Reader sentence example

reader
  • Will you be a reader, a student merely, or a seer?
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  • Ford owes his position among English dramatists to the intensity of his passion, in particular scenes and passages where the character, the author and the reader are alike lost in the situation and in the sentiment evoked by it; and this gift is a supreme dramatic gift.
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  • The literature on ants is so vast that it is only possible to refer the reader to a few of the most important works on the family.
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  • To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem.
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  • "Here I thought you were a mind reader or something!" she said.
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  • Our task is simply to furnish the general reader with an account of the types of instrumentation prevalent at various musical periods, and their relation to other branches of the art.
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  • From his youth he was diligent in his studies and a great reader, and during his college life showed a marked talent for extemporaneous speaking.
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  • " Spot " quotations, the reader will now understand, are partly nominal, and must therefore be taken as affording a general idea only of movements in the prices of cotton.
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  • It is impossible in this article to give a detailed description of the apparatus, but the reader is referred to Astron.
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  • 6 The English reader may consult - Jour.
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  • None the less, in the issue, it is the very element which goes beyond an appeal to facts - it is the depth and purity of Butler's moral nature - which fascinates the reader, and wins praise from Matthew Arnold or Goldwin Smith or even Leslie Stephen.
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  • We will now place a few of the grounds before the reader.
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  • He was a boy of a refined nature, a wide reader and an eager student.
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  • Mind reader, Dean thought, remembering his conversation with Cynthia.
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  • After flipping through a Ladies' Home Journal and read­ing the jokes in a Reader's Digest, he dug deeper into the pile.
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  • For the internal structural details of the micrometer the reader is referred to the article " Micrometer " in the 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica.
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  • 17 above, but the reader will find a detailed account of it, and of the manner in which the requisite adjustments are made, in the paper already quoted.
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  • Descartes was not in any strict sense a reader.
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  • For further details the reader is referred to Thulin's monograph, Die Etruskische Disciplin, II Die Haruspicin (Gothenburg, 1906) .
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  • ' For a more complete account of the nature of an electric wave the reader is referred to Hertz's Electric Waves, and to the article Electric Wave.
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  • The reader to whom the study is new will gain some idea of the bulk of the extant patristic literature, if we add that in Migne's collection ninety-six large volumes are occupied with the Greek fathers from Clement of Rome to John of Damascus, and seventysix with the Latin fathers from Tertullian to Gregory the Great.2 For a discussion of the more important fathers the student is referred to the articles which deal with them separately.
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  • Considerable diversity is to be noticed in details of structure within this group, and for an enumeration of all the various families which have been proposed and their distinguishing characters the reader is referred to one of the monographs mentioned below.
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  • But apart from the inevitable advances made in the course of a century during which historical research entered upon a new phase, the reader of Gibbon must be warned against one capital defect.
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  • For such the reader may consult Brand's Popular Antiquities, Hone's Every-Day Book, and Chambers's Book of Days.
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  • There is no critical edition, and the only version available for the general reader is the modernized and abridged text published by Paulin Paris in vols.
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  • With the principles of private morals he really deals only so far as is necessary to enable the reader to appreciate the impulses which have to be controlled by law.
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  • It was characteristic of the closeness with which he watched current events, and of his zeal in the cause of "lucidity," that when the Reader, an organ of science and unpartisan opinion, fell into difficulties in 1865 Mill joined with some distinguished men of science and letters in an effort to keep it afloat.
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  • His character was as transparent as his life was blameless; there are few church fathers whose biography leaves so pure an impression on the reader.
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  • The reader is referred to the article France (Law and Institutions) for the information respecting the various codes dating from this period, and to the article Concordat for the famous measure whereby Napoleon re-established official relations between the state and the church in France.
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  • If it should be objected that the wings so developed would be rudimentary, and that there would be nothing to encourage their development into perfect functional organs, we may remind the reader that we have already pointed out that imperfect wings of Exopterygota do, even at the present time under certain conditions, become perfect organs; and we may also add that there are, even among existing Endopterygota, species in which the wings are usually vestiges and yet sometimes become perfectly developed.
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  • Thus it became possible for almost any diligent reader without much chance of error to refer to its proper place nearly every bird he was likely to meet with.
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  • The definition of the Council of Trent was intended both to enforce the accepted Catholic position and to exclude the teaching of Luther, who, whilst not professing to be certain whether the "substance" of the Bread and Wine could or could not be said to remain, exclaimed against the intolerance of the Roman Catholic Church in defining the question.6 For a full and recent exposition of the Catholic teaching on Transubstantiation the reader may consult De ecclesiae sacra mentis, auctore Ludovico Billot, S.J.
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  • To the modern reader the importance of the Therapeutae, as of the Essenes, lies in the evidence they afford of the existence of the monastic system long before the Christian era.
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  • It is unnecessary here to dwell on the precautions which can only be conveniently acquired by experience; a sound appreciation of analytical methods is only possible after the reactions and characters of individual substances have been studied, and we therefore refer the reader to the articles on the particular elements and compounds for more information on this subject.
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  • Colour and Constitution.-In this article a summary of the theories which have been promoted in order to connect the colour of organic compounds with their constitution will be given, and the reader is referred to the article Colour for the physical explanation of this property, and to Vision for the physiological and psychological bearings.
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  • 24, the reader is left to recognize Enoch from his knowledge of the Biblical narrative.) In the second part of the book there is no expression of "messianic" hope; in the first part the picture of the national future agrees in general (if its expressions are to be taken literally) with that given in the book of Daniel: the Jews are to have dominion over the peoples (iii.
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  • Napoleon's short Spanish Campaign of 1809 is dealt with under Peninsular War (this article covering the campaigns in Spain, Portugal and southern France 1808-1814), and for the final drama of Waterloo the reader is referred to Waterloo Campaign.
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  • The sentimentality of her sentiment and the florid magniloquence of her style equally disgust the reader.
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  • The vascular system does not readily lend itself to morphological comparison between such widely different animals as Balanoglossus and Amphioxus, and the reader is therefore referred to the memoirs cited at the end of this article for further details.
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  • It will be a useful exercise for the reader to interpret the corresponding covariants of the general quantic, to show that some of them are simple powers or products of other covariants of lower degrees and order.
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  • Sir Henry Savile (1549-1622) thereupon appointed him in 1619 to the Savilian chair of astronomy just founded by him at Oxford; Bainbridge was incorporated of Merton College and became, in 1631 and 1635 respectively, junior and senior reader of Linacre's lectures.
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  • The freshness of the new field which was opened up to the imagination - so full of vivid lights and shadows, light-hearted fun, grinding hardship, stirring adventure, heroic action, warm friendships, bitter hatreds - was in exhilarating contrast to the world of the historical romancer and the fashionable novelist, to which the mind of the general reader was at that date given over.
