Refractive sentence example

refractive
  • The combustibility of the diamond was predicted by Sir Isaac Newton on account of its high refractive power; it was first established experimentally by the Florentine Academicians in 1694.

    1
    0
  • By the use of a revolving mirror similar to that used by Sir Charles Wheatstone for measuring the rapidity of electric currents, he was enabled in 1850 to demonstrate the greater velocity of light in air than in water, and to establish that the velocity of light in different media is inversely as the refractive indices of the media.

    1
    0
  • The figures given are the partial dispersions for ordinary crown and ordinary extra dense flint glasses, styled in Messrs Schott's catalogue of optical glasses as o 60 and 0.102 respectively, having refractive indices of 1 5179 and 1.6489 for the D ray respectively, and (µ D -I)/(l F -µc) =60 2 and 33.8 respectively to indicate their dispersive powers (inverted), = v.

    1
    0
  • An immediate deduction from Maxwell's theory was that in transparent dielectrics, the dielectric constant or specific inductive capacity should be numerically equal to the square of the refractive index for very long electric waves.

    1
    0
  • The only refractive indices which had been measured were the optical refractive indices of a number of transparent substances.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Maxwell made a comparison between the optical refractive index and the dielectric constant of paraffin wax, and the approximation between the numerical values of the square of the first and that of the last was sufficient to show that there was a basis for further work.

    0
    0
  • Experimental methods were devised for the further exact measurements of the electromagnetic velocity and numerous determinations of the dielectric constants of various solids, liquids and gases, and comparisons of these with the corresponding optical refractive indices were conducted.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the divergence in some cases between the square of the optical refractive index and the dielectric constant was very marked.

    0
    0
  • It is generally an advantage to secure a great refractive effect by several weaker than by one high-power lens.

    0
    0
  • The refractive indices for different wave lengths must be known for each kind of glass made use of.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In consequence of its low refractive and dispersive power, colourless pellucid fluor-spar is valuable in the construction of apochromatic lenses, but this variety is rare.

    0
    0
  • If the second medium be more highly refractive than the first, the secondary caustic is a hyperbola having the same focus and centre as before, and the caustic is the evolute of this curve.

    0
    0
  • In the article Refraction it is shown that a ray of light traversing a homogeneous medium is deviated from its rectilinear path when it enters a medium of different refractive index; it is therefore readily seen that the path of a ray through continuously varying media is necessarily curvilinear, being compounded of an infinite number of infinitesimally small rectilinear deviations.

    0
    0
  • Our atmosphere is a medium of continuously varying refractive index.

    0
    0
  • The object is really viewed through a horizontally stratified medium consisting of a central sheet of maximum refractive index, overand under-laid by sheets of decreasing refractive power.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Differences of refractive index produce their greatest dispersive effects when incidence on the refracting surface is nearly tangential.

    0
    0
  • They are formed now on one side, now on the other, of the absorption line; but the rapid increase of refractive index which accompanies true anomalous dispersion, and might be expected to produce similar bands by scattering the light, appears both from theory and experiment to belong to the side of greater wave-length exclusively.

    0
    0
  • It appears that Newton made the mistake of supposing that all prisms would give a spectrum of exactly the same length; the objections of his opponents led him to measure carefully the lengths of spectra formed by prisms of different angles and of different refractive indices; and it seems strange that he was not led thereby to the discovery of the different dispersive powers of different refractive substances.

    0
    0
  • The polarizing angle varies from one transparent substance to another, and Sir David Brewster in 1815 enunciated the law that the tangent of the polarizing angle is equal to the refractive index of the substance.

    0
    0
  • Since the two circular streams have different speeds, Fresnel argued that it would be possible to separate them by oblique refraction, and though the divergence is small, since the difference of their refractive indices in the case of quartz is only about o 00007, he succeeded by a suitable arrangement of alternately rightand left-handed prisms of quartz in resolving a plane-polarized stream into two distinct circularly polarized streams. A similar arrangement was used by Ernst v.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the contrary case, total reflection commences as soon as sin i =µ 1, µ being still the relative refractive index of the more highly refracting medium; and for greater angles of incidence r becomes imaginary.

