Republican party sentence example

republican party
  • The time had now come (1880) when the Republican party must nominate a candidate for the presidency.
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  • was one of disaster to the Republican party.
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  • But the "bosses" of the Republican party in three great States - New York, Pennsylvania and Illinois - were determined that he should be renominated.
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  • In July 1871 he was returned to the National Assembly for Marseilles at a by-election, and voted steadily with the Republican party.
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  • to the papacy in 1159 added a powerful ally to the republican party.
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  • He was again returned to the Senate in 1813, and was re-elected in 1819 as the result of a struggle between the Van Buren and Clinton factions of the Democratic - Republican party.
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  • Having failed to secure a re-election to the Senate in '887, Harrison was nominated by the Republican party for the presidency in 1888, and defeated Grover Cleveland, the candidate of the Democratic party, receiving 233 electoral votes to Cleveland's 168.
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  • In order to understand the utter inability of the old republican party to withstand these changes, it is needful to retrace our steps and consider the skilful use made by Bonaparte of plots and disturbances as they occurred.
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  • Bonaparte's action in the years1800-1802showed that he feared the old republican party far more than the royalists.
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  • Victory was with the Democrats in 1848 and 1852, but since the organization of the Republican party in 1854 the state has uniformly given to the Republican presidential candidates its electoral votes.
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  • The factional strife in the Republican party continued, a number of efforts being made to impeach Governor Harrison Reed (1813-1899).
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  • The constitution of 1787 was then before the public, and Gallatin, with his dislike of strong government still upon him, threw himself into opposition and became one of the founders of the Anti-Federalist, or, as it was afterwards called, the Republican party.
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  • He gave his support to the Republican party in 1856 and to the Lincoln administration throughout the Civil War.
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  • In the elections of 1828 the new party proved unexpectedly strong, and after this year it practically superseded the National Republican party in New York.
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  • The principal cause of his elevation was the determination of the various sections of the moderate republican party to exclude M.
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  • This has been called the first national victory of the Republican party.
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  • Having rejoined the Republican party in 1876, he was United States marshal for Massachusetts from 187 9 until 1888, when for the ninth time he was elected to Congress.
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  • By the spring of 1866 the ex-Confederates had succeeded in gaining possession of most of the local government and most of the state offices, although not of the governorship. The Republican party naturally became extremely radical.
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  • Since 1 9 00 a white Republican Party has made some headway in Louisiana politics, but in national and state elections the state has been uninterruptedly and overwhelmingly Democratic since 1877.
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  • He allied himself with the Republican party on its organization, but his inborn dislike for political manoeuvring prevented his ever becoming prominent in its councils.
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  • At first a Whig, he joined the Republican party at its formation, and was a Republican representative in Congress from 1859 to 1863.
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  • Giry took a keen interest in politics, joining the republican party and writing numerous articles in the republican newspapers, mainly on historical subjects.
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  • The Evening Journal, founded in 1830 as an anti-Masonic organ, and for thirty-five years edited by Thurlow Weed, was equally influential as an organ of the Whig and later of the Republican party.
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  • From1872-1873he was sent by Thiers as minister to Athens, but returned to the chamber as deputy for the Vosges, and became one of the leaders of the republican party.
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  • Leaving the Democratic party on the Kansas-Nebraska issue, he assisted in the formation of the Republican party in Connecticut, and was its candidate for governor in 1856; he was a delegate to the Republican national conventions of 1856 and 1860.
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  • In the summer of the next year he took an active part in the formal organization of the Republican party in the state, and at the opening of Congress in December began a long career of public service.
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  • With ardent anti-slavery principles, he entered political life as a "Young Whig" opposed to the Mexican War; he became an active Free-Soiler in 1848, and in 1854 took part in the organization in Massachusetts of the new Republican party.
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  • In spite of these great services, popular dissatisfaction with the Republican party rapidly increased during the years 1874-1876.
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  • Presi- the beginning of 1868, hoped to make him their can 1868y' didate in the election of that year; but the effect of the controversy with President Johnson was to bring Grant forward as the candidate of the Republican party.
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  • A faction among the managers of the Republican party attempted to secure his nomination for a third term as president, and in the convention at Chicago in June 1880 he received a vote exceeding 300 during 36 consecutive ballots.
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  • It was at a convention held at Jackson on the 6th of July 1854 that the Republican party was first organized and so named by a representative state body.