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  • In that book the solution of the problem of innocent suffering lies hidden from the sufferer, even to the end, for he is not admitted with the reader to the secret of the prologue; it is the practical solution of faithfulness resting on faith which is offered to us.
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  • For the interpretation of the book in detail, the English reader will find Driver's commentary (1906) the most useful.
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  • For information as to the embryology of scorpions, the reader is referred to the works named in the bibliography below.
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  • For an account of the courtship and dancing of spiders, of their webs and floating lines, the reader is referred to the works of M'Cook (30) and the Peckhams (31), whilst an excellent account of the nests of trap-door spiders is given by Moggridge (32).
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  • Many of them are also dealt with in separate articles, to which the reader is referred.
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  • To attempt a history of the development of the various topics in this article is inappropriate, and we refer the reader to the separate articles.
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  • The enumeration of orders above given will enable the reader to form some conception of the progress of knowledge relating to the lower forms of life during the fifty odd years which intervened between Linnaeus and Lamarck.
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  • For details on the liturgical use of the Psalter in Christendom the reader may refer to Smith's Diet.
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  • But it was by his Nouveaux Dialogues des morts (1683) that Fontenelle established a genuine claim to high literary rank; and that claim was enhanced three years later by the appearance of the Entretiens sur la pluralite des mondes (1686), a work which was among the very first to illustrate the possibility of being scientific without being either uninteresting or unintelligible to the ordinary reader.
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  • Returning to Normandy he was presented to the king by Jacques of Matignon; after he had abjured Protestantism, being again presented by Philip Desportes, abbot of Tiron, as a young man without equal for knowledge and talent, he was appointed reader to the king.
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  • Referring the reader to the article Elasticity for the theoretical and to the Strength Of Materials far the practical aspects of this subject, we give here a table of the "modulus of elasticity," E (column 2), for millimetre and kilogramme.
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  • Besides the conventional use of certain signs as the indications of names of gods, countries, cities, vessels, birds, trees, &c., which, known as " determinants," are the Sumerian signs of the terms in question and were added as a guide for the reader, proper names more particularly continued to be written to a large extent in purely " ideographic " fashion.
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  • Moreover, the writer no doubt intended that his reader should take the accuracy of the prediction (?) already accomplished to be a guarantee for the accuracy of that which was still unrealized.
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  • The reader is referred to Glucose and Fructose for an account of these substances.
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  • - For more detailed information the reader is referred to the articles English Law; France: French Law and Institutions, Villenage; Manor; Scutage; Knight Service; Hide.
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  • Deflers, to whose publications the technical reader is referred.
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  • It is certain, however, that he at one time held the post of "reader" at the monastery of Royaumont (Mons Regalis), not far from Paris, on the Oise, founded by St Louis between 1228 and 1235.
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  • - For general accounts of the structure and development of the Polyzoa the reader's attention is specially directed to 12, 14, 6, 25, I, 2, 17, 26, 18, 23, 3, in the list given below; for an historical account to i; for a full bibliography of the group, to 22; for fresh-water forms, to 1-3, 7-10, 17; for an indispensable synonymic list of recent marine forms, to 15; for Entoprocta, to to, II, 24; for the classification of Gymnolaemata, to 21, 1 4, 4, 13, 20; for Palaeontology, to 27, 22.
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  • It is by sheer strength of thought, by the vigorous perspicacity with which he strikes the lines of cleavage of his subject, that he makes his way into the mind of the reader; in the presence of gifts of this power we need not quarrel with an ungainly style.
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  • For the general reader the most useful text is that of Bartsch in Deutsche Classiker des Mittelalters, as it includes notes and a glossary.
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  • - I.n - 2 asxn.-3 The I.2 I.2.3 reader is referred to the article Algebra for the proof and applications of this theorem; here we shall only treat of the history of its discovery.
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  • For further information, the reader is referred to any standard work on organic chemistry.
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  • On his return to Geneva (1783) he accepted the post of reader to the brother of his old patron, Tronchin, and occupied himself with remodelling his published work of 1780.
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  • More detail concerning skull, scales and teeth will be found in the diagnostic descriptions of the various families (vide infra); for further anatomical information the reader is referred to the article Reptiles (Anatomy).
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  • It goes to the mind of the reader through a medium of sentiment rather than of continuous thought or imaginative illustration.
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  • - For further developments of the subject we must refer the reader to the numerous excellent treatises on electrostatics now available.
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  • For fuller details and explanations of the elements of the subject, the reader must be referred to general treatises such as Baynes's Thermodynamics (Oxford), Tait's Thermodynamics (Edinburgh), Maxwell's Theory of Heat (London), Parker's Thermodynamics (Cambridge), Clausius's Mechanical Theory of Heat (translated by Browne, London), and Preston's Theory of Heat (London).
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  • Most unfortunately our English version of the romances, Malory's Morte Arthur, being derived from these later forms (though his treatment of Gawain is by no means uniformly consistent), this unfavourable aspect is that under which the hero has become known to the modern reader.
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  • The charm of Villehardouin can escape no reader; but few readers will fail to derive some additional pleasure from the two essays which SainteBeuve devoted to him, reprinted in the ninth volume of the Causeries du lundi.
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  • From it we learn that the Meturgeman, who was distinct from the reader, translated each verse of the Law into Aramaic as soon as it had been read in Hebrew: in the readings from " the Prophets " three verses might be read at a time.
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  • But the ordinary reader need not feel concern about the future victory of either theory.
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  • There is a curious affectation about his style - a falsetto note - which, notwithstanding all his efforts to please, is often irritating to the reader.
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  • Hence, probably, the wide popularity which his works enjoyed in the 18th century; and hence the agreeable feeling with which, notwithstanding all their false taste and their tiresome digressions, they impress the modern reader.
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  • For upwards of a hundred years it remained the chief source of information for the general reader, and is still not wholly obsolete.
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  • For some centuries the inhabitants of Palestine were subject to periodical attacks from the warlike inhabitants of Mesopotamia, as even the most casual reader of the Bible is aware.
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  • The reader is referred to that paper for an exhaustive history and discussion of the intrument.
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  • To the question how all matter exists in dependence on percipient mind his only reply is, "Just how my reader pleases, provided it be somehow."
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  • In 1618 he became Reader in Rhetoric, and in 1619 orator for the university.
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  • The second part of the critical apparatus was devoted to a consideration of the various readings, and here Bengel adopted the plan of stating the evidence both against and in favour of a particular reading, thus placing before the reader the materials for forming a judgment.
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  • He modestly entitled his work a Gnomon or index, his object being rather to guide the reader to ascertain the meaning for himself, than to save him from the trouble of personal investigation.
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  • For the details of the struggle the reader must refer to the articles Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Paraguay, Uruguay, Venezuela.
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  • Shield sights were introduced for disappearing mountings to admit of continuous laying for line, and a disk engraved for yards of range duly corrected for height, and called an " elevation indicator," replaced the index plate and reader.
