Rev sentence examples

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  • The Missionary Life of St Francis Xavier, by the Rev. H.

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  • The Rt. Rev. Phillips Brooks has explained to her in a beautiful way the fatherhood of God.

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  • All we have is the letter from Rev. Martin, and lord knows what his intentions were.

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  • ARCHIBALD HENRY SAYCE (1846-), British Orientalist, was born at Shirehampton on the 25th of September 1846, son of the Rev. H.

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  • 26 1875, the son of the Rev. John Buchan.

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  • The reaping-machine, invented in 1812 by John Common, improved upon by the Rev. Patrick Bell in England and by Cyrus H.

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  • In 1818 he joined the Rev. John Campbell in his second journey to South Africa to inspect the stations of the London Missionary Society, and reported that the conduct of the Cape Colonists towards the natives was deserving of strong reprobation.

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  • My mind won't release me from all that has happened since Rev. Martin first visited me, and changed my life.

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  • Does Claire have the museum's picture of Rev. Martin and his wife?

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  • Imagine the overwhelming guilt Rev. Martin must have felt over this terrible sin of his relationship with a prostitute.

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  • An excellent sketch of his life and works, by the Rev. R.

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  • See The Vicar of Morwenstow (1875; later and corrected editions, 1876 and 1886), by the Rev. S.

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  • The mission at Tanjore was founded in 1778 by the Rev. Christian F.

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  • Here we are, in this lovely parlor, just where Annie must have stood, perhaps when Rev. Martin proposed to her!

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  • But then Rev. Martin came too and comforted us.

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  • "Enter Rev. Martin," she said with a sigh as she handed him the page.

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  • A bibliography of works dealing with the subject is included in the article by the Rev. Alexander Gordon in the Dictionary of National Biography.

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  • The attempt of Des Murs was praiseworthy, but in effect it has utterly failed, notwithstanding the encomiums passed upon it by friendly critics (Rev. de Zoologie, 1860, pp. 176-183,313-325,370-373).2 Until about this time systematists, almost without exception, may be said to have been wandering with no definite purpose.

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  • "Poor Rev. Martin died in a flu epidemic in '04," Fred said, his voice sounding duly respectful.

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  • Webster was twice married - first in 1898 to Grace, daughter of Rev. Elijah Fletcher, a New Hampshire clergyman.

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  • Do you think Annie ever told Rev. Martin she was carrying his child?

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  • Four letters mentioned Rev. Martin and the wonderful work he and Annie were doing with 'the poor mistaken souls.'

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  • Max Muller, "On Ancient Prayers," in Semitic Studies in Memory of Rev. Dr Alexander Kohut (1897); L.

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  • Shortly after he settled at Laleham, he married Mary, youngest daughter of the Rev. John Penrose, rector of Fledborough, Nottinghamshire.

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  • According, however, to the Rev. C. W.

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  • Viscount de Vaux in 1807 made use of water-pressure, as did the Rev. E.

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  • The name "Liberia" was invented by the Rev. R.

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  • 'AiroXXbwv), which means "destroyer" (hiroXX6av, to destroy), is taken from Rev. ix.

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  • Marillier (Rev. de l'hist.

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  • The town is one of the oldest in the state; it was founded in 1638 by Rev. John Wheelwright, an Antinomian leader who with a number of followers settled here after his banishment from Massachusetts.

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  • See " Descent of Ishtar to Hades," Rev. lines 6-10, where universal non-intercourse of sexes follows Ishtar's departure from earth to Hades.

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  • Bewegungsempfindungen (Leipzig, 1875); Die Mechanik in ihrer Entwickelung (Leipzig, 1883; rev. ed., 1908; Eng.

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  • Then in 1763 was delivered his speech in "The Parson's Cause" - a suit brought by a clergyman, Rev. James Maury, in the Hanover County Court, to secure restitution for money considered by him to be due on account of his salary (16,000 pounds of tobacco by law) having been paid in money calculated at a rate less than the current market price of tobacco.

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  • Others are met with in the most isolated localities; thus the Rev. A.

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  • et ses origines (1878); Horst, in Rev. de l'hist.

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  • In 1784 John Wesley, in disregard of the authority of the Established Church, took the radical step of appointing the Rev. Thomas Coke (1747-1814) and Francis Asbury superintendents or "bishops" of the church in the United States.

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  • 1108; Ontario, Rev. Stats.

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  • At one time, indeed, he found Lavoisier's views so specious that he was much inclined to accept them, but he overcame this wavering, and so late as 1800 he wrote to the Rev. Theophilus Lindsey (1723-1808), "I have well considered all that my opponents have advanced and feel perfectly confident of the ground I stand upon....

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  • The first settlement in New Haven (called Quinnipiac, its Indian name, until 1640) was made in the autumn of 1637 by a party of explorers in search of a site for colonization for a band of Puritans, led by Theophilus Eaton and the Rev. John Davenport, who had arrived at Boston, Massachusetts, from England in July 1637.

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  • The government of the Jurisdiction was of the strictest Puritan type, and although the forty-five "blue laws" which the Rev. Samuel Peters, in his General History of Connecticut, ascribed to New Haven were much confused with the laws of the other New England colonies and some were mere inventions, yet many of them, and others equally "blue," were actually in operation as enactments or as court decisions in New Haven.

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  • For thirty years (1842-1872) Pittsfield was the home of the Rev. John Todd (1800-1873), the author of numerous books, of which Lectures to Children (1834; 2nd series, 1858) and The Student's Manual (1835) were once widely read.

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  • Rev. xviii., p. 368) explains Quirinus as the oak-god (quercus), and Quirites as the men of the oaken spear.

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  • Holland was founded in 1847 by Dutch settlers, under the leadership of the Rev. A.

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  • Stat., 1901, pp. 239, 369 sqq.; Bachler, Rev. d'etudes juives, 1901, 125 seq.

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  • The village was founded as Oberlin Colony in 1833 (in 1846 it was incorporated as the village of Oberlin), by the Rev. John J.

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  • Shipherd (1802-1844), pastor of a church in Elyria, and the Rev. Philo Penfield Stewart (1798-1868), a missionary to the Choctaws of Mississippi, as a home for Oberlin Collegiate Institute, which was chartered in 1834; the name Oberlin College was adopted in 1850.

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  • He was the oldest of the four sons of the Rev. David Dudley Field (1781-1867), a well-known American clergyman and author.

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  • See also the Life of David Dudley Field (New York, 1898), by Rev. Henry Martyn Field.

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  • The Rev. Joseph Hunter associated him with the rebel earl of Lancaster of Edward II.'s time.

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  • See also An Inquiry into the Life of the Rev. W.

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  • The next English edition, described by Potthast as editio pessima, was that published by the English Historical Society in 1838, and edited by the Rev. J.

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  • The house is considered to be the original of "Castlewood" in Thackeray's Esmond; the novelist was acquainted with the place through his friendship with the Rev. William Brookfield and his wife, the daughter of Sir Charles Elton of Clevedon Court.

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  • Rev. ii., 1887).

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  • Gladstone and the Rev. T.

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  • 20; Rev. ii.

