Rector sentence example

rector
  • He became rector of St James's, Westminster, in 1733, and bishop of Bristol in 1735.
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  • In 1872 he became docent, and in 1882 professor of political economy at Upsala, of which university he was afterwards rector.
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  • He took part in founding the university of Halle (1694), where he became second and then first professor of law and rector of the university.
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  • The leading Peruvian authors on constitutional and legal subjects are Dr Jose Santistevan, who has published volumes on civil and criminal law; Luis Felipe Villaran (subsequently rector of the university at Lima), author of a work on constitutional right; Dr Francisco Garcia Calderon (once president of Peru), author of a dictionary of Peruvian legislation, in two volumes; Dr Francisco Xavier Mariategui, one of the fathers of Peruvian independence; and Dr Francisco de Paula Vigil (1792-1875), orator and statesman as well as author, whose work, Defensa de los gobiernos, is a noble and enlightened statement of the case for civil governments against the pretensions of the court of Rome.
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  • In 1882 he became professor of theology at Erlangen, and in 1889 proceeded to Leipzig, where he was professor until 1898, and then for a year rector of the university.
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  • He failed in this, but was made rector of the English college at Rome in 1597, and died there on the 18th of April 1610 Parsons was the author of over 30 polemical writings, mostly tracts.
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  • Another daughter married the Rev. Harry Drew, rector of Hawarden.
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  • One of his most intimate friends was William Stukeley (1687-1765) with whom he studied anatomy, chemistry, &c. In1708-1709Hales was presented to the perpetual curacy of Teddington in Middlesex, where he remained all his life, notwithstanding that he was subsequently appointed rector of Porlock in Somerset, and later of Faringdon in Hampshire.
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  • This latter great event is described by him in a letter to Thomas Hartley, rector of Winwick, as "the opening of his spiritual sight," "the manifestation of the Lord to him in person," "his introduction into the spiritual world."
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  • The local Diet, of which the two Roman Catholic bishops and the rector of the university of Graz are members ex officio, is composed of 63 members, while Styria sends 27 deputies to the Reichsrat at Vienna.
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  • Having entered the Society of Jesus in 1586, he was successively professor of philosophy at Douai and rector of the Jesuit College at Antwerp. He wrote a treatise on optics in six books (Antwerp, 1613), notable for containing the principles of stereographic projection.
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  • Quickly attaining a prominent position among the Frankish nobles, he appears as rector of the abbey of Marmoutier in 852, and as one of Charles the Bald's missi dominici, in 853; but soon afterwards he was among those who rebelled against Charles, and invited the king's halfbrother, Louis the German, to invade West Francia.
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  • Melanchthon gave him (1547) an introduction to his son-in-law, Georg Sabinus, at Konigsberg, where he was tutor to some Polish youths, and rector (1548) of the Kneiphof school.
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  • Oxford, Edinburgh and Glasgow gave him honorary degrees; the two Scottish universities made him lord rector.
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  • This improvement was first proposed by Rabbi Samuel, rector of the Jewish school of Sora in Mesopotamia, and was finally accomplished in the year 360 of our era by Rabbi Hillel, who introduced that form of the year which the Jews at present follow, and which, they say, is to endure till the coming of the Messiah.
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  • He was once made rector of his university, and had other distinctions bestowed on him.
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  • Locally it is ruled by an Imperial governor (the Statthalter) who resides at Innsbruck, where, too, meets annually the local legislature or Diet (the Landtag), composed (according to the constitution of 1861) of 68 members; the archbishop of Salzburg, the bishops of Trent and Brixen, and the rector of the university of Innsbruck sit in person, while the great ecclesiastical corporations send four deputies, the chambers of commerce of Innsbruck, Trent and Rovereto each one, the nobles ten, the towns 13, and the peasants 34.
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  • In 1810 he was elected rector of the new university founded in the previous year.
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  • In October 1401 he was made dean of the philosophical faculty, and for the half-yearly period from October 1402 to April 1403 he held the office of rector of the university.
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  • In 1402 also he was made rector or curate (capellarius) of the Bethlehem chapel, which had in 1391 been erected and endowed by some zealous citizens of Prague for the purpose of providing good popular preaching in the Bohemian tongue.
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  • Among the first results of the changed order of things were on the one hand the election of Huss (October 1409) to be again rector of the university, but on the other hand the appointment by the archbishop of an inquisitor to inquire into charges of heretical teaching and inflammatory preaching brought against him.
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  • In 1636 he was appointed rector (or perhaps only lecturer) of Rochford in Essex, which was so unhealthy that he had soon to leave it, and in 1639 he was elected to the perpetual curacy of St Mary Aldermanbury in London, where he had a large following.
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  • But he also took a keen interest and frequently an active part in the political and social movements of the day; and so highly did the students of Aberdeen rate his practical ability, that, after his retirement from the chair of logic, they twice in succession elected him lord rector of the university, each term of office extending over three years.
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  • He was afterwards rector of Abbreochy, Loch Ness, and later held a chantry in the cathedral of Norway.
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  • In 1841 he resigned his living to become curate to Samuel Wilberforce, then rector of Alverstoke, and upon Wilberforce's promotion to the deanery of Westminster in 1845 he was presented to the rectory of Itchenstoke.
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  • From 1846 to 1855 he represented the county of Renfrew in parliament in the Conservative interest, and was lord rector of Glasgow University in 1847-1848.
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  • His father was rector of the parish: his grandfather and great-grandfather were merchants in the City of London, where their descendants for a long while continued to be influential people; his mother belonged to the family of Roundell, which had been settled for four centuries in the West Riding of Yorkshire.
