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reverence

reverence

reverence Sentence Examples

  • Everything her father did inspired her with reverence and was beyond question.

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  • Everyone in the crowded room knew Pastor Humphries and treated him with the reverence as a visiting cardinal.

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  • It is respectful to show reverence to those who have passed away.

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  • Please have an attitude of reverence towards the veterans and honor their sacrifice.

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  • Patrick was doubtless educated as a Christian and was imbued with reverence for the Roman Empire.

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  • The brick tower in Pavia in which he was confined was, and still is, an object of reverence to the country people.

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  • His policy was evidently to find a deity that should win the reverence alike of Greeks and Egyptians.

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  • It is regarded with great reverence, owing to a legend that the inner band of iron has been hammered out of one of the nails of the true cross.

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  • The religious leaders inspired awe and reverence in the congregation with their wisdom and faith.

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  • Thomas Aquinas based his justification of them on the idea of reverent commemoration; since we venerate the saints, we must also show reverence for their relics, for whoever loves another does honour to that which remains of him after death.

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  • "No one can own it," she said with reverence.

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  • I'd like you to get back in this bed and show me some reverence.

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  • of baal), her real name not being pronounced (perhaps out of reverence).

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  • Squeezes of the inscription were sent to Europe, where various scholars discussed the meaning, which is as follows: "His Majesty, Piyadassi, came here in the 21st year of his reign and paid reverence.

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  • With the latter part of the 4th century a new epoch in the history of the catacombs arose--that of religious reverence.

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  • The blood rains through the platform on to the priest below, who receives it on his face, and even on his tongue and palate, and after the baptism presents himself before his fellow-worshippers purified and regenerated, and receives their salutations and reverence.

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  • The great sources of Greek poetry were no longer regarded, as they were by Lucretius and Virgil, as sacred, untasted springs, to be approached in a spirit of enthusiasm tempered with reverence.

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  • His first interview was disappointing; the coldness and formality of the aged philosopher checked the enthusiasm of the young disciple, though it did not diminish his reverence.

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  • After this disaster he issued a third Mississippi Valley novel, The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson, in 1894, and in 1896 another historical romance, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, wherein the maid is treated with the utmost sympathy and reverence.

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  • If the result was satisfactory, he was admitted, but before partaking of the common meal he was required to swear awful oaths, that he would reverence the deity, do justice to men, hurt no man voluntarily or at the command of another, hate the unjust and assist the just, and that he would render fidelity to all men, but especially to the rulers, seeing that no one rules but of God.

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  • On the one hand, indeed, they held tenaciously by the traditional Judaism: blasphemy against their lawgiver was punished with death, the sacred books were preserved and read with great reverence, though not without an allegorical interpretation, and the Sabbath was most scrupulously observed.

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  • Their most singular feature, perhaps, was their reverence for the sun.

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  • Even if Dietrich of Niem frequently painted him too black, there is no question that the means which Boniface employed to fill the papal treasury seriously impaired the prestige of the highest spiritual office and the reverence due to it.

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  • From the close of the Thirty Years' War to the outbreak of the French Revolution the papacy suffered abroad waning political prestige; at home, progressive financial embarrassment accompanied by a series of inadequate governmental reforms; and in the world at large, gradual diminution of reverence for spiritual authority.

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  • The Iberians still reverence as saints the Armenian doctors of the 5th century, but as early as 552 they began to resent the dictatorial methods of the Armenians, as well might a proud race of mountaineers who never wholly lost their political independence; and they broke off their allegiance to the Armenian see very soon afterwards, accepted Chalcedon and joined the Byzantine church.

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  • He was a son of a high official, and betrothed to a daughter of the king, but escaped on the eve of the wedding feast, entered the order, and attained to reverence and distinction.

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  • Full of an extreme reverence for the common law which he knew so well, he defended it alike against the court of chancery, the ecclesiastical courts, and the royal prerogative.

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  • On the other hand the reverence attached to it in the later periods of the city is evidenced by its being left standing in the midst of a triangular space adjoining the great theatre, which is surrounded by a portico, so as to constitute a kind of forum (the so-called Foro Triangolare).

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  • Man should worship them, but his worship is the reverence due to the ideals of perfect blessedness; it ought not to be inspired either by hope or by fear.

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  • In his public speeches the emperor repeatedly expressed his reverence for am the memory of his grandfather, and his determination to continue his policy; but he also repudiated the attempt of the extreme Conservatives to identify him with their party.

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  • It was, indeed, not easy to combine that respect and reverence which the emperor required should be paid to him, with that open criticism of his words which seemed necessary (even for selfdefence) when the monarch condescended to become the censor of the opinions and actions of large parties and classes among his subjects.

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  • The unbounded reverence of the Moslems for the Koran reaches its climax in the dogma that this book, as the divine word, i.e.

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  • Children, though often neglected, are not unkindly treated, and reverence for their parents and the aged is early inculcated.

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  • They entertain reverence for their Prophet; and the Koran is treated with the utmost respectnever, for example.

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  • In this way a large number of deities came to enjoy special reverence in restricted territories, eg.

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  • He was beautifully loyal to his mother and his sister Wilhelmina; his letters to the duchess of Gotha are full of a certain tender reverence; the two Keiths found him a devoted friend.

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  • Indeed they are corroborative evidence for the reverence with which the Pharisees were regarded by the people generally, and for the zeal with which they strove to fulfil God's will as contained in the Law and elucidated by the Tradition.