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  • Rev. ii., 188 7, p. 317 seq.; Niese, Historische Zeitschrift, lxxix., 18 97, p. 1, seq.); even the explicit statement in Arrian as to Alexander and the Arabians is given as a mere report; but we have wellauthenticated utterances of Attic orators when the question of the cult of Alexander came up for debate, which seem to prove that an intimation of the king's pleasure had been conveyed to Athens.

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  • Rev. ix.

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  • His friend and biographer, David Welsh (1793-1845), superintended the publication of his text-book, the Physiology of the Human Mind, and his Lectures on the Philosophy of the Human Mind was published by his successors, John Stewart and the Rev. E.

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  • The standard edition of Wesley's Journal (1909) has furnished much new material for this period of Wesley's life, the Rev. N.

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  • He did everything that strong words against separation could do to bind his societies to the Church of England; he also did everything that legal documents and ordinations could do to secure the permanence of that great work for which God had raised him up. In the words of Canon Overton and Rev. F.

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  • The best-known modern English translation is that by the Rev. L.

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  • Of the minor historical works a good edition was edited by Rev. J.

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  • The initiation period of the third age begins with St Benedict, while the actual age of the Spirit is not to begin until 1260, the Church- mulier amicta sole (Rev. xii.

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  • Rev. xx.

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  • Rev. xiii.

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  • He afterwards added to his charge at Sparkford, Lovington, South Barrow and North Barrow, and in September 1782 was presented to the perpetual curacy of South Barrow by the Rev. John Hughes, Coln St Denys.

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  • In 1800, when a frost-bitten thumb gave him great pain and much fear for his life, his friend, Rev. Philip Oliver of Chester, died, leaving him director and one of three trustees over his chapel at Boughton; and this added much to his anxiety.

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  • The London Hibernian Society asked him to accompany Dr David Bogue, the Rev. Joseph Hughes, and Samuel Mills to Ireland in August 1807, to report on the state of Protestant religion in the country.

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  • Seetzen, Reisen durch Syrien, Palastina;" Phonicienc., &c. (4 vols., 1854); Rev. J.

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  • Among the presidents of Amherst College have been in 1845-1854 and in 1876-1890 respectively - Edward Hitchcock, the famous geologist, and the Rev. Julius H.

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  • On this occasion, however, though strongly drawn to the beautiful island, he stayed not longer than six weeks, and proceeded to Sydney, where, early in 1890, he published, in a blaze of righteous anger, his Father Damien: an Open Letter to the Rev. Dr Hyde of Honolulu, in vindication of the memory of Father Damien and his work among the lepers of the Pacific. At Sydney he was very ill again: it was now obvious that his only chance of health lay within the tropics.

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  • Thyateira was an ancient town re-peopled with Macedonians by Seleucus about 290 B.C. It became an ithportant station on the Roman road from Pergamum to Laodicea, and one of the "Seven Churches" of Asia (Rev. ii.

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  • It is the seat of Blinn Memorial College (German Methodist Episcopal), opened as "Mission Institute" in 1883, and renamed in 1889 in honour of the Rev. Christian Blinn, of New York, a liberal benefactor; of Brenham Evangelical Lutheran College, and of a German-American institute (1898).

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  • 197 sqq.; on coins found in 1909, see Jameson in Rev. Num.

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  • CHARLES LUTWIDGE DODGSON (LEWIS CARROLL] (1832-1898), English mathematician and author, son of the Rev. Charles Dodgson, vicar of Daresbury, Cheshire, was born in that village on the 27th of January 1832.

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  • Lord Seaton) (London, 1903); Rev. A.

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  • He graduated at Yale in 1767, studied theology under the Rev. John Smalley (1734-1820) at Berlin, Connecticut, and was licensed to preach in 1769.

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  • See Jeremy Belknap, History of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1784-1792); and Rev. Dr A.

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  • One of them, Rev. Thomas Spurgeon, after some years of pastorate in New Zealand, succeeded his father as minister of the Tabernacle, but resigned in 1908 and became president of the Pastors' College.

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  • Other facilities for outdoor enjoyment are provided in Hesketh Park (presented to the town by the Rev. Charles Hesketh, formerly rector of North Meols, and one of the lords of the manor), the Botanic Gardens, Kew Gardens, South Marine Park, and the Winter Gardens.

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  • In 1791 the town was incorporated, and through the influence of the Rev. Seth Noble, the first pastor, the name was changed to Bangor, the name of one of his favourite hymn-tunes.

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  • Italy: "Lettres Romaines" in Annales de philosophie chretienne (Paris, January-March 1904), an Italian theologian's fearless defence of Loisy's main New Testament positions; Rev. P. Louis Billot S.J., De sacra traditione (Freiburg i.

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  • England: The Rev. T.

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  • Rev. John Owen, 1885), and in his Philosophical Consideralions concerning the existence of Sorcerers and Sorcery (1666).

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  • Guerin-Meneville, Rev. Zool., 1 838, p. 11; Karsch, " Ueber Cryptostemma Guer."

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  • Soc., 1894; Nalepa, " Phytoptidae," Das Thierreich (Berlin, 1898); Trouessart, " Classification des Acariens," Rev. Sci.

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  • Mission stations north of the 'Orange were established a few years later, and in 1813 the Rev. John Campbell, after visiting Griqualand West for the London Missionary Society, traced the Harts river, and from its junction with the Vaal followed the latter stream to its confluence with the Orange, journeying thence by the banks of the Orange as far as Pella, in Little Namaqualand, discovering the great falls.

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  • St John's Episcopal church at the west end of Princes Street was the scene of the ministrations of Dean Ramsay, and St Paul's Episcopal church of the Rev. Archibald Alison, father of the historian.

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  • In Warriston cemetery (opened in 1843) in the New Town, were buried Sir James Young Simpson, Alexander Smith the poet, Horatio McCulloch, R.S.A., the landscape painter, the Rev. James Millar, the last Presbyterian chaplain of the castle, and the Rev. James Peddie, the pastor of Bristo Street church.

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  • The parish church, effectively situated on an eminence by the side of the lake, was the scene of the ministration of the Rev. John Thomson (1778-1840), the landscape painter, who numbered Sir Walter Scott among his elders.

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  • JOHN CAMPBELL CAMPBELL, Baron (1779-1861), lord chancellor of England, the second son of the Rev. George Campbell, D.D., was born on the 17th of September 1779 at Cupar, Fife, where his father was for fifty years parish minister.

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  • Dingaan consented on condition that the Boers recovered for him certain cattle stolen by another chief; this task Retief accomplished, and with the help of the Rev. F.

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  • Rev. (Dec. 1897).

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  • His father, the Rev. Francis Wollaston (1731-1815), rector of Chislehurst, grandson of the William Wollaston noticed above, was an enthusiastic astronomer.

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  • Rev. (1898).

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  • JOHN ABERCROMBIE (1780-1844), Scottish physician, was the son of the Rev. George Abercrombie of Aberdeen, where he was born on the 10th of October 1780.

