Reluctance sentence example

reluctance
  • With some reluctance, mostly from Martha this time, we agreed.

    233
    98
  • He tossed in a hint of reluctance, just for good measure.

    221
    103
  • There was evidence of her reluctance to discuss some element of the accident.

    105
    57
  • Burgess spoke in a low tone but showed no reluctance to talk.

    52
    38
  • Brady followed with reluctance, intrigued to meet the woman whose voice had kept him company for several long weeks.

    40
    29
    Advertisement
  • We need to overcome this reluctance to talk openly.

    15
    5
  • No, your morals have nothing to do with my reluctance to introduce him.

    51
    46
  • She skipped back to the jeep, her earlier reluctance nowhere in evidence.

    54
    49
  • Napoleon undoubtedly entered on the struggle with reluctance.

    7
    5
  • In that adventure, she learned how important to her was the brave fighting spirit of her Klingon side, and yet she only reincorporated her Klingon nature with great reluctance.

    3
    2
    Advertisement
  • As yet, however, he had little knowledge of, and less inclination for, astronomy; and it was with extreme reluctance that he turned aside from the more promising career of the ministry to accept, early in 1594, the vacant chair of that science at Gratz, placed at the disposal of the Tubingen professors by the Lutheran states of Styria.

    0
    0
  • In 1873 he removed from Cincinnati to Fremont, his intention being to withdraw from public life; but in 1875 the Republican party in Ohio once more selected him as its candidate for the governorship. He accepted the nomination with great reluctance.

    0
    0
  • The Court of Appeal expressed great reluctance to send such a small remaining item to another trial.

    0
    0
  • Cynthia Byrne held out her hand and said, with what Dean hoped was at least a hint of reluctance, I guess I won't be seeing you again.

    1
    1
  • But the old man, finally, with much reluctance, agreed to re-figure the amount stolen when Dean began to ask how fre­quently deposits were made and offered to check bank records.

    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • He began to understand her reluctance to be involved with him and how thick the walls around her heart were, if she spent the years since the Schism learning how to shut people and emotion out.

    1
    1
  • Very little new capital was invested by the telegraph companies about 1865 because of the natural reluctance of the companies to extend the systems under their control so long as a proposal for their acquisition by the state was under consideration.

    0
    1
  • Notwithstanding this prospective loss of revenue, parliament showed great reluctance to vote any new impost, although hardly a year previously it had sanctioned (3oth June 1879) Depretiss scheme for spending during the next eighteen years 43,200,000 in building 5000 kilometres of railway, an expenditure not wholly justified by the importance of the lines, and useful principally as a source of electoral sops for the constituents of ministerial deputies.

    1
    1
  • With great reluctance the tsar consented to convoke a consultative chamber of deputies as a sop to public opinion, but that concession stimulated rather than calmed public opinion, and shortly after the conclusion of peace the Liberals and the Revolutionaries, combining their forces, brought about a general strike in St Petersburg together with the stoppage of railway communication all over the empire.

    0
    1
  • Xavier was seized with fever soon after his arrival, and was delayed by the failure of the interpreter he had engaged, as well as by the reluctance of the Portuguese to attempt the voyage to Canton for the purpose of landing him.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • But Mr. Churchill's great coup in the war was the attack on the Dardanelles, which he pressed forward in spite of the increasing reluctance of Lord Fisher.

    0
    1
  • After Oliver's death Henry hailed with delight the succession of his brother Richard to the office of protector, but although he was now appointed lieutenant and governor general of Ireland, it was only with great reluctance that he remained in that country.

    0
    1
  • If to these causes be added a certain exclusiveness, which refused to meet a would-be convert more than half-way, we find no difficulty in accounting for the reluctance which the medieval and modern synagogue has felt on the subject.

    1
    1
  • It was obviously, however, a measure to be used only in the last resort and with extreme reluctance.

