nut, maize, sugar-cane, coffee, cotton, rice and tobacco (which last does not suffer like other crops from the locusts) do well.
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  • Rice doesn't naturally have vitamin A. Enter transgenics.
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  • Can you guess how many lives these two varieties of rice have already saved?
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  • The second woman with the flushed face returned with a plate heaped with half a cooked chicken smelling of garlic and spices, rice, and fried plantains.
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  • The province produces much wheat, barley, rice, millet, cotton, but the authorities every now and then prohibiting the export of cereals, the people generally sow just as much as they think will suffice for their own wants.
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  • Macabebe's principal industries are the cultivation of rice and sugar cane, the distilling of nipa alcohol, and the weaving of hemp and cotton fabrics.
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  • Owing to its excellent harbour Baku is a chief depot for merchandise coming from Persia and Transcaspia - raw cotton, silk, rice, wine, fish, dried fruit and timber - and for Russian manufactured goods.
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  • The annual average value maybe put at not quite £2,000,000, machinery and tin-plate being a long way the most important items. There is further a small transit trade through Transcaucasia from Persia to the value of less than half a million sterling annually, and chiefly in carpets, cocoons and silk, wool, rice and boxwood; and further a sea-borne trade between Persia and Caucasian.
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  • Vegetation is prolific. Rice is grown by the natives, but the sago tree is of far greater importance to them.
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  • The western portion of the district is high-lying and produces the finer qualities of rice.
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  • The soil is admirably cultivated, the principal crops being wheat, rice, barley, maize, millet, lucerne, tobacco, vegetables and fruit.
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  • By one count, rice is the principle source of calories for about half the planet.
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  • It was fit that I should live on rice, mainly, who love so well the philosophy of India.
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  • Her gaze dropped to her plate, and she stared at the runny beans and floating rice.
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  • By the time Lana caught up, he'd had been lured into one of the buildings by a little girl with a handful of uncooked rice.
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  • Jack was obediently following the girl in yellow that fed him rice.
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  • In the Yeyaman tract the chief crop is rice.
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  • The soil is in general very fertile, the principal products being rice, maize and pulse (kachang) in the lower grounds, and cinchona, coffee and tea, as well as cocoa, tobacco and fibrous plants in the hills.
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  • The other cereals, millet and panico sorgo (Panicum italicum), have lost much of their importance in consequence of the introduction of maize and rice.
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  • These districts are pastoral, and the lower fertile lands are cultivated for sugar, cotton, maize, tobacco, rice, beans, and mandioca - sugar being the principal product.
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  • The production of other cereals decreased during the latter half of the 19th century: oats, from 1,959,620 bushels in 1879 to 1,611,000 bushels in 1907; wheat, from 587,925 bushels in 1859 to 22,000 in 1907; rye, from 39,474 bushels in 1859 to 963 bushels in 1899, after which year the crop has been negligible; and rice, from 2,719,856 lb in 1849 to about 1,080,000 lb in 1907.
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  • The largest Indian-corn producing districts are nearly the same as those which produce the most cotton; oats and wheat are grown chiefly in the north-eastern quarter of the state, and rice in the south-western quarter.
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  • The seeds are harvested from various grasses, especially from Aristida oligantha, a species known as " ant rice," which often grows in quantity close to the site selected for the nest, but the statement that the ants deliberately sow this grass is an error, due, according to Wheeler, to the sprouting of germinating seeds.
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  • The crops chiefly cultivated were wheat, millet, barley, beans and lentils; to which it is supposed, on grounds not improbable, may be added rice and cotton.
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  • Rice and cocoanuts are the principal agricultural products of the town.
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  • Their chief food is rice and fish.
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  • In 2005, a biotech firm called Syngenta produced a similar rice it called "Golden Rice 2."
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  • It was, for nearly two years after this, rye and Indian meal without yeast, potatoes, rice, a very little salt pork, molasses, and salt; and my drink, water.
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  • They live exclusively on rice.
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  • The soil is very fertile, and many of the inhabitants have acquired much wealth from the cultivation of rice.
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  • In planting rice three methods are in use: the cultivation of swamp-rice in irrigated fields; the planting of ploughed areas; and the planting of hill-rice by sowing each grain separately in holes bored for the purpose.
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  • In the irrigated fields the rice plants are first grown in nurseries, and are subsequently transplanted when they have reached a certain stage of development.
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  • Rice is grown in such quantities as to procure for Formosa, in former days, the title of the " granary of China "; and the sweet potato, taro, millet, barley, wheat and maize are also cultivated.
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  • Cotton, Indian corn, sweet potatoes, yams and rice are small crops.
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  • East of the town rises Mayon, an active volcano, and the rich volcanic soil in this region produces hemp, rice and coco-nuts.
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  • The principal crops are barley,',rice, wheat, other food-grains, pulse, sugar-cane and opium.
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  • In this region the sandstone rocks are generally overlaid with heavy black soil formed from the decaying trap, which is principally devoted to the cultivation of the spring crops, wheat and grain, while rice and hill millets are sown in the lighter and more sandy soils.
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  • In the latter are grown wheat and other spring crops, while the lighter kinds of rice and the hill millets are all that the poorer land can bear.
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  • The eastern part of the Nagpur country and the Chhattisgarh plain, comprising the Mahanadi basin, form the great rice tract of the province, its heavy rainfall and hard yellowish soil rendering it excellently adapted for the growth of this crop.
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  • In the autumn months malarial fever is prevalent in all thickly forested tracts and also in the rice country; but on the whole the province is considered to be healthy, and as the rains break fairly regularly in June and produce an immediate fall in the temperature, severe heat is only experienced for a period of from two to three months.
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  • Broadly speaking, the northern districts of the province produce principally cold weather crops, such as wheat and grain, and the eastern ones principally rice.
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  • Rice is an important crop in Damoh, Jubbulpore, Mandla, Seoni and Chanda, and is the chief staple of Bhandara, Balaghat, and the two eastern districts of Raipur and Bilaspur.
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  • The chief exports are raw cotton, rice, wheat, oil-seeds, hides and lac. The exports of wheat are liable to extreme fluctuations, especially during famine periods.
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  • The black soil of the district yields crops of which the principal are millet, other food-grains, pulse, rice, cotton and oil-seeds.
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  • The imports are mainly white longcloth, grey shirting, rice, jowaree, dates and sugar.
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  • Jowaree is displacing rice as the staple food of the Somali.
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  • At the same time Musha Island, at the entrance to the Gulf of Tajura, was bought by the British " for ten bags of rice," Bab Island, in the same gulf, and Aubad Island, off Zaila, were also purchased, the object of the East India Company being to obtain a suitable place " for the harbour of their ships without any prohibition whatever."