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  • For a while the Gauls withheld their hands out of awe and reverence, but the ruder passions soon prevailed.

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  • His famous son writes with reverence and affection of both parents, and has left a touching narrative of their death-bed hours.

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  • The reverence with which the foreign monarch Benhadad addressed Elisha deserves to be noted as showing the extent of the prophet's influence.

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  • The effect of these decisions is thus summarized in the report of the Royal Commission on Ecclesiastical Discipline, 1906: "Such images are lawful as objects of decoration in a church, but are unlawful if they are made, or are in danger of being made, objects of superstitious reverence, contrary to Article XXII.

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  • The family tie between all the Carlyles was unusually strong, and Thomas regarded his father with a reverence which found forcible expression in his Reminiscences.

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  • The chief object of his reverence was Goethe.

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  • The Irish church has paid more reverence to St Patricius than to Palladius (373-463), and the church of St Patricius, himself a figure as important as obscure, certainly abounded in bishops; according to Angus the Culdee there were 1071, but these cannot have been bishops with territorial sees, and the heads of monasteries were more potent personages.

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  • The fundamental conception is always that the Deity resides - or exercises a peculiarly powerful influence - in some definite locality; and to this locality the devout repair, either in reverence of their god, or in quest of his assistance and bounty.

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  • It is impossible to fix the date at which the supposititious relics were introduced into the church of the Sepulchre: it is certain, however, that in the 5th century the Cross was there preserved with scrupulous reverence, and accounted the highest treasure of the sanctuary.

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  • He is well acquainted with all the researches that have been made, but tries to save Tell's refusal to do reverence to the hat, his leap from the boat in the lake, and his slaying of the bailiff in the "hollow way."

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  • As a man he retained the impressions of his youth, and his great work was to be also a monument of his reverence for the monks in general and for the disciples of Hilarion in particular.

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  • It seems therefore consonant alike with prudence and reverence to refrain from attempting to combine afresh into a single picture the materials derivable from the various documents, and to endeavour instead to describe the main contents of the sources from which our knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ as an historical personage is ultimately drawn, and to observe the picture of Him which each writer in turn has offered to us.

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  • Its religious scheme is the simplest form of theism; religion is reverence for God and obedience to His laws.

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  • There he disowned the sermons of the pardonsellers, let it be seen that he did not approve of the action of the Legate, and so prevailed with Luther that the latter promised to write a submissive letter to the pope, to exhort people to reverence the Roman See, to say that Indulgences were useful to remit canonical penances, and to promise to write no more on the matter unless he happened to be attacked.

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  • To these experiences, too, we may partly ascribe the reverence for law, for the rights of property, and for the monarchical form of government which he appears to have sincerely felt; and, demagogue as he became in a certain sense, they gave his mind a deep Conservative tinge.

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  • On the other hand, saints, both male and female, are paid more reverence by Berbers than by Arabs.

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  • This avoidance of the original name was due on the one hand to reverence and on the other to fear lest the name be desecrated by heathens.

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  • "And," said a citizen of that town, "we had such an awe and reverence for Khalid, that he appeased the disorders, almost without punishing anybody."

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  • Hamilton's Philosophy, and there is no doubt that the empirical school owed a great deal to his sound, accurate thinking, untrammelled by any reverence for authority, technique and convention.

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  • Augustus witnessed the triumphal procession, and Tiberius, as it turned from the Forum to ascend the Capitol, halted, descended from his triumphal car, and did reverence to his adopted father.

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  • Among these was Synesius, afterwards (c. 410) bishop of Ptolemais, several of whose letters to her, full of chivalrous admiration and reverence, are still extant.

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  • Evagrius tells us that he was very:religious, and paid especial reverence to the Virgin, never engaging in battle till he conceived that she had given him the signal.

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  • Religion is in our emotions of reverence and dependence, and theology is the intellectual attempt to describe the object of worship. Doubtless the two do not exactly coincide, not only because accuracy is difficult or even impossible, but also because elements are admitted into the definition of God which are derived from various sources quite distinct from the religious experience.

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  • In later times the Greeks of the south looked on the inhabitants of Epirus as barbarians; nevertheless for Dodona they always preserved a certain reverence, and the temple there was the object of frequent missions from them.

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  • The high-caste Brahman will probably keep at his home asalagram stone, the favourite symbol of Vishnu, as well as the characteristic emblems of Siva and his consort, to both of which he will do reverence in the morning; and when he visits some holy place of pilgrimage, he will not fail to pay his homage at both the Saiva and the Vaishnava shrines there.

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  • Indeed," sectarian bigotry and exclusiveness are to be found chiefly among the professional leaders of the modern brotherhoods and their low-caste followers, who are taught to believe that theirs are the only true gods, and that the rest do not deserve any reverence whatever "(Jog.

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  • By the followers of this sect, also, an extravagant degree of reverence is habitually paid to their gurus or spiritual heads.

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  • It is doubtless a sense of filial obligation coupled with sentiments of piety and reverence that gave rise to this practice of offering gifts of food and drink to the deceased ancestors.

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  • For, just as the Roman Church as a whole preserves in the spiritual sphere the spirit and much of the organization of the Roman Empire, so the administration of the Curia carries on the tradition of Roman government, with its reverence for precedent and its practice of deciding questions, not on their supposed abstract merits, but in accordance with the rules of law as defined in the codes or by previous decisions.