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  • Having failed with Brand, the Boers invited the Rev. Thomas Francois Burgers, a member of a well-known Cape Colony family and a minister of the Dutch Reformed Church, to allow himself to be nominated.

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  • Demanche, " La 'Formation de la nation Boer," Rev. franCaise (1906), xxxi.

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  • The medicinal properties of the sulphur water were discovered, or perhaps rediscovered, in 1732 by a famous Welsh writer, the Rev. Theophilus Evans, then vicar of Llangammarch (to which living Llanwrtyd was a chapelry till 1871).

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  • Rev. xiv.

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  • His right to be held as an authority on ecclesiastical history was proved in 1858 by his Registrum sacrum anglicanum, which sets forth episcopal succession in England, by many other later works, and particularly by his share in Councils and Ecclesiastical Documents, edited in co-operation with the Rev. A.

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  • Some ill-considered imputations upon Father Damien by a Presbyterian minister produced a memorable tract by Robert Louis Stevenson (An Open Letter to the Rev. Dr Hyde, 1890).

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  • In 1899, on the appeal of the Rev. H.

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  • Westall, St Cuthbert's, London, and the Rev. E.

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  • of Tenbury, are St Michael's church and college (1858), founded and partially endowed by the Rev. Sir Frederick Gore Ouseley, in which the ordinary preparatory education of boys is combined with a school for choristers and instruction in ecclesiastical music.

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  • In 1836 American missionaries were also allowed to open stations; in 1837 he permitted the Rev. F.

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  • Bishop Colenso visited him in 1857 and obtained a grant of land for a mission station, which was opened in 1860, by the Rev. R.

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  • 1836); Zululand under Dingaan: Account of Mr Owen's Visit in 1837 (Cape Town, 1880); Rev. B.

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  • Shaw, Memorials of South Africa (1841); Rev. G.

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  • A complete transcript, Brief Lives chiefly of Contemporaries set down by John Aubrey between the Years 1669 and 1696, was edited for the Clarendon Press in 1898 by the Rev. Andrew Clark from the MSS.

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  • Non-official: Right Rev. Bishop Bigandet, Life or Legend of Gautama (3rd ed., London, 1881); G.

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  • Farther India (London, 1892); Rev. F.

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  • The Rev. A.

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  • Franks, Guide to Glass Room in British Museum (1888); Rev. A.

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  • A brief memoir was prefixed by Hawkins to a selection from Ken's works which he published in 1713; and a life, in two volumes, by the Rev. W.

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  • See also the Rev. W.

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  • Johnson and the Rev. S.

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  • There are several fine churches in the township; of one in Sound Beach the Rev. William H.

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  • The curious discussion before the papal court respecting the beatification of Odoric forms a kind of blue-book issued ex typographic rev. camerae apostolicae (Rome, 1755).

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  • For the Armagnacs see Paul Dognon, "Les Armagnacs et les Bourguignons, le comte de Foix et le dauphin en Languedoc" (1416-1420) in Annales du Midi (1889); Rameau, "Guerre des Armagnacs dans le Maconnais" (1418-1435) in the Rev. soc. lit.

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  • Mosheim in 1725; and translated into English by the Rev. John Guthrie, 1854.

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  • It has been edited, with an English translation (1907) by (Rev.) Lonsdale and Laura Ragg, who hold that it was the work of a Christian renegade to Mahommedanism about the 13th-16th century.

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  • The American Presbyterian Mission, established in Persia in1834-1835by the Rev. Justin Perkins and Dr A.Grant, comprises large buildings near Urmia, a college and a hospital.

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  • (Berlin, 1848); French by Carmoly, Rev. Or.

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  • Watertown was one of the earliest of the Massachusetts Bay settlements, having been begun early in 1630 by a group of settlers led by Sir Richard Saltonstall and the Rev. George Phillips.

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  • Fortnightly Rev. N.S.

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  • d'Arbois de Jubainville, " Les Celtes en Espagne," Rev. celtique, xiv.

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  • Salmon, Rev. mens.

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  • Herve, Rev. mens.

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  • CHARLES GILES BRIDLE DAUBENY (1795-1867), English chemist, botanist and geologist, was the third son of the Rev. James Daubeny, and was born at Stratton in Gloucestershire on the II th of February 1795.

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  • He also took a deep interest in religious matters, was a prominent member of the Church of the Disciples (Unitarian; founded in Boston by the Rev. James Freeman Clarke), and was assistant editor for some time of The Christian World, a weekly religious paper.

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  • In 1854 he delivered, in Exeter Hall, London, a lecture on the Theological Essays of the Rev. F.

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  • Little, Across Yunnan (London, 1910); Rev. J.

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  • He was the fourth of the twelve children of the Rev. George Clayton Tennyson (1778-1831) and his wife Elizabeth Fytche (1781-1865).

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  • At Christmas 1815 he was sent to the grammar school at Louth, his mother having kept up a connexion with this typical Lincolnshire borough, of which her father, the Rev. Stephen Fytche, had been vicar.

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  • His tutor was the Rev. Henry Hartopp Knapp. His brothers, Thomas and Robertson Gladstone, were already at Eton.

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  • The eldest daughter, Agnes, married the Rev. E.

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  • Another daughter married the Rev. Harry Drew, rector of Hawarden.

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  • Of his teachers, one, the Rev. Charles Wellbeloved, was, Martineau said, " a master of the true Lardner type, candid and catholic, simple and thorough, humanly fond indeed of the counsels of peace, but piously serving every bidding of sacred truth."

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  • 2 The other, the Rev. John Kenrick, he described as a man so learned as to be placed by Dean Stanley " in the same line with Blomfield and Thirlwall," 3 and as " so far above the level of either vanity or dogmatism, that cynicism itself could not think of them in his presence."

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  • occupy the pulpit of Little Portland Street chapel in London, which he did at first for two years in conjunction with the Rev. J.

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  • This grand group of mountains has been well called the Alps of Japan, and a good account of them may be found in The Japanese Alps (1896) by the Rev. W.

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  • He also published Modern Greece, A Narrative of a Residence and Travels in that Country (1856); a biography of his father, The Life of the Rev. Robert Baird, D.D.

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  • He declined an offer from his uncle, the Rev. Thomas Spencer, to send him to Cambridge, and so was practically self-taught.

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  • A useful handbook of Swedenborg's theology is the Compendium of the Theological Writings of Emanuel Swedenborg by the Rev. Samuel Warren (London, 1885).

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  • Lockhart, Rev. Whitwell Elwin, W.

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  • and the Monthly Repository (1806-1837), originally purely theological, but after coming into the hands of the Rev. W.

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  • American Rev. vol.

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  • Rev. (1888); P. Gagnon, Essai de bibliographie canadienne (1895), and S.

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  • This was followed by the South Asian Register (1827), the Australian Quarterly Journal (1828), edited by the Rev. P. N.

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  • We need not suspect Christian influences, but the parallelism of Rev. xx.

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  • 12, 13; Rev. xii.

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  • Bellet, "Le dessechement du Zuiderzee," Rev. Geog.