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  • He gave much time and attention to his duties as chairman of the second Oxford commission under the act of 1876; in 1878 he filled the office of lord rector of the university of St Andrews; and in the following year he presided over a commission on the subject of university education in London.
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  • In 1868 he was elected rector of St Andrews University, defeating Disraeli by a majority of fourteen.
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  • After holding the living of Chigwell (1597-1605) he became chaplain to Bancroft (then bishop of London), and afterwards archdeacon of Essex (1603-1609), rector of Stisted and bishop of Chichester (1609-1619) and archbishop of York (1629).
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  • In Scotland he gave £2,000,000 in 1901 to establish a trust for providing funds for assisting education at the Scottish universities, a benefaction which led in 1906 to his being elected lord rector of Edinburgh University.
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  • His great admiration for Erasmus first led him to Greek and biblical studies, and his election in May 1519 as rector of the university was regarded as a triumph for the partisans of the New Learning.
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  • In 1637, when the doubts of Scaliger and Heinsius as to the purity of the Greek of the New Testament prompted the rector of Hamburg to introduce the study of classical authors, any reflection on the style of the Greek Testament was bitterly resented.
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  • The Latin grammar in use was that of the Jesuit rector of the school at Lisbon, Alvarez (1572).
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  • The living of St Gabriel he exchanged for that of St Martin, Ironmonger Lane; and, as rector of that parish, he in 1648 subscribed the Remonstrance against putting Charles I.
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  • He was rector of Scarning, Norf., from 1879 to 1911 and during most of that time he acted as chaplain in ordinary to King Edward VII.
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  • Jeffrey was twice, in 1820 and 1822, elected lord rector of the university of Glasgow.
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  • Bernard Gilpin, "the Apostle of the North," was rector of this parish from 1556 to 1583, and the founder of the grammar school.
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  • In 1815 he became rector of the university of Paris, and after the second restoration he was active on the commission of public instruction.
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  • In 1857 he became rector of Water Shelford, Buckinghamshire, and in the following year was appointed Rawlinson professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford.
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  • There was a church here at the time of the Domesday Survey, and the earliest mention of a rector is found in the year 1331-1332.
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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.
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  • In 1828 he was elected fellow of Oriel; and after a few years there as a tutor, during which he was ordained and acted as curate at Cuddesdon, he became rector of Broadwindsor, Dorset (1838).
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  • We find him rector of the university of Paris in October 1397.
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  • The hare takes readily to the water, where it swims well; an instance having been recorded in which one was observed crossing an arm of 1 Julius Hare's co-worker in this book was his brother Augustus William Hare (1792-1834), who, after a distinguished career at Oxford, was appointed rector of Alton Barnes, Wiltshire.
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  • William Mason the poet (1725-1797) was the son of a rector of the parish.
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  • Released by Queen Mary (5th of September 1553), he returned to Bonner and became prebendary of St Paul's, rector of Finchley, then of Greenford Magna, chaplain and confessor to the queen, and dean of St Paul's (loth of March 1554).
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  • At the Restoration in 1660 he was deprived, but appointed prebendary of York and rector of Cranford, Middlesex.
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  • In March 1641 he succeeded the many-sided Richard Bernard as rector of Batcomb (Somerset).
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  • Alleine continued for twenty years rector of Batcomb and was one of the two thousand ministers ejected in 1662.
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  • Returning to Spain in 1587, and placing himself at the head of the opposition to Acquaviva, Acosta was imprisoned in 1592-1593; on his submission in 1594 he became superior of the Jesuits at Valladolid, and in 1598 rector of the Jesuit college at Salamanca, where he died on the 15th of February 1600.
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  • After an absence of twenty months he returned to Scotland in November 1585, and in March 1586 resumed his lectures in St Andrews, where he continued for twenty years; he became rector of the university in 1590.
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  • He graduated in 1856 at the Biblical Institute at Concord, New Hampshire (now a part of Boston University), became a minister in the Episcopal Church in 1857, and during the next three years was a rector first at North Adams, and then at Newton Lower Falls, Mass.
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  • He was rector of the church of St John the Evangelist in New York city from 1881 to 18 99, when he resigned in consequence of being converted to Roman Catholicism.
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  • In addition to numerous monographs and valuable contributions to Winsor's Narrative and Critical History of America, he published The Pre-Columbian Discovery of America by the Northmen (1868); The Northmen in Maine (1870); The Moabite Stone (1871); The Rector of Roxburgh (1871), a novel under the nom de plume of "William Hickling"; and Verrazano the Explorer; being a Vindication of his Letter and Voyage (1880).
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  • He then became vice-rector, and afterwards rector, of the Irish National College in Rome; and during the Mazzini revolution of 1848 he was rector of the Urban College, saving the property under the protection of the American flag.
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  • What the pope actually sought to combat by his dissolution of the Roman Academy 1 Diether von Isenburg (1412-1463), second son of Count Diether of Isenburg-Biidingen; rector of the university of Erfurt, 1434; archbishop of Mainz, 1459.
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  • He was professor of classics in Trinity College, Toronto, from 1859 to 1862, when he became rector of the high school at Quebec. In 1867 he returned to Oxford, and was made vice-principal of St Mary Hall, a post which he held until 1885.
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  • He became domiciled in England in 1587-1588, leaving Holland on the discovery of his complicity in a political plot, and was appointed (1588) rector of Tattenhall, Staffordshire.
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  • He then appears to have crossed over to Italy, and taught in Padua in 1 434, being subsequently made rector of the university.