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  • This conservative spirit and extreme reverence for authority pervades the whole Roman Catholic Church in exact proportion to the degree of effective control which the see of Rome has succeeded in obtaining over its branches in various countries.

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  • The 15th and 16th centuries had seen the final break-up of the medieval system of reverence for authority and tradition.

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  • The reverence that attached to the precious metals caused undue exaltation of the services rendered by this property.

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  • For at the beginning of the principate Augustus seems to have aimed at a complete estimate of the financial situation, though this may be regarded as due to the influence of the freer republican traditions which the reverence that soon attached to the emperor's dignity completely extinguished.

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  • Although he preserved a reverence for Aristotle (of whom, however, he seems to have known but little), he learned to despise the current Aristotelian philosophy.

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  • Such are the tendency to make all things subservient to, or take the colour of some favourite subject, the extreme fondness and reverence either for what is ancient or for what is modern, and excess in noting either differences or resemblances amongst things.

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  • The gorge, situated in Lakhimpur district, through which the southernmost branch of the Brahmaputra enters, has from time immemorial been held in reverence by the Hindus.

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  • For the former he soon found himself full of reverence, and from the latter he acquired the standpoint of modern philosophy.

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  • The new bishop showed much eagerness to reform the manners and morals of his clergy, and also to introduce greater order and reverence into the services of the church.

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  • The full stream of his love and reverence is reserved for his mother; he never leaves her to starve, and her wishes are laws to him.

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  • The High Church party in England had induced Vere to dismiss him from the chaplaincy; but he was still held, deservedly, in such reverence, that it was arranged he should attend the synod, and accordingly he was retained by the Calvinist party at four florins a day to watch the proceedings on their behalf and advise them when necessary.

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  • He has little, if anything at all, of the high imaginative mood - the mood of reverence and noble admiration - which made Ennius, Lucretius and Virgil the truest poetical representatives of the genius of Rome.

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  • amongst the Socratic schools, and canonized Antisthenes and Diogenes; while reverence for Socrates was the tie which united to them such an accomplished writer upon lighter ethical topics, as the versatile Persaeus, who, at the capital of Antigonus Gonatas, with hardly anything of the professional philosopher about him, reminds us of Xenophon, or even Prodicus.

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  • Pedro is one of the first representatives of those Spanish influences which set aside the Provençal manner and in its place adopted a taste for allegory and a reverence for classical antiquity, both imported from Italy.

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  • They hold the clergy in great fear and reverence, however, and are deeply influenced by the forms and ceremonies of the church, which have changed little since the first Spanish settlements.

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  • in Clement and Ignatius), and as reverence for these latter grew in connexion with their story in the Gospels and in Acts.'

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  • Semi-Arians and Unitarians, though sufficiently distinguished from the free-thinkers by reverence for the letter of Scripture, might be held to encourage departure from the ancient landmarks.

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  • And while as thinkers they diverged in their opinions, so too they differed radically in character, in reverence for their subject and in religious earnestness and moral worth.

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  • These were supposed to be celestial beings who, inspired by love of the human race, had taken the so-called Great Resolve to become future Buddhas, and who therefore descended from heaven when the actual Buddha was on earth, to pay reverence to him, and to learn of him.

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  • The belief in them probably arose out of the doctrine of the older school, which did not deny the existence of the various creations of previous mythology and speculation, but allowed of their actual existence as spiritual beings, and only deprived them of all power over the lives of men, and declared them to be temporary beings liable, like men, to sin and ignorance, and requiring, like men, the salvation of Arahatship. Among them the later Buddhists seem to have placed their numerous Bodhisats; and to have paid especial reverence to Manju-sri as the personification of wisdom, and to Avalokiteswara as the personification of overruling love.

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  • Amitabha, the Dhyani-Buddha of this trinity, soon began to fill the largest place in the minds of the new school; and Avalokite s wara, his Bodhisat, was looked upon with a reverence somewhat less than his former glory.

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  • But, though his reverence for the personal character of his prince seems to have known no bounds, he had probably gauged the strategic faculties of the saintly king, and he certainly had imbibed the spirit of the dictum that a man's first duties are those to his own house.

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  • But this laudation of times past concentrates itself almost wholly on the person of the sainted king whom, while with feudal independence he had declined to swear fealty to him, "because I was not his man," he evidently regarded with an unlimited reverence.

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  • Besides the Triune God there is no other object of divine worship, but homage (inrepSovXia) may be paid to the Virgin Mary, and reverence (SovXia) to the saints and to their pictures and relics.

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  • By some modern authorities he is supposed to have been the founder of Thuggism, the Thugs having a special reverence for his memory.

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  • Perhaps the chief things lacking in his attitude are, in the first place, reverence, of which, however, from a few passages, it is clear he was by no means totally devoid, and secondly, an appreciation of passion and poetry.

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  • It shows in its author a want of reverence, a want of decency in the proper sense, a too great readiness to condescend to the easiest kind of ludicrous ideas and the kind most acceptable at that time to the common run of mankind.

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  • To us, therefore, they are valuable not only for their eloquence, but still more as giving us our clearest insight into Livy's own sentiments, his lofty sense of the greatness of Rome, his appreciation of Roman courage and firmness, and his reverence for the simple virtues of older times.

