Rectory sentence examples

rectory
  • The poet William Cowper was born in the rectory in 1731.

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  • JOHN WESLEY (1703-1791), English divine, was born at Epworth Rectory on the 17th of June (O.S.) 1703.

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  • On February 9, 1709, the rectory was burnt down, and the children had a narrow escape.

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  • He also held the rectory of Stourton from 1801 to 1811 and that of Fovant from 1811 until his death.

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  • The Rectory Tower, a turreted gate-house of brick, dates from c. 1495.

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  • Among the rectors of Hadleigh several notable names appear, such as Rowland Taylor, the martyr, who was burned at the stake outside the town in 1 555, and Hugh James Rose, during whose tenancy of the rectory an initiatory meeting of the leaders of the Oxford Movement took place here in 1833.

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  • In 1841 he resigned his living to become curate to Samuel Wilberforce, then rector of Alverstoke, and upon Wilberforce's promotion to the deanery of Westminster in 1845 he was presented to the rectory of Itchenstoke.

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  • He appears to have survived till the year 1536; for on the 22nd of November in that year, the king presented John Garden to the rectory of Tyrie, vacant by the death of "Mr Hector Boiss."

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  • But for his services in defence of the faith the bishop of London gave him a stall in St Paul's; the bishop of Lincoln made him subdean of that cathedral, and the bishop of Durham conferred upon him the rectory of Bishopwearmouth.

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  • the livings of Great Baddow, Essex, and of Wokey, Somerset, which he had received in 1546, and was presented in 1552 by the dean and chapter of Canterbury to the rectory of All Hallows, Lombard Street, London.

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  • Returning to Oxford, he was elected a fellow of Merton College, and was ordained; and in 1833 he was presented to the rectory of Lavington-with-Graffham in Sussex by Mrs Sargent, whose granddaughter Caroline he married on the 7th of November 1833, the ceremony being performed by the bride's brother-in-law, Samuel Wilberforce, afterwards bishop of Oxford and of Winchester.

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  • In 1678 he was presented to the rectory of Islip, Oxfordshire.

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  • In 1640 he was presented to the sinecure living of Hartfield, Sussex, and in the following year he was made canon of Christ Church and exchanged to the rectory of Mildenhall, Wiltshire.

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  • He appears to have also been a prebendary of St Paul's, and for a very short time he had held the rectory of St Giles in the Fields.

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  • Inthe rectory the boys had the run of an excellent library, and here the young poet based his wide knowledge of the English classics.

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  • The new incumbent was willing that the Tennysons should continue to live in the rectory, which they did not leave until six years later.

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  • In 1837, to their great distress, the Tennysons were turned out of the Lincolnshire rectory where they had lived so long.

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  • He accepted the rectory of Elton in Huntingdonshire, but soon after went again to the continent, in order to study the methods of the Roman Catholic Church; and after a prolonged mental struggle he joined the Roman Catholic communion in November 1845.

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  • In 1827 he received the rectory of West Tytherley, Hampshire, and two years later he was elected headmaster of Harrow.

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  • He acted for a short time as a private chaplain, but was appointed in 1679 to the small rectory of Ampton, near Bury St Edmunds, and in 1685 he was made lecturer of Gray's Inn.

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  • Soon afterwards he was chosen fellow and tutor of his college; in 1676 he became chaplain to the bishop of Oxford, and in 1681 he obtained the rectory of Bletchington, Oxfordshire, and was made chaplain to Charles II.

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  • Dorset's beneficent intentions for his sons' pedagogue probably suggested Wolsey's ordination as priest at Marlborough on March ro, 1498, and on October io, r50o, he was instituted, on Dorset's presentation, to the rectory of Limington in Somerset.

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  • He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford, but migrated to Merton, where he obtained a fellowship. In 1631 he was proctor and also chaplain to Philip, earl of Pembroke, then chancellor of the university, who presented him to the rectory of Bishopston in Wiltshire.

