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repugnance

repugnance

repugnance Sentence Examples

  • The repugnance to animal food is not the effect of experience, but is an instinct.

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  • Pierre turned away with repugnance, and closing his eyes quickly fell back on the carriage seat.

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  • He showed no repugnance to a change of masters, and began to make overtures to the Medici.

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  • While the population of Brazil continued to increase, the moral and intellectual culture of its inhabitants was left in great measure to chance; they grew up with those robust and healthy sentiments which are engendered by the absence of false teachers, but with a repugnance to legal ordinances, and encouraged in their ascendancy over the Indians to habits of violence and oppression.

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  • As chancellor he had the onerous task of negotiating the queen's marriage treaty with Philip, to which he shared the general repugnance, though he could not oppose her will.

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  • Milan and Piedmont were comparatively well governed; but repugnance to Austrian rule in the former case, and the contagion of French Jacobinical opinions in the latter, brought those populations into increasing hostility to the rulers.

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  • Unlike many West African races, the Ashanti in general show a repugnance to the doctrines of Islam.

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  • In 1915 the official massacre of Armenians occurred, but evidence conclusively proves that, though there were cases of Kurdish participation, the greater portion of the nation not only held aloof, but, as in the case of the Dersim Kurds (who actually saved 25,000 Armenians), displayed their repugnance to the Turkish orders in a practical manner.

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  • About this time Bertha, having effected a temporary reconciliation between her sons, overcame the repugnance with which Pope Stephen III.

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  • Nor was his failure due to lack of activity or energy, but rather to the insuperable obstacles in his path - the physical configuration of Italy, and, above all, the invincible repugnance of the Italian municipalities to submit to the mastery of a religious power.

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  • The question of the economic development of the state, and of trade to the Orient, the views of the mercenary labour-contractor and of the philanthropist, the factor of " upper-race " repugnance, the " economic-leech" argument, the " rat-rice-filth-and-opium " argument, have all entered into the problem.

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  • It can hardly be doubted that this custom has been largely responsible for the crime of female infanticide, formerly so prevalent in India; as it also probably is to some extent for infant marriages, still too common in some parts of India, especially Bengal; and even for the all but universal repugnance to the re-marriage of widows, even when these had been married in early childhood and had never joined their husbands.

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  • 2 During his boyhood Ephraim showed a repugnance towards heathen worship, and was eventually driven by his father from the home.

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  • He retained to the last, as his History of Greater Britain shows, the repugnance characteristic of the university of Paris to the tyranny of kings and nobles; but like it, he was now alarmed by the revolt of Luther, and ceased to urge its ancient protest against the supremacy of the pope.

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  • 456; but the exorbitant claims and exactions of bishops, to which this repugnance to episcopal control is to be traced, far more than to the arrogance of abbots, rendered it increasingly frequent, and, in the 6th century, the practice of exempting religious houses partly or altogether from episcopal control, and making them responsible to the pope alone, received an impulse from Gregory the Great.

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  • His repugnance to public life had been strongly expressed to his father in a letter of a very early date, in which he begged that the money which a seat in the House of Commons would cost might be expended in a mode more agreeable to him.

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  • In the year 1789, when the French Revolution broke out, he was archdeacon of Ajaccio, and, like the majority of the Corsicans, he felt repugnance for many of the acts of the French government during that period; in particular he protested against the application to Corsica of the act known as the "Civil Constitution of the Clergy" (July 1790).

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  • The solecism in the Preface to the Adonais, " My known repugnance to the narrow principles of taste on which several of his earlier compositions were modelled prove at least that I am an impartial judge," would probably have been corrected by the poet if his attention had been called to it; but the two first ones, with others, cannot be thus regarded.

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  • But the racial repugnance to the Greek, which forbade an Egyptian even to eat an animal which had been carved with a Greek's knife (Hdt.

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  • His attitude towards slavery has been much discussed, but it does not seem to have been different from that of many other planters of that day: he did not think highly of the system, but had no invincible repugnance to it, and saw no way of getting rid of it.

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  • Along with the fundamental doctrine, certain characteristics have always marked its professors; namely, a large degree of toleration, a minimizing of essentials, a repugnance to formulated creed, an historical study of Scripture.