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  • " Reverence Zeus, the Father-God ": " all fathers are sacred to Zeus, the Father-God, and all brothers to Zeus the God of the family ": these phrases of Aristophanes and Epictetus 13 express the ideas that engendered his titles Ilarpci.ios, FapdiXcos, TEXE70, `Opoyvcos.

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  • Writing to Cecil before his accession he maintained, "am so far from any intention of persecution as I protest to God I reverence their church as our mother church, although clogged with many infirmities and corruptions, besides that I did ever hold persecution as one of the infallible notes of a false church."

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  • Staunton, who accompanied him as second commissioner, refused to consent, as Lord Macartney had done in 1793, unless the admission was made that his sovereign was entitled to the same show of reverence from a mandarin of his rank.

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  • Several of them were men of mark among the statesmen of the time, and it is the highest testimony to the character of Confucius that he inspired them with feelings of admiration and reverence.

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  • in circumference and inhabited by a people superior to any he had met in piety and courage, love of justice and reverence for learning.

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  • With all reverence, an historical student has to deduct something from both these statements.

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  • The fundamental metaphysical postulate that being and God are ultimately identical remained, however, the philosophical basis of all his thinking, and reverence for this being as the supreme good remained the fundamental disposition of his mind.

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  • Almost all the learned doctors, he says, declare that the confessor may reveal it, but he adds, " the contrary opinion is the safer and better doctrine, and more consistent with religion and with the reverence due to the holy rite of confession."

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  • the name in a review, and subsequently heard it mentioned with awe and reverence by two German students.

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  • The original reason for this was the reverence monies attaching to the memory of the Confessor, whose shrine and monu- stands in the central chapel behind the high altar.

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  • In later times, with the introduction of Greek gods into the Roman theological system, Consus, who had never been the object of special reverence, sank to the level of a secondary deity, whose character was rather abstract and intellectual.

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  • His knowledge of the Bible was such that he might have been called a living concordance; and on the margin of his copy of the Book of Martyrs are still legible the ill-spelt lines of doggerel in which he expressed his reverence for the brave sufferers, and his implacable enmity to the mystical Babylon.

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  • Soon the irresistible charm of a book which gratified the imagination of the reader with all the action and scenery of a fairy tale, which exercised his ingenuity by setting him to discover a multitude of curious analogies, which interested his feelings for human beings, frail like himself, and struggling with temptations from within and from without, which every moment drew a smile from him by some stroke of quaint yet simple pleasantry, and nevertheless left on his mind a sentiment of reverence for God and of sympathy for man, began to produce its effect.

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  • The recital of the Azan must be listened to with the utmost reverence.

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  • The later books say that they were all converted at once; but, according to the most ancient Pali record - though their old love and reverence had been so rekindled when the Buddha came near that their cold resolutions quite broke down, and they vied with each other in such acts of personal attention as an Indian disciple loves to pay to his teacher, - yet it was only after the Buddha had for five days talked to them, sometimes separately, sometimes together, that they accepted in its entirety his plan of salvation.'

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  • His father and uncles and others came to see him there, but the latter were angry, and would pay him no reverence.

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  • In the twentieth year his cousin Ananda became a mendicant, and from that time seems to have attended on the Buddha, being constantly near him, and delighting to render him all the personal service which love and reverence could suggest.

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  • The abbot was treated with the utmost submission and reverence by the brethren of his house.

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  • The Grail is here surrounded with the atmosphere of awe and reverence familiar to us through the 1 The etymology of the 0.

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  • On his return to Europe he was saluted as a magician, and received the greatest reverence from priests and people generally.

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  • It may be noted that he showed a special reverence for the old English royal saint, and christened his eldest son after him; wbile his second bore the name of Edmund, the East An.glian martyr.

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  • 2 Probably, if we leave out of sight the very numerous and obvious cases in which fasting, originally the natural reflex result of grief, fear or other strong emotion, has come to be the usual conventional symbol of these, we shall find that the practice is generally resorted to, either as a means of somehow exalting the higher faculties at the expense of the lower, or as an act of homage to some object of worship. The axiom of the Amazulu, that " the continually stuffed body cannot see secret things," meets even now with pretty general acceptance; and if the notion that it is precisely the food which the worshipper foregoes that makes the deity more vigorous to do battle for his human friend be confined only to a few scattered tribes of savages, the general proposition that " fasting is a work of reverence toward God " may be said to be an article of the Catholic faith.3 Although fasting as a religious rite is to be met with almost everywhere, there are comparatively few religions, and those only of the more developed kind, which appoint definite public fasts, and make them binding at fixed seasons upon all the faithful.

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  • They are held in reverence by the Bedouins.

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  • Those who shrink from the old confident assertion, " Christ would not have become incarnate but for man's sin," might claim to say, from reverence and not from evasiveness, ignoramus.

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  • He is typically English in his reverence for facts, whether facts of sense or of living consciousness, in his aversion from abstract speculation and verbal reasoning, in his suspicion of mysticism, in his calm reasonableness, and in his ready submission to truth, even when truth was incapable of being fully reduced to system by man.

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  • His " latitudinarianism " was the result of extraordinary reverence for truth, and a perception that knowledge may be sufficient for the purposes of human life while it falls infinitely short of speculative completeness.

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  • But Locke accepted Holy Scripture as infallible with the reverence of a Puritan.