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  • The Epistolae, which for the modern reader greatly exceed his other works in interest, have been edited by Demetriades (Vienna, 1792) and by Glukus (Venice, 1812), the Calvitii encomium by Krabinger (Stuttgart, 1834), the De providentia by Krabinger (Sulzbach, 1835), the De regno by Krabinger (Munich, 1825), and the Hymns by Flach (Tubingen, 1875).
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  • He lived, on the invitation of Dr Whistler, for a short time in 1682 at the College of Physicians, but died on the 12th of December 1685 at the house of Mr Cothorne, reader of the church of St Giles-in-the Fields.
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  • The reader will be able to make out the simultaneous motions and pressures at various points.
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  • The reader is referred to the full discussion by Helmholtz.
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  • He was all his life an omnivorous reader of the best books in very varied fields of literature, and he developed to an unusual degree the faculty of digesting and remembering what he has read.
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  • These details of his education (which, like most else that is known about him, come from his own mouth) are not only interesting in themselves, but remind the reader how, not far from the same time, Rabelais, the other leading writer of French during the Renaissance, was exercising himself, though not being exercised, in plans of education almost as fantastic. At six years old Montaigne was sent to the college de Guienne at Bordeaux, then at the height of its reputation.
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  • The book begins with a short avis (address to the reader), opening with the well-known words, "C'est icy un livre de bon foy, lecteur," and sketching in a few lively sentences the character of meditative egotism which is kept up throughout.
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  • At the beginning and end of each chapter occur puzzle-canons, wherein the primary part or parts alone are given, and the reader has to discover the canon that fixes the period and the interval at which the response is to enter.
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  • The reader, as it has been said, may think he might have done something else with advantage, but he can hardly think that he could have done this thing better.
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  • For full details on the large subject of the duties and qualifications of nurses the reader is referred to the numerous text-books and other technical authorities.
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  • In editing a father, or a classic, he had in view the practical utility of the general reader, not the accuracy required by the gild of scholars.
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  • Where Erasmus excelled was in prefaces - not philological introductions to each author, but spirited appeals to the interest of the general reader, showing how an ancient book might be made to minister to modern spiritual demands.
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  • For further details as to the development of the priestly caste and wisdom in India the reader must refer to Brahminism; here it is enough to observe that among a religious people a priesthood which forms a close and still more an hereditary corporation, and the assistance of which is indispensable in all religious acts, must rise to practical supremacy in society except under the strongest form of despotism, where the sovereign is head of the Church as well as of the state.
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  • For further details as to the history and doctrine of priesthood in Christendom the reader is referred to the article, " Priestertum: Priesterweihe in der Christlichen Kirche," in P.R.E., 3rd ed., Bd.
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  • For works relating to the Sobieskian, Saxon and Partitional periods of Polish history, the reader is referred to the bibliographical notes appended to the biographies of John III., king of Poland, Michal Czartoryski, Stanislaus II., Tadeusz Andrzej Kosciuszko, Jozef Poniatowski, and the other chief actors of these periods.
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  • The general reader will find Gaston Paris's study of the legend in Poemes et legendes du moyen age most interesting; also Joseph Bedier's popular retelling of the tale Tristan et Iseult.
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  • 1884 he was appointed reader in English law at Cambridge, and in 1888 became Downing professor of the laws of England.
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  • For the distinguishing marks of all these, the number of their genera and species, their habits and transformations and dwellings, the reader must be referred to the writings of specialists.
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  • Reimarus' posthumous attack on Christianity, a work which showed that the mere study of the New Testament is not enough to compel belief in an unwilling reader.
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  • For details the reader may refer to Diestel, Geschichte des Alten Testaments (Jena 1869), and for the final form of orthodox Protestant views to Witsius, De prophetis et prophetia.
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  • There is a short " preface to the reader " by Briggs, and a description of a triangular diagram invented by Wright for finding the proportional parts.
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  • But he hathe cutt off 4 of my figures throughout; and hathe left out my dedication, and to the reader, and two chapters the 12 and 13, in the rest he hath not varied from me at all."
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  • For more detailed information relating to Napier, Briggs and Vlacq, and the invention of logarithms, the reader is referred to the life of Briggs in Ward's Lives of the Professors of Gresham College (London, 1740); Thomas Smith's Vitae quorundam eruditissimorum et illustrium virorum (Vita Henrici Briggii) (London, 1707); Mark Napier's Memoirs of John Napier already referred to, and the same author's Naperi libri qui supersunt (1839); Hutton's History; de Morgan's article already referred to; Delambre's Histoire de l'Astronomie moderne; the report on mathematical tables in the Report of the British Association for 1873; and the Philosophical Magazine for October and December 1872 and May 1873.
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  • The second period of Oecolampadius's life opens with his return to Basel in November 1522, as vicar of St Martin's and (in 1523) reader of the Holy Scripture at the university.
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  • See " Address to the Reader."
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  • To note such chapters and places as contain matters of genealogies, or other such places not edifying, with some strike or note, that the reader may eschew them in his public reading.
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  • Truly (good Christian Reader), we neuer thought from the beginning, that we should neede to make a new Translation, nor yet to make of a bad one a good one .
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  • " They endeavoured to enable the English reader to follow the correspondences of the original with the closest exactness, to catch the solemn repetition of words and phrases, to mark the subtleties of expression, to feel even the strangeness of unusual forms of speech."
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  • It is on his skill as a reader of palimpsests that Mai's fame chiefly rests.
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  • From 1832 to 1836 Arany was a preceptor at Kis-Ujszallas and Debreczen, still a voracious reader with a wider field before him, for he had by this time taught himself French and German.
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  • But an analysis of his results leaves the reader in more perplexity than satisfaction at the kind of information imparted, and he reverts insensibly to the sources from which his instructor has himself been instructed.
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  • It admitted the stumbling-blocks which the Old Testament offers to every intelligent reader, and gave itself out as a Christianity without the Old Testament.
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  • It is the expression of the ultimate sovereignty of the people, and its existence gives to the working both of the Federal government and of the several state governments, a certain fixify and uniformity which the European, and especially the British, reader must constantly bear in mind, because under such a constitution every legislative body enjoys far scantier powers than in the United Kingdom and most European countries.
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  • But These Very Digressions' Give The Book Its Intimate And Abiding Charm; For They Keep The Reader In Close Personal Touch With Every Side Of Canadian Life, With Songs And Tales And Homely Forms Of Speech, With The Best Features Of Seigniorial Times And The Strong Guidance Of An Ardent Church, With Voyageurs, Coureurs De Bois, Indians,., Soldiers, Sailors And All The Strenuous Adventurers Of A Wild, New, Giant World.
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  • His Pelerinage Au Pays D'Evangeline (1888) Is A Splendid Defence Of The Unfortunate Acadians; And All His Books Attract The Reader By Their Charm Of Style And Personality.