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  • In 1866 like his father and brother he opposed the Congressional reconstruction policy, and on that issue left the Republican party.
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  • Capponi resigned, and Leopold reluctantly agreed to a MontanelliGuerrazzi ministry, which in its turn had to fight against the extreme republican party.
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  • From 1790 to 1795 he was the private secretary of his uncle, George Clinton, governor of New York and a leader of the Republican party.
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  • First, for many years the Free-Soilers gained strength; then in 1855 in an extraordinary party upheaval the Know-Nothings quite broke up Democratic, Free-Soil and Whig organizations; the FreeSoilers however captured the Know-Nothing organization and directed it to their own ends; and by their junction with the anti-slavery Whigs there was formed the Republican party.
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  • The Republican party in the state was at that time weakened by the quarrels between the " Stalwart " and " Halfbreed " factions within its ranks; and the Democrats were thus given an initial advantage which was greatly increased by the Republicans' nomination for governor of Charles J.
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  • In this year, however, the generally disorganized state of the Republican party seemed to give the Democrats an unusual opportunity.
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  • The Republican party was still further weakened by the defection of a large body of independents, known as " Mugwumps."
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  • In politics he allied himself with the Republican party on its organization, being a frequent speaker in presidential campaigns, beginning with that of 1856.
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  • In 1851 Moshesh joined the republican party in the Sovereignty in an invitation to Pretorius to recross the Vaal.
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  • While the elected delegates sent two members to England to try and induce the government to alter their decision Sir George Clerk speedily came to terms with a committee formed by the republican party and presided over by Mr J.
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  • In 1884 he was a delegate of the Republican party to the convention in Chicago which nominated James G.
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  • After Mr Blaine's nomination, however, he supported him in the campaign as the chosen candidate of the party, in spite of the fact that an important wing of the Republican party "bolted" the nomination and espoused the candidacy of Grover Cleveland, who was elected president.
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  • Mr Roosevelt, however, received a larger proportion of the total vote cast than any mayoralty candidate of the Republican party had previously received in New York City.
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  • When his regiment was mustered out of service in September 1898, Mr Roosevelt was nominated by the Republican party for the governorship of New York State and was elected in November by a substantial plurality.
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  • This transformation met with much opposition, not less in the Republican party than in the Democratic party.
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  • While the feeling in the Republican party had been from the outset in favour of protection, so high a range of duties met with much opposition.
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  • For a short time (1855) he identified himself with the American or Know Nothing party, and afterwards acted with the Republican party.
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  • When the revolution of 1848 broke out he took an active part as one of the leaders of the republican party in his native city, both as popular orator and as editor of one of the local papers.
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  • In politics he was at first an anti-slavery Whig and then from the time of its organization in 1854 until his death was a member of the Republican party.
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  • In 1873 he removed from Cincinnati to Fremont, his intention being to withdraw from public life; but in 1875 the Republican party in Ohio once more selected him as its candidate for the governorship. He accepted the nomination with great reluctance.
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  • This policy found much favour with the people generally, but displeased many of the Republican politicians, because it loosened the hold of the Republican party upon the Southern States.
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  • Sharpe, the surveyor of the customs. While these measures were of limited scope and effect, they served greatly to facilitate the more extensive reform of the civil service which subsequently took place, though at the same time they alienated a powerful faction of the Republican party in New York under the leadership of Roscoe Conkling.
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  • In the presidential election of 1880 the Republican party carried the day after an unusually quiet canvass, a result largely due to popular contentment with the then existing state of public affairs.
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  • The explanation lies in the fact that there were comparatively few " carpet-baggers " or adventurers in the state, and that a large number of conservative citizens, under the leadership of ex-Governor Brown, supported the Reconstruction policy of Congress and joined the Republican party.
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  • But, whether because he drew a distinction between the treason of individuals and of states, or was influenced by Seward, or simply, once in responsible position, separated Republican party politics from the question of constitutional interpretation, at least he speedily showed that he would be influenced by no acrimony, and adopted the lenient reconstruction policy of Lincoln.
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  • At Ripon started one of the disconnected movements that resulted in the founding of the Republican party.
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  • Flower, History of the Republican Party (1884).
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  • He supported the Republican party.
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  • In politics he was actively associated from the outset with the Republican party.