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  • Still, the enunciation of the moral precepts of Pythagoras appears to have been dogmatic, or even prophetic, rather than philosophic, and to have been accepted by his disciples with an unphilosophic reverence as the ipse dixit 1 of the master.

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  • The saga grew up in the quieter days which followed the change of faith (1002), when the deeds of the great families' heroes were still cherished by their descendants, and the exploits of the great kings of Norway and Denmark handed down with reverence.

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  • The chiefs are a real aristocracy, excelling the people in physique, skill, intellect and acquirements of all sorts; and the reverence felt for them, now gradually diminishing, was very great, and had something of a religious character.

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  • Ancestor-worship occurs most naturally among a people where tribal organization has reached a fairly advanced stage, and is the natural outcome of patriotic reverence for a successful chief and his councillors.

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  • So when next year the king of the Franks went to Rome in person, on Christmas Eve of the year 8oo and in the basilica of St Peter the pope placed on his head the imperial crown and did him reverence after the established custom of the time of the ancient emperors.

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  • For Aristotle the reverence of Averroes was unbounded, and to expound him was his chosen task.

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  • The chief causes of his victory over his opponents were his great popularity and the superstitious reverence paid to the episcopal character at that period.

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  • The Pankas worship the Supreme Being under the name of Kabir, and the Chamars under the name of Satnam; while each community has a high priest to whom reverence is paid.

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  • Luckily, or, to speak with a reverence proper to the occasion, providentially, mankind are not disposed to embark the blessings they enjoy on a voyage of syllogistic adventure to obtain something more beautiful in exchange.

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  • The reverence and authority which was accorded the famous compilation of the Alexandrian astronomer is well evidenced by the catalogue of the Tatar Ulugh Beg, the Arabian names thane adopted being equivalent to the Ptolemaic names in nearly every case; this is also shown in the Latin translations given below.

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  • Religious training was confined to instruction in the forms of the Orthodox Church and the repetition of prayers by rote; dogmatic questions Nicholas neither understood nor cared about; and, in spite of his reverence for his brother Alexander, the latter's mysticism had not the faintest influence upon him.

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  • Everyone in the crowded room knew Pastor Humphries and treated him with the reverence as a visiting cardinal.

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  • "No one can own it," she said with reverence.

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  • Harmony's voice held a hushed note of reverence that irked Gabriel.

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  • I'd like you to get back in this bed and show me some reverence.

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  • Above all may we have grace given us to reverence and keep holy the Sabbath day amid so much awful and general desecration.

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  • filial reverence devoutly do we kiss your blessed feet.

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  • Above all may we have grace given us to reverence and keep holy the Sabbath day amid so much awful and general desecration.

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  • hushed reverence for who?

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  • To the Rock Majority, however, mention of the eighties brings hushed reverence for who?

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  • Rather than grandeur moving you to worship as in a cathedral, here is a space where smallness and intimacy inspire a quiet reverence.

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  • May we follow their example in showing a reverence for all creation?

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  • We felt a great reverence for those who left to come to the U.S. to find a harsh environment to greet them.

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  • May the rebel land approach at your command, and do reverence to you.

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  • reverence for nature.

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  • reverence for tradition can lead to both errors.

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  • reverence for all life in Nature, they do not cast harmful spells, they don't worship Satan.

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  • reverence for the ancient law is apparent there also.

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  • reverence for all things outside us to make us tread fearfully on the grass.

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  • reverence for the beauty of it all.

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  • Neither do I regard a new-born child with any superstitious reverence.

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  • With all filial reverence devoutly do we kiss your blessed feet.

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  • This was the executioner, who is half converted by the woman, and shows the most profound reverence for her.

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  • Deep and holy reverence is enforced upon us by every page of divine truth, and every dictate of the human conscience.

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  • The couple had much in common, their children were to be brought up with a deep reverence for religion.

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  • Charles received the Vicar of Christ with all due reverence.

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  • reverence EE, but it's aall se grand!

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  • superstitious reverence.

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  • Other widely used ingredients include truffles, ham, pork, and offal and fresh vegetables are used with reverence.

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  • Speeches of dying men are wont to be received with much veneration and reverence, especially the charge of dying friends.

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  • writhecongregation in Norwich held him in reverence and love; but his Calvinist opponents pictured him writhing in hell.

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  • " Tenderness " she had abundantly, and it revealed itself not only in effusive sentimentality, as with Rousseau and Chateaubriand, but in active benevolence; " justice " too she had in so far as she sincerely wished that all men should share alike her happiness; but of " holiness," that sense of awe and reverence that was felt in divers kinds and degrees by Isaiah, Sophocles, Virgil and St Paul, she had not a rudimenatry conception.

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  • Ancestor worship, or reverence for the dead, was a third factor.

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  • Pliny is also our authority for the reverence in which the mistletoe when found growing on the robur was held by the Druids.

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  • He set duty above everything, had in the highest degree a reverence for honour, and placed his indomitable courage at the service of everything that was beneficial with an abnegation that nothing could tire.

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  • Few men have been so courageous, and his influence was magnetic. Even the rough Szeklers, though they did not understand the language of their "little father," regarded him with superstitious reverence.

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  • I sincerely profess it much lessened my reverence as to that great council for he was very much hearkened unto."

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  • The historians Faustus of Byzant and Lazar of Pharp in the 5th century already attest the reverence with which their memory was invested.