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  • The chief imports are textile fabrics, rice and petroleum.
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  • This quarter has been pierced by several straight roads, one of which, crossing the Mahmudiya canal by the Pont Neuf, leads to Gabbari, the most westerly part of the city and an industrial and manufacturing region, possessing asphalt works and oil, rice and paper mills.
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  • The principal products are millet, sesamum and sugar produced from toddy-palms in the riverain districts, which also grow rice, grain, peas and beans.
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  • Considerable tracts have also been diked and reclaimed for cotton, sugar and especially for rice culture.
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  • It is in and along the borders of this coast swamp region that most of the rice and much of the sugar cane 1 A sixth, less characteristic, might be included, viz.
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  • The total value of all farm products in 1899 was $72,667,302, of which $59,276,092 was the value of the distinctive crops - cotton, sugar and rice.
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  • Its hold upon the delta region is, however, almost unchallenged, especially since the rice farmers have found in the prairie lands that excel the delta for their purposes.
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  • Rice farming, which had its beginning immediately after the Civil War and first became prominent in the 'seventies, has developed enormously since 1880.
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  • The " buckshot clays " of the backlands, which are so stiff that they can scarcely be ploughed until flooded and softened, and are remarkably retentive of moisture, are ideal rice soil; but none of the alluvial lands has an underlying hardpan, and they cannot as a rule be drained sufficiently to make the use of heavy harvesting machinery possible.
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  • All the prairies district - the centre of which is Crowley - is becoming one great rice field.
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  • Some rice also is grown on the lowlands of the Mississippi valley, notably in Plaquemines, Jefferson and Lafourche parishes.
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  • Since that time select Japanese species, chosen for superior milling qualities, have been widely introduced, as the market prejudice in favour of head rice made the large percentage of broken rice a heavy handicap to the farmers.
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  • A strong tendency to run to red rice (hardier, but not so marketable) has been a second great difficulty to overcome.
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  • Irrigation is almost entirely confined to rice farms. In the prairie region there is abundant water at depths of too to 400 ft.
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  • The irrigated rice area increased 92.9% from 1899 to 1902, and the construction cost of irrigation works ($4747,359 in 1902; $12.25 per irrigated acre) 87.7% in the same years.
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  • Of the total irrigated area for rice of 387,580 acres in 1902, 310,670 acres were in the parishes of Calcasieu, Acadia and Vermilion.
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  • The total value of cereal products in 1899 was $ 1 4,49 1, 79 6, including Indian corn valued at $10,327,723 and rice valued at $4, 0 44,4 8 9; in 1907 it was more than $27,300,000, including Indian corn valued at $19,600,000, rice valued at $7,378,000 and oats valued at $223,000.
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  • Manufacturing industries are for the most part closely related to the products of the soil, about two-thirds of the value of all manufactures in Igoo and in 1905 being represented by sugar and molasses refining, lumber and timber products, cotton-seed oil and cake, and rice cleaned and polished.
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  • Rice is milled at New Orleans, Crowley, Abbeville, Gayden, Jennings and Lake Charles.
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  • In 1907 active preliminary work was begun on the Louisiana section of a great interstate inland waterway projected by the national government between the Mississippi and Rio Grande rivers, almost parallel to the Gulf Coast and running through the rice and truck-farm districts from the Teche to the Mermenton river (92 m.).
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  • Yams and sweet-potatoes, yuccas, malangas, cacao, rice - which is one of the most important foods of the people, but which is not yet widely cultivated on a profitable basis - and Indian corn, which grows everywhere and yields two crops yearly, may be mentioned also.
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  • In the river valley maize, rice, cotton and other crops are cultivated.
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  • Apart from the arid wastes of the Karst, the soil is well adapted for the growing of cereals, especially Indian corn; olives, vines, mulberries, figs, pomegranates, melons, oranges, lemons, rice and tobacco flourish in Herzegovina and the more sheltered portions of Bosnia.
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  • It is the chief point of exportation for a very rich province, which produces sugar, indigo, Indian corn, copra, and especially rice.
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  • There are several rice mills here.
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  • Perry, erected in commemoration of his victory on Lake Erie in 1813, is in Wade Park, where there is also a statue of Harvey Rice (1800-1891), who reformed the Ohio public school system and wrote Pioneers of the Western Reserve (1882) and Sketches of Western Life (1888).
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  • The Cambodians show skill in working gold and silver; earthenware, bricks, mats, fans and silk and cotton fabrics, are also produced to some small extent, but fishing and the cultivation of rice and in a minor degree of tobacco, coffee, cotton, pepper, indigo, maize, tea and sugar are the only industries worthy of the name.
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  • Rice, dried fish, beans, pepper and oxen are the chief elements in the export trade of the country, which is in the hands of Chinese.
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  • A considerable trade is carried on in the export of horses, buffaloes, goats, dinding (dried flesh), skins, birds' nests, wax, rice, katyang, sappanwood, &c. Sumbawa entered into treaty relations with the Dutch East India Company in 1674.
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  • Its principal imports are coffee (of which it is the greatest continental market), tea, sugar, spices, rice, wine (especially from Bordeaux), lard (from Chicago), cereals, sago, dried fruits, herrings, wax (from Morocco and Mozambique), tobacco, hemp, cotton (which of late years shows a large increase), wool, skins, leather, oils, dyewoods, indigo, nitrates, phosphates and coal.
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  • This supersedes artificial irrigation, and the plains so watered yield abundantly in rice, jute and mustard.
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  • The surrounding country, which is traversed by gravel roads leading to the principal towns of the province, is fertile and well cultivated, producing sugar, tobacco and rice in abundance.
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  • The staple crop is rice, but orchards and gardens are also common.
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  • Although an agricultural country, Brazil does not produce all its own bread and meat, and the imports of wheat, wheat flour, rice, fish, jerked beef and preserved meats, lard, butter, beans, potatoes, packed fruits and vegetables, Indian corn and other food-stuffs, are surprisingly large.
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  • Rice has been cultivated in places, but without much success, although the quality produced compared favourably with the imported article.
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  • In the southern districts almonds, figs, rice and olives are grown.
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  • Coffee, tobacco, rice and various fruits of superior quality are produced with ease, but agriculture is neglected and production is limited to domestic needs.
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  • The surrounding country is very fertile and produces large quantities of rice, as well as Indian corn, tobacco, sugar, coffee and a great variety of fruits.
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  • In the tropical district of the Limpopo valley there is some cultivation of the coffee-tree, and this region is also adapted for the growing of tea, sugar, cotton and rice.
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  • The Chinese used also to employ it largely, and the Persians and Spaniards still mix it with their rice.