    0
    1
  • Notwithstanding his loyal support of the administration during the struggle, he did not fully approve of its conduct of the war, which he deemed shifting and timid; and it was with great reluctance that he supported Lincoln in 1864 for a second term.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • But the only hitherto apparent evidence of such defects is an excessive clinging to the letter of the law; a marked reluctance to exercise discretion; and that, perhaps, i5 attributable rather to the habit of obedience.

    0
    1
  • In 1868 he was created vice-admiral of the Italian navy, but, two years later, left Italy to ascend the Spanish throne, his reluctance to accept the invitation of the Cortes having been overridden by the Italian cabinet.

    0
    1
  • Great care was shown not to alienate the Whig leaders in a body, which would have raised up under Pitt's leadership a formidable .party of resistance, but advantage was taken of disagreements between the ministers concerning the war, of personal jealousies, and of the strong reluctance of the old statesmen who had served the crown for generations to identify themselves with active opposition to the king's wishes.

    0
    1
  • His tact in overcoming the reluctance of the pope to be present at the coronation (it was only eight months after the execution of the duc d'Enghien) received further recognition.

    0
    1
  • Peter went to Sion, near Delft; Erasmus after prolonged reluctance became an Augustinian canon in St Gregory's at Steyn, a house of the same Chapter near Gouda.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • Sigismund, in 1422, even went so far as to propose a partition of Poland between Hungary, the empire and the Silesian princes, a scheme which foundered upon Sigismund's impecuniosity and the reluctance of the Magyars to injure the Poles.

    1
    1
  • It was only with reluctance that he supported the ambitious projects of Elizabeth Farnese, queen of Spain, in Italy by guaranteeing in 1729 the succession of Don Carlos to the duchies of Parma and Tuscany.

    2
    2
  • Burnside was by no means the equal of his predecessor, though a capable subordinate, and indeed only accepted the chief command with reluctance.

    1
    1
  • After the short ministry of Shelburne, succeeding the death of Rockingham, the duke of Portland was selected by Fox and North as a "convenient cipher" to become the head of the coalition ministry, to the formation of which the king was with great reluctance compelled to give his assent.

    1
    1
  • Bergman somehow neglected it, and this caused for a time a reluctance on Scheele's part to become acquainted with that savant, but the paper, through the instrumentality of Anders Johann Retzius (1742-1821), was ultimately communicated to the Academy of Sciences at Stockholm.

    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • Owing to the great pressure on the soil from the density of the population, to the reluctance to part with land characteristic of small proprietors, to the generally great productiveness of land and to the very light assessment of government revenue, land in Ballia, for agricultural purposes merely, has a market value higher than in almost any other district.

    1
    2
  • He was one of the original co-signatories of the Holy Alliance, though, in common with most, he signed it with reluctance; and in the counsels of the Grand Alliance he allowed himself to be practically subordinated to Alexander and later to Metternich.

    0
    1
  • But there was a reluctance to incur the expense of a contest with so powerful a neighbour as New York, and in 1764 that province procured from the king in council a royal order declaring the western boundary of New Hampshire to be the western bank of the Connecticut river.

    0
    1
  • His letters betray discontent with Elizabeth's reluctance to assist the States; he could not understand her antipathy to rebellious subjects, and he returned in October, having accomplished little.

    0
    1
  • In 1557 Philip appointed him to the archbishopric of Toledo; he accepted with reluctance, and was consecrated at Brussels on the 27th of February '558.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • With much reluctance the royal permission was given and the resignation accepted, on the 10th of May 1532, with many gracious expressions of goodwill on the part of the king.

    0
    1
  • Henceforth, too, annexations of territory were frequently carried out by the Bohemian crown on the extinction of Silesian dynasties, and the surviving princes showed an increasing reluctance to the exercise of their authority.

    0
    1
  • On the i 5th of July, after various delays interposed by her reluctance to leave the neighbourhood of the border, where on her arrival she had received the welcome and the homage of the leading Catholic houses of Northumberland and Cumberland, she was removed to Bolton Castle in North Yorkshire.