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  • As yet the stress was laid on reverence for the Holy Sacrament as a whole; there is no mention in Urban's bull of the solemn procession and exposition of the Host for the adoration of the faithful, which are the main features of the festival as at present celebrated.

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  • The universal belief in the efficacy of invocation as an indispensable adjunct to sacrifices and religious rites generally, could not fail to engender and maintain in the minds of the people feelings of profound esteem and reverence towards those who possessed the divine gift of inspired utterance, as well as for those who had acquired an intimate knowledge of the approved forms of ritual worship. A common designation of the priest is brahman (nom.

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  • And it is further probable that some of the Gentiles, who afterwards became Christians, were either Jewish proselytes or adherents who paid reverence to the God of the Jews.

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  • In the great development of reverence for sacred animals which took place after the New Kingdom, the domestic cat was especially the animal of Bubastis, although it had also to serve for all the other feline goddesses, owing no doubt to the scarcity and intractability of its congeners.

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  • To the name of Christ he was prepared to "surrender his whole soul," and to render before it "obedience, reverence without measure, intense humility, most unreserved adoration" (Sermons, vol.

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  • Bazard had devoted himself to political reform, Enfantin to social and moral change; Bazard was organizer and governor, Enfantin was teacher and consoler; the former attracted reverence, the latter love.

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  • The brick tower in Pavia in which he was confined was, and still is, an object of reverence to the country people.

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  • So he will argue as the essence of the matter that (iv.) he who has occupied Christ's place in history, and won such reverence from the purest souls, was what he claimed to be, and that his many-sidedness comes to focus and harmony when we recognize him as the Christ of God and the Saviour of the world.

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  • They are, however, in no sense evangelicals in the Western sense; for they observe rigorous fasts, reverence icons, and believe implicitly in the efficacy of the multiplication of crossings, bowings and prostrations.

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  • The reverence felt for the canonized Torah or law (the Pentateuch or so-called five books of Moses) grew even into worship. Of this spirit we find clear expression in some of the later psalms, e.g.

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  • The explanation of the dual kingship is probably this - the Tui Tonga were regarded as the direct descendants of the original head of the family from which the people sprang; regarded with reverence, and possessing unlimited power, they came to misuse this and discontent resulted, whereupon, to protect themselves, they appointed an executive deputy.

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  • venerabilis, worthy of reverence, venerari, to reverence, to worship, allied to Venus, love; the Indo-Germ.

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  • "win," properly to struggle for, hence to gain), worthy of honour, respect and reverence, especially a term applied to dignified or honourable age.

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  • There were, doubtless, in the 5th century church historians and theologians who still spoke of him with reverence, but such men became fewer and fewer.

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  • The inappropriate designation of St John's Christians arises from the early and imperfect acquaintance of Christian missionaries, who had regard merely to the reverence in which the name of the Baptist is held among them, and their frequent baptisms. In their dealings with members of other communions the designation they take is Sabians, in Arabic Sabi'una, from qs= y 25, to baptize, thus claiming the toleration extended by the Koran (Sur.

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  • Their reverence for John is of a piece with their whole syncretizing attitude towards the New Testament.

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  • His chief logical work, the treatise De sex principiis, was regarded with a reverence almost equal to that paid to Aristotle, and furnished matter for numerous commentators, amongst them Albertus Magnus.

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  • A conspicuous example of this is found in the attitude of the Hebrew prophets to the gods of the nations, whose power they recognize without admitting their claim to reverence and sacrifice.

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  • A common formula in Palmyrene dedications runs " To him whose name is blessed for ever, the good and the compassionate "; out of reverence the name of the deity was not pronounced; was it Bel or Malak-bel?

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  • Success, however, was scarcely to be hoped for amongst Orientals who did not understand Latin, and whose sense of reverence was unshocked by the question of Pelagius, et quis est mihi Augustinus?

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  • of baal), her real name not being pronounced (perhaps out of reverence).

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  • As early as Aeschylus (Supp. 991) the proffering of divine honours was a form of expression for intense feelings of reverence or gratitude towards men which naturally suggested itself - as a figure of speech in Aeschylus, but the figure had been translated into action before Alexander not in the wellknown case of Lysander only (cf.

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  • Dante held Joachim in great reverence, and has placed him in Paradise (Par., xii.

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  • Asura indicates the more sublime and awful divine character, for which man entertains the greater reverence and fear: daiva denotes the kind gods of light, the vulgar - more sensuous and anthropomorphic - deities.

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  • the good principle, the idea of the good, the principle that works in man inclining him to what is good; (2) Ashem, afterwards Ashem Vahishtem (Plutarch's hX'i 3 O sa), the genius of truth and the embodiment of all that is true, good and right, upright law and rule - ideas practically identical for Zoroaster; (3) Khshathrem, afterwards Khshathrem Vairim (euvoµla), the power and kingdom of Ormazd, which have subsisted from the first but not in integral completeness, the evil having crept in like tares among the wheat: the time is yet to come when it shall be fully manifested in all its unclouded majesty; (4) Armaiti (BoOa), due reverence for the divine, verecundia, spoken of as daughter of Ormazd and regarded as having her abode upon the earth; (5) Haurvatat (71Xou-os), perfection; (6) Ameretat, immortality.

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  • Squeezes of the inscription were sent to Europe, where various scholars discussed the meaning, which is as follows: "His Majesty, Piyadassi, came here in the 21st year of his reign and paid reverence.

