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retaliation

retaliation Sentence Examples

  • Yeah, and she has a pretty hot thirst for retaliation.

  • In 1798, when the French occupied Rome, Consalvi was imprisoned in the castle of St Angelo, together with other papal officials, in retaliation for the murder of General Duphot; a proposal to whip him through the streets was defeated by the French general in command, but, after three months' confinement, he was deported with a crowd of galley slaves to Naples, and his property was confiscated as that of "an enemy of the Roman republic."

  • He had aristocratic privileges and responsibilities, the right to exact retaliation for corporal injuries, and liability to heavier punishment for crimes and misdemeanours, higher fees and fines to pay.

  • A sort of symbolic retaliation was the punishment of the offending member, seen in the cutting off the hand that struck a father or stole a trust; in cutting off the breast of a wet-nurse who substituted a changeling for the child entrusted to her; in the loss of the tongue that denied father or mother (in the Elamite contracts the same penalty was inflicted for perjury); in the loss of the eye that pried into forbidden secrets.

  • In retaliation Arran occupied and stripped his castle at Crichton, whereupon Bothwell in November sent Arran a challenge, which the latter declined.

  • A diversion of this kind may explain the Israelite victories; the subsequent withdrawal of Assyria may have afforded the occasion for retaliation.

  • By this campaign, which exposed him to the worst retaliation of the English, he inaugurated his role of "procurator and defender of the king of France."

  • In retaliation General Andrew Jackson captured the place, but in a few days withdrew to New Orleans.

  • The bishop of Melanesia, John Coleridge Patteson, fell a victim to this retaliation on the island of Nukapu 10th September 1871.

  • The result was that the Turks in retaliation deprived the Catholics, always under the protection of France, of some of their privileges in connexion with the holy places, which were now granted to the Orthodox Church.

  • In the beginning of 1809, in retaliation for the occupation of Portugal, an expedition was sent from Para to the French colony of Guiana, and after some fighting this part of Guiana was incorporated with Brazil.

  • For the next 50 years they continued to raid the Byzantine empire, although Sergius condemned retaliation.

  • But he never was the man to take opposition to his wishes either quietly or without retaliation.

  • In retaliation, Stuyvesant, in 1655, with seven vessels and as many hundred men, recaptured the fort and also captured Fort Christina (Wilmington).

  • The old castle, now in ruins, was dismantled in 1645 by the marquis of Argyll in retaliation for the destruction of Castle Campbell in Dollar Glen on the south side of the Ochils.

  • But the most discriminating character of Garrick, slightly tinged with satire, is that drawn by Goldsmith in his poem of Retaliation.

  • Parliament in retaliation closed the port of Boston (1774), a proceeding which only aroused more bitter feeling in the country towns and enlisted the sympathy of the other colonies.

  • In retaliation a punitive expedition under Generals John Sullivan and James Clinton in 1779 destroyed the Iroquois towns, and dealt the Indian confederacy a blow from which it never recovered.

  • It was only in 1917 that the emergency decrees promulgated by the Stargkh Ministry at the beginning of the war failed to receive ratification, in retaliation for the suppression of trial by jury by a military trial and the extension over civilians of the j urisdiction of the military courts.

  • Meanwhile the labour traffic, which had been initiated, so far as the, Pacific islands were concerned, by an unsuccessful attempt in 1847 to employ New Hebridean labourers on a settlement near the present township of Eden in New South Wales, had attained considerable proportions, had been improperly exploited and, as already indicated, had led the natives to retaliation, sometimes without discernment, a notorious example of this (as was generally considered) being the murder of Bishop Patteson in 1871.

  • His prejudice against Napier naturally produced retaliation, and Mark Napier in defending his ancestor has fallen into the opposite extreme of attempting to reduce Briggs to the level of a mere computer.

  • In United retaliation for the supposed sympathy of Canadians with the South in this struggle the victorious North took steps to abrogate in 1866 the reciprocity treaty of 18J4, which had conferred such great advantages on both countries.

  • On another occasion he is said to have taken a man out of a British ship in retaliation for the impressment of an American seaman by H.M.S.

  • When the United States navy was organized in 1798 he was included in the corps of naval officers, and appointed to the schooner "Retaliation."

  • In retaliation the 41st Congress excluded the state's representatives on a technicality, and, on the theory that the government of Georgia was a provisional organization, passed an act requiring the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment before the admission of Georgia's senators and representatives.