    0
    0
  • Lord Rayleigh has pointed out that all theories are defective in that they disregard the fact that one at least of the media is dispersive, and that it is probable that finite reflection would result at the interface of media of different dispersive powers, even in the case of waves for which the refractive indices are absolutely the same.

    0
    0
  • The optical constants (refractive index and co-efficient of extinction) of the metal may then be obtained from observations of the principal incidence and the elliptic polarization then produced.

    0
    0
  • This is made by fixing a thin crystalline plate between two glass prisms turned in opposite directions by a cement of the same refractive index as the glass.

    0
    0
  • This refractive index should be equal to the greatest index of the plate, and with a biaxal plate the mean axis of optical symmetry should be parallel to its faces and in the normal section of the prisms, while with an uniaxal plate the optic axis should be in a plane perpendicular to this normal section.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is clear that direct transmission through the plate at a point where the thicknesses of the prisms are d 1 and d 2 will introduce a relative retardation of (µ,; -, u o) (d l - d2) between streams polarized in planes parallel and perpendicular to the edges of the prisms,, u o, and being the ordinary and the extraordinary refractive indices; and it is hence possible by an adjustment of the thickness to reduce elliptically polarized to plane polarization at an assigned point marked off by two parallel lines.

    0
    0
  • To reduce the aberrations Sir David Brewster proposed to employ in the place of glass transparent minerals of high refractive index and low dispersion.

    0
    0
  • The immersion liquids in common use are water, glycerine, cedar-wood oil, monobromnaphthalene, &c. Immersion systems in which the embedding liquid, coverslip, immersion-liquid and front lens have equal refractive indices are called " homogeneous immersion systems."

    0
    0
  • The value of the clearness of an image-point in a median section is the sine of the semi-aperture of the pencil multiplied with the refractive index of the medium.

    0
    0
  • In dry-systems only the sine of the semi-aperture is concerned; in immersion-systems it is the product of the refractive index of the immersion-liquid and the sine of the object-side semi-aperture.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • On the other hand, in immersion-systems the numerical aperture can almost amount to the refractive index, for A=n sin u

    0
    0
  • The value n sin u equals the numerical aperture A, where n is the refractive index of the immersion-liquid, and u is the semi-aperture on the object-side.

    0
    0
  • The advantages of the immersion over the dry-systems are greatest when the embedding-liquid, the glass cover, the immersion-liquid and the front lens have the same refractive index.

    0
    0
  • Cedarwood oil (Canada balsam), which has a refractive index of 1.515, is the immersion-liquid.

    0
    0
  • In order to determine the refractive index when the thickness of the crystal is known, or the thickness of the crystal when the index is known, a fine adjustment A makes it possible to measure exactly the changes in the length of the microscope.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Like so many coloured Protista, they frequently possess a pigmented " eye-spot " in which may be sunk a spheroidal refractive body (" lens ").

    0
    0
  • The essential oils possess a high refractive power, and most of them rotate the plane of the polarized light.

    0
    0
  • An extremely lucid consideration of the Becke Line, the refractive differences between specimen and mountant, is particularly useful.

    0
    0
  • Refractive correction for compound myopic astigmatism contained the following parameters.

    0
    0
  • Furthermore, because virtually all materials change a solvents refractive index, the interferometer can detect samples containing no natural chromophores.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • With refractive correction nearly 91% of the patients had vision equal to or better than 6/18.

    0
    0
  • Therefore, all that is needed to produce a sensitive refractive index sensor is a sensitive measure of the rotation of the polarization ellipse.

    0
    0
  • Non- corrected refractive errors are also important causes, accounting for another 40% of cases.

    0
    0
  • This is usually done by coating them in a material of lower refractive index than the fiber.

    0
    0
  • The corresponding refractive indices are the lengths of these axes.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Intraocular Refractive Surgery - Used for high myopes therefore still risk of complications.