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  • On his return to England in 1551 King Edward assigned him a pension of loo crowns, which he afterwards exchanged for the rectory of Upton-uponSevern, Worcestershire.

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  • Two manors of Padstow are mentioned later - the prior of Bodmin's manor, which included the rectory, and a manor which passed from the Bonvilles to the Greys, marquesses of Dorset, both of which were eventually acquired by the family of Prideaux.

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  • He was afterwards (1662) preferred to the rectory of-St Paul's, Covent Garden, London, where he continued to labour during the plague.

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  • in 1821, and, having been ordained in 1820, held successively curacies at Westwell in Kent and Ash (to the latter the rectory of Ivy Church was added in 1822).

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  • Soon afterwards Queen Anne appointed him one of her chaplains in ordinary, and in 170 9 presented him to the rectory of St James's, Westminster.

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  • In 1838 he entered Magdalene College, Cambridge, and in 1842 he was ordained to the curacy of Eversley in Hampshire, to the rectory of which he was not long afterwards presented, and this, with short intervals, was his home for the remaining thirty-three years of his life.

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  • In 1723 he was presented to the rectory of Chelmondiston in Suffolk; but residence being insisted on, he resigned both his appointments, and on the 3rd of July 1726 opened what he called an "oratory" in Newport Market, which he licensed under the Toleration Act.

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  • The rectory of Aberdaron (on the mainland, opposite Bardsey), Penmachno and Llangwnadl(Llangwynhoedl), in Lleyn (S.

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  • Though Aberdaron rectory does not belong to the isle, the farm "Cwrt" (Court), where the abbot held his court, still goes with Bardsey, which was granted to John Wynn of Bodvel, Carnarvonshire, after the battle and partial sack of Norwich by the Puritans in the Civil War; passing through Mary Bodvel to her husband, the earl of Radnor, who sold it to Dr Wilson of York.

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  • Meanwhile he had been presented by Bishop Moore to the rectory of Drayton, near Norwich.

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  • In the same year through the influence of Bishop Moore, he obtained the rectory of St Benet's, Paul's Wharf, London.

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  • In 1776 Paley was presented to the rectory of Musgrave in Westmorland, supplemented at the end of the year by the vicarage of Dalston, and presently exchanged for that of Appleby.

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  • In 1662 he was presented to the rectory of Ashwell, Herts.

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  • He received the rudiments of an excellent education at a free school in Dublin, and afterwards spent a year or two (1751-1752) under his father's roof at Skeyton rectory, Norfolk, and elsewhere, and for a short time he had Gibbon as a fellow-pupil.

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  • In 1721 he had been given a prebend at Salisbury by Bishop Talbot, who on his translation to Durham gave Butler the living of Houghton-le-Skerne in that county, and in 1725 presented him to the wealthy rectory of Stanhope.

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  • Wykeham's first benefice was the rectory of Pulham, the richest in Norfolk, worth X53 a year, or some £1600 of our money, to which he was presented on the 30th of November 1357.

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  • On the 31st of October he was made a canon of York, and on the 15th of December provost of the fourteen prebends of Combe in Wells cathedral, while at some date unknown he obtained also prebends in Bridgenorth collegiate church and St Patrick's, Dublin, and the rectory of Menheniot in Cornwall.

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  • on the 1st of June 1378, enabling Wykeham to found "a certain college he proposed to establish for 70 poor scholars, clerks, who should live college-wise and study in grammaticals near the city of Winchester," and appropriate to it Downton rectory, one of the richest livings belonging to his bishopric. The bull says that the bishop "had, as he asserts, for several years administered the necessaries of life to scholars studying grammar in the same city."

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  • In 1830 he was presented by Bishop Sumner of Winchester to the rectory of Brightstone in the Isle of Wight.

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  • In November 1839 he was installed archdeacon of Surrey, in August 1840 was collated canon of Winchester and in October he accepted the rectory of Alverstoke.

