Reye-s-syndrome sentence example

reye-s-syndrome
  • Although experience with these medications in children suggests they are safe, their use in children remains controversial because of the risk of Reye's syndrome.

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  • Aspirin should never be given to children under the age of 16 who have chickenpox or influenza, because children who have received aspirin for these conditions seem to have a higher than expected frequency of developing Reye's syndrome.

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  • Aspirin should not be given to a child or adolescent with a fever since this drug has been linked to an increased risk of the serious condition called Reye's syndrome.

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  • Aspirin, however, should not be given to a child or adolescent with a fever since this drug has been linked to an increased risk of Reye's syndrome.

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  • Treatment at home should consist of acetaminophen for fever and comfort (not aspirin, which has been implicated in Reye's syndrome in children), increased intake of liquids, and a cool water vaporizer.

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  • Children with measles should never be given aspirin, as aspirin is correlated with the fatal disease Reye's syndrome.

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  • The use of these medications in children remains controversial because of the risk of Reye's syndrome.

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  • Children under the age of 12 should not be given aspirin as a pain reliever because of the threat of Reye's syndrome.

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  • Aspirin and any medications that contain aspirin or other salicylates must not be used with chickenpox, for they appear to increase the chances of developing Reye's syndrome.

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  • These may be signs of Reye's syndrome or encephalitis, two rare but potentially dangerous conditions.

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  • Aspirin should not be given to children because of its association with the serious illness Reye's syndrome.

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  • They are taking aspirin or other salicylates that have the remote possibility of causing Reye's syndrome.

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  • Symptoms of Reye's syndrome are nausea and vomiting, and more seriously, neurological problems such as confusion or delirium.

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  • The number of cases declined rapidly thereafter once researchers made the association between aspirin use and the development of Reye's syndrome.

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  • As of 2004, fewer than 20 cases of Reye's syndrome are reported annually.

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  • Although as of 2004 the cause remains unknown, Reye's syndrome appears to be linked to an abnormality in the energy-converting structures (mitochondria) within the body's cells.

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  • Although rare, Reye's syndrome may occur without aspirin use and in adults.

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  • Diagnosis involves blood tests to determine the levels of certain liver enzymes, which are highly elevated in Reye's syndrome.

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  • Children with Reye's syndrome should be managed in an intensive-care unit.

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  • The mortality rate for Reye's syndrome is between 30 and 50 percent.

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  • Almost all children who survive Reye's syndrome recover fully, although recovery may be slow.

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  • Because Reye's syndrome is so highly correlated with use of aspirin for fever in young people, avoidance of aspirin use by children is strongly recommended.

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  • Aspirin should not be given to children with a cold because of its association with a risk of Reye's syndrome.

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  • Also, a parent should not give a child aspirin during a cold, because aspirin has been linked to the development of Reye's syndrome in children recovering from viral illnesses, especially influenza (flu) or chickenpox.

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  • Aspirin should not be given to toddlers, as it can contribute to a rare disease called Reye's Syndrome.

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