    0
    0
  • The refractive index, n, is given by the square root of the relative dielectric permittivity, i.e. .

    0
    0
  • Light is guided in the core of the fiber that has a higher refractive index than the cladding by total internal reflection.

    0
    0
  • The slower propagation of light in gas or water than in air or vacuum may be attributed to a greater density, or to a less rigidity, in the former case; or we may adopt the more complicated supposition that both these quantities vary, subject only to the condition which restricts the ratio of velocities to equality with the known refractive index.

    0
    0
  • In the chromatophores of many Algae and in the Liverwort Anthoceros there are present homogeneous, highly refractive, crystal-like bodies, called pyrenoids or starch-centres, which are composed of proteid substances and surrounded by an envelope of starch-grains.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The pioneer work in this field, now frequently denominated " spectro-chemistry," was done by Sir Isaac Newton, who, from theoretical considerations based on his corpuscular theory of light, determined the function (n 2 - 1), where n is the refractive index, to be the expression for the refractive power; dividing this expression by the density (d), he obtained (n 2 - i)/d, which he named the " absolute refractive power."

    0
    0
  • The "dielectric constant" of a medium is its specific inductive capacity, and on the electromagnetic theory of light it equals the square of its refractive index for light of infinite wave length (see Electrostatics; Magneto-Optics).

    0
    0
  • In optical systems composed of lenses, the position, magnitude and errors of the image depend upon the refractive indices of the glass employed (see Lens, and above, " Monochromatic Aberration ").

    0
    0
  • Amici was likewise the first to produce practical and good immersion-systems. The slight difference of the refractive indexes of the glass cover and the immersion-liquid involves a diminution of the aberrations, by which the objective will become less sensitive to the differences in thickness of the glass covers and admits of a more perfect adjustment.

    0
    0
  • Thus this figure is not the actual physical depth of the coverslip but one modified by the refractive index of the glass itself.

    0
    0
  • Two similar transparent uniaxial crystals show the same (principal) extraordinary refractive index, n e.

    0
    0
  • Minnesota Eye Consultants offers an innovative near-vision refractive correction technique to those who have experienced this age-related deterioration of their near vision.

    0
    0
  • A member of the American College of Eye Surgeons, he is also a member of the Society for Excellence in Eye Care, the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and the International Society of Refractive Surgery.

    0
    0
  • If you suffer from myopia, astigmatism, presbyopia, or some other form of refractive eye disorders, then a pinhole style of eyeglass might be right for you.

    0
    0
  • Eyeglasses and contact lenses are devices that correct refractive errors in vision.

    0
    0
  • People whose eyes have refractive errors do not see clearly without glasses, because the light emitted from the objects they are observing does not come into focus on their retinas.

    0
    0
  • The type and degree of refractive correction in the lens determine to some extent the type of frame most suitable.

    0
    0
  • Anisometropia. A difference of refractive states exists between the two eyes (in other words, a difference in prescription between the two eyes).

    0
    0
  • There are objective methods, such as retinoscopy, by which to measure the refractive status of the eyes.

    0
    0
  • It is important that any anisometropia and refractive problems be treated initially, because sometimes amblyopia can be resolved with glasses alone.

    0
    0
  • For individuals with nystagmus correction of refractive error with glasses or contact lenses is the first step in treating the condition.

    0
    0
  • A child's refractive status or power of the eye when he or she begins school is a good indicator of whether the child will become nearsighted.

    0
    0
  • Refractive surgery is also used to correct myopia, but only on fully grown individuals.

    0
    0
  • Inflammation of the eye, increased dryness of the eye, and cataracts are some of the risks associated with refractive surgery.

    0
    0
  • Diopter (D)-A unit of measure for describing the refractive power of a lens.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, however, moissanite's hexagonal crystal structure is nearly twice as refractive as a diamond's isometric one, giving it up to twice the brilliance and fire of a diamond depending on the shape and cut of the stone.