    0
    1
  • On the 26th of October the charge of complicity in the murder of Darnley was distinctly brought forward against her in spite of Norfolk's reluctance and Murray's previous hesitation.

    0
    1
  • But John George's reluctance to join the Protestants disappeared when the imperial troops under Tilly began to ravage Saxony, and in September 1631 he concluded an alliance with the Swedish king.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • In view of the scarcely disguised ambitions and intrigues of the Austrian court, Montgelas now believed that the interests of Bavaria lay in a frank alliance with the French republic; he succeeded in overcoming the reluctance of Maximilian Joseph; and, on the 24th of August, a separate treaty of peace and alliance with France was signed at Paris.

    0
    1
  • It was to obtain popular support for this policy and for the Bavarian claims on Baden that the crown prince pressed for a liberal constitution, the reluctance of Montgelas to concede it being the cause of his dismissal.

    0
    1
  • The reluctance of the States of Holland, and of Amsterdam in particular, to grant adequate supplies caused the campaigns of 1638 and 1639 to be in the main defensive and dilatory.

    0
    1
  • Soon afterwards he was elected to succeed Sancroft; but accepted the promotion with extreme reluctance, and it was deferred from time to time, at his request, till April 1691.

    0
    1
  • In dealing with the revolt of nobles Ernest of Swabia Conrad was aided by the reluctance a-nd the of the vassals of the great lords to follow them against land.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • This reluctance was due largely to the increasing independence of this class of landholders, who were beginning to learn that the sovereign, and not their immediate lord, was the protector of their liberties; the independence in its turn arose from the growth of the principle of heredity.

    0
    1
  • The general feeling of distrust which this prolonged controversy aroused was, however, shown by the almost contemptuous rejection in 1899 of a Bill to protect artisans who were willing to work against intimidation or violence (the Zuchthaus-Vorlage), a vote which was the more significant as it was not so much occasioned by the actual provisions of the bill, but was an expression of the distrust felt for the motives by which the government was moved and the reluctance to place any further powers in their hands.

    0
    1
  • In spite of the reluctance of Maria Theresa, Kaunitz, in July 1771, concluded a defensive alliance with the Porte.

    0
    1
  • It was, however, only with reluctance that Maria Theresa agreed to carry out the papal bull suppressing the Society of Jesus; and, while declaring herself against persecution, she could never be persuaded to accept the views of Kaunitz and Joseph in favour of toleration.

    0
    1
  • Between 200,000 and 300,000 Austrian troops were massed in Bohemia; and Austria took up the role of mediator, prepared to throw the weight of her support into the scale of whichever side should prove most amenable to her claims. The news of the battle of Vittoria, following on the reluctance of Napoleon to listen to demands involving the overthrow of the whole of his political system in central Europe, decided Austria in favour of the Allies.

    0
    1
  • On the one hand, a reluctance to confess that Hungary is no longer in any sense a part of Austria; on the other hand, the refusal of the Czechs to recognize that their country is part of Austria.

    0
    1
  • Nearly all the Austrian prelates had been opposed to the new doctrine; many of them remained to the end of the council and voted against it, and they only declared their submission with great reluctance.

    0
    1
  • Report already represented Suffolk as too friendly with French leaders like Charles of Orleans, and it was with reluctance that he undertook the responsibility of an embassy to France.

    0
    1
  • Middleton, Tarbat and Clarendon overcame Charles's reluctance to restore episcopacy; Lauderdale fell into the background; The Rev. James Sharp, hitherto the agent of the Resolutioners, or milder party among the preachers, turned his coat, and took the archbishopric of St Andrews.

    0
    1
  • To this policy may be traced his share in bringing about the religious peace of Augsburg in 1555, his tortuous conduct at the diet of Augsburg eleven years later, and his reluctance to break entirely with the Calvinists.

    0
    1
  • The king, who is said to have described him as a brave fellow who had no head, promoted him to the rank of brigadier, and then major-general with some reluctance.

    0
    1
  • His reluctance to leave Rome, already shown by his refusal to take a province, after his praetorship and consulship, was increased by the inclination of his daughter Tullia, then a widow, to marry again.'