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  • He was the son of the rector of Hauxwell, Yorkshire, and was privately educated by his father.
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  • In 1861 he was elected rector of Lincoln, marrying in the same year Emilia Francis Strong (afterwards Lady Dilke).
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  • The rector contributed largely to various reviews on literary subjects, and took a considerable interest in social science, even presiding over a section at a congress in 1876.
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  • In 1694 he was rector of the university of Paris, rendering great service among other things by reviving the study of Greek.
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  • In 1859 he graduated, was ordained deacon by Bishop William Meade of Virginia, and became rector of the church of the Advent, Philadelphia.
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  • In 1860 he was ordained priest, and in 1862 became rector of the church of the Holy Trinity, Philadelphia, where he remained seven years, gaining an increasing name as preacher and patriot.
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  • In 1869 he became rector of Trinity church, Boston.
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  • The chief movers in the enterprise were the Congregationalist, David Bogue of Gosport, and the Episcopalian, Thomas Haweis, rector of Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire.
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  • His father, Samuel Seabury (1706-1764), originally a Congregationalist minister in Groton, was ordained deacon and priest in the Church of England in 1731, and was a rector in New London, Conn., from 1732 to 1743, and in Hempstead, Long Island, from 1743 until his death.
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  • The son graduated at Yale in 1748; studied theology with his father; studied medicine at Edinburgh in 1752-1753; was ordained deacon by the bishop of Lincoln and priest by the bishop of Carlisle in 1753; was missionary in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1754-1757, and was rector in Jamaica, New York, in 1757-1766; and of St.
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  • He returned to Connecticut in 1785 and made New Haven his home, becoming rector of St James's Church there.
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  • Consequently where the right of patronage (the right of the patron to present to the bishop the person whom he has nominated to become rector or vicar of the parish to the benefice of which he claims the right of advowson) remains attached to the manor, it is called an advowson appendant, and passes with the estate by inheritance The distinction between nomination to a living and presentation is to be noted.
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  • He studied at Geneva, Leyden and Paris, before becoming (1700) professor of philosophy and mathematics at the academy of Lausanne, of which he was four times rector before 1724, when the theological disputes connected with the Consensus led him to accept a chair of philosophy and mathematics at Groningen.
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  • Shortly afterwards he became curate of Cheshunt, Herts, and in June 1663, rector of Kedington, Suffolk.
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  • Enclosure Acts often gave a portion of the lands enclosed to the spiritual or lay rector and exempted the rest from tithes; and in other local acts a corn rent or yearly money payment was substituted for tithes.
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  • He was admitted a citizen, and became rector of the university, which owed to him much of its recovered strength, particularly in the theological faculty.
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  • The Rector's Palace, another noteworthy example of late Romanesque, combined with Venetian Gothic, is one of the masterpieces of Dalmatian architecture.
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  • Only patricians could hold office in the senate, grand council and lesser council, three bodies which shared the work of government with the count, or, after 1358, the rector.
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  • In 1882 he was elected lord rector of the university of Glasgow, and Dr Dale wrote of his rectorial address: "It was not the old Bright."
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  • After practising for a short time as a lawyer in the church courts, he was ordained priest, becoming rector of St Michael's church, Trongate, Glasgow, in 1465.
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  • Before 1474 he had returned to Scotland, and was made rector of the university, and official of the see of Glasgow.
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  • A small endowment was provided by the king, and the university, modelled on that of Paris and intended principally to be a school of law, soon became the most famous and popular of the Scots seats of learning, a result which was largely due to the wide experience and ripe wisdom of Elphinstone and of his friend, Hector Boece, the first rector.
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  • In 1714, when he was appointed rector of the university, he succeeded Govert Bidloo (1649-1713) in the chair of practical medicine, and in this capacity he had the merit of introducing the modern system of clinical instruction.
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  • In 1876 he was elected prebendary of St Paul's Cathedral, and he was rector of Cliffe-at-Hoo near Gravesend (1880-1889) and of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire (1889-1900).
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  • It is governed by a rector, chosen by and from nine visitors, and a board of visitors appointed by the governor and two visitors ex officio, the state superintendent of public instruction and the president of the university; and the corporate name of the university is "The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia."
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  • The corner-stone of Central College was laid in October 1817, and Jefferson, who was rector of its board of trustees, evolved a plan for its development into the university of Virginia.
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  • In 1878 he was elected Lord Rector of Aberdeen and in 1880 of Edinburgh University, where he gave an eloquent address upon Patriotism.
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  • Little is known of his personal history except that on May 14, 1619, he entered the Society of Jesus, and that ultimately he became rector of the Jesuit college at Tarazona, where he died on the 6th of December, 1658.
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  • They were largely supported by the town councils, who erected the buildings, kept them in repair, and usually paid the rector's salary.
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  • Primed with all the knowledge of the West, he returned home to seek his fortune, and, as the Orthodox monk, became one of the professors at, and subsequently rector of, the academy of Kiev.
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  • He removed in 1844 to Hildesheim, where he had been appointed rector of the seminary.
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  • In 1817 he was appointed rector of the university of Rouen, but in 1822 was removed owing to clerical influence.
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  • In 1723 he became rector of the high school at Wismar in Mecklenburg, and in 1727 professor of Hebrew and Oriental languages in the high school of his native city.
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  • The candidate first took an " oath that he had complied with all the statutable conditions, that he would give no more than the statutable fees or entertainments to the rector himself, the doctor or his fellow-students, and that he would obey the rector."
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  • Permission to print the theses is given by the rector or vice-rector after report from one or more professors, and they are then discussed publicly by the faculty and the candidate (soutenance de these).