    0
    0
  • Both natural and lab-created stones have the same hardness, specific gravity, refractive index and dispersion factor."

    0
    0
  • Chromatophores.The chromatophores or plastids are protoplasmic structures, denser than the cytoplasm, and easily distinguishable from it by their color or greater refractive power.

    0
    1
  • In young cells the chromatophores are small, colorless, highly refractive bodies, principally located around the nucleus.

    0
    1
  • Crystals of sulphur are transparent or translucent and highly refractive with strong birefringence; they have a resinous or slightly adamantine lustre, and present the characteristic sulphur-yellow colour.

    0
    1
  • He constructed a map of as many as 576 of these lines, the principal of which he denoted by the letters of the alphabet from A to G; and by ascertaining their refractive indices he determined that their relative positions are constant, whether in spectra produced by the direct rays of the sun, or by the reflected light of the moon and planets.

    0
    1
  • Arago, with whom he had already carried out investigations on the refractive properties of different gases, in the measurement of an arc of the meridian in Spain, and in subsequent years he was engaged in various other geodetic determinations.

    0
    1
  • It is well known that singly, doubly and trebly linked carbon atoms affect the physical properties of substances, such as the refractive index, specific volume, and the heat of combustion; and by determining these constants for many substances, fairly definite values can be assigned to these groupings.

    0
    1
  • It is there shown that every substance, transparent to light, has a definite refractive index, which is the ratio of the velocity of light in vacuo to its velocity in the medium to which the refractive index refers.

    0
    1
  • According to the electromagnetic theory of light K = N2, where N is the refractive index for rays of infinite wave-length.

    0
    1
  • In the case of substances possessing anomalous dispersion, the direct measurement of the refractive index for Hertzian waves of very long wave-length may be employed.

    0
    1
  • Briihl, have investigated the relations existing between the refractive power and composition.

    0
    1
  • If a suspension of lead dichloride in hydrochloric acid be treated with chlorine gas, a solution of lead tetrachloride is obtained; by adding ammonium chloride ammonium plumbichloride, (NH 4) 2 PbC1 6, is precipitated, which on treatment with strong sulphuric acid yields lead tetrachloride, PbC1 4, as a translucent, yellow, highly refractive liquid.

    0
    1
  • In the above argument the whole space between the object and the lens is supposed to be occupied by matter of one refractive index, and X represents the wave-length in this medium of the kind of light employed.

    0
    1
  • Calling the refractive index µ, we have as the critical value of e=2Xo/ µ sin a, (1).

    0
    1
  • The limit can be depressed only by a diminution in Xo, such as photography makes possible, or by an increase in /2, the refractive index of the medium in which the object is situated.

    0
    1
  • Taking the refractive index of water for the red rays as 0;, and for the violet rays as 1 r, we can calculate the following values for the minimum deviations corresponding to certain assigned values of n.

    0
    1
  • Moreover, his association with glass manufacture led him to study the refractive indices of different kinds of glass; he further undertook abstruse researches on electrostatic capacity, the phenomena of the residual charge, and other problems arising out of Clerk Maxwell's electro-magnetic theory.

    0
    1
  • On the other hand, while in the older crown and flint glasses the relation between refraction and dispersion had been practically fixed, dispersion and refraction increasing regularly with the density of the glass, in some of the new glasses introduced by Abbe and Schott this relation is altered and a relatively low refractive index is accompanied by a relatively high dispersion, while in others a high refractive index is associated with low dispersive power.

    0
    1
  • The refractive indices of all glasses at present available lie between 1.46 and 1 90, whereas transparent minerals are known having refractive indices lying considerably outside these limits; at least one of these, fluorite (calcium fluoride), is actually used by opticians in the construction of certain lenses, so that probably progress is to be looked for in a considerable widening of the limits of available optical materials; possibly such progress may lie in the direction of the artificial production of large mineral crystals.

    0
    1
  • This is probably never completely attained, variations in the sixth significant figure of the refractive index being observed in different parts of single large blocks of the most perfect glass.