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  • The chief elements of the native diet are rice, fish and poultry; vegetables and pork are also eaten.
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  • ==Agriculture and other Industries== The cultivation of rice, which is grown mainly in the small deltas along the coast and in some districts gives two crops annually, and fishing, together with fish-salting and the preparation of nuoc-mam, a sauce made from decaying fish, constitute the chief industries of Annam.
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  • Besides rice, the products of the countryinclude tea, tobacco, cotton, cinnamon, precious woods and rubber; coffee, pepper, sugar-canes and jute are cultivated to a minor extent.
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  • The imports (£284,824 in 1905) include rice, iron goods, flour, wine, opium and cotton goods.
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  • In the next zone are grown many of the cereals (including rice), beans, tobacco, sugar-cane, peaches, apricots, quinces and strawberries.
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  • Rice is a common article of food and is one of the principal imports.
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  • The imports are chiefly rice (from India) and cotton goods for local use, and food stuffs, machinery, hardware and manufactured goods for Rhodesia.
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  • The grateful perfumed powder abir or rand y is composed either of rice, flour, mango bark or deodar wood, camphor and aniseed, or of sandalwood or wood aloes, and zerumbet, zedoary, rose flowers, camphor and civet.
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  • As compared with the Hindu, the Burmese wear silk instead of cotton, and eat rice instead of the cheaper grains; they are of an altogether freer and less servile, but also of a less practical character.
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  • The bestowal of alms, offerings of rice to priests, the founding of a monastery, erection of pagodas, with which the country is crowded, the building of a bridge or rest-house for the convenience of travellers are all works of religious merit, prompted, not by love of one's fellowcreatures, but simply and solely for one's own future advantage.
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  • The food of the people consists as a rule of boiled rice with salted fresh or dried fish, salt, sessamum-oil, chillies, onions, turmeric, boiled vegetables, and occasionally meat of some sort from elephant flesh down to smaller animals, fowls and almost everything except snakes, by way of condiment.
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  • The staple crop of the province in both Upper and Lower Burma is rice.
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  • As rice has to be transplanted as well as sown and irrigated, it needs a considerable amount of labour expended on it; and the Burman has the reputation of being a somewhat indolent cultivator.
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  • Salted fish forms, along with boiled rice, one of the chief articles of food among the Burmese; and as the price of salted fish is gradually rising along with the prosperity and purchasing power of the population, this industry is on a very sound basis.
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  • The chief articles of export from Burma are rice and timber.
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  • In 1895 the quantity of rice exported in the foreign and coastal trade amounted to 1,419,173 tons valued at Rs.9,77, 66, 1 3 2, and in 1905 the figures were 2,187,764 tons, value Rs.
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  • England takes by far the greatest share of Burma's rice, though large quantities are also consumed in Germany, while France, Italy, Belgium and Holland also consume a considerable amount.
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  • In 1900 over one million tons of rice were shipped to India during the famine there.
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  • Cocoa, rice and cotton were also increasingly cultivated and the fall in the value of rubber led to a much larger collection of copal, the amount exported, 2,139 tons in 1911, being 8,719 in 1916.
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  • Situated at the intersection of two roads - from Kulja to Tashkent, and from Semipalatinsk to Kashgar - Vyernyi carries on an active trade in wheat, rice, corn, tea, oil and tobacco.
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  • Tin and gold are worked in the district, in which also good coffee and rice are grown.
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  • Other beetles, such as the rice weevil (Calandra oryza), also attack dried tobacco.
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  • The imports to Jidda in the same year were £1,405,000, largely consisting of rice, wheat and other food stuffs from India; the exports, which have dwindled away in late years, amounted in 1904 to only £25,000.
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  • The chief items of imports are arms and ammunition, rice, coffee and piece goods; the staple export is dates, which in a good year accounts for nearly half the total; much of the trade is in the hands of British Indians, and of the shipping 92% is British.
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  • The principal trade centre of the Arabian side of the Persian Gulf is Bahrein; the total volume of trade of which amounted in 1904 to £1,900,000, nearly equally divided between imports and exports; rice, piece goods, &c., form the bulk of the former, while pearls are the most valuable part of the latter.
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  • To the south and west extends a rich agricultural district, noted for its rice.
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  • In 1903 the harbour was entered by 66 vessels of about 25,000 tons, engaged in the exportation of grain, rice and fruit, and the importation of guano.
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  • The town's inhabitants are farmers, and rice is the principal crop. Pangasinan and Ilocano are the languages spoken.
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  • Rice is an important crop in the inundated lands of Lambayeque and Libertad.
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  • Cacao, tobacco, cotton, rice and indigo are grown in the neighbouring country, and the town has a considerable trade in these and other commodities; it also manufactures sugar, fans and woven fabrics.
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  • Patches of land, chiefly around the coast, have been laid under rice, sweet potatoes and yams, but the island is hardly able to raise a home-supply of vegetables.
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  • The situation is low and unhealthy, but the territory is fertile, rice, cereals and sugar being grown.
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  • Other products are rice, corn, copra, cacao, sugar, cattle and horses.
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  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.
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  • The principal exports are salt, minerals, opium, cotton, cereals, wool and live stock; and the imports cloth-goods, coffee, rice and petroleum.
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  • The principal crops are millet, rice, other food grains, pulse, oilseeds, cotton and tobacco, with a little coffee.
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  • Agricultural products include rice and maize (the principal crops), wheat, barley and oats.
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  • These produce cotton, rice, sugar-cane, wheat, coffee, Indian corn, barley, potatoes and fruit.
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  • Most of its inhabitants are engaged in rice culture.
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  • It is particularly unfortunate that September should be the season of greatest typhoon frequency, for the earlier varieties of rice flower in that month and a heavy storm does much damage.
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  • For example, the ideographs signifying rice or metal or water in Chinese were used tc convey the same ideas in Japanese.
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  • But although the use of the potters wheel had long been understood, the objects produced were simple utensils tc contain offerings of rice, fruit and fish at the austere ceremonials of the Shinto faith, jars for storing seeds, and vessels for commor domestic use.
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  • 1-liguchi of Hirado is to be classed with ceramrsts of the new school on account of one ware only, namely, porcelain having translucid M d decoration, the so-called grains of rice of American ~ collectors, designated holaru-de (firefly style) in Japan.
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  • At the close of the 7th century the emperor Mommu is said to have enacted a law that wealthy persons living near the highways must supply rice to travellers, and in 745 an empress (Koken) directed that a stock of medical necessaries must be kept at the postal stations.
