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remarriage

remarriage Sentence Examples

  • Various projects for Margaret's remarriage had already been started, Louis XII.

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  • The resolutions on questions of marriage and divorce (37-43) reaffirm the traditional attitude of the Church; it is, however, interesting to note that the resolution (40) deprecating the remarriage in church of the innocent party to a divorce was carried only by eighty-seven votes to eighty-four.

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  • Still worse was the frequent remarriage of widowed princesses and heiresses.

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  • The desire of numerous divorced persons for a change in the law which prevented their remarriage was manifested in repeated demonstrations before Parliament; especially in that of Dec. 1911, in which it was asserted that the lives of half a million divorced wives were affected.

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  • On the civil marriage question in particular, and some years earlier on the still more troublesome one of allowing the remarriage of native converts to Christianity, his guidance, being not only learned but statesmanlike, was of the greatest value.

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  • Being repudiated by his family on account of his views on widow remarriage, he became a vernacular schoolmaster, and started a weekly paper in Gujarati called The Satya Prakash.

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  • The Polish Protestants hoped that he would take this course and thus bring about a breach with Rome at the very crisis of the confessional struggle in Poland, while the Habsburgs, who coveted the Polish throne, raised every obstacle to the childless king's remarriage.

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  • other than abstinence from marriage, at all events at the principal reproductive period; and perhaps to a decrease in marriage or remarriage after middle life, a period of which the weight in the age-distribution has been increasing of late.

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  • Divorce is easy and can be initiated by the woman; but remarriage of the pair can only be effected by the good offices of a proxy (as in Moslem societies, after a third divorce).

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  • His mother, Rachael Fawcett (Faucette), of French Huguenot descent, married when very young a Danish proprietor of St Croix, John Michael Levine, with whom she lived unhappily and whom she soon left, subsequently living with James Hamilton; her husband procured a divorce in 1759, but the court forbade her remarriage.'

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  • Always holding aloof from politics, he was an ardent and indefatigable advocate of social reform in India, especially as regards child marriage and the remarriage of widows.

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  • The scale of social precedence as recognized by native public opinion is concisely reviewed (ib.) as revealing itself" in the facts that particular castes are supposed to be modern representatives of one or other of the original castes of the theoretical Hindu system; that Brahmans will take water from certain castes; that Brahmans of high standing will serve particular castes; that certain castes, though not served by the best Brahmans, have nevertheless got Brahmans of their own whose rank varies according to circumstances; that certain castes are not served by Brahmans at all but have priests of their own; that the status of certain castes has been raised by their taking to infant-marriage or abandoning the remarriage of widows; that the status of others has been modified by their pursuing some occupations in a special or peculiar way; that some can claim the services of the village barber, the village palanquin-bearer, the village midwife, &c., while others cannot; that some castes may not enter the courtyards of certain temples; that some castes are subject to special taboos, such as that they must not use the village well, or may draw water only with their own vessels, that they must live outside the village or in a separate quarter, that they must leave the road on the approach of a highcaste man and must call out to give warning of their approach."

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  • She consulted a Russian priest as to the possibility of divorce and remarriage during a husband's lifetime, and the priest told her that it was impossible, and to her delight showed her a text in the Gospel which (as it seemed to him) plainly forbids remarriage while the husband is alive.

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  • She also has two step-siblings from her father's remarriage - Alisa, born in 1977 and Kyle, born in 1981.

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  • Child's development is affected by family conditions such as divorce, remarriage, and parental employment.

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  • Divorce, remarriage, and the formation of a stepfamily are traumatic events for children.

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  • Individual therapy for children whose parents are going through a divorce and remarriage can be helpful.

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  • Blended family-A family formed by the remarriage of a divorced or widowed parent.

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  • The frequency of divorce and remarriage produces stepfamilies with their own difficulties and challenges.

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  • Children who steal are often expressing displaced feelings of anxiety, rage, or alienation resulting from a disruption in their life, such as a parent's divorce or remarriage.

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  • When meeting singles in this group, there is one thing that is highly important: Make sure that you and any potential mates have the same religious views of divorce and remarriage.

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  • There are many effects of remarriage on both the kids and the couple.

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  • I commend you for taking seriously the concerns your fiancé has about how the remarriage may affect your children.

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