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  • In 1827 Rose was collated to the prebend of Middleton; in 1830 he accepted the rectory of Hadleigh, Suffolk, and in 1833 that of Fairsted, Essex, and in 1835 the perpetual curacy of St Thomas's, Southwark.

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  • Out of a conference at his rectory in Hadleigh came the Association of Friends of the Church, formed by R.

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  • In the latter year he was appointed to the vicarage of Easton Maudit, Northamptonshire, and three years later was instituted to the rectory of Wilby in the same county, benefices which he retained until 1782.

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  • Returning to England towards the close of Queen Mary's reign, he was invested by his mother's uncle, Tunstall, bishop of Durham, with the archdeaconry of Durham, to which the rectory of Easington was annexed.

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  • With bitter indignation Swift denounced the simony and threw up his chaplaincy, but he was ultimately reconciled to Berkeley by the presentation to the rectory of Agher in Meath with the united vicarages of Laracor and Rathbeggan, to which was added the prebend of Dunlavin in St Patrick's - the total value being about 230 a year.

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  • His early observations were made at the rectory of Wanstead in Essex, under the tutelage of his uncle, the Rev. James Pound (1669-1724), himself a skilled astronomer, and he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on the 6th of November 1718.

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  • In 1840 Bishop Blomfield of London appointed him his examining chaplain and presented him to the rectory of Launton, Oxfordshire, which he resigned in 1850 on becoming a Roman Catholic. Allies was appointed secretary to the Catholic poor school committee in 1853, a position which he occupied till 1890.

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  • Collier (afterwards Lord Monkswell, q.v.), the Ewelme rectory case,' the significant Odo Russell (Lord Ampthill) episode (to help the government out of a scrape the ambassador was accused of exceeding his instructions) - told yet more.

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  • A few monks were granted pensions, and the abbot was endowed with the profits of the rectory of Dalton, valued at £33, 6s.

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  • In 1862 he broke up his school, and removed to the rectory of Winterborne Came, to which he was presented by his old friend, Captain Seymour Dawson Darner.

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  • Immediately on the expiration of his sentence (13th April 1713) he was instituted to the valuable rectory of St Andrew's, Holborn, by the new Tory ministry, who despised the author of the sermons, although they dreaded his influence over the mob.

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  • Cotton to the rectory of Ashley in Staffordshire, where he remained until June, 1642, when he went to London, probably to superintend the publication of his next work, A Few and New Observations upon the Book of Genesis: the most of them certain; the rest, probable; all, harmless, strange and rarely heard of before, which appeared at London in that year.

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  • In 1643 Lightfoot published A Handful of Gleanings out of the Book of Exodus, and in the same year he was made master of Catharine Hall by the parliamentary visitors of Cambridge, and also, on the recommendation of the Assembly, was promoted to the rectory of Much Munden in Hertfordshire; both appointments he retained until his death.

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  • In 1654 Lightfoot had been chosen vice-chancellor of the university of Cambridge, but continued to reside by preference at Munden, in the rectory of which, as well as in the mastership of Catharine Hall, he was confirmed at the Restoration.

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  • WILLIAM COWPER (1731-1800), English poet, was born in the rectory (now rebuilt) of Great Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire, on the 26th of November (O.S.

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  • MATTHEW POOLE (1624-1679), English Nonconformist theologian, was born at York, educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and from 1649 till the passing of the Act of Uniformity (1662) held the rectory of St Michael le Querne, London.

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  • He already held the nonresident rectory of Dennington, Suffolk, and the vicarage of St Dunstan's, Stepney, and was now collated rector of Thurning, Hunts.

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  • It was in his rectory house at Hadleigh, Suffolk, that a meeting of High Church clergymen was held, 25th to 29th of July (Newman was not present), at which it was resolved to fight for "the apostolical succession and the integrity of the Prayer-Book."

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  • advowson of the rectory has belonged to the Waldegrave family from Henry the Eight's reign to the present time.

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  • biographer records that the Old Rectory, owned by Rev Edwin Luard, was Georgian with a separate wing known as The Glebe.