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  • Of another church on this site Cranmer was rector after the Reformation.
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  • He was apppointed vice-rector of the English College in 1827, and rector in 1828 when not yet twenty-six years of age.
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  • In 1830 he was rector of the university; and in his speech at the tricentenary of the Augsburg Confession in that year he charged the Catholic Church with regarding the virtues of the pagan world as brilliant vices, and giving the crown of perfection to poverty, continence and obedience.
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  • The local diet, of which the archbishop of Czernowitz and the rector of the university are members ex officio, is composed of 31 members, and Bukovina sends 14 deputies to the Reichsrat at Vienna.
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  • He had been educated at Winchester, and became rector of the Jesuits' College in Goa.
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  • In 1767 he became rector of Lambeth, and took his D.D.
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  • Having studied at Herborn and Heidelberg, and travelled in Holland and England, he became rector of a school at Prerau, and after that pastor and rector of a school at Fulnek.
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  • There is no record of the first erection of a parish church, but the first known rector was appointed in 1242, and a church probably existed a century before this.
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  • He accordingly returned to India in 1640, and was elected rector, and afterwards provincial, of the Jesuits at Goa.
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  • In 1855--1859 he was assistant minister, and in1859-1862assistant rector, of Trinity Church, New York city, of which he was rector from 1862 until his death.
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  • The individual Jesuit obeyed his superior, who obeyed the rector, who obeyed the provincial, who obeyed the general, Who obeyed the pope, who took his orders straight from God Almighty.
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  • He was also rector of Otmore (or Otmoor), near Oxford, a living which involved him in a trying but successful litigation, whereof later incumbents reaped the benefit.
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  • Some time before Henry III.'s reign the baron of Newton granted to the rector of Wigan the manorial privileges.
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  • He now, it is said, applied for help to Dr Israel Tonge, rector of St Michael's in Wood Street, an honest half-crazy man, who even then was exciting people's minds by giving out quarterly "treatises in print to alarm and awake his majesty's subjects."
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  • ' Circa 1554-1616; educated at Cambridge; ordained priest 1581; vicar of Ridge, Herts, 1581; rector of Hinton St George, Somerset, 1587; eventually condemned to death at the Taunton Assizes (7th August 1615).
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  • Birch was killed on the 9th of January 1766 by a fall from his horse, and was buried in the church of St Margaret Pattens, London, of which he was then rector.
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  • Meanwhile the writings and personal example of the pious rector of Llanddowror were stirring other Welshmen in the work of revival, chief amongst them being Howell Harris of Trevecca (1713-1773), a layman of brilliant abilities but erratic temperament; and Daniel Rowland (1713-1790), curate of Llangeitho in Mid-Cardiganshire, who became in time the most eloquent and popular preacher throughout all Wales.
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  • The city is in the diocese of Upsala, but has a separate consistory, composed of the rectors of the city parishes, the president of which is the rector of St Nicholas (Storkyrka).
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  • Having studied theology at Lingen and Halle, he became successively rector of the grammar school at Mors (1793), professor of theology at Duisburg (1800), preacher at Crefeld, and afterwards at Kettwig, Consistorialrath and superintendent in Bernburg, and, after declining an invitation to the university of Bonn, pastor of the Ansgariuskirche in Bremen (1824).
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  • He married Anne Penrose, daughter of a rector of Newbury.
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  • The rector presides over the local school board, which is appointed by the church assembly (kyrkostdmman), and thus an intimate relation between the church and education has long been maintained.
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  • He was a fellow of his college, and was appointed Woodwardian professor of geology in 1762, and in 1767 rector of Thornhill in Yorkshire, where he died on the 29th of April 1793.
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  • He graduated at Mt St Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Maryland, in 1827, studied theology there, was ordained a priest in 1834, and in 1837, after two years in the college of the Propaganda at Rome, became rector of St Joseph's, New York City, a charge to which he returned in 1842 after one year's presidency of St John's College (afterwards Fordham University), Fordham, New York, then just opened.
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  • Having continued twelve years at Franeker (where he was rector in 1626), his health gave way, and he contemplated removal to New England.
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  • Mather had been acting president of Harvard College in 1681-1682, and in June 1685 he again became acting president (or rector), but still preached every Sunday in Boston and would not comply with an order of the General Court that he should reside in Cambridge.
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  • Marselius von Inghen was its first rector.
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  • He was assistant in 1828-1830 and rector in 1830-1832 of Christ church, Boston, and was bishop of New Jersey from October 1832 to his death at Burlington, New Jersey, on the 27th of April 1859.
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  • David's Theological College, Lampeter, where he gathered about him a band of earnest religious enthusiasts, known as the Lampeter Brethren, and was eventually ordained to the curacy of Charlinch in Somerset, where he had sole charge in the illness and absence of the rector, the Rev. Samuel Starkey.
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  • In the end the rector was deprived of his living and Prince's licence withdrawn, and together with a few disciples they started the Charlinch Free Church, which had a very brief existence.
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  • He was also canon of Christ Church (1770) and rector of Culham (1753), in Oxfordshire, and was subsequently presented to the living of Menheniot, Cornwall, which he was unable to visit and resigned two years before his death.
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  • Henry Dymoke was created a baronet; he was succeeded by his brother John, rector of Scrivelsby (1804-1873), whose son Henry Lionel died without issue in 1875, when the baronetcy became extinct, the estate passing to a collateral branch of the family.
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  • In 1546 he was appointed rector of the college of Meissen, where he died on the 17th of July 1571.
