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revulsion

revulsion

revulsion Sentence Examples

  • This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling.

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  • Moreover, a feeling of revulsion against the Jesuits was sweeping over western Europe: they were accused of being the incarnation of the most baneful principles, political, intellectual, moral; and though Clement (1758-1769) protected them against the pressure of the Bourbon courts, his successor Clement XIV.

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  • Moreover, a feeling of revulsion against the Jesuits was sweeping over western Europe: they were accused of being the incarnation of the most baneful principles, political, intellectual, moral; and though Clement (1758-1769) protected them against the pressure of the Bourbon courts, his successor Clement XIV.

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  • In 445 a revulsion of feeling led the Megarians to massacre their Athenian garrison.

    26
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  • In 445 a revulsion of feeling led the Megarians to massacre their Athenian garrison.

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  • "He is old and feeble, and I dare to condemn him!" she thought at such moments, with a feeling of revulsion against herself.

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  • A revulsion of feeling, however, soon took place.

    21
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  • The first point is to be noted, because it has often been supposed that Hobbes's political doctrine took its peculiar complexion from his revulsion against the state of anarchy before his eyes, as he wrote during the progress of the Civil War.

    21
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  • This was due, no doubt, to his revulsion from the sternness of his upbringing and the period of stress through which he passed in early manhood, but also to the sympathetic and emotional qualities which manifested themselves in his early manhood.

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  • The revulsion only came when the queen, victorious after the rout of Ludford, Supp,~sapplied to the vanquished Yorkists those penalties of sion of confiscation and attainder which Duke Richard ~had Yorks always refused to employ in his day of power.

    18
    8
  • The revulsion only came when the queen, victorious after the rout of Ludford, Supp,~sapplied to the vanquished Yorkists those penalties of sion of confiscation and attainder which Duke Richard ~had Yorks always refused to employ in his day of power.

    18
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  • A revulsion of feeling soon led to his reinstatement, apparently with extraordinary powers.

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  • It is difficult to allow the appositeness of this special illustration; on the other hand, Ford has even in this case shown his art of depicting sensual passion without grossness of expression; for the exception in Annabella's language to Soranzo seems to have a special intention, and is true to the pressure of the situation and the revulsion produced by it in a naturally weak and yielding mind.

    16
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  • A revulsion of feeling was completed in 338 by the orator Demosthenes, who persuaded Thebes to join Athens in a final attempt to bar Philip's advance upon Attica.

    16
    8
  • It is difficult to allow the appositeness of this special illustration; on the other hand, Ford has even in this case shown his art of depicting sensual passion without grossness of expression; for the exception in Annabella's language to Soranzo seems to have a special intention, and is true to the pressure of the situation and the revulsion produced by it in a naturally weak and yielding mind.

    16
    8
  • It was doubtless a revulsion of feeling against the doctrinaires and in particular against the puritanic reign of Michel that made her turn to Chopin.

    16
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  • With a sudden revulsion of feeling Henry offered peace to France, which King Louis XII.

    15
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  • Alexander's diplomatic skill and moral authority, reinforced by the Capetian alliance and the revulsion of feeling caused by the murder of Becket, enabled him to force the despotic Henry to yield, and even to do penance at the tomb of the martyr.

    15
    8
  • There is no revulsion, as later, from dogma as such, nor is more stress laid upon one dogma than upon another; all are treated upon the same footing, and the whole dogmatic system is held, as it were, in solution by the philosophic medium in which it is presented.

    15
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  • The key to Reid's philosophy is to be found in his revulsion from the sceptical conclusions of Hume.

    14
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  • The revulsion of feeling after the witchcraft delusion undermined his authority greatly, and Robert's Calef's More Wonders of the Spiritual World (1700) was a personal blow to him as well as to his son.

    13
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  • The savage reprisals on their suppression, in especial the "Bloody Assizes" of Jeffreys, produced a revulsion of public feeling.