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  • Burnham Market Burnham Rectory was the reputed birthplace of Admiral Lord Nelson.

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  • There is a list of winners in the porch - please pick up prizes from the Sacristy or Rectory and present counterfoils.

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  • Unfortunately, Nelsons birthplace was demolished just after his father's death and replaced by the present rectory.

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  • father's death and replaced by the present rectory.

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  • gazebo built into the wall of the Rectory garden.

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  • Camomile The Old Rectory Ruan Lanihorne A gorgeous, stylishly furnished, luxury ground floor self catering apartment.

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  • hustled off to be plied with sherry at the local rectory.

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  • impropriate rectory.

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  • The rectory gate house could have been demolished at the time the new mermaid was built.

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  • A recent musical evening at the Rectory, Opera to Broadway, included the percussionist Evelyn Glennie.

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  • The Borley Rectory affair ensured that the participants were given historical permanence by accident.

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  • He was also presented to the Rectory of Alton, and became a prebendary of Winchester.

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  • e.g. double-clicking directory rectory r will give you: The directories inside r correspond to the first two letters of user names.

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  • The rectory house was considerably enlarged by the present rector in 1845.

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  • Please contact Canon Michael or ring the rectory for more information.

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  • Newman, who held the rectory 45 years, and died in 1837.

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  • rectory valued in the King's Book at £ 7 7s.

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  • rectory in the diocese of Ripon.

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  • rectory in the patronage of the Duke of Cornwall; and the tithes are commuted at £ 250.

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  • There are case studies from people who have renovated everything from a working windmill to a Georgian rectory.

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  • The fine example of a Victorian rectory dated 1876 stands in secluded grounds with mature trees which provide a haven for wildlife.

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  • The property was the former rectory to North Walsham Parish Church.

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  • See the sign to the plaque in the wall where the old rectory stood.

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  • The present rectory was built by the late Canon Sir John Hobart Culme Seymour, who was rector from 1830 to 1880.

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  • Borley's new rectory was built on the very spot where an old mansion had once stood.

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  • rectory manor of Penistone which he bestowed on Godfrey.

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  • rectory cottage is en route for the Cambrian Way and the Marches Way.

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  • rectory garden used to be.

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  • rectory gate house could have been demolished at the time the new Mermaid was built.

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  • rectory farm is a large thatched farmhouse at the bottom of the street on the right hand side.

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  • rectory ground on August 23rd.

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  • The parish church of Hackney was a sinecure rectory, (fn.

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  • Antique lovers will feel at home at Egerton Gray, a former 17th century rectory.

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  • sinecure rectory, (fn.

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  • He had received tonsure but was only in his fifteenth year; he was instituted to the rectory in 1308 while still a minor.

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  • Being admitted to holy orders, he left the university about 1603, and was presented to the rectory of Aldbury, near Guildford in Surrey; and about 1628 he was appointed by the earl of Arundel to instruct his son in mathematics.

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  • In his thirty-third year he had already become renowned for the obstinate zeal with which he supported the falling dynasty of the Stuarts, and was rewarded for his services with the prebend and rectory of Cudworth, with the chapel of Knowle annexed, in Somersetshire.

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  • He was often in pecuniary difficulties, from which at last he was obliged to free himself by selling the reversion of Langford rectory to Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

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  • Please contact Canon Michael or ring the Rectory for more information.

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  • The benefice is a rectory valued in the King 's Book at £ 7 7s.

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  • The living is a rectory in the diocese of Ripon.

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  • The Living is a rectory in the patronage of the Duke of Cornwall; and the tithes are commuted at £ 250.

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  • The fine example of a Victorian Rectory dated 1876 stands in secluded grounds with mature trees which provide a haven for wildlife.

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  • The property was the former Rectory to North Walsham Parish Church.

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  • Borley 's new rectory was built on the very spot where an old mansion had once stood.

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  • He became very wealthy and bought the rectory manor of Penistone which he bestowed on Godfrey.