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  • NORMAN MACLEOD (1812-1872), Scottish divine, son of Rev. Norman Macleod (1783-1862), and grandson of Rev. Norman Macleod, minister of Morven, Argyllshire, was born at Campbeltown on the 3rd of June 1812.

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  • Cunningham, The Churches of Asia (London, 1880); Renan, "Les Crises du Catholicisme Naissant" in Rev. d.

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  • Thus it came about that he was brought up as a Roman Catholic, chiefly at the scat of Mr Holman at Warkworth, Northamptonshire, where the Rev. John Gother, a celebrated controversialist, officiated as chaplain.

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  • Challoner (1784); Flanagan, History of the Catholic Church in England (1857); there is also a critical history of Challoner by Rev. E.

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  • In 1850 the decision of the privy council, that the bishop of Exeter was bound to institute the Rev. G.

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  • Another English student, the Rev. T.

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  • and commentaries were found and collated by the Rev. A.

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  • Cesaire d'Arles," Rev. Benedictine, Oct.

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  • According to Clement of Alexandria this was written prophetically to apply to the Carpocratians, an antinomian Gnostic sect of c. 150; but hyper-Paulinists had given occasion to similar complaints already in Rev. ii.

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  • Sieffert, on account of the superscription, would date as early as 70-80, but acknowledges the hyper-Pauline affinity of the heresy, its propagation as a doctrine, and close relation to the Nicolaitan of Rev. ii.

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  • Tallack, Rev. H.

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  • Seddall, Boisgolin, Rev. W.

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  • A Life by Rev. T.

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  • ROGER COTES (1682-1716), English mathematician and philosopher, was born on the 10th of July 1682 at Burbage, Leicestershire, of which place his father, the Rev. Robert Cotes, was rector.

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  • Lagrange, Rev. biblique, iii.

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  • Learning (1694), has given rise to a literature of its own; see, especially, Tollin's Die Entdeckung des Blutkreislaufs, &c. (1876); Huxley, in Fortnightly Rev. (February 1878); Tollin's Kritische Bemerkungen fiber Harvey and seine Vorganger (1882).

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  • 3 (Rev. xxi.

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  • I (Rev. iii.

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  • Andreas of Caesarea mentions Papias as attesting the credibility of Revelation, and cites two of his remarks on Rev. xii.

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  • siecle," in Rev. philos.

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  • He graduated as valedictorian in 1808 at the college of New Jersey (Princeton); studied theology under the Rev. Walter Addison of Maryland, and in Princeton; was ordained deacon in 1811 and priest in 1814; and preached both in the Stone Chapel, Millwood, and in Christ Church, Alexandria, for some time.

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  • Signor Rosio used a telephonic method to effect the same end, and mechanical, optical and telephonic devices have been utilized by the Rev. F.

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  • Burk, translated into English by Rev. R.

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  • In 1877 the Rev. C. T.

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  • Bishop Hannington, who attempted to enter Buganda by the forbidden route from the east, was murdered, and the Rev. R.

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  • A large Protestant army now went to the assistance of Macdonald, and from the 19th of October to the 9th of January the siege of Luba's continued, with constant skirmishes, among the killed being the Rev. G.

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  • Austin, With Macdonald in Uganda (1903) and Among Swamps and Giants in Equatorial Africa (1902); Winston Churchill, My African Journey (1908); Bishop Tucker, Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa (1908); articles on ethnology by the Rev. H.

    0
    0
  • Among other explorers in this period the following may be mentioned: Nicholas von Miklucho Maclay in 1870, 1877 and 1879-1881, in the Astrolabe Bay district, &c.; the missionary, Rev. S.

    0
    0
  • Macfarlane (1875, Fly river, &c.); about1876-1880the north-east coasts and adjacent islands were explored by the Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • There may be mentioned the work of the Rev. J.

    0
    0
  • Chuquet in Rev. critique d'histoire et de litterature, 25th of May 1891 (Paris); also articles by others in the Rev. historique, vols.

    0
    0
  • Or again the following prayer for baptism over the water from the Ethiopic Statutes of the Apostles as translated by the Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • Woodward, History of Hampshire (London, 1861-9); Rev. Silvester Davies, History of Southampton (London, 1883).

    0
    0
  • P. Hallowell, The Quaker Invasion of Massachusetts (Boston, 1883; rev. ed., 1887).

    0
    0
  • Weill, Rev. archeol., i.

    0
    0
  • Dussaud, Rev. de l'hist.

    0
    0
  • Rev. xxii.

    0
    0
  • In the New Testament Balaam is cited as a type of avarice;6 in Rev. ii.

    0
    0
  • 3, and which has had a place in the worship of the Christian church since the 2nd century; to the Hallelujah of several of the Psalms and of Rev. xix.; to such passages of glorification as Rom.

    0
    0
  • At the age of thirteen he accompanied his sister Emilia and her husband the Rev. Josiah Brewer (the parents of the distinguished judge of the Supreme Court, David J.

    0
    0
  • Faber, D.D., by his brother the Rev. F.

    0
    0
  • Rev. i.

    0
    0
  • 15; Rev. viii.

    0
    0
  • In Rev. i.

    0
    0
  • n Rev. vii.

    0
    0
  • 16 Rev. vii.

    0
    0
  • 17 Rev. viii.

    0
    0
  • 19 Rev. xiv.

    0
    0
  • Andrews, Church Treasury (1898), article " Pilgrims' Signs," by Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • 19); " the marriage of the Lamb has come " (Rev. xix.

    0
    0
  • " They have no wine ": the hopelessness of the old conditions is announced here by the true Israel, the Messiah's spiritual mother, the same " woman " who in Rev. xii.

    0
    0
  • A very curious observation is recorded by the Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • are: Philippolis, 809, at one time capital of the Griqua chief Adam Kok and named after the Rev. John Philip. Fauresmith, 1363, a mining centre, 6 m.

    0
    0
  • In his zeal for the historic episcopacy he published in 1807 An Apology for Apostolic Order and its Advocates, a series of letters to Rev. John M.

    0
    0
  • 36; Rev. xxii.

    0
    0
  • 13; Rev. v.

    0
    0
  • 53) speaks of the" tree of life,"and Rev. xxii.

    0
    0
  • 14, &c.) prove that the idea was familiar, 12 and in Rev. xxii.

    0
    0
  • 22),-the only other Biblical reference (apart from Rev. xxi.

    0
    0
  • In compensation let it be mentioned that in Rev. xii.

    0
    0
  • For Fauriel's correspondence with Guizot see Nouvelle Rev. (Dec. 1, 1901, by V.

    0
    0
  • The Rev. George Davys, afterwards bishop of Peterborough, taught the princess Latin; Mr J.

    0
    0
  • 7 Rev. Archeol.

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    0
  • Their first church was in Broad Street, nearly opposite the present First Presbyterian Church, with cupola and flankers from which "watchers" and "wards" might discover the approach of hostile Indians, and as an honour to their pastor, Rev. Abraham Pierson (1608-1678), who came from Newark-on-Trent, they gave the town its present name, having called it Milford upon their first settlement.

    0
    0
  • The College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, was situated here from 1747 to 1756, for all but the first few months under the presidency of the Rev. Aaron Burr, who published in 1752 the well-known Newark Grammar, long used in Princeton and originally prepared for Burr's very successful boys' school in Newark.