    13
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  • The rapid publication of the Reminiscences by Froude produced a sudden revulsion of feeling.

    12
    5
  • The instantaneous revulsion of public feeling was somewhat unreasonable, for Pitt's health seems now to have been beyond doubt so shattered by his hereditary malady, that he was already in old age though only fifty-eight.

    12
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  • Revulsion from the dogmatic temper of the Presbyterians, and the unreasoning enthusiasm of the Independents favoured sympathy afterwards with Cambridge Platonists and other liberal Anglican churchmen.

    11
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  • The flight of the emperor had led to a revulsion of feeling in Vienna; but the issue of the proclamation and the attempt of the government to disperse the students by closing the university, led to a fresh outbreak on the 26th.

    10
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  • After the election, and Constantine's return to Athens as King, a noticeable revulsion of feeling set in, especially in provinces where the anti-Venizelist vote had been strong.

    8
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  • The courage and resourcefulness of their youthful leader inspired the people to make heroic sacrifices for their independ- of the ence, but unfortunately such was the revulsion of feeling against the grand pensionary, that he himself and his brother Cornelius were torn in pieces by an infuriated mob at the Hague (loth of August).

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  • In politics the revulsion from his particuar conclusions did not prevent the more clear-sighted of his opponents from recognizing the force of his supreme demonstration of the practical irresponsibility of the sovereign power, wherever seated, in the state; and, when in a later age the foundations of a positive theory of legislation were laid in England, the school of Bentham - James Mill, Grote, Molesworth - brought again into general notice the writings of the great publicist of the 17th century, who, however he might, by the force of temperament, himself prefer the rule of one, based his whole political system upon a rational regard to the common weal.

    6
    6
  • There seems to have been at that time in south-west Germany a considerable amount of sturdy independent thought among the Franciscans; Pellicanus himself became a Protestant very gradually, and without any such revulsion of feeling as marked Luther's conversion.

    6
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  • The rebels' appeal to the Seleucid governor of part of Syria (88 B.C.) caused a revulsion in his favour, and finally he made peace by more than Roman methods.

    6
    6
  • In April 1872 came the revulsion; there was a shrinkage of $60,000,000 in ten days; then in 1873 a tremendous advance, and in 1875 a final and disastrous collapse; in ten years thereafter the stock of the Comstock lode shrank from $3,000,000 to $2,000,000.

    6
    6
  • At this time, and for many years to come it will be very difficult to express the true revulsion against such attacks.

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  • Some of us may well have felt the same sudden revulsion at the first images of the Milan accident some weeks ago.

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  • It was the expressions on the faces, frozen at the moment of death, that caused the greatest revulsion.

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  • We feel good in crowds, we have a revulsion for feeling ' out of place ' .

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  • The opening of the concentration camps at the end of the war provoked a widespread revulsion in the world and within Germany itself.

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  • The British Methodist Church shares the widespread revulsion at the March 11 th bombings in Madrid, and unequivocally condemns them.

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  • revulsion at the death of some of the premature babies dissuaded him.

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  • revulsion at the idea of an Arab land being occupied by a non-Arab country " .

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  • revulsion at the sight of scurrying legs and scaly tail.

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  • revulsion at these acts.

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  • Moreover, the abstract expression of rejected pluralism was a widespread revulsion from the very concept of a private sector.

    0
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  • Christ was teaching us to view our own secret sins with the same moral revulsion we feel for wanton acts of public sin.

    0
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  • This vicious and cowardly crime has filled us all with horror and deepest revulsion.

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  • Surely the public revulsion throughout these islands to the Omagh bomb must mark a new beginning in political relations here.

    0
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  • The Conservatives were kicked out last year in a wave of popular revulsion that has almost no equal in a modern democracy.

    0
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  • world revulsion at evidence of the Holocaust, which unfolded in 1945, ensured that there were going to be trials for war crimes.

    0
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  • There is a lot of beneath the surface revulsion to this going on by those below that level of rank.

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  • revulsion against the war.

