Renan sentence example

renan
  • The supposition of such influence is favoured by some critics (Tyler, Plumptre, Palm, Siegfried, Cheyne in his Jewish Religious Life after the Exile, and others), rejected by some (Zeller, Renan, Kleinert and others).

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  • To the Prophecy of Restoration we may fitly apply the words, too gracious and too subtly chosen to be translated, of Renan, "ce second Isaie, dont Fame lumineuse semble comme impregnee, six cent ans d'avance, de toutes les rosees, de tous les parfums de l'avenir" (L'Antechrist, p. 464); though, indeed, the common verdict of sympathetic readers sums up the sentence in a single phrase - "the Evangelical Prophet."

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  • Having successfully completed his investigations and sent copies of inscriptions and drawings of the tombs to Renan in Paris, he determined to push on farther into the desert.

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  • Meanwhile he had gained a high reputation as a preacher, and especially as the advocate of religious freedom; but his teaching became more and more offensive to the orthodox party, and on the appearance (1864) of his article on Renan's Vie de Jesus in the Nouvelle Revue de theologie he was forbidden by the Paris consistory to continue his ministerial functions.

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  • And these were strengthened by French influences, notably those of Renan and the Strassburg theologians.

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  • In 1857 the new scholarship was put to a famous test, in which the challenge thrown down by Sir George Cornewall Lewis and Ernest Renan was met by Rawlinson, Hincks, Oppert and Fox Talbot in a conclusive manner.

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  • His views have been accepted by (amongst many others) Renan, 1 Hilgenfeld, 2 Gebhardt,3 Lipsius, 4 Harnack, 5 Zahn, 6 Lightfoot, ?

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  • There is a statue of Ernest Renan, a native of the town.

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  • At first, and indeed down to the middle of the 17th century, Jewish traditions and methods in the study of Hebrew dominated Christian scholars; but in the 17th and 18th centuries the study of other Semitic languages opened up that comparative linguistic study which was systematized and brought nearer to perfection in the 19th century (which also witnessed the opening up of the new study of Assyrian) by scholars such as Gesenius, Ewald, Olshausen, Renan, Noldeke, 'Stade and Driver.

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  • Space forbids any attempt to sketch here the special growth of criticism in other countries, such as France, where the brilliant genius of Renan was in part devoted to the Old Testament, or within the Roman Catholic Church, which possesses in Pere Lagrange, for example, a deservedly influential critical scholar, and in the Revue Biblique an organ which devotes much attention to the critical study of the Old Testament.

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  • Lagarde, who is followed by Renan, connects this form with the LXX.

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  • He also published a small work, The Christ of the Gospels and the Christ of History, in which the views of Renan on the gospel history were dealt with; a monograph on Pascal for Blackwood's Foreign Classics series; and a little work, Beginning Life, addressed to young men, written at an earlier period.

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  • Renan, however, says that he merely tried to justify Averroism against the charge of heterodoxy.

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  • To the lay reader may be recommended Ernest Renan's article, "Les congregations de auxiliis" in his Nouvelles etudes d'histoire religieuse.

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  • The researches of Renan have refuted the once popular idea that a great part of the original island has disappeared by natural convulsions, though he believes that the remains of a submerged wall at the south end indicate that about 15 additional acres were once reclaimed and have been again lost.

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  • The present harbour is certainly the Sidonian port, though it is not so large as it once was; the other ancient harbour, the Egyptian port, has disappeared, and is supposed by Renan to have lain on the south side of the island, and to be now absorbed in the isthmus.

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  • Renan, no prejudiced judge, pronounces him "the most Christian man of his time," and attributes to this his success as a reformer.

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  • Lewes censures Renan for asserting of Ghazali's theory of causation - " Hume n'a rien dit plus."

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  • Renan, De Philosophia Peripatetica apud Syros (1852), and Averroes et l'Averroisme (Paris, 3rd ed., 1867); Am.

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  • All his life Renan was divided between his father's and his mother's political beliefs.

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  • Her paternal ancestors came from Bordeaux, and Renan used to say that in his own nature the Gascon and the Breton were constantly at odds.

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  • In the summer of 1838 Renan carried off all the prizes at the college of Treguier.

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  • Dupanloup sent for Renan at once.

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  • The superficial, brilliant, pseudo-scientific Catholicism of the capital did not satisfy Renan, who had accepted the austere faith of his Breton masters.

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  • In 1840 Renan left St Nicholas to study philosophy at the seminary of Issy.

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  • Renan began to perceive the essential contradiction between the metaphysics which he studied and the faith that he professed, but an appetite for truths that can be verified restrained his scepticism.