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  • With the latter part of the 4th century a new epoch in the history of the catacombs arose--that of religious reverence.

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  • The plan adopted by the Christians saved labour, economized space, and consulted reverence in the deposition of the corpse.

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  • (From de Rossi.) drunk in the chapels of the martyrs, placing their excesses to the score of religious reverence for the dead " (August., De Mor.

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  • Thus in social relationships we speak of "instinctive" liking or distrust; we are told that the Greeks had "instinctive" appreciation of art; we hear of an instinct of reverence or "instinctive" beliefs.

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  • It is said that reverence and love for their departed relatives was a marked feature in the character of the aborigines, and that the Spaniards made use of this as a bait to trap the unhappy natives.

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  • Patrick was doubtless educated as a Christian and was imbued with reverence for the Roman Empire.

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  • The blood rains through the platform on to the priest below, who receives it on his face, and even on his tongue and palate, and after the baptism presents himself before his fellow-worshippers purified and regenerated, and receives their salutations and reverence.

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  • He says they chiefly reverence Tahiti (Hestia), next Papaeus and his wife Apia (Zeus and Ge), then Oitosyros (Apollo) and Argimpasa (Aphrodite Urania).

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  • - lxxxix.) were collected, it was already the custom, from motives of reverence, to abstain from pronouncing the Tetragrammaton.

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  • Notwithstanding his reverence, therefore, for the great scholar with whose name it is associated, and to whose memory he would pay both grateful and humble tribute, he has ventured to omit or rewrite all those portions of the original article which he considers no longer tenable, while retaining every word which is still valuable.

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  • We have already spoken of the difference of tone between parts of the latter half of the book; and, when we compare the disputed prophecies of the former half with the Prophecy of Israel's Restoration, how inferior (with all reverence be it said) do they appear!

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  • It may, with all reverence, be added that our estimate of prophecy must be brought into harmony with facts, not facts with our preconceived theory of inspiration.

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  • It runs thus: "While informing your Reverence of the faith of the Thessalonicans and of the miracles wrought among them, must yet, in respect of this request of yours, remark that the faith of the city is not of such a kind as that the people desire to worship God and to honour his saints by means of anything sensible.

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  • The classical works, though still regarded with unreasoning reverence, were found to have a germinative and vivifying power that carried the mind out of the region of dogma, and prepared the way for the scientific movement which has been growing in strength up to our own day.

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  • Westminster Abbey is pre-eminent; in part, it may be, owing to the reverence felt towards it in preference to the classical St Paul's by those whose ideal of a cathedral church is essentially Gothic, but mainly from the fact that it is the burial-place of many of the English monarchs and their greatest subjects, as well as the scene of their coronations (see Westminster).

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  • The Nanakpanti Sikhs do not wear the hair long, nor use any of the outward signs of the Sikhs, though they reverence the Granth Sahib and above all the memory of their guru.

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  • Papineau had formerly professed a deep reverence for British institutions, and he had acquired a theoretical knowledge of the constitution, but he did not possess the qualities of a statesman, and consequently in his determination to apply the strict letter of the constitution he overlooked those elements and compensating forces and powers which through custom and usage had been incorporated in British institutions, and had given them permanence.

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  • An instinctive feeling that a proper name for God implicitly recognizes the existence of other gods may have had some influence; reverence and the fear lest the holy name should be profaned among the heathen were potent reasons; but probably the most cogent motive was the desire to prevent the abuse of the name in magic. If so, the secrecy had the opposite effect; the name of the god of the Jews was one of the great names in magic, heathen as well as Jewish, and miraculous efficacy was attributed to the mere utterance of it.

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  • - The sources for the personal life of Catherine of Siena are (1) the Vita or Legenda, Fra Raimondo's biography written 1384 - 1 395, first published in Latin at Cologne, 1553, and widely translated; (2) the Processus, a collection of testimonies and letters by those of her followers who survived in 1411, and had to justify the reverence paid to the memory of one yet uncanonized; (3) the Supplementum to Raimondo's Vita, compiled by Tommaso Caffarini in 1414; (4) the Legenda abbreviata, Caffarini's summary of the Vita, translated into beautiful Italian by Stefano Maconi; (5) the Letters, of which the standard edition is that of Girolamo Gigli (2 vols., Siena, 1713, Lucca, 1721).

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  • His disciples believe that in time the world will reverence Comte's sentiment about Clotilde de Vaux, as it reveres Dante's adoration of Beatrice - a parallel that Comte himself was the first to hit upon.

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  • The views on art contained in Herder's Kritische Wader (1769), Plastik (1778), &c., are chiefly valuable as a correction of the excesses into which reverence for Greek art had betrayed Winckelmann and Lessing, by help of his fundamental idea of national idiosyncrasy.

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  • He addressed a comparatively small and select circle, a congregation of thoughtful and devout men, who cultivated reverence and loved religion all the more that their own beliefs were limited to the simplest and sublimest truths.

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  • The great sources of Greek poetry were no longer regarded, as they were by Lucretius and Virgil, as sacred, untasted springs, to be approached in a spirit of enthusiasm tempered with reverence.

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  • The question at once arises, Can the simple historic faith be maintained without adding theological interpretations, those arid wastes of dogma in which the springs of faith and reverence run dry?