  • On October 1st Mr Balfour spoke at Sheffield, reiterating his views as to free-trade and retaliation, insisting that he "intended to lead," and declaring that he was prepared at all events to reverse the traditional fiscal policy by doing away with the axiom that import duties should only be levied for revenue purposes.

  • They rejected Mr Chamberlain's food-taxes, discredited his statistics, and, while admitting the theoretical orthodoxy of retaliation, criticized Mr Balfour's attitude and repudiated his assumption that retaliation would be desirable.

  • The burning by the American general McClure, on the 10th of December 1813, of Newark(Niagara on the Lake), for which severe retaliation was taken at Buffalo, was made the excuse for much destruction.

  • Fateh Khan was barbarously murdered by Kamran (Mahmud's son) near Ghazni in 1818; and in retaliation Mahmud himself was driven from power, and the Barakzai clan secured the sovereignty of Afghanistan.

  • During 1881-1882 Hungary, desiring means of retaliation against the duties on corn and the impediments to the importation of cattle recently introduced into Germany, withdrew her opposition to protective duties; the tariff was completely revised, protective duties were introduced on all articles of home production, and high finance duties on other articles such as coffee and petroleum.

  • In retaliation, the capital Paros was besieged by an Athenian fleet under Miltiades, who demanded a fine of ioo talents.

  • 17) and of retaliation for injury received (xxiv.

  • The Xenien succeeded as a retaliation on the critics, but the masterpieces which followed them proved in the long run much more effective weapons against the prevailing mediocrity.

  • Capital punishment was confined to treason and murder; the former was not to be attended by corruption of blood, drawing, or quartering; all other felonies were made punishable by confinement and hard labour, save a few to which was applied, against Jefferson's desire, the principle of retaliation.

  • It was his belief that such a system of retaliation would remove the possibility of war arising from commercial quarrels.

  • 4 Next year Anne's desire to give a regiment to Hill, Mrs Masham's brother, led to another ineffectual attempt in retaliation to displace the new favourite, and the queen showed her antagonism to the Whig administration on the occasion of the prosecution of Sacheverell.

  • But the kings ambition was to go farther than retaliation or chastisement.

  • A free-state man having been murdered for his opinions, a friend who threatened retaliation was arrested by the pro-slavery sheriff, S.

  • As an historical figure, it is impossible to dogmatize concerning the personality of Joan of Arc. The modern clerical view has to some extent provoked what appears, in Anatole France's learned account, ably presented as it is, to be a retaliation, in regarding her as a clerical tool in her own day.

  • The laws uniformly discountenanced revenge, retaliation, the punishment of one crime by another, and permitted capital punishment only in the last resort and in ultimate default of every other form of redress.

  • He turned mere personal defence and retaliation into an occasion for a lofty enforcement of constitutional principles, and this, too, with a relevancy and pertinence of consummate skilfulness.

  • Retaliation for murder and other injuries was a common method of redress, although the church had endeavoured to introduce various reforms. Hence we find in the Brehon Laws a highly complicated system of compensatory payment; but there was no authority except public opinion to enforce the payment of the fines determined by the brehon in cases submitted to him.

  • I~Ien like Stein, Hardenberg and Scharnhorst were secretly preparing Prussias retaliation.

  • Not the least of the anxieties of the colonial office during this period was the situation in the West Indies, where the canesugar industry was being steadily undermined by the European bounties given to exports of continental beet; and though the government restricted themselves to attempts at removing the bounties by negotiation and to measures for palliating the worst effects in the West Indies, Mr Chamberlain made no secret of his repudiation of the Cobden Club view that retaliation would be contrary to the doctrines of free trade, and he did his utmost to educate public opinion at home into understanding that the responsibilities of the mother country are not merely to be construed according to the selfish interests of a nation of consumers.

  • The source of all the evil was, he declared, the excessive wealth of the church, which, in retaliation for the sentence of excommunication, he threatened to confiscate.

  • Of these, among the most remarkable was his review of Herder's Philosophy of History, which greatly exasperated that author, and led to a violent act of retaliation some years after in his Metakritik of Pure Reason.

  • Yeah, and she has a pretty hot thirst for retaliation.

  • On 1 October 1944 an SS battalion had, in retaliation for Italian partisan resistance, killed 1,830 inhabitants of this small village.

