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rashi

rashi Sentence Examples

  • Rashi was twenty-five years of age when he returned to Troyes, which town thenceforward eclipsed the cities of Lorraine and became the recognized centre of Jewish learning.

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  • Rashi was twenty-five years of age when he returned to Troyes, which town thenceforward eclipsed the cities of Lorraine and became the recognized centre of Jewish learning.

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  • The most important of them for the understanding of the gemara (Babhli) is that of Rashi 3 (Solomon ben Isaac, d.

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  • The name Jarchi, formerly used for Rashi, rests on a misunderstanding.

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  • Rashi.

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  • in 1040 at Mainz), a famous Talmudist and com mentator, his pupil Jacob ben Yaqar, and Moses of Narbonne, called ha-Darshan, the "Exegete," were the forerunners of the greatest of all Jewish commentators, Solomon ben Isaac (Rashi), who died at Troyes in 1105.

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  • Rashi was a pupil of Jacob ben Yaqar, and studied at Worms and Mainz.

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  • 1171), the grandson of Rashi, wrote the Sepher ha-yashar (hiddushin and responsa) and was one of the chief Tosaphists.

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  • about 1500) compiled his very useful commentary on the Mishnah, based on those of Rashi and Maimonides.

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  • The introduction of printing (first dated Hebrew printed book, Rashi, Reggio, 1475) gave occasion for a number of scholarly compositors and proof-readers, some of whom were also authors, such as Jacob ben Ilayyim of Tunis Later waters.

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  • Soon after Gershom's death, Rashi (1040-1106) founded at Troyes a new school of learning.

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  • If Maimonides represented Judaism on its rational side, Rashi was the expression of its traditions.

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  • He was a grandson of Rashi, but differed in his method of interpretation.

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  • Rashi >>

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  • of the Bible or important texts, and in most printed books, (b) the Rabbinic(or Rashi) character, used in commentaries and treatises of all kinds, both in MS. and in printed books, (c) the Cursive character, used in letters and for informal purposes, not as a rule printed.

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  • They may be looked upon as the last editors of the now unwieldy thesaurus; less probable is the view, often maintained since Rashi (11th century), that it was first written down in their age.4 4.

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  • To Rashi's disciples are due the Tosaphoth " additions," which, with the commentary of " the Commentator," as he was styled, are often reproduced in printed editions of the Talmud.

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  • It may strike one as characteristically Jewish that extravagant and truly oriental encomiums were passed upon such legalists and Talmudists as Isaac Alfazi, Rashi or Maimonides; none the less the medieval Jews were able to produce and appreciate excellent literature of the most varied description.

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  • RASHI (1040-1105), Jewish scholar.

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  • Rabbi Solomon IzxAQ1 (son of Isaac), usually cited as Rashi from the initials of those words, was born at Troyes in 1040 and died in the same town in 1105.

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  • In fact, Rashi never went farther than from the Seine to the Rhine; the utmost limit of his travels were the academies of Lorraine.

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  • This is shown by the glosses in Rashi's works, almost invariably in French.

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  • Within this, it is said, Rashi was wont to teach.

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  • A small edifice on the east of the synagogue is called the "Rashi Chapel," and the "Rashi Chair," raised on three steps in the niche, is one of the objects of the pious admiration of pilgrims. At Worms Rashi worked under Jacob ben Yaqar, and at Mainz under Isaac ben Judah, perhaps combining at the same time the functions of teacher and student.

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  • From these Rashi learned much, and probably he incorporated some of these notes in his own works.

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  • In the middle ages there was a communism in learning, but if Rashi used some of the stones quarried and drafted by others, it was to his genius that the finished edifice was due.

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  • Rashi acted as rabbi and judge, but received no salary.

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  • Rashi and his family worked in the vines of Troyes (in the Champagne); in his letters he describes the structure of the winepresses.

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  • The latter part of Rashi's life was saddened by the incidents connected with the first Crusade.

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  • According to legend, Rashi and Godfrey of Bouillon - of the foremost leaders of the Crusade - were intimate friends.

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  • Rashi died peacefully in Troyes in 1105.

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  • Rashi was the most conspicuous medieval representative of the Jewish spirit.

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  • A century later Maimonides was to give a new turn to Jewish thought, by the assimilation of Aristotelianism with Mosaism, but Rashi was a traditionalist pure and simple.

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  • Besides minor works, such as a recension of the Prayer-Book (Siddur), the Pardes and ha-Orah, Rashi wrote two great commentaries on which his fame securely rests.

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  • Rashi unites homily with grammatical exegesis in a manner which explains the charm of the commentary.

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  • Even more important was Rashi's commentary on the Talmud, which became so acknowledged as the definitive interpretation that Rashi is cited simply under the epithet of "the Commentator."

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  • It is no exaggeration to assert that the modern world owes its power to understand the Talmud to Rashi.