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  • The church of St Mary is a fine building, mainly Decorated and Perpendicular, wherein are preserved relics of John Wycliffe, who was rector here from 1374 until his death in 1384.
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  • He studied law at Oxford, but afterwards he took holy orders, and in 1609 became vicar of St Giles, Oxford, a living which he retained until he became rector of Somerton, Oxfordshire, in 1615.
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  • He held, however, the prebend of Shipton in Salisbury cathedral, and is said to have been for a short time rector of Cripplegate.
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  • In 1856 he became master of King Edward's grammar school at Lichfield, in 1858 warden and professor of classical literature and geology in Queen's College, Birmingham, in 1862 rector of Mellis, in Suffolk, and in 1867 vicar of St John's, Bethnal Green, London.
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  • Each civil or " poor law " parish was governed by the vestry and the overseers of the poor, dating from the Poor Law of 1601; the vestry, which dealt with general affairs, being presided over by the rector, and having the churchwardens as its chief officials.
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  • In 1729 he took holy orders, and, after holding two livings in Lincolnshire, was appointed rector of a parish in Bloomsbury, London.
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  • He was rector of St Paul's Boston, from 1826 to 1831, when he became professor of moral and intellectual philosophy and political economy at Union.
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  • He graduated at Union College in 1826, was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1828, was rector for several months in Saco, Maine, and in 1828-1833 was professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut.
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  • In 1833-1854 he was rector of St Peter's, Albany; in November 18J4 he was elected provincial bishop of New York in place of Benjamin Tredwell Onderdonk (1791-1861), who had been suspended, and upon Onderdonk's death he became bishop. In 1868 his diocese was divided, the new dioceses of Albany, Central New York and Long Island being separated from it.
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  • Among them were some of those men of mark who made the backbone of the American character: the sturdy Puritan, Peter Bulkeley, sometime rector of Odell in Bedfordshire, and afterward pastor of the church in the wilderness at Concord, New Hampshire; the zealous evangelist, Father Samuel Moody of Agamenticus in Maine, who pursued graceless sinners even into the alehouse; Joseph Emerson of Malden, "a heroic scholar," who prayed every night that no descendant of his might ever be rich; and William Emerson of Concord, Mass., the patriot preacher, who died while serving in the army of the Revolution.
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  • Strangers and travellers found a ready reception; and even their horses were treated with so much care that it was humorously said that, if one were turned loose in any part of the country, it would immediately make its way to the rector of Houghton.
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  • In1722-1723he was for eight months stated supply of a small Presbyterian church in New York city, which invited him to remain, but he declined the call, spent two months in study at home, and then in1724-1726was one of the two tutors at Yale, earning for himself the name of a " pillar tutor " by his steadfast loyalty to the college and its orthodox teaching at the time when Yale's rector (Cutler) and one of her tutors had gone over to the Episcopal Church.
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  • After leaving the university he was appointed vicar of Over-Whitacre, and rector of Sheldon in Warwickshire, where he wrote his famous Catechetical Lectures.
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  • From 1706 till his death in February 1730 he was rector of St Botolph-Without, Aldgate, London, being unceasingly engaged in philanthropic and literary pursuits.
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  • In the spring of 1616, Donne was presented to the living of Keyston, in Hunts., and a little later he became rector of Sevenoaks; the latter preferment he held until his death.
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  • George Crabbe, the poet, was rector from 1813 to 1831.
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  • Choosing the schoolmaster's profession, he became successively rector of the schools at Nordhausen, Tennstadt (1555), Magdeburg (1557) and Quedlinburg (1560).
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  • In 1571 he was appointed to the Raths-gymnasium at Erfurt, not as rector, but as director (Vorsteher).
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  • He was the son of Charles Gaspard de la Rive (1770-1834), who studied medicine at Edinburgh, and after practising for a few years in London, became professor of pharmaceutical chemistry at the academy of Geneva in 1802 and rector in 1823.
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  • The church of Cockayne Hatley, near Potton, is fitted with rich Flemish carved wood, mostly from the abbey of Alne near Charleroi, and dating from 1689, but brought here by a former rector early in the 19th century.
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  • A rector of the school of Laud would have held such a young man up to the whole parish as a model.
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  • His father was Gavin Lesley, rector of Kingussie.
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  • In the same year he was elected F.R.S., and made lord rector of Aberdeen University.
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  • In 1700 he became rector of St Botolph's, Aldgate, London, and in 1701 archdeacon of Huntingdon.
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  • M ` Grigor (1778-1851), the military surgeon and director-general of the Army Medical Department, who was thrice elected lord rector of the College.
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  • (2) By the general canon law the burden of repairing the nave, as well as the chancel of the church, was upon the parson or rector who collected the whole tithe.
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  • When Newton was little more than two years old his mother married Barnabas Smith, rector of North Witham.
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  • His mother's brother, William Ayscough, the rector of Burton Coggles, the next parish, was a graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge, and when he found that Newton's mind was wholly devoted to mechanical and mathematical problems, he urged upon Mrs Smith the desirability of sending her son to his own college.
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  • He was the first professor of theology at the newly founded (1477) university of Tubingen, of which he was twice rector.
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  • Entering the church in 1838, he was curate at Wylye in Wiltshire, and for a short time at Steeple Claydon in Buckinghamshire, becoming later rector of Down Hatherley in Gloucestershire, and finally (1855) vicar of Rowington in Warwickshire, and rural dean.
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  • Under the influence of John Sommer, rector of the Kolozsvar gymnasium, David (about 1572) abandoned the worship of Christ.