    0
    1
  • It is not improbable, therefore, that the fall in wholesale prices which, with temporary interruptions, persisted between 1870 and 1900, in general harmony with the other movement, may have conduced to reluctance on the part of those who have enlarged their notions of the standard of comfort to endanger their prospects of enjoying it by incurring the additional expenses of family life.

    0
    1
  • The Protestants refused to attend an assembly where even the most conciliatory prelate could hardly condescend to meet them on equal terms. Nor was Pole allowed to use the only possible means of overcoming their reluctance.

    1
    1
  • Such abstinences as the above, though based on taboo, that is, on a reluctance to eat the totem or sacred animal, are yet ascetic in so far as they involve much self-denial.

    1
    1
  • On the death of Ignatius, probably in October 878, Photius, after a decent show of reluctance, again filled the patriarchal throne.

    1
    1
  • When on the 13th of August 1836 the soldiers on duty at the summer palace, La Granja, mutinied and forced the regent to grant a constitution, it was generally, though wrongly, believed that they overcame her reluctance by seizing Munoz, whom they called her "guapo," or fancy man, and threatening to shoot him.

    1
    1
  • Yet it required four ballots in the national convention to overcome the reluctance of Webster's, Clay's and Scott's followers and secure the party nomination.

    1
    1
  • Immediately after graduation he became an assistant in his brother William's school for young ladies in Boston, and continued teaching, with much inward reluctance and discomfort, for three years.

    1
    1
  • Sadoleto was a diligent and devoted bishop and left his diocese with reluctance even after he was made cardinal (1536).

    1
    1
  • An attitude so indecent threatened to defeat the very objects of the reactionary powers, and Gentz congratulated the congress that these sorry protests would be buried in the archives, offering at the same time to write for the king a dignified letter in which he should express his reluctance at having to violate his oaths in the face of irresistible force !

    1
    1
  • After some delay, and with manifest reluctance, the Scots complied; their hand was forced by the fact that most of the claimants to the crown had hastened to make the acknowledgment, each hoping thereby to prejudice the English king in his own favor.

    1
    1
  • But counties and boroughs were broken up into a number of small constituencies, for the most part returning only one member each; while the necessity of increasing the relative weight of Great Britain, and the reluctance to inflict disfranchisement on Ireland, led to an increase in the numbers of the House of Commons from 658 to 670 members.

    1
    1
  • Addington consented, and after some delay caused by the king's illness, and by the reluctance of several of Pitt's followers to serve under him, became first lord of the treasury and chancellor of the exchequer in March 1801.

    1
    1
  • The common sense of Christendom gradually shook off these extravagances; but the reluctance to shed blood lingered long, and was hardly extinguished even by the growing horror of heresy.

    4
    4
  • He landed at Newport, Rhode Island, on the 10th of July, but was held here inactive for a year, owing to his reluctance to abandon the French fleet, which was blockaded by the British in Narragansett Bay.

    1
    1
  • In 1062 he was chosen bishop of Worcester, and the choice was approved by the witan; with some reluctance Wulfstan accepted, and was consecrated at York in September.

    1
    1
  • He was summoned in April 1675 before a committee of the House of Commons to give evidence against Lauderdale, and disclosed, without reluctance according to his enemies, confidences which had passed between him and the minister.

    1
    1
  • About four years after, in 1092, on the invitation of Hugh, earl of Chester, Anselm with some reluctance, for he feared to be made archbishop, crossed to England.

    1
    1
  • La Rochelle was now invested, the Huguenots were hard pressed also on land, and, but for the reluctance of the Dutch to allow their ships to be used for such a purpose, an end might have been made of the Protestant opposition in France; as it was,, Richelieu was forced to accept the mediation of England and conclude a treaty with the Huguenots (February 1626).