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  • revulsion of feeling swept over his mind.

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  • Carol is a bit unhinged, with a revulsion to men and sex.

    0
    0
  • It was doubtless a revulsion of feeling against the doctrinaires and in particular against the puritanic reign of Michel that made her turn to Chopin.

    0
    0
  • A revulsion of feeling soon led to his reinstatement, apparently with extraordinary powers.

    0
    0
  • There is no revulsion, as later, from dogma as such, nor is more stress laid upon one dogma than upon another; all are treated upon the same footing, and the whole dogmatic system is held, as it were, in solution by the philosophic medium in which it is presented.

    0
    0
  • So, again, it is in place where the movement of revulsion from a mechanical philosophy takes the form rather of immediate assertion than of reasoned demonstration, and where the writers, after insisting generally on the spiritual basis of phenomena, either leave the position without further definition or expressly declare that the ultimate problems of philosophy cannot be reduced to articulate formulas.

    0
    0
  • The key to Reid's philosophy is to be found in his revulsion from the sceptical conclusions of Hume.

    0
    0
  • This was due, no doubt, to his revulsion from the sternness of his upbringing and the period of stress through which he passed in early manhood, but also to the sympathetic and emotional qualities which manifested themselves in his early manhood.

    0
    0
  • This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling.

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    0
  • It was easy to represent the Entente as having betrayed the interests of Serbia and her kinsmen: and as for a time the Pasic Cabinet, in deference to the narrowly Orthodox influences then all powerful at Petrograd, was prepared to limit its claims to the mainly Serb and Orthodox provinces of Bosnia and Slavonia, and to leave the Catholic Croats and Slovenes to their fate, there was during the summer a certain revulsion of feeling in favour of Austria-Hungary, who appointed a Serb Orthodox frontiersman (Granicar), General Boroevic, to the chief command on the Isonzo front.

    0
    0
  • The savage reprisals on their suppression, in especial the "Bloody Assizes" of Jeffreys, produced a revulsion of public feeling.

    0
    0
  • Alexander's diplomatic skill and moral authority, reinforced by the Capetian alliance and the revulsion of feeling caused by the murder of Becket, enabled him to force the despotic Henry to yield, and even to do penance at the tomb of the martyr.

    0
    0
  • The courage and resourcefulness of their youthful leader inspired the people to make heroic sacrifices for their independ- of the ence, but unfortunately such was the revulsion of feeling against the grand pensionary, that he himself and his brother Cornelius were torn in pieces by an infuriated mob at the Hague (loth of August).

    0
    0
  • The first point is to be noted, because it has often been supposed that Hobbes's political doctrine took its peculiar complexion from his revulsion against the state of anarchy before his eyes, as he wrote during the progress of the Civil War.

    0
    0
  • In politics the revulsion from his particuar conclusions did not prevent the more clear-sighted of his opponents from recognizing the force of his supreme demonstration of the practical irresponsibility of the sovereign power, wherever seated, in the state; and, when in a later age the foundations of a positive theory of legislation were laid in England, the school of Bentham - James Mill, Grote, Molesworth - brought again into general notice the writings of the great publicist of the 17th century, who, however he might, by the force of temperament, himself prefer the rule of one, based his whole political system upon a rational regard to the common weal.

    0
    0
  • The flight of the emperor had led to a revulsion of feeling in Vienna; but the issue of the proclamation and the attempt of the government to disperse the students by closing the university, led to a fresh outbreak on the 26th.

    0
    0
  • The rapid publication of the Reminiscences by Froude produced a sudden revulsion of feeling.

    0
    0
  • There seems to have been at that time in south-west Germany a considerable amount of sturdy independent thought among the Franciscans; Pellicanus himself became a Protestant very gradually, and without any such revulsion of feeling as marked Luther's conversion.

    0
    0
  • The rebels' appeal to the Seleucid governor of part of Syria (88 B.C.) caused a revulsion in his favour, and finally he made peace by more than Roman methods.