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  • John Norris, the metaphysical rector of Bemerton and English disciple of Malebranche,, criticized it in 1690.
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  • He became rector of Chartham, Kent, in the same year.
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  • In 1670 he became archdeacon of Canterbury, and two years after he was appointed rector of Ickham, Kent.
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  • He was rector of St John's Church, Hartford, in 1843-1854, of Grace Church, Baltimore, in 1854-1863, and of Calvary Church, New York City, in 1863.
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  • In 1887 he was transferred to Liverpool, becoming rector of Wavertree.
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  • Parson imparsonee (persona impersonata) is he that as rector is in possession of a church parochial, and of whom the church is full, whether it be presentative or impropriate (Coke upon Littleton, 300 b).
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  • The word parson is properly used only of a rector.
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  • A parson must be in holy orders; hence a lay rector could not be called a parson.
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  • Calvin's old friend, Nicolas Cop, had just been elected rector of the university and had to deliver an oration according to custom in the church of the Mathurins, on the feast of All Saints.
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  • In 1872 he was appointed canon of Canterbury, and after 1888 he was rector of All Hallows, Lombard Street.
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  • He was professor of philosophy in the university of Paris, was rector in 1327, and in 1345 was deputed to defend its interests before Philip of Valois and at Rome.
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  • He was elected fellow of Corpus Christi College in 1620; in 1633 he became chaplain to Archbishop Laud and in 1634 master of Jesus College, Cambridge, and rector of Yelverton, Somerset.
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  • He lectured on theology at the university of Erfurt, of which he was rector in 1455.
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  • In 1835, however, Sir Robert Peel made him rector of St Margaret's, Westminster, and canon of Westminster, and in 1849 he became dean of St Paul's.
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  • In later life Oxford and Cambridge gave him their doctors' degrees; and in 1897 he was made lord rector of Glasgow Crystal of Chalybite.
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  • After completing his education at Paris, Strassburg, and at Padua, where as rector of the academy he composed his celebrated work De senate romano (Venice, 1563), he returned home in 1565, one of the most consummate scholars and jurists in Europe.
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  • In 1491, Guillaume Cappel, as rector of the university of Paris, protested against a tithe which Innocent VIII.
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  • He gained considerable distinction as a lecturer, and was the first rector of the school which the Franciscans established in Oxford about 1224.
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  • He already held the nonresident rectory of Dennington, Suffolk, and the vicarage of St Dunstan's, Stepney, and was now collated rector of Thurning, Hunts.
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  • Besides the preferments above mentioned, he was rector of the gild of Jesus at St Paul's and chaplain to Henry VIII.
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  • In 1702 he was appointed rector of Wem in Shropshire, but continued to reside at Oxford, where he died on the 14th of December 1710.
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  • In 1854, at the request of the Irish bishops, Newman went to Dublin as rector of the newly-established Catholic university there.
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  • In the Roman empire, after Constantine, the title rector was borne by governors of provinces subordinate to the prefects or exarchs.
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  • Rector is also still the title of the heads of the Scottish universities (Lord Rector), who are elected for three years, and of the German universities (Rector Magnificus), in which the office is held for a year by a representative of each faculty in turn.
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  • In those German universities where the rectorship is held by the sovereign (Rector Magnificentissimus), the acting head is known as Prorector.
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  • " Rector" is also the title of the heads of Exeter and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford.
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  • As an ecclesiastical title rector was once loosely used for rulers of the Church generally, whether bishops, abbots or parish priests (see Du Cange, Rectores ecclesiarum).
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  • The ecclesiastical title rector, however, became ultimately confined in certain parts of Europe (Poland, Spain and notably England) to the office of a priest having a cure of souls.
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  • It follows that, rectories being usually richer than vicarages, the style of "rector" is in England slightly more dignified than that of "vicar."
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  • The rector, vicar or incumbent is a corporation-sole, in whom is vested the freehold of the church and churchyard, subject to the parishioners' rights of user; their rights of burial have been enlarged by various acts.
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  • Hutton, B. D. the rector, who died in 1704, and several other benefactions.
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  • Newton accepted the curacy of Olney, where he lived until 1780 when he became Rector of St Mary Woolnoth in London.
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  • The regime of the present rector being conspicuous for the liberality of the surrounding gentry.
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  • This Ewbank was successively rector of Washington and Winston, prebendary of the 12th stall, and prebendary of the 12th stall, and prebendary of Litchfield.
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  • One of their first tasks was to appoint a rector.
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  • In November 1787 Smith was elected lord rector of Glasgow.
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  • Paul McPherson became the first rector of the college from the ranks of the Scottish secular clergy.
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  • Go now and see if anybody is coming " said the rector in five minutes ' time.
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  • The former rector is either gone to a new job or moved to a retirement location.
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  • In 1822, the Rev. William Wilson, a late rector, bequeathed £ 400 three per cent.
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  • The rectory house was considerably enlarged by the present rector in 1845.
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  • Not only that, but the sisters of the previous rector were on hand, and eager to add lurid detail.
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  • He has been a professor and is past rector of Opus Dei's Santa Croce University in Rome.
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  • The present rectory was built by the late Canon Sir John Hobart Culme Seymour, who was rector from 1830 to 1880.
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  • In a lately issued ' Mathematical Gazette ' there is an interesting reminiscence of the Rector of Headley.
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  • When the railroad plan was finally abandoned the land reverted to the Rector.
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  • The son of a former Rector of Passenham, John Jenkinson was a silk mercer, linen draper and wool stapler.
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  • It bears the initials of Alexander Galloway, Rector of Kinkell Maitland Grave Methlick A fine example of an 18th century tombstone.