  • political will may be there for a spasm retaliation to an attack on the homeland.

  • We have always been told retaliation is not the key to resolving problems.

  • Sounds silly but the falcon knows that nothing likes going into thorn bushes, so she is protecting herself against retaliation by other rooks.

  • For the first time, U.S. military force was employed in direct retaliation to state-sponsored terrorism.

  • This retaliation is usually transitory, just to test the strength of your boundaries.

  • coalition warplanes bombed an Iraqi air defense site in retaliation, a Pentagon statement said.

  • In 1798, when the French occupied Rome, Consalvi was imprisoned in the castle of St Angelo, together with other papal officials, in retaliation for the murder of General Duphot; a proposal to whip him through the streets was defeated by the French general in command, but, after three months' confinement, he was deported with a crowd of galley slaves to Naples, and his property was confiscated as that of "an enemy of the Roman republic."

  • Punishment can, therefore, be justified only in so far as it (1) protects society by removing temporarily or 1 Talio, in juridical Latin, the abstract noun from talis, such, alike, hence "retaliation."

  • As Pickering was held responsible for Franklin's imprisonment, some of Franklin's followers in retaliation kidnapped Pickering and carrying him into the woods, tried in vain for nearly three weeks to get from him a promise to intercede for Franklin's pardon.

  • fall of Dan and Shiloh), and if their eponym is Cain, the story of Cain and Abel serves, amid a variety of purposes, to condemn the murder of the settled agriculturist by the nomad, but curiously allows that any retaliation upon Cain shall be avenged (see below, note 5).

  • He had aristocratic privileges and responsibilities, the right to exact retaliation for corporal injuries, and liability to heavier punishment for crimes and misdemeanours, higher fees and fines to pay.

  • A sort of symbolic retaliation was the punishment of the offending member, seen in the cutting off the hand that struck a father or stole a trust; in cutting off the breast of a wet-nurse who substituted a changeling for the child entrusted to her; in the loss of the tongue that denied father or mother (in the Elamite contracts the same penalty was inflicted for perjury); in the loss of the eye that pried into forbidden secrets.

  • In retaliation Arran occupied and stripped his castle at Crichton, whereupon Bothwell in November sent Arran a challenge, which the latter declined.

  • A diversion of this kind may explain the Israelite victories; the subsequent withdrawal of Assyria may have afforded the occasion for retaliation.

  • By this campaign, which exposed him to the worst retaliation of the English, he inaugurated his role of "procurator and defender of the king of France."

  • In retaliation General Andrew Jackson captured the place, but in a few days withdrew to New Orleans.

  • The bishop of Melanesia, John Coleridge Patteson, fell a victim to this retaliation on the island of Nukapu 10th September 1871.

  • The result was that the Turks in retaliation deprived the Catholics, always under the protection of France, of some of their privileges in connexion with the holy places, which were now granted to the Orthodox Church.

  • In the beginning of 1809, in retaliation for the occupation of Portugal, an expedition was sent from Para to the French colony of Guiana, and after some fighting this part of Guiana was incorporated with Brazil.

  • For the next 50 years they continued to raid the Byzantine empire, although Sergius condemned retaliation.

  • But he never was the man to take opposition to his wishes either quietly or without retaliation.

  • In retaliation, Stuyvesant, in 1655, with seven vessels and as many hundred men, recaptured the fort and also captured Fort Christina (Wilmington).

  • The old castle, now in ruins, was dismantled in 1645 by the marquis of Argyll in retaliation for the destruction of Castle Campbell in Dollar Glen on the south side of the Ochils.

  • But the most discriminating character of Garrick, slightly tinged with satire, is that drawn by Goldsmith in his poem of Retaliation.

  • Parliament in retaliation closed the port of Boston (1774), a proceeding which only aroused more bitter feeling in the country towns and enlisted the sympathy of the other colonies.

  • In retaliation a punitive expedition under Generals John Sullivan and James Clinton in 1779 destroyed the Iroquois towns, and dealt the Indian confederacy a blow from which it never recovered.

  • It was only in 1917 that the emergency decrees promulgated by the Stargkh Ministry at the beginning of the war failed to receive ratification, in retaliation for the suppression of trial by jury by a military trial and the extension over civilians of the j urisdiction of the military courts.