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  • Rectory Cottage is en route for the Cambrian Way and the Marches Way.

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  • New houses now stand where the rectory garden used to be.

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  • Rectory Farm is a large thatched farmhouse at the bottom of the street on the right hand side.

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  • In 1643 he was presented to the rectory of Overstone, Northamptonshire, by Charles I.

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  • to the rectory of Fobbing in Essex, and in 1673 he was presented by Bishop Sheldon to the rectory of Laindon in the same county.

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  • Ordained about that time, he was named chaplain to Richard Cox, then bishop of Ely, and in 1575 was presented to the rectory of Teversham in Cambridgeshire.

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  • The next year he was one of the preachers to the university, and in 1584 was presented to the rectory of St Andrew's, Holborn.

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  • Before 1415 he was instituted to the rectory of Boston in Lincolnshire, and in 1420 he was consecrated bishop of Lincoln.

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  • St Michael's church is a cruciform Early English and Decorated building, with a picturesque embattled rectory adjoining.

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  • One-half of the town is glebe belonging to the rectory.

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  • In the controversy between Walter Travers and Richard Hooker he interposed by prohibiting the preaching cf the former; and he moreover presented Hooker with the rectory of Boscombe in Wiltshire, in order to afford him more leisure to complete his Ecclesiastical Polity, a work which, however, cannot be said to represent either Whitgift's theological or his ecclesiastical standpoint.

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  • He was educated at private schools and at King's College, London, after his father's promotion to the rectory of St Luke's, Chelsea.

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  • The Horticultural Society 's annual show is held in the Rectory ground on August 23rd.

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  • The parish church of Hackney was a sinecure rectory, ( fn.

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  • Antique lovers will feel at home at Egerton Gray, a former 17th century Rectory.

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  • Borley Rectory: This is a famous haunted house in England that once bore the title of "Most Haunted House in England".

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  • In 1724 he became rector of Houghton-leSpring, Durham, resigning in 1727 on his appointment to the rectory of Ryton, Durham, and to a canonry of Durham.

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  • In 1722 he was presented to the rectory of Ludgvan, and in 173 2 he obtained in addition the vicarage of St Just, his native parish.

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  • After two years in Oxford, he was presented, in March 1638, by Juxon, bishop of London, to the rectory of Uppingham, in Rutlandshire.

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  • In 1768 he became vicar of South Mimms near Barnet; and in November 1769 he was presented to the rectory of Tewkesbury, with which he held also the vicarage of Longdon in Worcestershire.

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  • About this time he was presented to the rectory of Campsie by his uncle James Beaton, then archbishop of Glasgow.

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  • The poet's grandfather, George Tennyson, M.P., had disinherited the poet's father, who was settled hard by in the rectory of Somersby, in favour of the younger son, Charles Tennyson D'Eyncourt.

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  • ARTHUR COLLIER (1680-1732), English philosopher, was born at the rectory of Steeple Langford, Wiltshire, on the 12th of October 1680.

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  • gave him in 1623 the sinecure lay rectory of Whitford, Flintshire, worth 120 a year.

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  • His eldest son (Edmund), known as "the younger," was educated at Cambridge, and was ejected from the rectory of Moreton, Essex, in 1662.

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  • and was for two years tutor, after which he held from 1701 to 1711 the lectureship of St Mildred in the Poultry, and along with it from 1704 the rectory of St Peter-le-Poer, London.

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  • In 1710 he was presented by a private patron to the rectory of Streatham in Surrey.

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  • For this purpose he repaired to the Rectory, Wanstead, then the residence of Mrs Pound, the widow of his uncle James Pound, with whom he had made many observations of the heavenly bodies.

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  • On the 23rd of March 16 to he exchanged Lewisham for the rectory of Great Chart, Kent.

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  • Having taken orders in 1560, he became in the same year chaplain to Richard Cox, bishop of Ely, who collated him to the rectory of Teversham, Cambridgeshire.

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