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  • Its rector was the Archdeacon of St Andrews who appointed a vicar to do the work of a parish priest.
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  • 1672) was rector; Richard Baxter, Sir Matthew Hale (Lord ChiefJustice), Henry Fielding the novelist and John Lindley the botanist (d.
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  • 4 In 1787 he was elected lord rector of the university of Glasgow, an honour which he received with "heartfelt joy."
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  • After attending the Latin school of his native town, Gotthold was sent in 1741 to the famous school of St Afra at Meissen, where he made such rapid progress, especially in classics and mathematics, that, towards the end of his school, career he was described by the rector as "a steed that needed double fodder."
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  • Some efforts to remedy this dark condition of things had already been made by Thomas Gouge, with the assistance of Stephen Hughes, and also by the newly founded " Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge "; but it was Griffith Jones (1683-1761), rector of Llanddowror in south Carmarthenshire, who was destined to become the true pioneer of Welsh education, religious and secular.
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  • The system of the Welsh circulating charity schools, set up by Griffith Jones, rector of Llanddowror, in the 18th century, undoubtedly gave an immense impetus to the spread of popular education in Wales, for it has been stated on good authority that about one-third of the total population was taught to read and write Welsh by means of this system.
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  • In 1748 a Protestant Episcopal Church was organized, and before and during the War of Independence its members belonged to the Loyalist party; their rector, Rev. James Nichols, was tarred and feathered by the Whigs, and Moses Dunbar, a member of the church, was hanged for treason by the Connecticut authorities.
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  • Go now and see if anybody is coming said the rector in five minutes ' time.
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  • He has been a professor and is past rector of Opus Dei 's Santa Croce University in Rome.
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  • Team rector the Rev Andrew Holliday stated we have had a gift day which received a good response and we raised £ 1,500.
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  • My grandfather was a clergyman, a Church of England rector in a parish in Norfolk.
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  • The rector of a parish has much to do.
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  • To the rector of the church, he leaves 40s.
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  • Up to the change of rector of university, we were happy in our faculty.
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  • The manorial courts are still held, and the Court Rolls are with the rector 's solicitor as steward of the manor.
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  • Just over two hundred years later, its Rector John Rodwell published the first reliable English translation of the Koran.
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  • His first important post was as procurator for the province of Austria, 1847; next year he became rector of the Jesuit college at Louvain, and, after serving as secretary to the provincials of Belgium and Austria, was elected head of the order in 1853.
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  • In 1879 and 1880 as Rector Magnificus he fought against the introduction of Czech instead of German in the Prague University.
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  • About the time of the Revolution he took orders, and was shortly afterwards made rector of St Austin's, London, and lecturer of St Dunstan's in the West.
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  • In 1640 Henderson was elected by the town council rector of Edinburgh University - an office to which he was annually re-elected till his death.
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  • He was admitted a Jesuit in 1612, and afterwards sent on mission work to Chile and Peru, where he became rector of the college of Cuenca.
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  • The members took no vows and were free to leave when they chose; but so long as they remained they were bound to observe chastity, to practise personal poverty, putting all their money and earnings into the common fund, to obey the rules of the house and the commands of the rector, and to exercise themselves in self-denial, humility and piety.
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  • The rector was chosen by the community and was not necessarily a priest, though in each house there were a few priests and clerics.
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  • It is stated that the MS. was delivered by one of the king's agents to Edward Symmons, rector of Raine, near Bocking, and that it was in the handwriting of Oudart, Sir Edward Nicholas's secretary.
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  • Robert Barclay (q.v.), a descendant of an ancient Scottish family, who had received a liberal education, principally in Paris, at the Scots College, of which his uncle was rector, joined the Quakers about 1666, and William Penn (q.v.) came to them about two years later.
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  • In 1857 he became docent in German law at Munich university, and in 1862 professor-extraordinary, but in 1863 was called to Wiirzburg to a full professorship. In 1872 he removed to the university of Konigsberg, and in 1888 settled at Breslau, becoming rector of the university in 1895.
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  • He reached the conclusion that the religious friend who directed Wesley's attention to the writings of Thomas a Kempis and Jeremy Taylor, in 1725, was Miss Betty Kirkham, whose father was rector of Stanton in Gloucestershire.
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  • Three influential people, among them the rector of Bala, agitated some of the parishioners against him, and persuaded his rector to dismiss him.
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  • By September he had crossed the Rubicon, Henry Newman (his rector at Shepton Beauchamp and Sparkford) accompanying him on a tour in Carnarvonshire.
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  • The reputation which he had gained in the physical sciences soon caused him to be raised to the position of rector of the university (for the first term of the year 1313).
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  • In 1613 he joined the Society of Jesus, and was appointed superior of the English mission at Brussels in 1616, and in 1618 rector of the English college at Rome.
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  • Having entered the church he became rector of Ripple, Worcestershire, and later of St Vedast, Foster Lane, London, and it was probably when he was chaplain to John de Vere, earl of Oxford, that he made the acquaintance of Elizabeth Woodville, afterwards the queen of Edward IV.
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  • In 1600 he was made rector of the high school at Dort, and devoted himself to philology and historical theology.
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  • Among his charges was John Parke Custis, the step-son of George Washington, with whom he began a long and intimate friendship. Returning to England, he was ordained by the bishop of London in March 1762, and at once sailed again for America, where he remained until 1775 as rector of various Virginia and Maryland parishes, including Hanover, King George's county, Virginia, and St Anne's at Annapolis, Maryland.