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    0
  • He married a daughter of his former tutor, the Rev. R.

    0
    0
  • "WILLIAM MAXWELL AITKEN BEAVERBROOK, 1ST Baron (1879-), British politician, was born at Newcastle, New Brunswick, on May 25 1879, the son of the Rev. William Aitken, Presbyterian minister of Newcastle.

    0
    0
  • From the days of Ignatius, down through Paul of Samosata and Lucian to the 'great controversies of the 5th century which began with the theories of Apollinarius, the theologians of Antioch started from the one sure fact, that 1 Coptic Life of Dioscurus (Rev. Egyptologique, 1880-1883).

    0
    0
  • 8 ff.); witness the reference in Rev. ii.

    0
    0
  • The Rev. C. H.

    0
    0
  • Rev. iv.

    0
    0
  • Rev. (July 1893); Introduction and Notes to new ed.

    0
    0
  • An impressive announcement of the Easter Communion Service, made by the Rev. Pryce Davies, vicar of Talgarth, on the 30.th of March 1735, was the means of awakening Howell Harris (1714-1773) of Trevecca, and he immediately began to hold services in his own house.

    0
    0
  • A notable event in the history of Welsh Methodism was the publication in 1770, of a 4to annotated Welsh Bible by the Rev. Peter Williams, a forceful preacher, and an indefatigable worker, who had joined the Methodists in 1746, after being driven from several curacies.

    0
    0
  • The ignorance of the people of the north made it very difficult for Methodism to benefit from these manifestations, until the advent of the Rev. Thomas Charles (1755-1814), who, having spent five years in Somersetshire as curate of several parishes, returned to his native land to marry Sarah Jones of Bala.

    0
    0
  • In 1842, the South Wales Association opened a college at Trevecca, leaving Bala to the North; the Rev. David Charles became principal of the former, and the Rev. Lewis Edwards of the latter.

    0
    0
  • His father, the Rev. Aaron Burr (1715-1757), was the second president (1748-1757) of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University; his mother was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the well-known Calvinist theologian.

    0
    0
  • Haverhill was settled in June 1640 by a small colony from Newbury and Ipswich, and its Indian name, Pentucket, was replaced by that of Haverhill in compliment to the first minister, Rev. John Ward, who was born at Haverhill, England.

    0
    0
  • The foundation of our knowledge of the resistance of the air, as employed in the construction of ballistic tables, is the series of experiments carried out between 1864 and 1880 by the Rev. F.

    0
    0
  • JOHN WALLIS (1616-1703), English mathematician, logician and grammarian, was born on the 23rd of November 1616 at Ashford, in Kent, of which parish his father, Rev. John Wallis (1567-1622), was incumbent.

    0
    0
  • 14 each cherub has four faces, a view tastefully simplified in the Johannine Apocalypse (Rev. iv.

    0
    0
  • p. 402 (1888); and Les Copepodes du Boulonnais (1892); Cuenot, Rev. biol.

    0
    0
  • Rev. IV.

    0
    0
  • He was the son of Rev. Oliver Everett and the brother of Alexander Hill Everett.

    0
    0
  • It originated in a proposal made to the committee of the Religious Tract Society, by the Rev. Thomas Charles of Bala, who found that his evangelistic and philanthropic labours in Wales were sorely hindered by the dearth of Welsh Bibles.

    0
    0
  • Bodin's De Republica in 1606, but the Grammatica Latina, Graeca et Hebraica, attributed to him by Anthony Wood and others, is the work of the Rev. Hanserd Knollys (c. 1599-1691), a Baptist minister.

    0
    0
  • Beside the equivalence of the hon to 5 utens weight of water, the mathematical papyrus (35) gives 5 besha = (2/3)cubic cubit (Revillout's interpretation of this as 1 cubit cubed is impossible geometrically; see Rev. Eg., 1881, for data); this is very concordant, but it is very unlikely for 3 to be introduced in an Egyptian derivation, and probably therefore only a working equivalent.

    0
    0
  • -- A system differing widely both in units and names from the preceding is found on the standard slab of Gythium in the southern Peloponnesus (Rev. Arch., 1872).

    0
    0
  • It has been described (Rev. Arch., 1872) as an Attic choenix.

    0
    0
  • The tema is the same name as the large wheat measure (35), which was worth 30,000 to 19,000 grains of copper, according to Ptolemaic receipts and accounts (Rev. Eg., 1881, 150), and therefore very likely worth to utens of copper in earlier times when metals were scarcer.

    0
    0
  • Golenischeff, in Rev. egypt.

    0
    0
  • (19) Ledrain, in Rev. egypt.

    0
    0
  • Revillout, in Rev. eg.

    0
    0
  • Stern, in Rev. eg.

    0
    0
  • (42) P. Tannery, Rev. arch.

    0
    0
  • an Evangelical Free Church Catechism, the work of a committee (convened by Rev. Hugh Price Hughes) comprising Congregationalists, Baptists, Methodists (Wesleyan, Primitive and others), and Presbyterians, and thus representing directly or indirectly the beliefs of sixty or seventy millions of avowed Christians in all parts of the world, a striking example of inter-denominational unity.

    0
    0
  • Rev. xxiv., 1909, p. 115).

    0
    0
  • The second, or Later Version, being a thorough revision of the first, is ascribed to the year 1388 by Sir Frederic Madden and the Rev. Joshua Forshall in their edition of these two versions.'

    0
    0
  • Madden and Rev. J.

    0
    0
  • Davidson; Dr Benjamin Davies (1814-1875), professor of oriental and classical languages at Stepney Baptist College; the Rev. A.

    0
    0
  • Fairbairn, congregationalist; the Rev. Frederick Field (1801-1885), fellow of Trinity, Cambridge; Dr C. D.

    0
    0
  • Ginsburg; the Rev. Dr Gotch of Bristol; Archdeacon Benjamin Harrison (1808-1887), Hebraist; the Rev. Stanley Leathes (1830-1900), professor of Hebrew at King's College, London; Professor M `Gill; Canon Robert Payne Smith (1819-1895), regius professor of divinity at Oxford, dean of Canterbury (1870); Professor J.

    0
    0
  • Perowne, afterwards bishop of Worcester; the Rev. Edward Hayes Plumtre (1821-1891), professor of exegesis at King's College, London, afterwards dean of Wells; Canon E.

    0
    0
  • - The Rev. Dr Joseph Angus, president of the Stepney Baptist College; Dr David Brown; Richard Chenevix Trench, archbishop of Dublin; the Rev. Dr John Eadie (1810-1876), Presbyterian; the Rev. F.

    0
    0
  • Hort; the Rev. W.

    0
    0
  • Humphry (1815-1886), vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London; the Rev. Benjamin Hall Kennedy, canon of Ely; William Lee (1815-1883), archdeacon of Dublin, and professor of ecclesiastical history in the university; J.

    0
    0
  • Lightfoot, afterwards bishop of Durham; Professor William Milligan; the Rev. William Fieldian Moulton (1835-1898), Wesleyan biblical scholar; Dr J.