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  • And whereas it is by faith alone that we should worship the Father and reverence the Son, and be filled with the Spirit, we are now obliged to strain our weak human language in the utterance of things beyond its scope; forced into this evil procedure by the evil procedure of our foe::.

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  • weorffscipe), honour, dignity, reverence, respect.

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  • The word is used in a special sense of the service, reverence and honour paid, by means of devotional words or acts, to God, to the gods, or to hallowed persons, such as the Virgin Mary or the saints, and hallowed objects, such as holy images or relics.

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  • It is true that tradition largely fixes the form of figures and symbols in apocalyptic. Yet each new apocalypse is to some extent a reinterpretation of traditional material, which the writer uses not wholly freely but with reverence from the conviction that they contained the key to the mysteries of the present and the past.

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  • It was held in great reverence by all Moslems, though it did not possess canonical authority, and furnished most of the materials out of which the Koran, as it now exists, was prepared.

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  • His first interview was disappointing; the coldness and formality of the aged philosopher checked the enthusiasm of the young disciple, though it did not diminish his reverence.

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  • Now, the revelation of this divine character of morality is possible only to a being in whom the lower impulses have been, or are, successful in overcoming reverence for the law.

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  • It is regarded with great reverence, owing to a legend that the inner band of iron has been hammered out of one of the nails of the true cross.

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  • After this disaster he issued a third Mississippi Valley novel, The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson, in 1894, and in 1896 another historical romance, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, wherein the maid is treated with the utmost sympathy and reverence.

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  • He was a devout member of the Church of England, to which he looked up with unstinted affection and reverence; and he found in its service and formularies an adequate satisfaction for all his religious feelings.

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  • HOLY, sacred, devoted or set apart for religious worship or observance; a term characteristic of the attributes of perfection and sinlessness of the Persons of the Trinity, as the objects of human worship and reverence, and hence transferred to those human persons who, either by their devotion to a spiritual ascetic life or by their approximation to moral perfection, are considered worthy of reverence.

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  • The same year saw the birth of Maffeo Vegio, whose early reverence for the muse of Virgil and whose later devotion to the memory of Monica have left their mark on the educational treatise which he wrote a few years before his death in 1458.

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  • Yahweh was Israel's only god, who tolerated no other god beside Himself, and who claimed to be the sole object of the Israelite's reverence.

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  • The ideal of Deuteronomy is a community of which every member is full of love and reverence towards his God, and of sympathy and regard for his fellow-men.

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  • In America some of the Amerindian tribes reverence the rattlesnake as grandfather and king of snakes who is able to give fair winds or cause tempest.

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  • His policy was evidently to find a deity that should win the reverence alike of Greeks and Egyptians.

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  • President Johnson's leading political principles were a reverence of Andrew Jackson, unlimited confidence in the people, and an intense veneration for the constitution.

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  • The villagers regard the Passion Play as a solemn act of religious worship, and the performances are characterized by the greatest reverence.

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  • It receives a small portion of the daily food of its owner, and is treated with reverence, and mainly used to bring evil on some one else.'

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  • Thomas Aquinas based his justification of them on the idea of reverent commemoration; since we venerate the saints, we must also show reverence for their relics, for whoever loves another does honour to that which remains of him after death.

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  • The chief charge against Melville is that his fervour often led him to forget the reverence due to an "anointed monarch."

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  • If the result was satisfactory, he was admitted, but before partaking of the common meal he was required to swear awful oaths, that he would reverence the deity, do justice to men, hurt no man voluntarily or at the command of another, hate the unjust and assist the just, and that he would render fidelity to all men, but especially to the rulers, seeing that no one rules but of God.

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  • On the one hand, indeed, they held tenaciously by the traditional Judaism: blasphemy against their lawgiver was punished with death, the sacred books were preserved and read with great reverence, though not without an allegorical interpretation, and the Sabbath was most scrupulously observed.

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  • Their most singular feature, perhaps, was their reverence for the sun.

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  • Even if Dietrich of Niem frequently painted him too black, there is no question that the means which Boniface employed to fill the papal treasury seriously impaired the prestige of the highest spiritual office and the reverence due to it.

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  • From the close of the Thirty Years' War to the outbreak of the French Revolution the papacy suffered abroad waning political prestige; at home, progressive financial embarrassment accompanied by a series of inadequate governmental reforms; and in the world at large, gradual diminution of reverence for spiritual authority.

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  • The Iberians still reverence as saints the Armenian doctors of the 5th century, but as early as 552 they began to resent the dictatorial methods of the Armenians, as well might a proud race of mountaineers who never wholly lost their political independence; and they broke off their allegiance to the Armenian see very soon afterwards, accepted Chalcedon and joined the Byzantine church.

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  • Far too much has been made of the extent to which the knightly code, and the reverence paid to the Virgin Mary, raised the position of women (e.g.

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  • He was a son of a high official, and betrothed to a daughter of the king, but escaped on the eve of the wedding feast, entered the order, and attained to reverence and distinction.

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  • Full of an extreme reverence for the common law which he knew so well, he defended it alike against the court of chancery, the ecclesiastical courts, and the royal prerogative.

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  • On the other hand the reverence attached to it in the later periods of the city is evidenced by its being left standing in the midst of a triangular space adjoining the great theatre, which is surrounded by a portico, so as to constitute a kind of forum (the so-called Foro Triangolare).

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