  • Meanwhile the labour traffic, which had been initiated, so far as the, Pacific islands were concerned, by an unsuccessful attempt in 1847 to employ New Hebridean labourers on a settlement near the present township of Eden in New South Wales, had attained considerable proportions, had been improperly exploited and, as already indicated, had led the natives to retaliation, sometimes without discernment, a notorious example of this (as was generally considered) being the murder of Bishop Patteson in 1871.

  • This is, perhaps, his most marked deviation from the rigour of principle; it was doubtless a concession to popular opinion with a view to an attainable practical improvement The wisdom of retaliation in order to procure the repeal of high duties or prohibitions imposed by foreign governments depends, he says, altogether on the likelihood of its success in effecting the object aimed at, but he does not conceal his contempt for the practice of such expedients.

  • His prejudice against Napier naturally produced retaliation, and Mark Napier in defending his ancestor has fallen into the opposite extreme of attempting to reduce Briggs to the level of a mere computer.

  • In United retaliation for the supposed sympathy of Canadians with the South in this struggle the victorious North took steps to abrogate in 1866 the reciprocity treaty of 18J4, which had conferred such great advantages on both countries.

  • On another occasion he is said to have taken a man out of a British ship in retaliation for the impressment of an American seaman by H.M.S.

  • When the United States navy was organized in 1798 he was included in the corps of naval officers, and appointed to the schooner "Retaliation."

  • In retaliation the 41st Congress excluded the state's representatives on a technicality, and, on the theory that the government of Georgia was a provisional organization, passed an act requiring the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment before the admission of Georgia's senators and representatives.

  • On October 1st Mr Balfour spoke at Sheffield, reiterating his views as to free-trade and retaliation, insisting that he "intended to lead," and declaring that he was prepared at all events to reverse the traditional fiscal policy by doing away with the axiom that import duties should only be levied for revenue purposes.

  • They rejected Mr Chamberlain's food-taxes, discredited his statistics, and, while admitting the theoretical orthodoxy of retaliation, criticized Mr Balfour's attitude and repudiated his assumption that retaliation would be desirable.

  • The burning by the American general McClure, on the 10th of December 1813, of Newark(Niagara on the Lake), for which severe retaliation was taken at Buffalo, was made the excuse for much destruction.

  • Fateh Khan was barbarously murdered by Kamran (Mahmud's son) near Ghazni in 1818; and in retaliation Mahmud himself was driven from power, and the Barakzai clan secured the sovereignty of Afghanistan.

  • During 1881-1882 Hungary, desiring means of retaliation against the duties on corn and the impediments to the importation of cattle recently introduced into Germany, withdrew her opposition to protective duties; the tariff was completely revised, protective duties were introduced on all articles of home production, and high finance duties on other articles such as coffee and petroleum.

  • In retaliation, the capital Paros was besieged by an Athenian fleet under Miltiades, who demanded a fine of ioo talents.

  • Arnold in retaliation laid claim to the duchy of Jiilich, which had likewise been granted to Adolf by Sigismund, and a war followed in which the cities and nobles of Gelderland stood by Arnold; it ended in Arnold retaining Gelderland and Zutphen, and Gerard, the son of Adolf (d.

  • 17) and of retaliation for injury received (xxiv.

  • The Xenien succeeded as a retaliation on the critics, but the masterpieces which followed them proved in the long run much more effective weapons against the prevailing mediocrity.

  • Capital punishment was confined to treason and murder; the former was not to be attended by corruption of blood, drawing, or quartering; all other felonies were made punishable by confinement and hard labour, save a few to which was applied, against Jefferson's desire, the principle of retaliation.

  • It was his belief that such a system of retaliation would remove the possibility of war arising from commercial quarrels.

  • In 1794 he tried again his commercial weapons, introducing in the House of Representatives resolutions based on Jefferson's report on commerce, advising retaliation against Great Britain and discrimination in commercial and navigation laws in favour of France; and he declared that the friends of Jay's treaty were "a British party systematically aiming at an exclusive connexion with the British government," and in 1796 strenuously but unsuccessfully opposed the appropriation of money to carry this treaty into effect.

  • 4 Next year Anne's desire to give a regiment to Hill, Mrs Masham's brother, led to another ineffectual attempt in retaliation to displace the new favourite, and the queen showed her antagonism to the Whig administration on the occasion of the prosecution of Sacheverell.