    0
    0
  • In April 1872 came the revulsion; there was a shrinkage of $60,000,000 in ten days; then in 1873 a tremendous advance, and in 1875 a final and disastrous collapse; in ten years thereafter the stock of the Comstock lode shrank from $3,000,000 to $2,000,000.

    0
    0
  • A revulsion of feeling was completed in 338 by the orator Demosthenes, who persuaded Thebes to join Athens in a final attempt to bar Philip's advance upon Attica.

    0
    0
  • The revulsion of feeling after the witchcraft delusion undermined his authority greatly, and Robert's Calef's More Wonders of the Spiritual World (1700) was a personal blow to him as well as to his son.

    0
    0
  • The instantaneous revulsion of public feeling was somewhat unreasonable, for Pitt's health seems now to have been beyond doubt so shattered by his hereditary malady, that he was already in old age though only fifty-eight.

    0
    0
  • With a sudden revulsion of feeling Henry offered peace to France, which King Louis XII.

    0
    0
  • Revulsion from the dogmatic temper of the Presbyterians, and the unreasoning enthusiasm of the Independents favoured sympathy afterwards with Cambridge Platonists and other liberal Anglican churchmen.

    0
    0
  • After the election, and Constantine's return to Athens as King, a noticeable revulsion of feeling set in, especially in provinces where the anti-Venizelist vote had been strong.

    0
    0
  • Her sublime folly turned out to be wiser than their wisdom; in two months, from May to July 1429, she had freed Orleans, destroyed the prestige of the English army at Patay, and dragged the doubting and passive king against his will to be crowned at Reims. All this produced a marvellous revulsion of political feeling throughout France, Charles VII.

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  • A revulsion of feeling, however, soon took place.

    0
    0
  • In an ' exalted spirit ', she felt revulsion from the wounds she was tending [and] bitterly reproached herself.

    0
    0
  • At this time, and for many years to come it will be very difficult to express the true revulsion against such attacks.

    0
    0
  • Some of us may well have felt the same sudden revulsion at the first images of the Milan accident some weeks ago.

    0
    0
  • It was the expressions on the faces, frozen at the moment of death, that caused the greatest revulsion.

    0
    0
  • We feel good in crowds, we have a revulsion for feeling ' out of place '.

    0
    0
  • The opening of the concentration camps at the end of the war provoked a widespread revulsion in the world and within Germany itself.

    0
    0
  • The British Methodist Church shares the widespread revulsion at the March 11 th bombings in Madrid, and unequivocally condemns them.

    0
    0
  • Richard considered a career in pediatrics, but his revulsion at the death of some of the premature babies dissuaded him.

    0
    0
  • Most were motivated by " revulsion at the idea of an Arab land being occupied by a non-Arab country ".

    0
    0
  • All this leads to almost universal revulsion at the sight of scurrying legs and scaly tail.

    0
    0
  • The country is united in revulsion at these acts.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the abstract expression of rejected pluralism was a widespread revulsion from the very concept of a private sector.

    0
    0
  • Christ was teaching us to view our own secret sins with the same moral revulsion we feel for wanton acts of public sin.

    0
    0
  • This vicious and cowardly crime has filled us all with horror and deepest revulsion.

    0
    0
  • Surely the public revulsion throughout these islands to the Omagh bomb must mark a new beginning in political relations here.

    0
    0
  • The Conservatives were kicked out last year in a wave of popular revulsion that has almost no equal in a modern democracy.

    0
    0
  • World revulsion at evidence of the Holocaust, which unfolded in 1945, ensured that there were going to be trials for war crimes.

    0
    0
  • There is a lot of beneath the surface revulsion to this going on by those below that level of rank.

    0
    0
  • The result was a massive wave of revulsion against the war.

    0
    0
  • A sudden revulsion of feeling swept over his mind.

    0
    0
  • Carol is a bit unhinged, with a revulsion to men and sex.

    0
    0
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