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  • In 1855 he took a prominent part in organizing the Republican party in Pennsylvania, and in 1856 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention, in which he opposed the nomination of John C. Fremont.
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  • He then undertook a political campaign to rouse the republican party throughout France, which culminated in a speech at Romans (September 18, 1878) formulating its programme.
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  • The next day, wrapped in a tricolour scarf and preceded by a drummer, he went on foot to the Hotel de Ville - the headquarters of the republican party - where he was publicly embraced by Lafayette as a symbol that the republicans acknowledged the impossibility of realizing their own ideals and were prepared to accept a monarchy based on the popular will.
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  • The various anti-Nebraska elements came together, in Illinois as elsewhere, to form a new party at a time when the old parties were disintegrating; and in 1856 the Republican party was formally organized in the state.
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  • The National Convention of the Republican Party in 1856 cast i ra votes for Lincoln as its vice-presidential candidate on the ticket with Fremont, and he was on the Republican electoral ticket of this year, and made effective campaign speeches in the interest of the new party.
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  • On the 27th of February 1860 in Cooper Union, New York City, he made a speech (much the same as that delivered in Elwood, Kansas, on the 1st of December) which made him known favourably to the leaders of the Republican party in the East and which was a careful historical study criticising the statement of Douglas in one of his speeches in Ohio that "our fathers when they framed the government under which we live understood this question [slavery] just as well and even better than we do now," and Douglas's contention that "the fathers" made the country (and intended that it should remain) part slave.
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  • From the very beginning of his service in Congress he was prominent as an opponent of the extension of slavery; he was a conspicuous supporter of the Wilmot Proviso, spoke against the Compromise Measures of 1850,1850, and in 1856, chiefly because of the passage in 1854 of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill, which repealed the Missouri Compromise, and his party's endorsement of that repeal at the Cincinnati Convention two years later, he withdrew from the Democrats and joined the newly organized Republican party.
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  • The "Appeal of the Independent Democrats in Congress to the People of the United States," written by Chase and Giddings, and published in the New York Times of the 24th of January 1854, may be regarded as the earliest draft of the Republican party creed.
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  • In 1856 after a year in Europe he settled in Watertown, Wisconsin, and immediately became prominent in the Republican party of that state.
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  • In the state campaign of 1859 he made a speech attacking the Fugitive Slave Law and arguing for state's rights and thus injured his political standing in Wisconsin; and in April he delivered in Faneuil Hall, Boston, an oration on "True Americanism," which coming from an alien was intended to clear the Republican party of the charge of "nativism."
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  • The Germans of Wisconsin unsuccessfully urged his nomination for governor by the Republican party in 1859.
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  • In 1856 he took a leading part in organizing the Republican party in Connecticut, and in 1857 became editor of the Hartford Evening Press, a newly established Republican newspaper.
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  • Upon the organization of the Republican party he became one of its leaders in Pennsylvania, and in October 1860 was chosen governor of the state on its ticket, defeating Henry D.
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  • From the close of the Civil War until the end of the 19th century the Republican Party was generally dominant, but the trend of political development was not without interest.
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  • His faith in Federalism was weakened by the party's opposition to the War of 1812, and he gradually became associated with the Jacksonian wing of the Republican party.
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  • The passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill in 1854 had finally alienated him from the Democratic party, and he became one of the founders of the new Republican party in the state.
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  • He was a prominent member of the free soil party, and was one of the organizers of the Republican party in New York.
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  • In 1854, having failed to secure the nomination for senator from the "Know-Nothing" Party, which he had recently joined, he became a leader of the "People's Party," as the Republican Party was at first called in Pennsylvania.
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  • Owing to the nature of the country, and the hope of securing independence from a possible overthrow of the Republican party in the United States, the war was prolonged for two or three years.
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  • Cicero returned to Rome on the 9th of December, and from that time forward led the republican party in the senate.
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  • It was at this time that the Democratic or Republican party divided, largely along personal lines, into Jacksonian Democrats and National Republicans, the latter led by such men as Henry Clay and J.
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  • Upon the accession of the Republican party to power in 180 r, Madison became secretary of state in Jefferson's cabinet, a position for which he was well fitted both because he possessed to a remarkable degree the gifts of careful thinking and discreet and able speaking, and of large constructive ability; and because he was well versed in constitutional and international law and practised a fairness in discussion essential to a diplomat.