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  • 5 that in 1748 he was compelled to quit Holland for Berlin, where Frederick the Great not only allowed him to practise as a physician, but appointed him court reader.
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  • The corresponding thesis of the opposite school would be that it is better to present to the reader something which the author might have written than something which he could not: or, in other words, that "stopgaps" should be preferred to debris.
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  • And the price is that the reader's perception of the signification of the word or words so wrested is dimmed and impaired, and his power of discriminating and understanding them when he meets them again is shot with doubt and error.
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  • For further details the reader should consult the special articles on these groups, to which cross-references will be found.
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  • New varieties are being constantly introduced; the reader is referred to the catalogues of nurserymen for named kinds.
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  • The latter are based upon the tables of Charles Gilpin, clerk to the Royal Society, for which the reader is referred to the Phil.
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  • However, with all the author's disclaimers, the general effect left on the reader's mind is that throughout the universe there is an unceasing change of matter and motion, that evolution is always such a change, that it begins with phenomena in the sense of physical facts, gradually issues in life and consciousness, and ends with phenomena in the sense of subjective affections of consciousness.
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  • Lastly, when a theory of the world supposes a noumenal power, a resistent and persistent force, which results in an evolution, defined as an integration of matter and a dissipation of motion, which having resulted in inorganic nature and organic nature, further results without break in consciousness, reason, society and morals, then such a theory will be construed as materialistically as that of Haeckel by the reader, whatever the intention of the author.
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  • For some time before 341 he worked as a lector (reader of the Scriptures), probably among his own countrymen in Constantinople, or among those attached as foederati to the Imperial armies in Asia Minor.
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  • Into these we shall not enter, referring the reader to the Life of Faraday, by Dr Bence Jones.
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  • In 1883 he was presented to the living of Purleigh in Essex, and in 1884 was appointed university reader in ecclesiastical history.
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  • This work, containing nothing original, but giving a clear representation of Wolff's philosophy, met with great success, and the author was appointed to the office of preacher at the castle of Tubingen and of reader in the school of theology.
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  • Perhaps the most famous are a little treatise on Italian prose, and a dialogue entitled Gli Asolani, in which Platonic affection is explained and recommended in a rather longwinded fashion, to the amusement of the reader who remembers the relations of the beautiful Morosina with the author.
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  • In the present article a short account of the characters of the Dermaptera and Orthoptera is given, while for details the reader is referred to special articles on the more interesting families or groups.
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  • For the more important religious as distinguished from the military orders of knighthood or chivalry the reader is referred to the headings ST John Of Jerusalem, Knights Of; Teutonic Knights; and Templars.
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  • This was the ideal, but to give the reader a clear view of the actual features of knightly society in their contrast with that of our own day, it is necessary to bring out one or two very significant shadows.
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  • He was educated for the law, entered the Middle Temple (becoming autumn reader in 1526), was town clerk of Colchester, and was on the commission of the peace for Essex in 1521.
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  • For the results of that campaign, and for the history of Italian progress towards independence, in which Milan played a prominent part by opening the revolution of 1848, with the insurrection of the Cinque Giorvate (March 17-22), by which the Austrians were driven out; the reader is referred to the article Italy.
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  • These anomalies, however confusing to the general reader, in fact cause no appreciable trouble to important makers or users of iron and steel, beyond forming an occasional side-issue in litigation.
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  • Omission has been made of Aldo's reprints, in order that the attention of the reader might be concentrated on his labours in editing Greek classics from MSS.
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  • For the first of these the reader is referred to the article Ethics, where Theology Hume's views are placed in relation to those of his pre- and ethics.
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  • - For further information concerning the construction and employment of water motors, the reader is referred to the following papers and textbooks: - Proc. Inst.
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  • First come two lessons from the Old Testament by a reader, the whole of the Old Testament being made use of except the books of the Apocrypha.
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  • In 1578 he was called to the bar, and in the next year he was chosen reader at Lyon's Inn.
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  • In 1586 he was made recorder of Norwich, and in 1592 recorder of London, solicitor-general, and reader in the Inner Temple.
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  • But it happened that Hobbes had allowed a French acquaintance to have a private translation of his reply made by a young Englishman, who secretly took a copy of the original for himself; and now it was this unnamed purloiner who, in 1654, when Hobbes had become famous and feared, gave it to the world of his own motion, with an extravagantly laudatory epistle to the reader in its front.
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  • Its contents, as was to be expected, are of a very chaotic character - of a character so chaotic indeed that the reader is almost at the mercy of the arrangement, perforce an arbitrary arrangement, of the editors.
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  • The improvement may be discerned by a skilful critic in the Journey to the Hebrides, and in the Lives of the Poets is so obvious that it cannot escape the notice of the most careless reader.
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  • He was appointed reader in moral and metaphysical philosophy at Magdalen College in 1855, and Waynflete professor in 1859.
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  • Four years later he went to continue his studies at the university of Paris, where he became reader in canon law, and then, proceeding to Orleans, became lecturer in the university there.
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  • In view of this difference it was agreed that each should speak on his own individual responsibility in the paper, appending his initial to each of his articles for the information of the reader.
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  • Apocrypha; but many more are due perhaps to misconceptions such as only a listener (not the reader of a book) could fall into.
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  • An unprejudiced and critical reader will certainly find very few passages where his aesthetic susceptibilities are thoroughly satisfied.
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  • On the whole, while many parts of the Koran undoubtedly have considerable rhetorical power, even over an unbelieving stylistic reader, the book, aesthetically considered, is by Weak- no means a first-rate performance.
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  • Among the revelations put forth in Mecca there is a considerable number of (for the most part) short suras, which strike every attentive reader as being the oldest.
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  • Although a picture sign may at times have embarrassed the skilled native reader by offering a choice of fixed values or functions, it was never intended to convey merely an idea, so as to leave to him the task of putting the idea into his own words.
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  • In some of his books he reminds the reader of Turgeniev.
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  • - The reader will find in the following works details of the subject and references to the literature: Bentham and Hooker, Genera Plantarum (London, 1862-1883); Eichler, Bluthendiagramme (Leipzig, 1875-1878); Engler and Prantl, Die naturlichen Pflanzenfamilien (Leipzig, 1887-1899) Engler, Syllabus der Pflanzenfamilien, 3rd ed.
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  • These disposed of, he amused himself for a couple of hours with literary work; between six and seven he would converse with his friends or listen to his reader (a post held for some time by La Mettrie); at seven there was a concert; and at half-past eight he sat down to supper, which might go on till midnight.
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  • From what has been already stated, the reader will perceive that Justinian did not, according to a strict use of terms, codify the Roman law.
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  • 15, we simply read of "the testimony" inscribed on the tables, and it seems to be assumed that its contents must be already known to the reader.
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  • It is clear to any reader of Ferrerius, Lesley and Buchanan that they all drew from a common source, now unknown, and this source may well have been a chronicle inspired by James's enemies.