    1
    1
  • In his Dialogo dei massimi sistemi, printed not less than thirteen years after the last of the three laws had been given to the world, the epicycles by which Copernicus, adhering to the ancient postulate of uniform circular motion, had endeavoured to reduce to theory the irregularities of the planetary movements, were neither expressly adopted nor expressly rejected; and the conclusion seems inevitable that this grave defection from the cause of progress was due to his perhaps unconscious reluctance to accept discoveries which he had not originated.

    1
    1
  • The Cortes met at last on the i4th of June, and the upshot justified Villaverdes reluctance to meet it.

    1
    1
  • A treaty of alliance with Italy was arranged in the spring of 1866; and Bismarck then with much difficulty overcame the reluctance of the king to embark in a war with his old ally.

    4
    4
  • In spite of the reluctance of his wife, and the opposition of the Sicilian nobles, he accepted the invitation; and having recognized the papal supremacy over Sicily, and procured the coronation of his son Henry as its king, reached Germany after an adventurous journey in the autumn of 1212.

    2
    2
  • Having overcome Monmouth's reluctance to take part in this movement, he accompanied the duke to the west of England and drew up the manifesto against James II., escaping to Holland after the battle of Sedgemoor.

    2
    2
  • There was ample evidence of Cynthia's reluctance to discuss some element of Shipton's accident and Dean was just as reluctant to subject her to police interrogation.

    4
    4
  • With reluctance, Taran trotted away in the direction of the walls.

    2
    2
  • Racism thrives because the silence of the majority, and their reluctance to stand up and be counted quietly condones it!

    2
    2
  • Prince Max von Baden had introduced a general amnesty for all political prisoners tho there was reluctance to let Luxemburg have her freedom.

    2
    2
  • She recorded the reluctance of the SHO to see the patient but he eventually did turn up and prescribed the analgesia as already noted.

    2
    2
  • He said there seemed to be a " cultural barricade " around Birmingham and a reluctance to accept ideas from elsewhere.

    2
    2
  • Further, unexpected experiences may also lead to reluctance to participate raising the question of when perseverance in following up participants becomes coercion?

    2
    2
  • There is a great reluctance by the government to allow cannabis derivatives to be used therapeutically.

    2
    2
  • However, there is some reluctance in that sms isn't reliable in terms of delivery, thus discouraged in emergencies.

    2
    2
  • And there are three deep splits behind the reluctance either to decisively reject the euro or to leap into the unknown of a referendum.

    2
    2
  • What lay behind Darwin's seemingly inexplicable reluctance to publish his views on this subject?

    2
    2
  • Why is it that the British have such a reluctance to embrace the idea - popular on the continental mainland - of European federalisation?

    2
    2
  • Clues include abnormal posture; straining; lying with tummy pressed to the floor; or reluctance to move.

    2
    2
  • One recurring theme has been our perceived reluctance to tell the world of our successes and of our contributions.

    1
    1
  • These timescales indicate a reluctance to promote mass-burn incineration with energy recovery.

    1
    1
  • Studies also show the reluctance of patients to seek medical advice.

    1
    1
  • How does history explain the American reluctance to support the International Criminal Court?

    1
    1
  • He said there was a " marked reluctance " to shut the station down.

    3
    3
  • Thus the concern with outcomes was greater, with consequent understandable reluctance to switch to thinking in terms of learning processes.

    1
    1
  • Gentleman's apparent reluctance to grant Government time for a debate on the subject.

    1
    1
  • Europe's persistent reluctance puts the Turks in a quandary.

    1
    1
  • We need to rally against the government's reluctance to introduce tax incentives.

    1
    1
  • Our reluctance to invest in professional translation is extremely shortsighted.

    1
    1
  • The initial soundings had evidently revealed a considerable reluctance from her parents to give her such consent.

    1
    1
  • The reluctance of the refugees to move again underscores some of the problems that have plagued relief organizations, particularly the UN.

    1
    1
  • It was he who overcame the reluctance of the army to march to the relief of Vienna; after the defeat of Schwechat, at which he was present, he sent Bern to carry on the war in Transylvania.