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  • The remnant of the republican party took refuge either with Brutus and Cassius in the East, or with Sextus Pompeius, who had made himself master of the seas.
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  • In early life he had little time for politics, but after 1880 he became prominent in the affairs of the Republican party in Cleveland, and in 1884 and 1888 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention, in the latter year being associated with William McKinley in the management of the John Sherman canvass.
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  • After President Roosevelt's policies became defined, Senator Hanna came to be regarded as the leader of the conservative branch of the Republican party and a possible presidential candidate in 1904.
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  • The struggle fused with the personal contests of two men, rivals for the United States Senate, William McKendree Gwin (1805-1885, United States senator, 1850-1861), the leader of the pro-slavery party, and David Colbreth Broderick (1819-18J9), formerly a leader of Tammany in New York, and after 1857 a member from California of the United States Senate, the champion of free labour, who declared in 1860 for the policy of the Republican party.
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  • The convention adopted a tariff plank drafted by McKinley, and, of far greater immediate importance, a plank, which declared that the Republican party was "opposed to the free coinage of silver, except by international agreement with the leading commercial nations of the world, which we pledge ourselves to promote, and until such agreement can be obtained the existing gold standard must be preserved."
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  • This "gold standard" plank drove out of the Republican party the Silver Republicans of the West, headed by Senator Henry M.
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  • The Republican convention demanded the maintenance of the gold standard, and pointed to the fulfilment of some of the most important of the pledges given by the Republican party four years earlier.
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  • The tendency towards the concentration of capital in great industrial corporations had been active to an extent previously undreamt of, with incidental consequences that had aroused much apprehension; and the Democrats accused President McKinley and the Republican party of having fostered the "trusts."
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  • But the campaign against McKinley and the Republican party was not only "anti-trust" but "anti-imperialistic."
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  • Blaine, whom he succeeded as a leader of the Republican party and whose views of reciprocity he formally adopted in his last public address, McKinley had great personal suavity and dignity, and was thoroughly well liked by his party colleagues.
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  • He was a member of the New York Senate in 1850-1851, was one of the founders of the Republican party in New York, and from 1868 until his death was on the staff of the New York Sun.
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  • In 1867 the Republican party had prepared for the admission of Colorado as a state, but the enabling act was vetoed by President Johnson, and statehood was not gained until 1876.
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  • This was the first convention of the Republican party in Illinois; among the delegates were Abraham Lincoln, Richard Yates, John M.
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  • In April 1806, for example, only one Republican deputy was returned, although it was notorious that the Republican party could command a majority in many constituencies.
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  • But it was in Michigan that the Republican party received its first official recognition, at a state convention held at Jackson on the 6th of July 1857, and from the beginning of the following year the administration has been Republican with the exception of two terms from 1883 to 1885, and from 1891 to 1893, when it was again Democratic.
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  • In the Civil War his personal sympathies were with Pompey and the republican party (Tac. Ann.
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  • The Fifteenth Amendment was rejected by one legislature, but was accepted by its successor, in which the Republican party had obtained a majority.
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  • As a result of the slavery question, there was a party disintegration between 1850 and 1855, followed by the supremacy of the Republican party from 1856 to 1878.
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  • The Republican party and (less violently) the Democratic in their national platforms and in Congress attacked and opposed the Mormon institution of polygamy.
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  • The first definite organization of the Liberal Republican party may therefore be said to have been made in Missouri in 1870.
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  • He was always an anti-slavery man, but never technically an abolitionist, and he joined the Republican party soon after its organization.
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  • It is to be noted that the Republican party had not favoured requiring a pledge from members of the legislature that they would vote for the people's choice for senator; that the Democratic candidate for senator (Gov.
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  • Chamberlain) was a prominent advocate of the initiative, the referendum and the direct election of United States senators; and that a wing of the Republican party worked for the choice of the Democratic candidate by the people in the hope that the (Republican) legislature would not ratify the popular choice and so would nullify the direct primary law.
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  • He was a delegate to the first national convention of the Republican party (1856) and was a member of the New York assembly in 1862-1863 and of the state senate in 1864-1867.
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  • Wilmot supported Van Buren in 1848 and entered the Republican party at the time of its formation, and was a delegate to the national conventions of 1856 and 1860.