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  • An estimate of the writings of individual authors will be found in separate articles, to which the reader is, in each case, referred.
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  • The " Scottish prejudice " which Burns tells us was " poured " into his veins from the Wallace is not obvious to the dispassionate reader of the Brus.
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  • In depth of philosophic insight, in the method of Socratic questioning often adopted, in the earnest and elevated tone of the whole, in the evidence they afford of the most cultured thought of the day, these dialogues constantly remind the reader of the dialogues of Plato.
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  • At Lafayette he introduced the first carefully scientific study of English in any American college, and in 1870 published A Comparative Grammar of the AngloSaxon Language, in which its Forms are Illustrated by Those of the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Gothic, Old Saxon, Old Friesic, Old Norse and Old High German, and An Anglo-Saxon Reader; he was editor of the "Douglass Series of Christian Greek and Latin Classics," to which he contributed Latin Hymns (1874); he was chairman of the Commission of the State of Pennsylvania on Amended Orthography; and was consulting editor of the Standard Dictionary, and in 1879-1882 was director of the American readers for the Philological Society's (New Oxford) Dictionary.
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  • In 1887 he became university reader in ancient history, and two years later was elected to.
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  • The spirit of beauty breathes in every line; a sense of music and of colour is everywhere abundant; the reader moves, as it were, under a canopy of apple-blossom, over a flower-starred turf, to the faint harmony of virginals.
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  • He became reader in chemistry at Oxford in 1801, and in 1803 was elected the first Aldrichian professor of chemistry.
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  • Bearing in mind the details already given as to the dates of Fra Giovanni's sojournings in various localities, the reader will be able to trace approximately the sequence of the works which we now proceed to name as among his most important productions.
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  • To the modern reader, who may well be impressed b y Goethe's extraordinary receptivity, it may seem strange that his interests in Italy were so limited; for, after all, he saw comparatively little of the art treasures of Italy.
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  • But in 1798 appeared Hermann and Dorothea, one of Goethe's most perfect poems. It is indeed remarkable - when we consider by how much reflection and theoretic discussion the composition of the poem was preceded and accompanied - that it should make upon the reader so simple and "naive" an impression; in this respect it is the triumph of an art that conceals art.
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  • The humanist Vives was brought from Italy to teach Latin, and the reader in theology was instructed to follow the Greek and Latin Fathers rather than the scholastic commentaries.
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  • In the present state of biblical historical criticism this plan seemed more advisable than any attempt to reconstruct the history; the necessity for some reconstruction will, however, be clear to the reader on the grounds of both the internal intricacies and the external evidence.
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  • For the details of Plato's critique the reader should go not to the summaries of commentators, but to the dialogues themselves.
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  • He was a wide reader, but a somewhat indifferent student, graduating at Harvard without special honours in 1838.
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  • Both are abundantly illustrated in most popular works on astronomy, and it seems sufficient to refer the reader to the original descriptions.2 We pass, therefore, directly to the equatorial telescope, the instrument par excellence of the modern extra-meridian astronomer.
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  • To a reader not acquainted with the peculiar nature of the man, which led him to regard what commended itself to him as therefore objectively true, they must be, moreover, entirely unintelligible and, from their peculiar, pietistic tone and scriptural jargon, probably offensive.
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  • Fleury's evident intention was to write a history of the church for all classes of society; but at the time in which his great work appeared it was less religion than theology that absorbed the attention of the clergy and the educated public; and his work accordingly appealed to the student rather than to the popular reader, dwelling as it does very particularly on questions of doctrine, of discipline, of supremacy, and of rivalry between the priesthood and the imperial power.
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  • In 1872 he accepted a fellowship and lectureship at Emmanuel College; in 1878 he was made Hulsean professor of divinity, and in 1887 Lady Margaret reader in divinity.
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  • He indulged in the more violent invective, which, though shocking to a modern reader, e.g.
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  • For (3) (a) we are constrained to refer the reader to Joly's own Manual of Quaternions (1905).
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  • 137, who includes, for purposes of comparison, as the reader should be warned, some specimens of the unfortunately numerous class of forged inscriptions.
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  • The mother-idea of his poems, he says, is democracy, and democracy "carried far beyond politics into the region of taste, the standards of manners and beauty, and even into philosophy and theology" His Leaves certainly radiates democracy as no other modern literary work does, and brings the reader into intimate and enlarged relations with fundamental human qualities - with sex, manly love, charity, faith, self-esteem, candour, purity of body, sanity of mind.
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  • But the reader who cares to have an opinion about Sterne should hesitate till he has read and re-read in various moods considerable portions of Sterne's own writing.
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  • The preceding enumeration will have prepared the reader to view the great plague of1664-1665in its true relation to others, and not as an isolated phenomenon.
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  • He was also preacher at the Rolls Chapel and reader at the Temple.
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  • (For accounts of the organization of the Roman Curia the reader is referred to the articles Cardinal and Curia Romana.) The characteristic note of the Roman Curia is its intense conservatism and its slowness to move, whether in approving or condemning new developments of opinion or action.
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  • In others there are imperfections in rhythm, conventionalities of language, obscurities or over-subtleties of thought, which mar the reader's enjoyment.
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  • Yet even the most defective poems commonly have, at least, a single verse, expressing some profound thought or tender shade of feeling, for which the sympathetic reader willingly pardons artistic imperfections in the rest.
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  • His education was only elementary and very defective, except in mathematics, in which he was largely self-taught; and although at his death he left a considerable library, he was never an assiduous reader.
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  • In addition to the minister, who is its most definite figure and proved to be the most permanent, it recognizes the superintendent, the lay elder and the reader.
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  • The reader was to conduct service when no minister was available, reading the Scriptures and the Common Prayer.
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  • Neither superintendent nor reader now appears; all the functions of bishops and superintendents are vested in the elderships, or church courts, and it is urged that the parts which still remain in Scotland of the old system should be cleared away and the sole jurisdiction of the kirk, as then constituted, recognized.
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  • - For the earlier history of the kirk the outstanding authorities are the histories of Knox, Calderwood, Baillie's Letters, and Wodrow's History: Knox's liturgy has been edited by Dr Sprott, and on the Westminster Standards the reader may consult Dr Mitchell's Minutes of the Westminster Assembly, and Baird lectures on the same subject.
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  • For a very full list of the papers and works of these early electrical philosophers, the reader is referred to the bibliography on Electricity in Dr Thomas Young's Natural Philosophy, vol.
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  • We must refer the reader for further information to his monumental work entitled Experimental Researches on Electricity, in three volumes, reprinted from the Phil.
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  • No modern reader can endure to toil through the Intellectual System; its only interest is the light it throws upon the state of religious thought.
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  • " addition ") and the Midrashim, and since all these, together with the Targumim, represent the orthodox Rabbinical literature connecting the Old Testament with medieval and modern Judaism, the reader should also consult the articles Jews (parts ii.