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  • Rice, wheat, barley, oats, Indian corn, various kinds of millet, pulses, oil-seeds, tobacco, cotton, indigo, opium, flax and hemp and sugar-cane, are the principal agricultural products of Bhagalpur district.
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  • It possesses excellent wharves, does a large import trade in coal, and has shipbuilding yards, breweries, distilleries, cloth aid paper factories, glass-works, copper-works, soap-works and rice mills.
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  • The intermediate rice plains stretch inland for about 40 m.
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  • The intermediate rice plains, known as the Mogholbandi, from their having been regularly settled by the Mahommedans, have yielded to the successive dynasties and conquerors of Orissa almost the whole of the revenues derived from the province.
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  • Rice forms the staple product of the district; its three chief varieties are biali or early rice, sarad or winter rice, and dalua or spring rice.
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  • The other cereal crops consist of mandua (a grass-like plant producing a coarse grain resembling rice), wheat, barley, and china, a rice-like cereal.
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  • The river valleys in the vicinity produce cotton, pepper, tobacco, rice, Indian corn and fruit.
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  • Notwithstanding its mountainous character, Morelos is one of the most flourishing agricultural states of Mexico, producing sugar, rice, Indian corn, coffee, wheat, fruit and vegetables.
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  • Lake Charles is the chief centre of lumber manufacture in the state, and has rice mills, car shops and an important trade in wool.
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  • The soil throughout the greater portion of Bastar consists of light clay, with an admixture of sand, suited for raising rice and wet crops.
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  • The principal products are rice, oil-seeds, lac, tussur silk, horns, hides, wax and a little iron.
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  • Their food consists of meat, chiefly pork, turnips, rice, barley-meal and tea made from the brick-tea of China.
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  • Their favourite drink is thong, distilled from rice or barley and millet, and Marwa, beer made from fermented millet.
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  • The commodities otherwise mostly dealt in are opium, tea, rice, oil, raw cotton, fish and silk.
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  • Rice, cotton, sugar-cane, yucas (Manihot aipi) and tropical fruits are produced in the irrigated valleys of the coast, and wheat, Indian corn, barley, potatoes, coffee, coca, &c., in the upland regions.
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  • The principal exports are rice and teak, and the principal imports, cotton and silk goods and gold-leaf.
    0
    0
  • Tea, coffee, cinchona, sugar-cane, rice, nutmegs, cloves and pepper are cultivated.
    0
    0
  • (valued at $7,130,000); the rice crop, 9,894,000 bu.
    0
    0
  • Most of the rice is raised along the seaboard, in the south-eastern corner of the state.
    0
    0
  • The highest average quantity of rough milled rice per establishment in the United States in 1905 was for Texas, where seventeen establishments produced an average of 18,598,259 ib, valued, together with that of other rice products, at $4,638,867.
    0
    0
  • Southwards of Mergui town it consists chiefly of low mangrove swamps alternating with small fertile rice plains.
    0
    0
  • The chief exports consist of rice, rattans, torches, dried fish, areca-nuts, sesamum seeds, molasses, sea-slugs, edible birds' nests and tin.
    0
    0
  • The cultivated products include coffee, the Coco-nut palm, tobacco, sugar-cane, cotton, vanilla, sorghum, earthnuts, sesame, maize, rice, beans, peas, bananas (in large quantities), yams, manioc and hemp. Animal products are ivory, hides, tortoiseshell and pearls.
    0
    0
  • Large quantities of rice are imported from German East Africa.
    0
    0
  • It produces rice, tobacco, coffee, cotton and sugar-cane, none of them important as exports.
    0
    0
  • The chief cultivation is rice, with about two acres of dry or hill rice to one of wet bottom.
    0
    0
  • Wheat, maize, rice, oil, flax and hemp, of fine quality, are grown in considerable quantities; as well as saffron, madder, liquorice, sumach, and a variety of fruits.
    0
    0
  • The principal crops are millet, rice, other food grains, pulse, oil-seeds, cotton and indigo.
    0
    0
  • Except a few acres of tobacco, all the cultivation is rice.
    0
    0
  • This tribe inhabits the deadly jungle with impunity, and cultivates cotton, rice and other ordinary crops, by the jum process described above.
    0
    0
  • Figueras is built at the foot of the Pyrenees, and on the northern edge of El Ampurdan, a fertile and well-irrigated plain,which produces wine, olives and rice,and derives its name from the seaport of Ampurias,.
    0
    0
  • Cotton, grain and rice are produced in the vicinity, and there are some manufactories, including cotton mills, a cotton-seed oil mill and planing mills.
    0
    0
  • Coco-nuts are grown in considerable quantities along the seashore, and rice is cultivated at Balek Palau and in the interior, but the jungle still spreads over wide areas.
    0
    0
  • The town is situated in the midst of a rice plain, 53 m.
    0
    0
  • Among the chief productions of the plains are rice (the staple export of the country); pepper (chiefly from Chantabun); sirih, sago, sugar-cane, coco-nut and betel, Palmyra or sugar and attap palms; many forms of banana and other fruit, such as durian, orange-pommelo, guava, bread-fruit, mango, jack fruit, pine-apple, custard-apple and mangosteen.
    0
    0
  • The staple food of the Siamese is rice and fish.
    0
    0
  • The cultivation of paddi (unhusked rice) forms the occupation of practically the whole population of Siam outside the capital.
    0
    0
  • Forty or fifty varieties of paddi are grown, and Siam rice is of the best in the world.
    0
    0
  • The tang is used for measuring rice and the sat for paddi and other grain.
    0
    0
  • Not only are rice and maize, sugar and coffee, among the widely cultivated crops, but the coco-nut, the bread-fruit, the banana and plantain, the sugar-palm, the tea-plant, the sago-palm, the coco-tree, the ground-nut, the yam, the cassava, and others besides, are of practical importance.
    0
    0
  • The principal articles of export are sugar, tobacco, copra, forest products (various gums, &c.), coffee, petroleum, tea, cinchona, tin, rice, pepper, spices and gambier.
    0
    0
  • A great proportion of the exports goes to the mother country, though a considerable quantity of rice is exported to China.
    0
    0
  • In 1803 a commission met to consider the state of the Dutch colonies, and advocated drastic administrative and commercial reforms, notably freedom' of trade in all commodities except firearms, opium, rice and wood - with coffee, pepper and spices, which were state monopolies.
    0
    0
  • Daendels, however, maintained the existing restrictions upon trade and even made rice a state monopoly.
    0
    0
  • The chief industry is silk-weaving, but there are also rice and timber mills.
    0
    0
  • The staple crop is rice.