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  • This repugnance to believe blindly what rested on arbitrary authority, as distinguished from what was seen to be sustained by self-evident reason, or by demonstration, or by good probable evidence, runs through his life.

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  • In fact, except personal courage, great fertility in military resource, a lively though sometimes ill-directed repugnance to injustice, oppression and meanness of every description, and a considerable power of acquiring influence over those, necessarily limited in numbers, with whom he was brought into personal contact, General Gordon does not appear to have possessed any of the qualities which would have fitted him to undertake the difficult task he had in hand."

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  • The spokesman of the Reformed Church was Beza, who, in the first session, gave a lengthy exposition of its tenets, but excited such repugnance by his pronouncements on the Communion that he was interrupted by Cardinal Tournon.

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  • We also recognize the moral repugnance that many have with the killing of animals for food.

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  • 22, 1781) of a dauphin, Louis Joseph Xavier Francois, and on the death of Maurepas, which left the king without a chief minister, she might have exerted a considerable influence in public affairs had she taken a consistent interest in them; but her repugnance to serious matters triumphed, and she preferred to occupy herself with the education of her children, to whom she was a wise and devoted mother, 2 and with her friends and amusements at Trianon.

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  • These evil tendencies in the popular presentation of Christianity undoubtedly begot in Shaftesbury's mind a certain amount of repugnance and contempt to some of the doctrines of Christianity itself; and, cultivating, almost of set purpose, his sense of the ridiculous, he was too apt to assume towards such doctrines and their teachers a tone of raillery.

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  • Ultramontanism, too, labours systematically to bring the whole educational organization under ecclesiastical supervision and guidance; and it manifests the greatest repugnance to allowing the future priest to come into touch with the modern spirit.

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  • When the country was in distress, the queen felt a womanly repugnance for festivities; and yet it was undesirable that the court should incur the The court reproach of living meanly to save money.

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  • There was no repugnance to the idea on the queen's part, but Sir Robert Peel thought unfavourably of it as an "empirical" plan, and the question of expense was always mooted as a serious consideration.

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  • Young William Pitt, then only in his twenty-fifth year, had been chancellor of the exchequer in Lord Shelburne's short ministry, and had refused to enter the coalition government from an honourable repugnance to join Lord North.

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  • My life had hitherto been remarkably secluded and domestic, and this had given me invincible repugnance to new countenances.

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  • Judge Critchlow told him: " It is no surprise that the public show repugnance of such behavior.

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  • Many Jews and Israelis have an equal repugnance of Zionism.

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  • Arousing widespread repugnance, the disrespectful attitude of the reporters was widely condemned.

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  • Judge Critchlow told him: It is no surprise that the public show repugnance of such behavior.

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  • His attack on the conduct of Governor Eyre in Jamaica was listened to, but with repugnance by the majority, although his action in this matter in and out of parliament was far from being ineffectual.

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  • Of a cold and worldly temperament, devoid of passion, blameless in his conduct as the father of a family, faithful as the servant of his papal patrons, severe in the administration of the provinces committed to his charge, and indisputably able in his conduct of affairs, he was at the same time, and in spite of these qualities, a man whose moral nature inspires a sentiment of liveliest repugnance.

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  • I did not feel the same repugnance toward this creature which I had experienced in my encounters with the other Beast Men.

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  • His powers of persuasion overcame the strong repugnance of the chiefs to take up arms without effective foreign co-operation.

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  • arousing widespread repugnance, the disrespectful attitude of the reporters was widely condemned.

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  • Such innovations troubled deeply the pious souls of the conservative Muscovites, and confirmed them in their repugnance to accept the ecclesiastical reforms. Though this original fanaticism gradually cooled and the rigorists had to make many concessions to the exigencies of practical life, a large section of the Russian people remained outside the official fold, so that at the present day, if we may credit the most competent authorities, the schismatics and heretics number more than twelve millions.

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  • At the outset she felt some repugnance for the thin sallow-faced young officer, and was certainly terrified by his ardour and by the imperious egoism of his nature; but she consented to the union, especially when he received the promise of the command of the French army of Italy.

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