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  • It appals the reader with its irregularity of treatment, its variations of style, and its abrupt transitions from the spiritual to the crude and trivial, and from superstition to the purest insight.
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  • There the reader will find the most solid results of recent anthropological research.
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  • If the reader wish to keep pace with the output of literature on this vast subject, he will find L'Annee sociologique (1896 onwards) a wonderfully complete bibliographical guide.
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  • Finally let it be repeated that there is offered here no more than an introductory course of standard authorities suitable for the English reader.
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  • The thesis is less interesting to a modern reader - because now generally acknowledged - than the argument by which it is supported.
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  • Aphraates impresses a reader favourably by his moral earnestness, his guilelessness, his moderation in controversy, the simplicity of his style and language, his saturation with the ideas and words of Scripture.
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  • For an exhaustive summary of all that has been written on the subject the reader may consult Bd.
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  • The reader of the khutba is also called khatib.
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  • Reitor, depict country life and scenery with loving sympathy, and hold the reader by the charm of the characters, but Diniz is a rather subjective monotonous writer who lacks the power to analyse, and he is no psychologist.
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  • Of the Taj as a whole Lord Roberts says in his Forty Years in India:- " Neither words nor pencil could give to the most imaginative reader the slightest idea of the all-satisfying beauty and purity of this glorious conception.
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  • At any rate, in passing from Rutilius to Sidonius no reader can fail to feel that he has left the region of Latin poetry for the region of Latin verse.
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  • For the other names by which it is referred to, such as The Apocalypse of Moses, The Testament of Moses, The Book of Adam's Daughters and the Life of Adam, the reader may consult Charles's The Book of Jubilees, pp. xvii.-xx.
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  • In 1639, in the epistle to the reader of his most noticeable book historically, his Triall of our Church-Forsakers, he tells us, "I have lived now, by God's gratious dispensation, above fifty years, and in the place of my allotment two and twenty full."
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  • The reader will find full illustrations of the different styles in Bouet's Breiz-izel, ou vie des Bretons de l'Armorique (1844).
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  • In 1564 a new and enlarged edition was printed in Edinburgh, and the Assembly ordered that "every Minister, exhorter and reader" should have a copy and use the Order contained therein not only for marriage and the sacraments but also "in Prayer," thus ousting the hitherto permissible use of the Second Book of Edward VI.
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  • The Bohmerwald, which, like its parallel range, the 1 As a guide to the English-speaking reader, the following notes on the pronunciation of Bohemian names are appended.
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  • 3 It may further be conjectured that the epistle does not lie before the modern reader in the precise shape in which it left Paul and his amanuensis at Corinth.
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  • Early study and travel had indeed furnished him with abundant material for rhetorical illustration; and he was also a great reader of newspapers, but he used to say that he knew in his whole life but one thing thoroughly, namely, the history of the English Civil War, and there were few occasions when he could not draw from it the needful illustration.
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  • The reader must, however, be on his guard against confusing the authenticity of the fifth book generally with that of supposed early copies of it.
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  • Everywhere the author lays stress on the excellence of "Pantagruelism," and the reader who is himself a Pantagruelist (it is perfectly idle for any other to attempt the book) soon discovers what this means.
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  • For a general estimate of Rabelais's literary character and influence the reader may be referred to the article French Literature.
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  • His connexion with the Temple church, in London, began in 1866, when he was appointed reader; and in 1894 he succeeded Dr Vaughan as master.
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  • For it was on the artistic rather than on the critical side of history that stress was almost universally laid in antiquity, and the thing that above all others was expected from the historian was not so much a scientific investigation and accurate exposition of the truth, as its skilful presentation in such a form as would charm and interest the reader.
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  • To appreciate them we must take them for what they are, pieces of declamation, intended either to enliven the course of the narrative, to place vividly before the reader the feelings and aims of the chief actors, or more frequently still to enforce some lesson which the author himself has at heart.
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  • To the lay reader may be recommended Ernest Renan's article, "Les congregations de auxiliis" in his Nouvelles etudes d'histoire religieuse.
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  • The economic ~ questions which attend the production of, silver and the influence which gold and silver exercise 'on prices are treated in the articles Money and Bimetallism; the reader is referred to the former article for the history of silver production and to the topographical headings for the production of specific countries.
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  • Besides those quoted in the notes, the reader may consult with advantage Du Cange's Glossarium, s.v.
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  • - For an account of the anatomy of Mytilus edulis the reader is referred to the treatise by Sabatier on that subject (Paris, 1875).
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  • He removed (1555) to Basel, where he worked as printer's reader to Johann Herbst or Oporinus.
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  • The reader has only to imagine figs.
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  • It is necessary, therefore, at this stage to direct the attention of the reader somewhat fully to the subject of flight, as witnessed in the insect, bird and bat, a knowledge of natural flight preceding, and being in some sense indispensable to, a knowledge of artificial flight.
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  • Villains, over whose fate the reader rejoices, are put down as victims of vile treason, and those who dealt with them as he would have been glad to do are subjected to horrible executions without one word of sympathy.
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  • Some of the main points it illustrates may be briefly stated here, the reader being referred for further information to Huxley's Essays.
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  • To bring this to the reader's notice, top and side views of three skulls, as placed together in the human development series in the Oxford University Museum, are represented in the plate, for the purpose of showing the great size of the orbital ridges, which the reader may contrast with his own by a touch with his fingers on his forehead.
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  • In order to put this argument clearly before the reader, a few selected implements are figured in the Plate.
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  • The minuteness of his narrative detracts from its interest; though his arrangement is generally good, here and there the reader finds the thread of a subject broken by the intrusion of incidents not immediately connected with it, and does not pick it up again without an effort.
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  • And Gardiner has the defects of his supreme qualities, of his fairness and critical ability as a judge of character; his work lacks enthusiasm, and leaves the reader cold and unmoved.
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  • In October he was appointed reader in divinity to the benchers of Lincoln's Inn.
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  • The first impression of an unbiassed reader who dips into the poems of Donne is unfavourable.
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  • It is so true, so entirely based upon the facts of human nature, that the question what particular class of persons supplied the author with his examples of folly or misdoing, however interesting to the commentator, may be neglected by the reader.
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  • Soon the irresistible charm of a book which gratified the imagination of the reader with all the action and scenery of a fairy tale, which exercised his ingenuity by setting him to discover a multitude of curious analogies, which interested his feelings for human beings, frail like himself, and struggling with temptations from within and from without, which every moment drew a smile from him by some stroke of quaint yet simple pleasantry, and nevertheless left on his mind a sentiment of reverence for God and of sympathy for man, began to produce its effect.
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  • Notwithstanding this domestic felicity, an impression is left on the reader of Corneille's biographies that he was by no means a happy man.
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  • Almost the first thing which strikes a reader is the singular inequality of this poet, and the attempts to explain this inequality, in reference to his own and other theories, leave the fact untouched.