    0
    0
  • The exports from Batavia to the other islands of the archipelago, and to the ports in the Malay Peninsula, are rice, sago, coffee, sugar, salt, oil, tobacco, teak timber and planks, Java cloths, brass wares, &c., and European, Indian and Chinese goods.
    0
    0
  • Espirito Santo is almost exclusively agricultural, sugar-cane, coffee, rice, cotton, tobacco, mandioca and tropical fruits being the principal products.
    0
    0
  • Most of the agricultural products are sent to the Peninsula; wine, figs, marble, almonds, lemons and rice to Europe and Africa.
    0
    0
  • Wherever it is possible to rear rice every other product is neglected; yet the quantity produced is not sufficient for the wants of the inhabitants.
    0
    0
  • It has a comparatively cool and healthful climate, and is pleasantly situated about midway between the Pampanga Grande and the Pampanga Chico rivers, and in a large and fertile valley of which the principal products are Indian corn, rice, sugar and tobacco.
    0
    0
  • Bananas are grown over a large and increasing area; rice, maize, barley, potatoes and beans are cultivated to some extent in the interior; cocoa, vanilla, sugar-cane, cotton and indigo are products of the warm coast-lands, but are hardly raised in sufficient quantities to meet the local demand.
    0
    0
  • On the irrigated lowlands rice, wheat and other cereals are cultivated, and exported to the highlands.
    0
    0
  • The principal crops are rice, barley, other food-grains, pulse, sugar-cane and opium.
    0
    0
  • Rice Holmes, Caesar's Conquest of Gaul (1901), in which references to earlier literature will be found.
    0
    0
  • " Tunas " or cactus fruit, red peppers, " zapotes " (the fruit of various trees), " arrayan " (Myrtus arayan), " ciruelas " or Mexican plums (Spondias), guavas, " huamuchil " (Pithecolobium dulce), tamarinds, aguacates (Persea gratissima), bananas, plantains, pineapples, grapes, oranges, lemons, limes, granadillas, chirimoyas, mammees (Mammea americana), coco-nuts, cacao, mangoes, olives, gourds and melons, are among the fruits of the country, and rice, wheat, Indian corn, beans, yams, sweet potatoes, onions and " tomatoes " (Physalis) are among its better-known food products.
    0
    0
  • In these regions, sugar, tobacco, indigo, cacao, rice, sweet potatoes, alfalfa, beans and cassava are produced, and Indian corn yields two and three crops a year.
    0
    0
  • In Europe the corn spirit sometimes immanent in the crop, sometimes a presiding deity whose life does not depend on that of the growing corn, is conceived in some districts in the form of an ox, hare or cock, in others as an old man or woman; in the East Indies and America the rice or maize mother is a corresponding figure; in classical Europe and the East we have in Ceres and Demeter, Adonis and Dionysus, and other deities, vegetation gods whose origin we can readily trace back to the rustic corn spirit.
    0
    0
  • The plain and the neighbouring valleys produce cacao, tobacco, rice and sugar-cane.
    0
    0
  • Much of the soil is still covered with forest, but it includes fertile rice land.
    0
    0
  • Sugar, rice and indigo are cultivated; salt-making is practised on the coast.
    0
    0
  • If he marries, it is to have children who may celebrate them after his death; if he has no children, he lies under the strongest obligation to adopt them from another family, ` with a view,' writes the Hindu doctor, ` to the funeral cake, the water and the solemn sacrifice.'" "May there be born in our lineage," so the Indian Manes are supposed to say, "a man to offer to us, on the thirteenth day of the moon, rice boiled in milk, honey and ghee."
    0
    0
  • Rice, which shares with millet the distinction of being the principal food-stuff of the greatest number of human beings, is not grown nearly as widely as is wheat, the staple food of the white races.
    0
    0
  • Roughly speaking, the district consists of a series of parallel ridges, whose summits are depressed into beds or hollows, along which the rivers flow; while between the ridges are low-lying rice lands, interspersed with numerous natural reservoirs.
    0
    0
  • The soil is fertile, and very highly cultivated, bearing magnificent crops of rice, sugar-cane and indigo.
    0
    0
  • The silver kettle, which fits on a ring near the top of the outer covering, has a cup-like cover in which rice is placed with a little water; the ginseng is put in the inner vessel with water, a cover is placed over the whole, and the apparatus is put on the fire.
    0
    0
  • When the rice in the cover is sufficiently cooked, the medicine is ready, and is then eaten by the patient, who drinks the ginseng tea at the same time."
    0
    0
  • Its exports, which are large, include rice, coffee of excellent quality, cacao, sugar, Indian corn, horses and cattle.
    0
    0
  • The chief exports are rice, indigo, linseed and other seeds, saltpetre and tobacco.
    0
    0
  • The valleys and slopes are carefully cultivated in fields divided by stone walls, and produce beans, peas, sweet potatoes, "Russian turnip radish," barley, a little rice and millet, the last being the staple article of diet.
    0
    0
  • All the islands possess a very fertile soil; there are forests of coco-nut palms, and among the products are rice, maize, sweetpotatoes, yams, coffee, cotton, vanilla and various tropical fruits, the papaw tree being abundant.
    0
    0
  • The agricultural products of Jalisco include Indian corn, wheat and beans on the uplands, and sugar-cane, cotton, rice, indigo and tobacco in the warmer districts.
    0
    0
  • The chief articles of import are cotton goods (European white longcloth and American grey shirting), rice and jowari, flour, dates, sugar and tobacco (the last from Rotterdam).
    0
    0
  • The principal industries of Maranhao are agricultural, the river valleys and coastal zone being highly fertile and being devoted to the cultivation of sugar-cane, cotton, rice, coffee, tobacco, mandioca and a great variety of fruits.
    0
    0
  • Agriculture has also greatly declined, the state producing for export only a comparatively small quantity of cotton, rice, sugar and aguardiente.
    0
    0
  • Its culms and leaves afford excellent fodder for cattle; and the grain, of which the yield in favourable situations is upwards of a hundredfold, is used for the same purposes as maize, rice, corn and other cereals.
    0
    0
  • According to Roxburgh, the great Indian botanist, the cultivated rice with all its numerous varieties has originated from a wild plant, called in India Newaree or Nivara, which is indigenous on the borders of lakes in the Circars and elsewhere in India, and is also native in tropical Australia.
    0
    0
  • The rice plant is an annual grass with long linear glabrous leaves, each provided with a long sharply pointed ligule.
    0
    0
  • Rice has been cultivated from time immemorial in tropical countries.
    0
    0
  • According to Stanislas Julien a ceremonial ordinance was established in China by the emperor Chin-nung 2800 years B.C., in accordance with which the emperor sows the rice himself while the seeds of four other kinds may be sown by the princes of his family.