  • But the kings ambition was to go farther than retaliation or chastisement.

  • A free-state man having been murdered for his opinions, a friend who threatened retaliation was arrested by the pro-slavery sheriff, S.

  • As an historical figure, it is impossible to dogmatize concerning the personality of Joan of Arc. The modern clerical view has to some extent provoked what appears, in Anatole France's learned account, ably presented as it is, to be a retaliation, in regarding her as a clerical tool in her own day.

  • The laws uniformly discountenanced revenge, retaliation, the punishment of one crime by another, and permitted capital punishment only in the last resort and in ultimate default of every other form of redress.

  • He turned mere personal defence and retaliation into an occasion for a lofty enforcement of constitutional principles, and this, too, with a relevancy and pertinence of consummate skilfulness.

  • He started life as a small tradesman; but turning to politics, he became a member of the corporation of Dublin, and made himself popular by his denunciation of municipal corruption and by his proposal of a boycott of English goods in Ireland, in retaliation for the restrictions imposed by the government on Irish commerce.

  • Retaliation for murder and other injuries was a common method of redress, although the church had endeavoured to introduce various reforms. Hence we find in the Brehon Laws a highly complicated system of compensatory payment; but there was no authority except public opinion to enforce the payment of the fines determined by the brehon in cases submitted to him.

  • I~Ien like Stein, Hardenberg and Scharnhorst were secretly preparing Prussias retaliation.

  • Not the least of the anxieties of the colonial office during this period was the situation in the West Indies, where the canesugar industry was being steadily undermined by the European bounties given to exports of continental beet; and though the government restricted themselves to attempts at removing the bounties by negotiation and to measures for palliating the worst effects in the West Indies, Mr Chamberlain made no secret of his repudiation of the Cobden Club view that retaliation would be contrary to the doctrines of free trade, and he did his utmost to educate public opinion at home into understanding that the responsibilities of the mother country are not merely to be construed according to the selfish interests of a nation of consumers.

  • The source of all the evil was, he declared, the excessive wealth of the church, which, in retaliation for the sentence of excommunication, he threatened to confiscate.

  • Of these, among the most remarkable was his review of Herder's Philosophy of History, which greatly exasperated that author, and led to a violent act of retaliation some years after in his Metakritik of Pure Reason.

  • Sounds silly but the falcon knows that nothing likes going into thorn bushes, so she is protecting herself against retaliation by other rooks.

  • For the first time, U.S. military force was employed in direct retaliation to state-sponsored terrorism.

  • This retaliation is usually transitory, just to test the strength of your boundaries.

  • Coalition warplanes bombed an Iraqi air defense site in retaliation, a Pentagon statement said.

  • As retaliation, Rodrick supposedly tells all of Greg's friends "his big secret."

  • You do have the right to speak to your supervisor about it, but if you do so, don't be surprised if there are hurt feelings, or even worse - retaliation.

  • Try not to get physical in retaliation as you can never be sure whether someone has a weapon.

  • Cook also made history in 2005 when his second album, Retaliation, debuted at number four on the Billboard 200 -- making him the highest-charting comedian in 25 years.

  • Well, in reply or retaliation, however you want to put it, Audrina wrote on her blog that she "NEVER" said those things about Lauren.

  • If you do pull off great practical joke ideas on someone, you should be prepared for good-hearted retaliation.

  • Often the victim fears retaliation from the offender.

  • They may even purposely steal in retaliation for the pain they feel society has inflicted on them.

  • Attack the last Pawn in a chain - This Pawn is usually the least protected and so a capture is less likely to result in retaliation by your opponent.

  • In retaliation, Jack began to romance Victor's ex-wife Nikki, eventually marrying her.

  • In retaliation, your metabolic rate slowed itself down, from necessity for that matter, because you did not nourish it with an appropriate amount of energy to work.

  • Retaliation is swift and brutal - a human colony is destroyed and we find ourselves in a war with an enemy that is completely incomprehensible to us.

  • For example, in Stolen, when Elena escapes her captors, she meets up with her friends, they lie low at a hotel in Canada and plot their retaliation.

  • Most works related to artificial intelligence struggle with the retaliation of sentient machines against humanity.

  • These end of the world themes tend to intertwine with others such as the retaliation of artificial intelligence, epidemics and man’s consumption of natural resources.

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