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  • It was not mathematics but philology which was to settle the gathering doubts of Ernest Renan.

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  • Secretly, Renan felt himself cut off from the communion of saints, and yet with his whole heart he desired to live the life of a Catholic priest Hence a struggle between vocation and conviction; owing to Henriette, conviction gained the day.

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  • In October 1845 Renan left the seminary of St Sulpice for Stavistas, a lay college of the Oratorians.

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  • Renan, brought up by priests in a world ruled by authority and curious only of feeling and opinion, was to accept the scientific ideal with an extraordinary expansion of all his faculties.

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  • To the day of Renan's death their friendship continued.

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  • Renan was occupied as usher only in the evenings.

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  • The revolution of 1848 aroused in Renan that side of him which loved the priesthood because "the priest lives for his fellows."

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  • The difficulty haunted Renan throughout his life.

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  • On his return to Paris Renan lived with his sister Henriette.

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  • In his two volumes of essays Renan shows himself a Liberal, but no longer a Democrat.

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  • Renan was now a candidate for the chair of Hebrew and Chaldaic languages at the College de France, which he had desired since first he studied Hebrew at the seminary of St Sulpice.

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  • No one in France save Renan was capable of filling it.

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  • Yet the emperor wished to conciliate Ernest Renan.

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  • Renan immediately accepted.

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  • Leaving his wife at home with their baby son, Renan left France, accompanied by his sister, in the summer of 1860.

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  • Madame Renan joined them in January 1861, returning to France in July.

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  • The mission proved fruitful in Phoenician inscriptions which Renan published in his Mission de Phenicie.

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  • At Amshit, near Byblos, Henriette Renan died of intermittent fever on the 24th of September 1861.

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  • His sister in her last days had entreated him not to give up his candidature for the chair of Hebrew, and on the 11th of January 1862 the Minister of Public Instruction ratified Renan's election to the post.

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  • But his opening lecture, in which, amid the applause of the students, Renan declared Jesus Christ "an incomparable Man," alarmed the Catholic party.

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  • Renan's lectures were pronounced a disturbance of the public peace, and he was suspended.

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  • On the 2nd of June 1864, on opening the newspaper, Renan saw that he had been transferred from the chair of Hebrew at the College of France to the post of sublibrarian at the National Library.

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  • Renan still used his literary gifts to pursue a scientific ideal.

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  • Renan was not only a scholar.

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  • On the eve of its dissolution Renan was half prepared to accept the Empire, and, had he been elected to the Chamber of Deputies, he would have joined the group of l'Empire liberal.

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  • The Franco-German War was a turning-point in Renan's history.

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  • The errors of the Commune confirmed Renan in this reaction.

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  • Thus out of the depths rises unvanquished the essential idealism of Ernest Renan.

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  • Renan was a great worker.

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  • At sixty years of age, having finished the Origins of Christianity, he began his History of Israel, based on a lifelong study of the Old Testament and on the Corpus Inscriptionum Semiticarum, published by the Academic des Inscriptions under Renan's direction from the year 1881 till the end of his life.

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  • Langen, Hilgenfeld, Wieseler, Stahelin, Renan, Hausrath, Drummond, Dillmann, Rosenthal, Gunkel, have maintained on various grounds the priority of 4 Ezra; and Scharer, Bissell, Thomson, Deane, Kabisch, De Faye, Wellhausen, and Ryssel the priority of Baruch on grounds no less convincing.

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  • Balard, his former master, and about the same time he began his life-long friendship with Ernest Renan.

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  • He was also the author of Science et philosophie (1886), which contains a well-known letter to Renan on "La Science ideale et la science positive," of La Revolution chimique, Lavoisier (1890), of Science et morale (1897), and of numerous articles in La Grande Encyclopedie, which he helped to establish.

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  • In Arabic we have fragments at Paris, of which Renan translated a specimen for the Spicilegium solesmense, and another version of thirty-seven chapters at Leiden, probably the work of a monk at Jerusalem, which Land translated and printed with the Syriac. The Latin MSS.

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  • Renan, Les rabbins francais, pp. 647 foil.; Perles, Salomo ben Abraham ben Adereth, pp. 15-54; Jewish Encyclopaedia, s.v.

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  • The success of the Etudes d'histoire religieuse and the Essais de morale had made the name of Renan known to a cultivated public. While Mademoiselle Renan remained shut up at home copying her brother's manuscripts or compiling material for his work, the young philosopher began to frequent more than one Parisian salon, and especially the studio of Ary Scheffer, at that time a noted social centre.

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