    1
    1
  • As a trusted counsellor of a succession of popes he was made cardinal bishop of Ostia, a position which he accepted with some reluctance; and presiding over a council at Milan in 1059, he courageously asserted the authority of Rome over this province, and won a signal victory for the principles which he advocated.

    1
    1
  • Financial embarrassments forced him to consent to a foreign control over the Debt, and the decree of December 1881, whereby many of the revenues of the empire were handed over to the Public Debt Administration for the benefit of the bondholders, was a sacrifice of principle to which he could only have consented with the greatest reluctance.

    1
    1
  • The general proposition as to a parallelism between individual and ancestral development is no doubt indisputable, but extended knowledge of the very different ontogenetic histories of closely allied forms has led us to a much fuller conception of the mode in which stages in embryonic and larval history have been modified in relation to their surroundings, and to a consequent reluctance to attach detailed importance to the embryological argument for evolution.

    0
    1
  • Their reluctance to acknowledge a female sovereign was increased when Henry gave her in marriage to Geoffrey Plantagenet, the heir of Anjou and Maine (1129); nor was it removed by the birth of the future Henry II.

    0
    1
  • Although, like most men of strong originative power, he assimilated with difficulty the ideas of others, his tardiness sprang rather from inability to depart from the track of his own methods than from reluctance to acknowledge the merits of his competitors.

    0
    1
  • Gloucester obtained possession of the king's person, and, having arrested Rivers and some of his supporters, assumed the crown himself after a very slight and feigned reluctance, on the ground that the marriage of Edward and Elizabeth Woodville was invalid, and consequently its issue was illegitimate.

    0
    1
  • The exceptions are chiefly to be found in the higher and mode poetical strains of feeling to which the humorist temperament lends itself with reluctance and distrust, though it by no means excludes them.

    0
    1
  • But the growing influence of the senate over elections on the one hand, and on the other hand the increasing reluctance of leading citizens to become candidates for office (see below), gradually made popular election a mere form.

    0
    1
  • He discouraged the king's advances, showed reluctance to go to the palace, and seemed constrained when there.

    3
    3
  • His contempt of luxury, his avoidance of hyperbole and dislike of excessive ceremony, his protection to commerce and consideration for his soldiers, the reluctance with which he assumed the crown almost at the close of his reignall these would have been praiseworthy in another man; but on his death the memory of his atrocious tyranny alone survived.

    0
    1
  • At the Restoration in 1660 Hale was very graciously received by Charles II., and in the same year was appointed chief baron of the exchequer, and accepted, with extreme reluctance, the honour of knighthood.

    0
    1
  • Kutuzov was silent for a few seconds and then, submitting with evident reluctance to the duty imposed by his position, raised his head and began to speak.

    0
    1
  • Gentleman 's apparent reluctance to grant Government time for a debate on the subject.

    0
    1
  • Europe 's persistent reluctance puts the Turks in a quandary.

    0
    1
  • This was n't an obvious reluctance on the part of the Italian voters to swallow a bitter pill of economic reform.

    0
    1
  • Yet what are we to make of the seemingly growing reluctance of Christian parents to take their children to the evening service?

    3
    3
  • The resulting adrenal edge is visceral and rewarding, and keeps you in tune with the uneasy mix of reluctance and determination stewing in Sgt.

    0
    1
  • If a child expresses reluctance to participate in any aspect of the rituals of death, adults should accept the child's feelings and not exert pressure.

    1
    2
  • Behavior may also change, demonstrated by reluctance to go to school, daydreaming in class, or a decline in academic performance.

    0
    1
  • Parents should call the doctor when a child in kindergarten or older shows extreme reluctance to separate from the parent to the point where it interferes with the child's normal life and social development.

    0
    1
  • However, 1987 noted a five-fold increase in the incidence of the disease because of the reluctance of some states to adopt comprehensive school immunization laws.

    0
    1
  • This in turn makes elimination uncomfortable and even painful, creating even greater reluctance and resistance on the part of the child.