    0
    0
  • Newman; the Rev. Samuel Newth (1821-1898), congregationalist, professor of ecclesiastical history at, and afterwards president of, New College, London; Dr A.

    0
    0
  • Roberts; the Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • Vance Smith; Dr Robert Scott; the Rev. F.

    0
    0
  • The Rev. J.

    0
    0
  • In 1638 the Rev. John Wheelwright, an Antinomian leader who had been banished] from Massachusetts, founded Exeter on land claimed to have been bought by him from the Indians.

    0
    0
  • The Rev. John Campbell, one of the founders of the Bible Society, also travelled in southern Bechuanaland and the adjoining districts in 1812-1814 and 1819-1821, adding considerably to the knowledge of the river systems. About 1817 Mosilikatze, the founder of the Matabele nation, fleeing from the wrath of Chaka, the Zulu king, began his career of conquest, during which he ravaged a great part of Bechuanaland and enrolled large numbers of Bechuana in his armies.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the convention the Boers remained in Stellaland and Goshen - which were west of the new Transvaal frontier, and in April 1884 the Rev. John Mackenzie, who had succeeded Livingstone, was sent to the country to arrange matters.

    0
    0
  • Rev. (July 1904), p. 113, figs.; (20) A.

    0
    0
  • His associations there, however, were almost exclusively with Episcopalians, including Mr Cartwright and the Rev. Dr. Stuart, for a time the only clergyman in the district.

    0
    0
  • A memoir of his life by the Rev. Arundell Blount Whatton, prefixed to a translation of the Venus in sole visa, appeared at London in 1859.

    0
    0
  • The best book on Celtic fairy lore is still that of the minister of Aberfoyle, the Rev. Mr Kirk (ob.

    0
    0
  • Elliott, Biographical Story of the Constitution (New York, 1910); Woodrow Wilson, Constitutional Government in the United States (ibid., rev. ed., 1908); and especially important are the decision of the United States Supreme Court, known by the name of the reporter until 1874A.

    0
    0
  • Newbury, including the site of the present Newburyport, was settled in 1635 by a company under the leadership of the Rev. Thomas Parker (1595-1677), who had taught in Newbury, England, in his youth.

    0
    0
  • DAVID GEORGE RITCHIE (1853-1903), Scottish philosopher, was born at Jedburgh, son of the Rev. George Ritchie, D.D.

    0
    0
  • By the Rev. Robert Willis.

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM STEPHEN RAIKES HODSON (1821-1858), known as "Hodson of Hodson's Horse," British leader of light cavalry during the Indian Mutiny, third son of the Rev. George Hodson, afterwards archdeacon of Stafford and canon of Lichfield, was born on the lgth of March 1821 at Maisemore Court, near Gloucester.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand the Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • Upon Hodson's side see Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • "HENRY MELVILL GWATKIN (1844-1916), English theological scholar, was born at Barrow-on-Soar, Leics., July 30 184 4, the youngest son of the Rev. R.

    0
    0
  • Rev. (1906), pp. 741 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Rev. xvi., 1902, p. 365, where the whole evidence is very fully collected; and Frazer's Studies in the Early History of Kingship (1907), where he accepts Cook's criticism of his own earlier theory.

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    0
  • In this family tree are men famous in arms and in the public service: Sir Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw, Admiral Sir John Ross, Field-Marshal Sir Hew Dalrymple Ross, Dr John Adair, in whose arms Wolfe died at Quebec, and the Rev. W.

    0
    0
  • At fifteen he was sent for two years to the day-school of the Rev. T.

    0
    0
  • 1884); La maniere de language, written in 1396 (P. Meyer, Rev. crit.

    0
    0
  • The Memoirs of the Life and Times of the Most Rev. Father in God, Dr Thomas Tenison, late Archbishop of Canterbury, appeared without date not long after his death.

    0
    0
  • His father, Rev Henry Lyon Davis (1775-1836), was a prominent Protestant Episcopal clergyman of Maryland, and for some years president of St John's College at Annapolis.

    0
    0
  • Since the Rev. William Ellis and a party of American missionaries first made the volcano known to the civilized ' Among the minqr phenomena of Hawaiian volcanoes are the delicate glassy fibres called Pele's hair by the Hawaiians, which are spun by the wind from the rising and falling drops of liquid lava, and blown over the edge or into the crevices of the crater.

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    0
  • The Rev. William Ellis, an early English missionary, described the natives as follows: " The inhabitants of these islands are, considered physically, amongst the finest races in the Pacific, bearing the strongest resemblance to the New Zealanders in stature, and in their well-developed muscular limbs.

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    0
  • The first Hawaiian minister of public instruction was the Rev. William Richards (1792-1847), who held office from 1843 to 1847, and was followed by Richard Armstrong (1805-1860), an American Presbyterian missionary, the father of General S.

    0
    0
  • A short time afterwards the British government presented a small schooner to the king, and this afforded an opportunity for the Rev. William Ellis, the well-known missionary, to visit Honolulu with a number of Christian natives from the Society Islands.

    0
    0
  • St Paul delighted to represent it as the " ideal Israel," and St John echoes the thought in the words of praise (Rev. i.

    0
    0
  • Casual excavations were made here in 1744 and 1833; more systematic ones intermittently between 1864 and 1884 by the Rev. J.

    0
    0
  • Rev. (1896); for the villages, Gen.

    0
    0
  • Rev. (1904); Prof. Bury's Life of St Patrick (1905); Haverfield's Romanization (cited above); and P.1 Vinogradoff, Growth of the Manor (1905), bk.

    0
    0
  • Rev. vol.

    0
    0
  • In 1873 he was defendant in a libel action brought against him by the Rev. R.

    0
    0
  • The Rev. G.

    0
    0
  • In the minutes of conference for 1818 "Rev."

    0
    0
  • In 1885 the Rev. S.

    0
    0
  • Collier was appointed to Manchester and the Rev. Peter Thompson was sent to work in the East End.

    0
    0
  • The names of the Rev. William Arthur, Sir Francis Lycett, Sir W.

    0
    0
  • The Rev. Albert Clayton, the secretary of the fund, lavished his strength on his vast task and the total income exceeded I, 073,782.

    0
    0
  • 4 Padan-Aram (Rev. Vers.

    0
    0
  • On the interpretation see P. Dhorme, Rev. Bibl.

    0
    0
  • His father was the Rev. Edward Poole, a wellknown bibliophile.

    0
    0
  • Hill, Church Quarterly Rev. (April 1908), pp. 118-141, who specially emphasizes the evidence of the Phoenician coins.

    0
    0
  • It was not till 1865 that Sir George Young and the Rev. H.

    0
    0
  • which he translated with the assistance of Captain Morrison and the Rev. A.

    0
    0
  • His Commentary on the Psalms was edited by the Rev. H.

    0
    0
  • See Life of Bishop Gleig, by the Rev. W.

    0
    0
  • He studied first at the Edinburgh Academy, then for two years under the Rev. Thomas Dale, the poet, in Kent, passed one session at Glasgow University in 1833, and, having chosen the career of the Indian civil service, completed his studies with distinction at Haileybury College.