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  • For further details of colonyformation the reader is referred to the articles Anthozoa and Hydromedusae.
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  • He held the office of Reader in Scandinavian at the university of Oxford (a post created for him) from 1884 till his death.
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  • The Arabic historians are largely occupied with fabulous matter as to Mecca before Islam; for these legends the reader may refer to C. de Perceval's Essai.
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  • 4 does not relieve the reader from any exercise of judgment, except as regards the net capacity of reservoirs when the necessary data have been obtained.
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  • He, however, resigned his ecclesiastical preferments in 1721, on his appointment to the Savilian professorship of astronomy at Oxford, while as reader on experimental philosophy (1729-1760) he delivered 79 courses of lectures in the Ashmolean museum.
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  • For further details of the structure of Actinians, the reader should consult the work of 0.
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  • Canon 18 of the Code of 1870 recognizes the offices of catechist, reader and sub-deacon (Wirzmann, The English Church and People in South Africa, p. 223 et seq.).
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  • 787, to confer the tonsure and admit to the order of reader; but gradually abbots, in the West also, advanced higher claims, until we find them in A.D.
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  • Secondly, whereas it has been argued 'above that " Opinion " is necessarily included in the system, Zeller, supposing Parmenides to deny the Nonent even as a matter of opinion, regards that part of the poem which has opinion for its subject as no more than a revised and improved statement of the views of opponents, introduced in order that the reader, having before him the false doctrine as well as the true one, may be led the more certainly to embrace the latter.
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  • Such a sketch must pass lightly over debatable ground, and must consist largely of suggestions still in need of confirmation; but if it serves as a frame into which more precise and more detailed statements may be fitted as they come to the ken of the reader, its object will be attained.
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  • At a comparatively early age he entered the church, and held for some time the office of anagnost or reader; subsequently he manifested a desire to devote himself to the secular life as a rhetorician, an impulse which was checked by the earnest remonstrances of Gregory of Nazianzus.
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  • (For the details and disputes concerning the terms of this convention the reader is referred to ~the articles TRANSvAAL and SuZERAINTY.)
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  • Richard Burke was received with many compliments, but of course nothing came of his mission, and the only impression that remains with the reader of his prolix story is his tale of the two royal brothers, who afterwards became Louis XVIII.
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  • For the distribution of the various families and genera the reader may be referred to the article Primates; and it will suffice to mention here that while chimpanzees and baboons are now restricted to Africa and (in the case of the latter group) Arabia, they formerly occurred in India.
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  • It may be added that De Morgan was a great reader and admirer of Dickens; he was also fond of music, and a fair performer on the flute.
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  • The treatment of the subject, the atmosphere which surrounds it, the delicacy in which the little prattling ways of the nuns, their jealousies, their tiny trifles, are presented, takes the reader entirely by surprise.
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  • The very first verses in the book startle the reader by their exaggerations, e.g.
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  • For the thorough study of the church of St Sophia, the reader must consult the works of Fossati, Salzenburg, Lethaby and Swainson, and Antoniadi.
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  • The legislative and statistical and especially the ritualistic parts belonging to P are so detailed and uninteresting that they make no impression on a reader's memory, and P's diffuseness, always undue, reaches a climax in chap. vii.
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  • The latter's elaborate plans go on the supposition that great masses of men, women and children could be moved about over the desert as easily as pawns on a chess-board; but even the greatest military leader the world has seen would have been unable to preserve such complicated formations amid the difficulties inevitable on a desert march; and the more carefully an intelligent reader has studied the details of P's plan, the more astonished will he be to read the statement in x.
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  • Once a paradox it is now commonplace, and the superabundant argument in the Letters on Toleration fatigues the modern reader.
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  • " That there are certain propositions," we find him saying, " which, though the soul from the beginning, or when a man is born, does not know, yet, by assistance from the outward senses, and the help of some previous cultivation, it may afterwards come certainly to know the truth of, is no more than what I have affirmed in my first book " (" Epistle to Reader," in second edition).
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  • At the end of this patient search among our ideas, he supposes the reader apt to complain that he has been " all this while only building a castle in the air," and to ask what the purpose of all this stir is, if we are not thereby carried beyond mere ideas.
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  • On the whole, there is probably no treatise so masterly as Aristotle's Ethics, and containing so much close and valid thought, that yet leaves on the reader's mind so strong Transi= an impression of dispersive and incomplete work.
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  • His accounts of the genesis of the conceptions of obligation and responsibility as of most of the ultimate conceptions with which moral philosophy deals will be accepted or rejected to the extent to which the main contention concerning the psychological basis of ethics commends itself to the reader.
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  • The mass of information contained in so small a space, the clearness and accuracy of the details, the immense amount of life which is breathed into the whole, astonish the reader, when he reflects that this colossal task was accomplished by one man, for his collaborator Kolsegg merely filled up his plan with regard to part of the east coast, a district with which Ari in his western home at Stad was little familiar.
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  • The reader who will trace out these successive concepts and study the results of his changing positions will readily acquire the notions which it is our subject to define.
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  • This being assumed, the hope of the writer is that the exposition will afford the student an insight into the theory which may facilitate his orientation, and convey to the general reader with a certain amount of mathematical training a clear idea of the methods by which conclusions relating to it are drawn.
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  • The non-mathematical reader may possibly be able to gain some general idea, though vague, of the significance of the subject.
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  • After being for many years a master at Rugby, he became in 1882 fellow and tutor of Corpus, Oxford; and from 1894 to 1906 was Reader in Greek in the university.
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  • Sincerity and intensity are, indeed, to the modern reader, the most obvious characteristics of Demosthenes.
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  • As the literary language of both nations is now practically the same, and is, indeed, commonly known as "SerboCroatian," the reader may be referred to the article Servia: Language and Literature, for an account of its history, of its chief literary monuments up to the 19th century and inclusive of Dalmatian literature, and of the principal differences between the dialects spoken in Servia and Croatia-Slavonia.
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  • Any careful perusal of modern attempts to recover historical facts or an historical outline from the book will show how very inadequate the material proves to be, and the reconstructions will be found to depend upon an interpretation of the narratives which is often liberal and not rarely precarious, and to imply such reshaping and rewriting of the presumed facts that the cautious reader can place little reliance on them.
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  • The reader may consult La Vasconie by Jean de Jaurgain (Paris, 1898) for the latest example of this reconstruction of ancient history from fragmentary and dubious materials.
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  • Hemihedral forms are of special importance in crystallography, to which article the reader is referred for a fuller explanation of these and other modifications of polyhedra (tetartohedral, enantiotropic, &c.).
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  • This subject is treated in the article Magneto-Optics, to which the reader is also referred for John Kerr's discovery of the effect on polarization produced by reflection from a magnetic pole, and for the action of a magnetic field on the radiation of a source - the "Zeeman effect."
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  • In addition to the above the reader may consult for the general subject of polarization the following treatises: Th.