    0
    0
  • This fact, joined to other considerations, induced Alphonse de Candolle to consider rice as a native of China.
    0
    0
  • Crawfurd, on philological grounds, considers that rice was introduced into Persia from southern India.
    0
    0
  • Rice was first cultivated in Italy near Pisa in 1468.
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    0
  • Carolina until 1700, and then, it is said, by accident, although at one time the southern United States furnished a large proportion of the rice introduced into commerce.
    0
    0
  • Rice sports into far more varieties than any of the corns familiar to Europeans; for some varieties grow in the water and some on dry land; some come to maturity in three months, while others take four and six months to do so.
    0
    0
  • A very full account of the cultivation of rice in India will be found in Sir George Watt's Dictionary of the Economic Products of India.
    0
    0
  • Rice constitutes one of the most important articles of food in all tropical and subtropical countries, and is one of the most prolific of all crops.
    0
    0
  • The rice yields best on low lands subject to occasional inundations, and thus enriched by alluvial deposits.
    0
    0
  • Rice is sown broadcast, and in some districts is transplanted after a fortnight or three weeks.
    0
    0
  • No special rotation is followed: indeed the soil best suited for rice is ill adapted for any other crop. In some cases little manure is employed, but in others abundance of manure is used.
    0
    0
  • Rice in the husk is known as " paddy."
    0
    0
  • On cutting across a grain of rice and examining it under the microscope, first the flattened and dried cells of the husk are seen, and then one or two layers of cells elongated in a direction parallel to the length of the seed, which contain the gluten or nitrogenous matter.
    0
    0
  • Rice is not so valuable as a food as some other cereals, inasmuch as the proportion of nitrogenous matter (gluten) is less.
    0
    0
  • Payen gives only 7% of gluten in rice as compared with 22% in the finest wheat, 14 in oats and 12 in maize.
    0
    0
  • Rice, therefore, is chiefly a farinaceous food, and requires to be combined with fatty and nitrogenous substances, such as milk or meat gravy, to satisfy the requirements of the system.
    0
    0
  • A large proportion of the rice brought to Europe is used for starch-making, and some is taken by distillers of alcohol.
    0
    0
  • Rice is also -the source of a drinking spirit in India, known as arrack, and the national beverage of Japan - sake - is prepared from the grain by means of an organic ferment.
    0
    0
  • Rice and sugar-cane are largely grown on the irrigated lands of Hazara, Peshawar and Bannu districts, and the well and canal irrigated tracts of Peshawar district produce fine crops of cotton and tobacco.
    0
    0
  • In the trans-border agencies the valleys of the Swat, Kurram and Tochi rivers yield abundant rice crops.
    0
    0
  • Both slopes of the Caucasus are very fertile and well irrigated, with fine forests, fields of rice and other cereals, and flourishing gardens.
    0
    0
  • Rice was the second product in importance until competition with Japan, Louisiana and Texas made the crop a poor investment; improved culture and machinery may restore rice culture to its former importance.
    0
    0
  • Most of the manufacturing industries, indeed, are maintained for supplying the local market, there being only three important exceptions - the manufacture of sugar, the cleaning of coffee and the cleaning and polishing of rice.
    0
    0
  • Next to sugar, fertilizers were the most important manufactured product, their value being $1,150,625; the products of the establishments for the polishing and cleaning of rice were valued at $664,300.
    0
    0
  • $ 1 5,357,9 0 7, and the value of shipments of domestic merchandise from Hawaii to the United States was $31,984,433, of which $30,111,524 was the value of brown sugar, $133,133 the value of rice, $601,748 the value of canned fruits, $124,146 the value of green, ripe or dried fruits, $117,403 the value of hides and skins, and $105,515 the value of green or raw coffee.
    0
    0
  • Rice is grown in the extreme south of the province.
    0
    0
  • The vegetation of the small and narrow islands, all encompassed by the sea, is very luxuriant, and the products, principally nutmegs, mace, and other spices, include also rice and sago.
    0
    0
  • Rice Thomas (1554, Plowden, 124 a), " which concern other faculties, we commonly apply for the aid of that science or faculty which it concerns."
    0
    0
  • At Nasibin (Nisibis) rice is cultivated with success.
    0
    0
  • A few localities in the extreme southern portions of the country, and around Lhasa possibly, are said to produce a non-glutinous variety of rice.
    0
    0
  • From Mongolia come leather, saddlery, sheep and horses, with coral, amber and small diamonds from European sources; from Kham perfumes, fruits, furs and inlaid metal saddlery; from Sikkim and Bhutan rice, musk, sugar-balls and tobacco; from Nepal broadcloth, indigo, brasswork, coral, pearls, sugar, spices, drugs and Indian manufactures; from Ladak saffron, dried fruits and articles from India.
    0
    0
  • The soil, both in the valley and on the neighbouring mountain-sides, is very fertile, and produces rice, vegetables, Indian corn, indigo, cotton, tobacco, maguey and sugar-cane.
    0
    0
  • The chief crops are sesamum, millet, rice, peas, wheat and cotton.
    0
    0
  • The imports (cotton goods, sugar, tea, rice, &c.) were valued at £280,000 in 1900, £286,000 in 19"04, and £320,000 in 1906.
    0
    0
  • Cereals, cotton, tobacco, rice and silk are produced, but most of the fertile lands have been abandoned to semi-nomads, who raise large quantities of live stock.
    0
    0
  • In the vicinity Sea Island cotton, rice, potatoes and other vegetables are raised - the truck industry having become very important; and there are groves of yellow pine and cypress.
    0
    0
  • Among the Battas of Sumatra rice or grain is sprinkled on the head of a man who returns from a dangerous enterprise, and in the latter case the grains are called padiruma tondi, " means to make the soul (tondi) stay at home."
    0
    0
  • Rice, areca-nuts, and betel-vine leaf are the chief agricultural products.
    0
    0
  • Almost the only crop grown is rice, which is exported in large quantities to Rangoon.
    0
    0
  • The city is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. Wilmington is chiefly a commercial city, and ships large quantities of cotton, lumber, naval stores, rice, marketgarden produce and turpentine; in 1909 the value of its exports was $23,310,070 and the value of its imports $1,282,724.
    0
    0
  • This country is protected from inundation by immense embankments, so that almost the whole area is suitable for rice cultivation.
    0
    0
  • The bulk of the cultivation is rice, but a number of acres are under tobacco.
    0
    0
  • The principal cultivated plants, apart from sugar-cane and coffee, are rice (in great variety of kinds), the coco-nut palm, the areng palm, the areca and the sago palms, maize, yams, and sweet potatoes; and among the fruit trees are the Indian tamarind, pomegranate, guava, papaw, orange and lemon.