    0
    0
  • Through his father, William Gray Brooks, he was descended from the Rev. John Cotton; through his mother, Mary Ann Phillips, a woman of rare force of character and religious faith, he was a great-grandson of the founder of Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.

    0
    0
  • In 1901, at New York, was published, in two volumes, Phillips Brooks, Life and Letters, by the Rev. A.

    0
    0
  • Never married, though there is evidence that he delighted in the society of women of education and refinement, he lived for more than a quarter of a century with his friend the Rev. W.

    0
    0
  • 14 and Rev. xii.

    0
    0
  • PLYMOUTH BRETHREN, a community of Christians who received the name in 1830 when the Rev. J.

    0
    0
  • Rev. Samuel Seabury (Boston, 1881).

    0
    0
  • Wells, Culture of the Chrysanthemum; Rev. S.

    0
    0
  • Massee, Plant Diseases; Rev. A.

    0
    0
  • Rose Society, Handbook on Pruning Roses; Rev. J.

    0
    0
  • Pemberton, Roses, their History, Development and Culture; Very Rev. Dean Hole, A Book about Roses; J.

    0
    0
  • Norwich was settled in 1659 by colonists from Saybrook under the leadership of Captain John Mason (1600-1672), who had crushed the power of the Pequot Indians in Connecticut in 1637, and the Rev. James Fitch (1622-1702), who became a missionary to the Mohegans."

    0
    0
  • His father, Daniel Doddridge, was a London merchant, and his mother the orphan daughter of the Rev. John Bauman, a Lutheran clergyman who had fled from Prague to escape religious persecution, and had held for some time the mastership of the grammar school at Kingston-upon-Thames.

    0
    0
  • He declined offers which would have led him into the Anglican ministry or The Bar, and in 1719 entered the very liberal academy for dissenters at Kibworth in Leicestershire, taught at that time by the Rev. John Jennings, whom Doddridge succeeded in the ministry at that place in 1723, declining overtures from Coventry, Pershore and London (Haberdashers' Hall).

    0
    0
  • See Memoirs, by Rev. Job Orton (1766); Letters to and from Dr Doddridge, by Rev. Thomas Stedman (1790); and Correspondence and Diary, in 5 vols., by his grandson, John Doddridge Humphreys (1829).

    0
    0
  • The two books following are by besieged residents in Kumasi: The Siege of Kumasi, by Lady Hodgson (London, 1901); Dark and Stormy Days at Kumasi, 1900, from the diary of the Rev. Fritz Ramseyer (London, 1901).

    0
    0
  • Hume's relation to the society of his time is described in the Rev. H.

    0
    0
  • This inscription, now in the Louvre, was found at Dhiban, the biblical Dibon, in 1868 by the Rev. F.

    0
    0
  • CHURCH ARMY, an English religious organization, founded in 1882 by the Rev. Wilson Carlile (afterwards prebendary of St Paul's), who banded together in an orderly army of "soldiers" and "officers" a few working men and women, whom he and others trained to act as "Church of England evangelists" among the outcasts and criminals of the Westminster slums. Previous experience had convinced him that the moral condition of the lowest classes of the people called for new and aggressive action on the part of the Church, and that this work was most effectively done by laymen and women of the same class as those whom it was desired to touch.

    0
    0
  • Martin (1698), Rev. K.

    0
    0
  • Rev. S.

    0
    0
  • It had "been treated in such a manner by some of the French economists, occasionally by Montesquieu, and, among English writers, by Dr Franklin, Sir James Steuart, Arthur Young and Rev. J.

    0
    0
  • Asbury Park was founded in 1869, was named in honour of the Rev. Francis Asbury, was incorporated as a borough in 1874, and was chartered as a city in 1897.

    0
    0
  • In Rev. ix.

    0
    0
  • 1306, rev. 16.

    0
    0
  • a Wood, with additions by the Rev. Sir Peshall (1773, 4to; the text is garbled and the editing very imperfect).

    0
    0
  • In 1628 a patent for the territory was granted by the New England Council to the Dorchester Company, in which the Rev. John White of Dorchester, England, was conspicuous, and which in the same year sent out a small company under John Endecott as governor.

    0
    0
  • Rev. (1902).

    0
    0
  • In 1832 he called on the Rev. John Aldis, an eminent Baptist minister, to accompany him to a local Bible meeting.

    0
    0
  • Levy, Rev. des El.

    0
    0
  • For gems see " Gobineau " in the Rev. arche'ol., vols.

    0
    0
  • (1895) p. 16; Rev. d'Assyr.

    0
    0
  • In the case of the architectural remains, the Greek tradition is obvious at Hatra (Jacquerel, Rev. archeol., 18 97 [i i ], 343 f.), and in the relics of the temple at Kingavar (Dieulafoy, L' Art antique de la Perse, v.

    0
    0
  • of the Rev. C. Plummer's edition of Two of the Saxon Chronicles Parallel (Clarendon Press, 1892, 1899); to which the student may be referred for detailed arguments.

    0
    0
  • In 1865 the Clarendon Press published Two Saxon Chronicles (A and E) Parallel, with supplementary extracts from the others, by the Rev. John Earle.

    0
    0
  • On this edition is partly based the later edition by the Rev. C. Plummer, already cited above.

    0
    0
  • The best translation is that by the Rev. Joseph Stevenson, in his series of Church Historians of England (1853).

    0
    0
  • xix., and the authorities there cited; P. Barre, "Melilla et les presides espagnols," Rev. francaise (1908).

    0
    0
  • Rev. (1888) p. 352); Montefiore, Hibbert Lectures (1892), Appendix I; W.

    0
    0
  • Named after Milford, England, it was founded in 1639 by Rev. Peter Prudden and his followers from New Haven and Wethersfield.

    0
    0
  • The following year he succeeded the Rev. R.

    0
    0
  • Middleton, Tarbat and Clarendon overcame Charles's reluctance to restore episcopacy; Lauderdale fell into the background; The Rev. James Sharp, hitherto the agent of the Resolutioners, or milder party among the preachers, turned his coat, and took the archbishopric of St Andrews.

    0
    0
  • This, coming on the head of the Rye House murder plot (of which the Rev. Mr Carstairs, the agent of Argyll, and probably Argyll himself, then in Holland, were not ignorant), caused the government to demand, at the hands of the military, from all and sundry, an " Abjuration " of Renwick's anarchist utterances.

    0
    0
  • The volumes of the book clubs, Bannatyne, Maitland, Abbotsford and Spalding, are full of matter; also those of the Early Scottish Texts Society and the Wodrow Society, with the works of Knox, Calderwood and the History of the Sufferings by Woodrow (edited by the Rev. Robert Burns, 1837-1838).

    0
    0
  • Edwards' Addresses and Sermons, with a memoir by Rev. Edwards A.

    0
    0
  • Ancren Riwle was edited for the Camden Society by the Rev. James Morton in 1843 from the Cotton MS. (Nero A xiv.).

    0
    0
  • The following books may be consulted on this subject: Rev. W.