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  • Bearing this in mind the reader will understand that so much of the natural history of the honey-bee as is necessary for elucidating the practical part of our subject may be comprised in (I) the life of the insect, (2) its mission in life, and (3) utilizing to the utmost the brief period during which it can labour before being worn out with toil.
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  • It also shows sealed honey and pollen in cells, &c. To familiarize himself with the various objects depicted, all of which are drawn from nature, will not only help the reader to understand the different phases of bee-life during the swarming season, but tend to increase the interest of beginners in the pursuit.
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  • In this article we shall consider the historical development of the geometry of conics, and refer the reader to the article Geometry: Analytical and Projective, for the special methods of investigation.
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  • For the nature and causes of the variations between different copies the reader may consult Lane, iii.
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  • Enjoying a liberal allowance, he now lived in Paris in comfort and independence, and he published his early novels, none of which is quite of sufficient value to retain the modern reader.
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  • Here again the story of the man with two brides is not new, but the three characters of the story are so dealt with that each wins the reader's sympathy.
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  • They showed the blase modern reader that a world no less poetic, no less primitive than that of the Origins of Christianity exists, or still existed within living memory, on the north-western coast of France.
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  • I'll leave judgment to the reader.
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  • As the only Oracle and soul reader in existence, she was the only one who could repair the mind of her mate's brother, the Grey God, who suffered a fate worse than death as a slave to Czerno.
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  • Andre was a mind reader.
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  • It required a diligent reader with critical understanding, unlike too many popular science books that obfuscate with over-simplification.
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  • This brutality seems rather incredulous to the modern reader.
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  • An avid reader, she also regularly indulges in retail therapy.
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  • Johnnie is a proficient reader.
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  • This size font puts a further strain on the reader.
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  • In the ensuing chapter the reader will become more fully acquainted with my fresh conquest.
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  • Acrobat Reader Down load the adobe acrobat Reader Down load the adobe acrobat reader to enable you to read PDF files.
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  • Use This link to download acrobat reader for free.
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  • If you need a copy of acrobat Reader to read this file download it (for free) from the www.adobe.com acrobat download page.
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  • They are in pdf format and so the person looking has to have adobe or similar reader.
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  • If you have problems reading the file you may need to download adobe acrobat reader.
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  • The web page provides the full report, available as a pdf file, requiring acrobat adobe reader.
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  • You should keep your reader apprised of what you are up to.
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  • The layout of the book takes the reader through the basic requirements of successfully maintaining aquatic and semi aquatic Chelonia in captivity.
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  • The reader has to carry out " information archeology " using the few bricks that remain from the building.
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  • Information: A reader succeeded in reducing her atrial arrhythmia by using natural progesterone cream.
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  • The reader may judge for himself that tho asleep in Jesus, he being dead yet speaketh.
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  • A bell to summon assistance is also located to the left of the reader entrance to the New Library.
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  • Passages of the book are occasionally repetitive, as if Hughes distrusted the reader's attention span.
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  • Because of that book i am a very avid reader.
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  • Henley, the Guardian reader, dressed like one of the smart-casual baby boomers you see at their shows, looks thoughtful.
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  • How far I succeeded I can only leave the audience or reader of Klytemnestra's bairns to judge.
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  • What are the particular challenges facing the biographer and what is the nature of his or her relationship with his/her subject and the reader?
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  • The reader is led very cleverly down a complete blind alley about halfway through.
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  • In a PDF file, Acrobat Reader can display page bookmarks in a bookmark list.
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  • Omea Reader Omea Reader is an easy to use RSS feed reader, newsgroup reader, and web bookmark manager.
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  • To watch closed captions you need to connect a caption reader to your video recorder.
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  • Meanwhile, a reader wrote and she said what could she be doing in her garden during January, silly chump.
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  • Some will say that they are just a tool to bring out the natural clairvoyance that is present in the Reader anyway.
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  • Pure Clairvoyance is what distinguishes a natural clairvoyant from a Tarot Reader!
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  • This might affect hyperstructural coherence in various ways, depending on the distinctive character of the hyperstructure and the expectations of the reader.
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  • Columbia river cruises pass holders can across a reader's.
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  • A misplaced comma or a sentence prematurely terminated can leave the reader bemused.
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  • Tell us which type of puzzle you enjoy most on our reader comments service at the foot of the page.
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  • I leave the reader to conjure up how daunting this was to two impressionable new communicants!
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  • It aims to provide the reader with guidance to encourage confidence while retaining composure and authority when dealing with difficult situations.
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  • Bob and I also concocted various reader participation stories such as " Who Killed Cockney Robin?
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  • Each card can be read in one sitting, boosting the confidence of even the most reluctant reader.
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  • The effect is to provoke deeper contemplation in the mind of the reader; language truly is endlessly complex!
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  • A deliberately conversational tone allows Tricomi to debate these ideas with the reader rather than offering prescriptive models.
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  • At the moment I am building a Morse code reader to interface to my 64K ZX-81 using a tone decoder and A/D converter.
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  • Smart card reader Some of these features are enabled by using a ` docking cradle ' provided with the base unit.
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  • The writer makes the reader wait for this, the relative clauses in commas (analyzed above) creating a crescendo.
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  • John O'Brien's ' Leaving Las Vegas ', the ending of which leaves the reader emotionally crippled?
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  • Each entry is extensively cross-referenced giving the reader seemingly unlimited avenues to explore.
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  • Here you can download the latest version of Acrobat Reader, or try the demos of our Data CD ROMs.
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  • If your page is too dense, your reader will quit out of it as soon as their eyes begin to tear.
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  • I hope the reader will pardon this digression, which is not without interest.
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  • In either case the reader is done a serious disservice.
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  • A long disuse of my native tongue will apologize to the learned reader for any inaccuracies.
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  • Hard copy & Website return to top Please note: To read PDF documents you need to install a product called Adobe Acrobat Reader.
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  • Also, and for your reader's edification, I have been writing about Aids for 15 years.
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  • Each reader is deeply engrossed in a science fiction novel.
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  • There is a space between every line of text which should help the reader to avoid eyestrain.
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  • If you wish to use the fiche it is advisable to book a reader in advance.
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  • With the integrated fingerprint reader, users encrypt files using fingerprint authentication, combining convenience with strong notebook security.
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  • This makes for very flabby, vague writing and impedes the reader's ability to understand exactly what you mean.
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  • Peterson has translated Latin terms and added copious footnotes, putting the instructions and references into context for the modern reader.
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  • These books are in PDF format, for which you need an Acrobat Reader.
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  • The .pdf file format opens in adobe acrobat reader.
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  • The reader is expected to keep far too many significant details in mind, and the narrative becomes more fragmentary, less coherent.
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  • If these explanations seem too frivolous for the reader, I can only think of one other alternative.
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  • And yet the reader is provided with a pointer in the rather fussy pun on ' odyssey ' .
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