    0
    1
  • Inhibited-A type of child defined by Jerome Kagan and his colleagues as having a low level of responsiveness to strangers, a reluctance to initiate activities, and requiring a long time to relax in new situations.

    2
    2
  • This may be a result of parental reluctance to invest in clothing that will be worn once or not at all.

    2
    2
  • The series' muted quality comes in large part from matriarch Betty's reluctance to put her clan on television.

    2
    2
  • My studies were sometimes interrupted with a sigh, which I breathed towards Lausanne; and on the approach of spring I withdrew without reluctance from the noisy and extensive scene of crowds without company, and dissipation without pleasure."

    1
    3
  • So great was his reputation that when Sir Walter Mildmay founded Emmanuel College in 1584 he chose Chaderton for the first master, and on his expressing some reluctance, declared that if he would not accept the office the foundation should not go on.

    1
    3
  • The danger of such an enterprise was diminished by the reluctance to violate the apartments of women and attack a sleeping foe, which appears also in Judges xvi.

    1
    3
  • Murad was soon removed by assassination, and the way being thus cleared, Aurangzeb, with affected reluctance, ascended the throne in August 1658.

    27
    29
  • His counsels were marred by his reluctance to appeal to arms at the critical moments of action, and by the slenderness of his own resources, but they deserve attention for their broad common sense and spirit of tolerance.

    0
    2
  • Moreover, the belief that the justice of punishment depends upon the responsibility of the criminal for his past offences and the admission of the moral consciousness that his previous wrong-doing was freely chosen carries with it, so it is argued, consequences which the libertarian moralist might be willing to accept with reluctance.

    0
    2
  • The aim of the project is to design, build, test and document a basic switched reluctance motor drive with microcomputer control.

    1
    3
  • We need to rally against the government 's reluctance to introduce tax incentives.

    1
    3
  • This is very popular and overcomes the reluctance of employers to release workers for treatment.

    1
    3
  • However, the reluctance of the Government to make these changes has moved the Committee to take this action.

    1
    3
  • Some persons told their stories with seeming reluctance, some with candor and sincerity, some with obvious embellishments or deletions.

    1
    3
  • I'm sure the vet had reasons for her reluctance, but there's no way to be sure of what was really going on unless you can access the record of treatment.

    1
    3
  • This helps to eliminate any surprises and reluctance on the part of the model.

    1
    3
  • In the meantime, your dog's tummy may have shrunk from starvation, and this could play a role in his reluctance to eat.

    1
    3
  • Now she knew Candice was referring to the Medena hacienda and Alex's reluctance to inherit.

    15
    18
  • In spite of his youth and his reluctance to assume the responsibility, he was chosen as commander-in-chief after the defeat of the Vendeans by the republicans at Cholet.

    10
    13
  • Their continued reluctance to embrace fully the new politics mapped out in the Good Friday Agreement is a challenge to be overcome.

    1
    4
  • He was threatened by the intervention of England on the side of the coalition, and would have made peace earlier but for his reluctance to abandon his ally Sweden.

    6
    11
  • The old physical attacks on the Jews continued in Russia, but there was added the reluctance of several national groups in Europe to admit the Jews to social equality.

    9
    14
  • He accepted, though with some reluctance, and only on condition that he should be at liberty, in the event of the Tories going into opposition, to take any line he might think proper.

    9
    14
  • But as time progressed, his obvious reluctance to propose marriage presented a far more difficult problem.

    19
    25
  • He did so now, describing Lydia's reluctance in descending to the accident, but glossing over just how petrified she'd been.

    12
    18
  • They relied also on the known reluctance of the Dutch government to go to war.

    5
    11
  • Still, the rich hardwood floor reflected the weak morning sun in a cheerful manner that spawned reluctance to continue the tour.

    10
    18
  • It deals with Abraham's reluctance to die and the means by which his death was brought about.

    5
    13
  • A petition was presented to him begging him to be a candidate for the presidency, and with some reluctance the veteran leader gave his consent.

    7
    16