    0
    1
  • As a general rule, to which, however, there are important exceptions, both these qualities are found to a greater degree, the lower the refractive index of the glass.

    0
    1
  • In this table n is the refractive index of the glass for sodium light (the D line of the solar spectrum), while the letters C, F and G' refer to lines in the hydrogen spectrum by which dispersion is now generally specified.

    0
    1
  • Owing principally to differences in the length of the inch in various countries this method had great inconveniences, and now the unit is the refractive power of a lens whose focal length is one metre.

    0
    1
  • A lens of twice its strength has a refractive power of 2 D, and a focal length of half a metre, and so on.

    0
    1
  • In astigmatism, owing to differences in the refractive power of the various meridians of the eye, great defect of sight, frequently accompanied by severe headache, occurs.

    0
    1
  • There are very few substances, however, for which the optical refractive index has the same value as K for steady or slowly varying electric force, on account of the great variation of the value of K with frequency.

    0
    1
  • With all the important work he accomplished in physics - the enunciation of Boyle's law, the discovery of the part taken by air in the propagation of sound, and investigations on the expansive force of freezing water, on specific gravities and refractive powers, on crystals, on electricity, on colour, on hydrostatics, &c. - chemistry was his peculiar and favourite study.

    0
    1
  • The eyes are refractive globules set in a cup of red pigment traversed by a nerve fibre, and lie on the proximal side of the body, directly on the postero-dorsal surface of the brain, or at a little distance from it, on the neck, often within the circle on the corona, and usually well within the transparent body.

    0
    1
  • This quantity may readily be expressed in terms of the refractive indices for the three colours, for if A is the angle of the prism (supposed small) bc=(/1c - I)A, bD =(/ AD - OA, F - I)A, where µc, A n, µ F are the respective indices of refraction.

    0
    1
  • It is more useful than (1), as the refractive indices may be measured with a prism of any convenient angle.

    0
    1
  • If the powder of a transparent substance is immersed in a liquid of the same refractive index, the mixture becomes transparent and a measurement of the refractive index of the liquid gives the refractivity of the powder.

    0
    1
  • Christiansen found, in an investigation of this kind, that the refractivity of the liquid could only be got to match that of the powder for mono-chromatic light, and that, if white light were used, brilliant colour effects were obtained, which varied in a remarkable manner when small changes occurred in the refractive index of the liquid.

    0
    1
  • If the refractive index is, for instance, the same for both in the case of green light, and a source of white light is viewed through the mixture, the green component will be completely transmitted, while the other colours are more or less scattered by multiple reflections and refractions at the surfaces of the powdered substance.

    0
    1
  • Wood, when white light is transmitted through a paste made of powdered quartz and a mixture of carbon bisulphide with benzol having the same refractive index as the quartz for yellow light.

    0
    1
  • Wood has studied the iridescent colours seen when a precipitate of potassium silicofluoride is produced by adding silicofluoric acid to a solution of potassium chloride, and found that they are due to the same cause, the refractive index of the minute crystals precipitated being about the same as that of the solution, which latter can be varied by dilution.

    1
    2
  • The equations finally arrived at are DX2(A2_ 2) (x2_ A2m)2+g2A2 ' DgA3 (A A l m) 2 +g 2 A2 ' where is the wave-length in free ether of light whose refractive index is n, and A m the wave-length of light of the same period as the electron, is a coefficient of absorption, and D and g are constants.

    1
    2
  • The question as to whether the motion was due to an irregular distribution of the earth's atmosphere, thus involving abnormal variations in the refractive index, was also investigated; here, again, negative results were obtained.

    1
    2
  • It would therefore seem to be more appropriate to replace 1 - K- 1 by (2 - I)1112, where j s is the refractive index; but this expression involves the wave propagation for periods coinciding with free periods of the molecules.

    1
    2
  • Liquid prisms, however, suffer from the fact that any change of temperature involves a change in the refractive index of the prism.

    1
    2