    0
    0
  • Rice is the staple crop; there are promising plantations of coffee and rubber.
    0
    0
  • Next in importance come those of tobacco, snuff, cigars, the making of cigar boxes, jute-spinning, distilling, sugar refining and the shelling of rice.
    0
    0
  • In two articles, tobacco and rice, Bremen is the greatest market in the world; in cotton and indigo it takes the first place on the continent, and it is a serious rival of Hamburg and Antwerp in the import of wool and petroleum.
    0
    0
  • The principal articles imported are textiles, hardware, wines, rice, flour, canned goods and general provisions; the exports are yerba mate, hides, hair, dried meat; wood, oranges, tobacco.
    0
    0
  • The "self-sown wheat" of the sagas he identifies as strand wheat, instead of Indian corn, or wild rice, and the mdsur trees as the canoe birch.
    0
    0
  • The soil is fertile, and whereas rice is mainly grown on the lowlands the highlands are especially suitable for the cultivation of coffee, tea, tobacco, cinchona and vanilla.
    0
    0
  • The chief exports are cocoanut products, for the preparation of which there are factories, and tea; and the chief import is rice.
    0
    0
  • Of crops the vilayet produces wheat (which is indigenous), rice, barley (which takes the place of oats as food for horses), durra (a coarse, maize-like grain), sesame, cotton and tobacco; of fruits, the date, orange, lemon, fig, banana and pomegranate.
    0
    0
  • In ordinary years in southern India the maize and the millet, which form so large a portion of the p easants' food, can be raised without irrigation, but it is required for the more valuable rice or sugar-cane.
    0
    0
  • But to keep sugar-cane, or indigo, or cotton alive in summer before the monsoon sets in in India or the Nile rises in Egypt the field should be watered every ten days or fortnight, while rice requires a constant supply of water passing over it.
    0
    0
  • For we are not dealing in these grass lands with a semi-aquatic plant like rice, nor are we supplying any lack of water in the soil, nor are we restoring the moisture which the earth cannot retain under a burning sun.
    0
    0
  • The canal system of Orissa was never expected to be remunerative, since in five years out of six the local rainfall is sufficient for the rice crop. In1878-1879the area irrigated was 111,250 acres, and the outlay up to date was Rx.1,750,000.
    0
    0
  • On a lower floor he sometimes, but very rarely, regaled a friend with a plain dinner - a veal pie, or a leg of lamb and spinach, and a rice pudding.
    0
    0
  • Metals and metal goods, rice, wool and woollen goods, and cotton and cotton goods are the chief imports; and silk, silk goods and tea are the chief exports.
    0
    0
  • The surrounding country is fertile, producing sugar, Indian corn, and maguay in abundance; rice, cacao and fruits are also produced.
    0
    0
  • The exports are olive oil, hemp, flax, rice, fruit, wine, hats, cheese, steel, velvets, gloves, flour, paper, soap and marble, while the main imports are coal, cotton, grain, machinery, &c. Genoa has a large emigrant traffic with America, and a large general passenger steamer traffic both for America and for the East.
    0
    0
  • Cotton and rubber are found in considerable quantities, and fields of maize, corn, rice and sugarcane bear witness to the fertility of the soil.
    0
    0
  • Rice and wheat are cultivated in many parts, though the staple food is guinea corn.
    0
    0
  • The principal imports are cotton goods (nearly all from the United Kingdom), and in the southern region spirits - gin and geneva - almost wholly from Holland and Germany, salt, rice and other provisions, tobacco, hardware, cutlery and building material, &c., mostly from the United Kingdom.
    0
    0
  • Cotton, sugar and rice are the chief summer crops; wheat, barley, flax an.d vegetables are chiefly winter crops; maize, millet and flood rice are Nih crops; millet and vegetables are also, but in a less degree, summer crops.
    0
    0
  • Rice is largely grown in the northern part of the Delta, where the soil is very wet.
    0
    0
  • Two kinds are cultivated: Sultani, a summer crop, and Sabaini, a flood crop. Sabaini is a favorite food of the fellahin, while Suhtani rice is largely exported.
    0
    0
  • In Upper Egypt there are a number of factories for sugar-crushing andrefining, and one or two towns of the Delta possess rice mills.
    0
    0
  • The chief exports in order of importance are: raw cotton, cotton seed, sugar, beans, cigarettes, onions, rice and gumarabic. The gum is not of native produce, being in transit from the Sudan.
    0
    0
  • The heads of houses were to elect a superior general, and Rice held this office from 1822 to 1838, during which time the institution extended to several English towns (especially in Lancashire), and the course of instruction grew out of the primary stage.
    0
    0
  • Rice died on the 29th of August 1844.
    0
    0
  • The principal crops in both districts are rice, millet, other food grains, oil-seeds and indigo.
    0
    0
  • The manufactories include rice mills, saw mills, sash, door and blind factories, shingle mills, iron works, oil refineries, broom factories and a dynamite factory.
    0
    0
  • In 1905 the cleaning and polishing of rice was the most important industry, its output being valued at $1,203,123, being nearly twice the value of the product of the rice mills of the city in 1900, 25.9% of the total value of the state's product of polished and cleaned rice, 46.1% of the value ($2,609,829) of all of Beaumont's factory products, and about.
    0
    0
  • The town is noted for its manufacture of pottery, and carries on a trade in rice.
    0
    0
  • The small rivers serve only for irrigation and the growing of rice, which is of superior quality.
    0
    0
  • The town is surrounded by an extensive and extremely fertile plain which produces very large quantities of rice as well as a great variety of tropical fruits, and a ready market for these products is found in Manila whither they are shipped by boat.
    0
    0
  • Agriculture.-The agricultural industries on which the export trade depends are almost wholly restricted to the western lowlands, and include cacao, coffee, cotton, sugar, tobacco, rice, yucca and sweet potatoes.
    0
    0
  • Other industries are the cultivation of tobacco, rice, Indian corn and hemp, and the manufacture of sinamay, a coarse hemp cloth.
    0
    0
  • The staple crop is rice, but a good deal of tobacco also is grown.
    0
    0
  • About 150o acres are under rice cultivation, and there are scattered patches of coco-nut and sago palms and a few vegetable gardens, the latter owned for the most part by Chinese.
    0
    0
  • Rice grows wild, and several kinds of Poa grass are used as food by the natives.
    0
    0
  • The soil is very fertile, is well watered, and produces much wheat, barley and rice.
    0
    0
  • The surrounding country is a fertile plain, producing large quantities of rice, is well as sugar, Indian corn and a variety of fruits.