    0
    0
  • The account given above reproduces the main descriptive passages in the Rev. S.

    0
    0
  • EDWARD SPENCER BEESLY (1831-), English historian and positivist, son of the Rev. James Beesly, was born at Feckenham, Worcestershire, on the 23rd of January 1831.

    0
    0
  • Rev. xvi.

    0
    0
  • An account of his life, privately printed, was written by the Rev. John Kelly (1150-1809), the Manx scholar, who married one of his granddaughters.

    0
    0
  • Rev. Hib.

    0
    0
  • Thus it comes that the devil, the opponent of God, appears in the end often also in the form of a terrible dragonmonster; this appears most clearly in Rev. xii.

    0
    0
  • (Rev. xi.).

    0
    0
  • Cherubim) in Rev. iv.

    0
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  • The American Arabian mission was founded in 1889 in the United States; the first agents of the mission were the Rev. J.

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  • Cantine and the Rev. S.

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  • d'Alexandrie," Rev. des etudes grecques, v., 1892; E.

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  • high by 50 diameter) is a tumulus or "moat-hill," formerly thought to mark the site of a Roman camp. The theological college of the Calvinistic Methodists and the grammar school (endowed), which was founded in 1712, are the chief features, together with the statue of the Rev. Thomas Charles, the distinguished theological writer, to whom was largely due the foundation of the British and Foreign Bible Society.

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  • He married, in 1901, Margaret Eleanor, daughter of the Rev. Henry Furneaux, a well-known Oxford scholar, his family consisting of a son and two daughters.

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  • The modern name, as above-mentioned, is Merj Ibn `Amir (" the meadow-land of the son of `Amir "); in ancient times it was known as the Valley of Jezreel, of which name Esdraelon is a Greek corruption; and by another name (Har-Magedon) derived from that of the important town of Megiddo - it is referred to symbolically in Rev. xvi.

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  • For their bearing on Palestine, see especially P. Dhorme, Rev. biblique (2908), pp. 500 -529; (1909), pp - 5 0 -73, 368-385.

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  • Rev. xix.

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  • Illinois College (Presbyterian), founded in 1829 through the efforts of the Rev. John Millot Ellis (1793-1855), a missionary of the American Home Missionary Society and of the so-called Yale Band (seven Yale graduates devoted to higher education in the Middle West), is one of the oldest colleges in the Central States of the United States.

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  • The Rev. Edward Beecher was the first president of the college (from 1830 to 1844), and among its prominent graduates have been Richard Yates, jun., the Rev. Thomas K.

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  • Hahn, Rev. Quest.

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  • At length, when the Rev. A.

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  • See Rev. Preb.

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  • (1847-1913), three times private secretary to Gladstone when Prime Minister; the Right Rev.

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  • (1852-1903), Bishop of Southampton; and the REV. Edward Lyttelton, D.D.

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  • He developed four well-defined characters in the process - a country farmer, Ezekiel Biglow, and his son Hosea; the Rev. Homer Wilbur, a shrewd old-fashioned country minister; and Birdofredum Sawin, a Northern renegade who enters the army, together with one or two subordinate characters; and his stinging satire and sly humour are so set forth in the vernacular of New England as to give at once a historic dignity to this form of speech.

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  • Fuller also published an admirable Memoir of the Rev. Samuel Pearce, of Birmingham, and a volume of Expository besides a considerable number of smaller pieces, chiefly sermons and pamphlets, which were issued in a collected form after his death.

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  • There is also a biography by the Rev. J.

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  • (Documentos) (Lisbon, 1877); A Report of the Kingdom of Congo (London, 1881), an English translation, with notes by Margarite Hutchinson, of Filippo Pigafetta's Relatione del Reame di Congo (Rome, 1591), a book founded on the statements and writings of Duarte Lopez; Rev. Thos.

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  • Facing the South Common were the homes of Rev. Nathaniel Ward (1578-1652), principal author of the Massachusetts "Body of Liberties" (1641); the first code of laws in New England, and author of The Simple Cobler of Aggawam in America, Willing to help mend his Native Country, lamentably tattered, both in the upper-Leather and the Sole (1647), published under the pseudonym, "Theodore de la Guard," one of the most curious and interesting books of the colonial period; of Richard Saltonstall (1610-1694), who wrote against the life tenure of magistrates, and although himself an Assistant espoused the more liberal principles of the Deputies; and of Ezekiel Cheever (1614-1708), a famous schoolmaster, who had charge of the grammar school in 1650-1660.

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  • In the vicinity was the house of the Rev. William Hubbard (1621-1704), author of a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England (Boston, 1677) and a general History of New England, published by the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1815.

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  • For this offence six leaders, headed by the Rev. John Wise, minister of the Chebacco Parish (now Essex), were prosecuted, found guilty, imprisoned for three weeks to await sentence and then disqualified for office; they were also fined from £15 to L50 each, and were required to give security for their good behaviour.

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  • There may be noticed Sackville College (an almshouse founded in 1608), and St Margaret's home and orphanage, founded by the Rev. John Mason Neale (1818-1866), warden of Sackville College.

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  • Myers (English secretary of Legation at Peking), the French missionaries, and others, were superseded in 1898 by a large and learned volume by the Rev J.

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  • Pervinquiere in Rev. sci.

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  • A form of air-engine which was invented in 1816 by the Rev. R.

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  • 10, Rev. iv.

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  • Rev. ii.

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  • Rev. Oct.

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  • Rev. from 1913, onwards and in U.S. Naval Inst.

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  • A still more sweeping theory of the same nature is propounded by the Rev. C. J.

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  • This monthly magazine,organized by the Rev. Abel Charles Thomas (1807-1880), pastor of the First Universalist Church, was from October 1840 to March 1841 made up of articles prepared for some of the many improvement circles or literary societies; it then became broader in its scope, received more spontaneous contributions, and from October 1842 until December 1845 was edited by Harriot F.

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  • In 1842, when the Rev. G.

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  • Rev. W.

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  • Principle of Least Resistance.Where more than one system of resistances are alike capable of balancing the same system of loads applied to a given structure, the smallest of those alternative systems, as waS demonstrated by the Rev. Henry Moseley in his Mechanics of Engineering and Architecture, is that which will actually be exerted but are distinguished by an asterisk.

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  • He adopted his father's trade of stone-mason, but gave it up in 1785 in order to enter the Rev. Cornelius Winter's school at Marlborough.

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  • He also wrote a Life of Rev. Cornelius Winter, and Memoirs of Rev. John Clarke.

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  • Returning to America, he was appointed professor of Dogmatic Theology and Sacred Scripture, and director of the ecclesiastical seminary of Seton Hall College at South Orange, New Jersey; soon afterwards he was made vice-president of the institution; and in 1868 became president, succeeding Rev. Bernard J.

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  • In 1784 the Rev. John Carroll was appointed prefect-apostolic for the Catholics of the English colonies hitherto dependent on the vicar-apostolic of London.

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  • He was the second child of the Rev. John Keble and his wife Sarah Maule.

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  • In 1844 he became co-pastor with the Rev. Thomas Lewis of Union Chapel, Islington.

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