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  • His son, Barton Boucher (1794-1865), rector of Fonthill Bishops, Wiltshire, in 1856, was well known as the author of religious tracts, hymns and novels.
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  • Other facilities for outdoor enjoyment are provided in Hesketh Park (presented to the town by the Rev. Charles Hesketh, formerly rector of North Meols, and one of the lords of the manor), the Botanic Gardens, Kew Gardens, South Marine Park, and the Winter Gardens.
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  • He was three times elected dean of the faculty, in 1847, 1858 and 1863; and in 1861, rector magnificus.
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  • The local diet is composed of 78 members, of which the archbishop of Vienna, the bishop of St Polten and the rector of the Vienna University are members ex officio.
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  • He was lord rector of the University of Glasgow from 1868 to 1871, and later held the same office in that of Edinburgh.
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  • After the Restoration he was successively rector of Wimbush, Essex, vicar of Frome Selwood, Somersetshire, rector of Streat and Walton.
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  • In the Music Hall in George Street, Carlyle, as lord rector of the university, delivered his stimulating address on books to the students, and Gladstone addressed the electors in his Midlothian campaigns.
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  • As a corporation it consists of a chancellor, vice-chancellor, lord rector (elected by the students every three years), principal, professors, registered graduates and matriculated students.
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  • His father, the Rev. Francis Wollaston (1731-1815), rector of Chislehurst, grandson of the William Wollaston noticed above, was an enthusiastic astronomer.
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  • He was rector of Cholderton, Wiltshire, from 1875 to 1879, when he was appointed a canon of St Paul's.
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  • Trained for the scholastic profession, he was appointed assistant professor at the Academy of Paris in 1831, professor of mathematics at Lyons in 1834, rector of the Academy of Grenoble in 1835, inspector-general of studies in 1838, rector of the Academy of Dijon and honorary inspectorgeneral in 1854, retiring in 1862.
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  • Meanwhile he became archdeacon of Berkshire (1673), prebendary of Norwich, rector of St Giles's-in-theFields, and in 1681 dean of Norwich.
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  • In 1855 he refused from Lord Palmerston an office not connected with foreign affairs, was elected lord rector of Aberdeen university, and on 15th June moved a resolution in the House of Commons (defeated by a large majority) declaring that in public appointments merit had been sacrificed to private influence and an adherence to routine.
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  • In 1843 he was raised to the office of consistorial councillor, and was selected by the university to hold the office of rector, a distinction which has not since been conferred upon any theologian of the Reformed Church.
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  • He was papal rector (governor) of the March of Ancona from 1235 to 1240.
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  • After holding a school mastership and two curacies, he was made rector of St Martin's Orgar in London in 1628, where he took a leading part in the contest between the London clergy and the citizens about the city tithes, and compiled a treatise on the subject, which is printed in Brewster's Collectanea (1752).
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  • 2 He was from January 1635-1636 rector of Sandon, in Essex, where his first wife, Anne Claxton, is buried.
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  • Its present name, however, was not adopted until 1574, two years after its first secular rector had been chosen.
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  • In 1693 he was appointed rector of St James's, Westminster.
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  • The plague of 1665, carried hither from London, almost depopulated this village, and the name of the rector, William Mompesson, attracted wide notice on account of his brave attempts to combat the outbreak.
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  • His appointment as rector of a school at Buda was of no long continuance; his views excited the zeal of the Dominicans and he was thrown into prison.
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  • The term "curate" in the present day is almost exclusively used to signify a clergyman who is assistant to a rector or vicar, by whom he is employed and paid; and a clerk in deacon's orders is competent to be licensed by a bishop to the office of such assistant curate.
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  • Science and Literature.-Though the university of Cordoba is the oldest but one in South America, it has made no conspicuous contribution to Argentine literature beyond the historical works of its famous rector, Gregorio Funes (1749-1830).
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  • Gesner was then rector, an office to which Ernesti succeeded in 1734.
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  • The minority among the "nations" chose him as rector in opposition to the elected candidate, Aubri de.
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  • Through the influence of Conrad Wimpina, rector of Frankfurt, Tetzel was created D.D.
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  • In 1724 he became rector of Houghton-leSpring, Durham, resigning in 1727 on his appointment to the rectory of Ryton, Durham, and to a canonry of Durham.
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  • In 1869 he was elected chancellor of Edinburgh University, having already been rector of the university of Glasgow.
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  • His efforts were impeded by the obstruction of the clergy of Cracow, who regarded him as an adventurer; but he succeeded in reforming the university after his own mind, and was its rector for three years (1782-1785).
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  • At the university of Greifswald he gained much distinction as a humanist, and in 1504 was appointed by the abbot of the Praemonstratensian monastery at Belbuck rector of the town school at Treptow.
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  • Shortly after he settled at Laleham, he married Mary, youngest daughter of the Rev. John Penrose, rector of Fledborough, Nottinghamshire.
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  • He took orders in the Protestant Church of Ireland, and was rector of Killyleagh, Down, from 1825 till his death on the 3rd of December 1866.
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  • In 1786 he was appointed vicar of Kingston-on-Thames, and in 1788 rector of Bemerton, Wiltshire.
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  • Of their own will they devoted themselves to God, and all busied themselves in obeying their rector or his vicar....
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  • After holding minor educational posts, he obtained in 1791, through the influence of Herder, the appointment of rector of the gymnasium at Weimar, where he entered into a circle of literary men, including Wieland, Schiller, and Goethe.
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  • He was made rector of Lavenham in Suffolk in 1644; and before he received that appointment he seems to have officiated, perhaps as curate, at Sudbury.
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