    0
    0
  • Rice, barley and wheat are the chief cereals cultivated, and lucerne for fodder.
    0
    0
  • The province, however, produces cotton, rice, ground-nuts, wheat, indigo, tallow and beans in abundance.
    0
    0
  • Rice is a principal food of the people; it was formerly taken from the East Indies, but is now mostly raised in the island.
    0
    0
  • The Argive plain, though not yet sufficiently reclaimed, yields good crops of corn, rice and tobacco.
    0
    0
  • When abroad he sought out varieties of grasses, trees, rice and olives for American experiment, and after his return from France received yearly for twenty-three years, from his old friend the superintendent of the Jardin des plantes, a box of seeds, which he distributed to public and private gardens throughout the United States.
    0
    0
  • It consists of rice, varieties of millet and sorghum, of maize, Phaseolus Mungo, tobacco, beet, turnips, &c. The loftier regions have but one harvest.
    0
    0
  • Rice is not largely distributed.
    0
    0
  • Rice forms the staple agricultural product.
    0
    0
  • The brewing of beer from rice and other grains, which is universal among the hill tribes and other aboriginal races, is practically untaxed and unrestrained.
    0
    0
  • In1907-1908the total customs revenue amounted to £4,910,000, of which £664,000 was derived from the export duty on rice and £ 22 3,73 0 from the excise on cotton manufactures.
    0
    0
  • The name of rice has from time immemorial been so closely associated with Indian agriculture that it is difficult to realize how comparatively small an area is planted with this crop. With the exception of the deltas of the great rivers and the long strip of land fringing the western coast, rice may be called an occasional crop throughout the remainder of the peninsula.
    0
    0
  • The rice crop is most important in Burma, Bengal and Madras, and there is an average of 20 million acres under rice in the other provinces of British India.
    0
    0
  • In Burma, where the large waste area is being gradually brought under cultivation, there has been an almost uninterrupted increase in the area of the rice crop, and the rice export is one of the main industries of the province.
    0
    0
  • In ordinary years most of this rice goes either to Europe or to the Farther East; but in famine seasons a large part is diverted to peninsular India, and Burma is the most important of the outside sources from which the deficient crops are supplemented.
    0
    0
  • In1905-1906the export of rice from India was valued at 122 millions sterling.
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  • Taking India as a whole, the staple food grain is neither rice nor wheat, but millets, which are probably the most prolific grain in the world, and the best adapted to the vicissitudes of a tropical climate.
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  • In recent years the cultivation of oil-seeds has received an extraordinary stimulus owing to the demand for export to Europe, especially to France; but as they can be grown after rice, &c., as a second crop, this increase has hardly at all tended to diminish the production of food grains.
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  • The coco-nut, which loves a sandy soil and a moist climate, is found in greatest perfection along the strip of coast-line that fringes the west of the peninsula, where it ranks next to rice as the staple product.
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  • Australia and Argentina need it for wool and wheat, Chili and Brazil for nitrates and coffee, Asiatic countries for rice, and the world as a whole for its increased output of produce.
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  • In addition to these and the cotton and jute mills there are indigo factories, rice mills, timber mills, coffee works, oil mills, iron and brass foundries, tile factories, printing presses, lac factories, silk mills, and paper mills.
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  • The chief exports are raw cotton, cotton goods and yarn, rice, wheat, oil-seeds, raw jute and jute-manufactures, hides and skins, tea, opium and lac. In1905-1906there was great activity in both the cotton and jute industries.
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  • The tract lying between these streams consists of a rich alluvial deposit, more or less subject to inundations, but producing good crops of rice, wheat and barley.
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  • The export trade of the district itself is chiefly in rice, sugar and other agricultural produce.
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  • Many of the roots and vegetables of Europe have been introduced, as well as some of those peculiar to the tropics, including maize, millet, yams, manioc, dhol, gram, &c. Small quantities of tea, rice and sago, have been grown, as well as many of the spices (cloves, nutmeg, ginger, pepper and allspice),' and also cotton, indigo, betel, camphor, turmeric and vanilla.
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  • The imports are mainly rice, wheat, cotton goods, wine, coal, hardware and haberdashery, and guano.
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  • The rice comes principally from India and Madagascar; cattle are imported from Madagascar, sheep from South Africa and Australia, and frozen meat from Australia.
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  • The chief products are rice, cotton, oil-seeds and tobacco; cutch is also very abundant, and the manufacture of the dye-stuff is carried on extensively.
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  • It contains the usual public buildings and several large rice mills.
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  • The chief exports are rice and oil.
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  • A chevrotain is found in Balabac. The house rat, introduced by man, is a common nuisance, and mice occasionally seriously damage sugar-cane and rice.
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  • From the great opercula of certain marine forms bracelets and other ornaments are carved, while the hard serrated edges of other species are sometimes employed in place of knives for harvesting rice.
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  • The principal crops are hemp (abaca), sugar, tobacco, coco-nuts and rice.
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  • Rice is the staple food of the natives.
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  • As late as 1902, however, about one-half of the land under cultivation was sown to rice.
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  • In some districts Indian corn is the staple food instead of rice, and the production of this cereal in small quantities for livestock is general.
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  • The foreign commerce of the Philippines consists chiefly in the exportation of Manila hemp, dried coco-nut meat (copra), sugar and tobacco, both in the leaf and in cigars and cigarettes; and in the importation of cotton goods, rice, wheat-flour, fresh beef, boots and shoes, iron and steel, illuminating oil, liquors, paper and paper goods.
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  • In 1909 free trade was established between the United States and the Philippines in all goods which are the growth, product or manufacture of these countries, with the exception of rice, except that a limit to the free importation from the Philippines to the United States in any one year is fixed on cigars at 15,000,000; on wrapper tobacco and on filler tobacco, when mixed with more than 15% of wrapper tobacco, at 300,000 th; on filler tobacco at 1,000,000 lb and on sugar at 300,000 gross tons.
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  • The inhabitants are engaged chiefly in the cultivation of rice and Indian corn, and in lumbering; good timber grows on the neighbouring mountains, and some iron and gold have been found in this region.
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  • The principal crops are millet, rice, other food grains, pulse, oil seeds and cotton.
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  • There are several cotton mills and important rice and salt markets.
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  • The jhils supply the villages with wild rice, the roots and seeds of the lotus, and the singhara water-nut.
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  • The great agricultural staple is wheat, but millets and rice are also largely cultivated.
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  • Speaking broadly, rice and oilseeds predominate in the eastern and sub-Himalayan districts, millets and cotton in Bundelkhand and wheat in the greater part of the Gangetic plain.
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  • Rice is threshed by beating the ears on a log; other grains, with flails on mud threshing-floors.
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