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  • In 1908, when the Republican party had declared in favour of county option and the Democratic party favoured township and ward option, a special session of the legislature, called by the Republican governor, passed the Cox Bill for county options.
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  • In 1854 one of the first steps in the organization of the Republican party was taken at Ripon.
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  • He was always a violent partisan, and was identified with the radical wing of the Republican party.
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  • He helped to organize its Republican party in Tioga county, and in1873-1877was a representative in Congress.
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  • In 1856 he refused to follow most of his former Whig associates into the Republican party and gave his support to James Buchanan, whom he considered the representative of a national instead of a sectional party.
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  • Differing from the Republican party on the reconstruction policy, Blair gave his adherence to the Democratic party after the Civil Cumberland in 1746.
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  • Following the split in the Republican party he became one of the founders of the National Progressive party and was a delegate at its national convention in Chicago in 1912.
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  • But the republican party was more powerful without than within.
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  • A Republican party had been formed led by a few professors and coffee-house politicians, with the mob of the towns for its support, and having as its mouthpiece Don Emilio Castelar, an honest man of Qepublican incredible fluency.
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  • At any rate the Republican party had worked for admission because it needed senators in Congress, and it got them.
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  • MUGWUMP, in American political slang, a name applied to any independent voter, and especially to those independents in the Republican party who refused to support James G.
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  • The system of representation had sometimes put in power a political party representing a minority of the voters: in 1878, 1884, 1886, 1888 and 1890 the Democratic candidates for state executive offices received a plurality vote; but, as a majority was not obtained, these elections were referred to the general assembly, and the Republican party in control of the lower house secured the election of its candidates; in 1901 constitutional amendments were adopted making a plurality vote sufficient for election, increasing the number of senatorial districts, and stipulating that " in forming them regard shall be had " to population.
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  • At the elections in 1869 the Republican party split into two factions.
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  • elected district attorney of New York County in 1937, he became the Republican Party candidate for governor and won the post in 1942.
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  • A gourmet dinner ramesh ponnuru jay make sense out republican party than.
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  • In 1884 Blaine at last won the Republican Party presidential nomination.
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  • Workers were equally tight-lipped with monitors from Bill McBride's campaign and the state Republican Party.
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  • The constitutions and rituals of these secret orders have declarations of principles, of which the following are characteristic: to protect and succour the weak and unfortunate, especially the widows and orphans of Confederate soldiers; to protect members, of the white race in life, honour and property from the encroachments of the blacks; to oppose the Radical Republican party and the Union League; to defend constitutional liberty, to prevent usurpation, emancipate the whites, maintain peace and order, the laws of God, the principles of 1776, and the political and social supremacy of the white race - in short, to oppose African influence in government and society, and to prevent any intermingling of the races.
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  • As an advocate he was at once successful, but after 1831 he devoted his attention chiefly to politics, identifying himself first with the Whig and after 1858 with the Republican party.
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  • A provisional and afterwards a permanent regency, composed of three members, was now formed in Brazil, but scenes of disorder succeeded, and discussions and struggles between the republican party and the government, and a reactionary third party in favour of the restoration of Dom Pedro, occupied the succeeding years.
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  • Entering parliament in 1861 as deputy of the extreme Left for Castelvetrano, Crispi acquired the reputation of being the most aggressive and most impetuous member of the republican party.
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  • Originally a Democrat, and always a believer in states' rights, his strong Union sentiments caused him nevertheless to accept Lincoln's doctrine of coercion, and that, together with his anti-slavery sympathies, led him to act with the Republican party during the period of the Civil War.
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  • But the Democrats broke into two factions in 1846 over the question of slavery (see Hale, John Parker); the American or " Know-Nothing " party elected a governor in 1855 and 1856; and then control of the state passed to the Republican party which has held it to the present.
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  • Besides these two monarchist parties - the Regenerators or Conservative right and the Progressives or Constitutional left - a strong Republican party was formed in 1881.
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  • Since that time, however, the Republican party has grown more secure, and it has placed on the statute books a series of radical and progressive enactments in regard to railway rate legislation and taxation, publicity of campaign expenditures and a state-wide direct primary law (1905).
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  • Workers were equally tight-lipped with monitors from Bill McBride 's campaign and the state Republican Party.
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  • She has also performed for a host of prestigious events, including the 2004 Christmas in Washington, multiple events for the Republican Party and a single to benefit victims of the Asian tsunami.
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