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  • He practically edited the text of the Talmud besides explaining it, and the Talmud is never printed without Rashi's commentary on the margin.

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  • An important feature of Rashi's commentaries is the frequency of French translations of words.

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  • Liber, Rashi (1906), published as a memorial of Rashi on the 800th anniversary of his death.

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  • Rashi's commentary on the Bible has been translated into Latin by Breithaupt (1710-1714); and into German (Pentateuch) by Dukes (1833-38) and others.

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  • The foundation of recent investigation into Rashi's life is Zunz's Salomon b.

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  • A critical edition of Rashi's Pentateuch commentary was published by A Berliner (2nd ed., 1905).

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  • Among his most important work was the elucidation of Old French by means of the many glosses in the medieval writings of Rashi and other French Jews.

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  • The most important of them for the understanding of the gemara (Babhli) is that of Rashi 3 (Solomon ben Isaac, d.

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  • 1104) with the Tosafoth (additions, not to be confused with the Tosefta) chiefly by the French school of rabbis following Rashi.

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  • The name Jarchi, formerly used for Rashi, rests on a misunderstanding.

    0
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  • in 1040 at Mainz), a famous Talmudist and com mentator, his pupil Jacob ben Yaqar, and Moses of Narbonne, called ha-Darshan, the "Exegete," were the forerunners of the greatest of all Jewish commentators, Solomon ben Isaac (Rashi), who died at Troyes in 1105.

    0
    0
  • Rashi was a pupil of Jacob ben Yaqar, and studied at Worms and Mainz.

    0
    0
  • Closely connected with Rashi, or of his school, are Joseph Qara, of Troyes (d.

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  • 1171), the grandson of Rashi, wrote the Sepher ha-yashar (hiddushin and responsa) and was one of the chief Tosaphists.

    0
    0
  • about 1500) compiled his very useful commentary on the Mishnah, based on those of Rashi and Maimonides.

    0
    0
  • The introduction of printing (first dated Hebrew printed book, Rashi, Reggio, 1475) gave occasion for a number of scholarly compositors and proof-readers, some of whom were also authors, such as Jacob ben Ilayyim of Tunis Later waters.

    0
    0
  • Soon after Gershom's death, Rashi (1040-1106) founded at Troyes a new school of learning.

    0
    0
  • If Maimonides represented Judaism on its rational side, Rashi was the expression of its traditions.

    0
    0
  • He was a grandson of Rashi, but differed in his method of interpretation.

    0
    0
  • of the Bible or important texts, and in most printed books, (b) the Rabbinic(or Rashi) character, used in commentaries and treatises of all kinds, both in MS. and in printed books, (c) the Cursive character, used in letters and for informal purposes, not as a rule printed.

    0
    0
  • They may be looked upon as the last editors of the now unwieldy thesaurus; less probable is the view, often maintained since Rashi (11th century), that it was first written down in their age.4 4.

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  • Solomon Izhaki of Troyes (see RAsHI); his knowledge of contemporary tradition and his valuable notes make it a new starting point in the interpretation of the Talmud.

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  • To Rashi's disciples are due the Tosaphoth " additions," which, with the commentary of " the Commentator," as he was styled, are often reproduced in printed editions of the Talmud.

    0
    0
  • It may strike one as characteristically Jewish that extravagant and truly oriental encomiums were passed upon such legalists and Talmudists as Isaac Alfazi, Rashi or Maimonides; none the less the medieval Jews were able to produce and appreciate excellent literature of the most varied description.

    0
    0
  • RASHI (1040-1105), Jewish scholar.

    0
    0
  • Rabbi Solomon IzxAQ1 (son of Isaac), usually cited as Rashi from the initials of those words, was born at Troyes in 1040 and died in the same town in 1105.

    0
    0
  • In fact, Rashi never went farther than from the Seine to the Rhine; the utmost limit of his travels were the academies of Lorraine.

    0
    0
  • This is shown by the glosses in Rashi's works, almost invariably in French.

    0
    0
  • Within this, it is said, Rashi was wont to teach.

    0
    0
  • A small edifice on the east of the synagogue is called the "Rashi Chapel," and the "Rashi Chair," raised on three steps in the niche, is one of the objects of the pious admiration of pilgrims. At Worms Rashi worked under Jacob ben Yaqar, and at Mainz under Isaac ben Judah, perhaps combining at the same time the functions of teacher and student.

    0
    0
  • From these Rashi learned much, and probably he incorporated some of these notes in his own works.

    0
    0
  • In the middle ages there was a communism in learning, but if Rashi used some of the stones quarried and drafted by others, it was to his genius that the finished edifice was due.

    0
    0
  • Rashi acted as rabbi and judge, but received no salary.

    0
    0
  • Rashi and his family worked in the vines of Troyes (in the Champagne); in his letters he describes the structure of the winepresses.

    0
    0
  • Rashi had no sons, but his three daughters were women of culture, and two of the sons of Jochebed (see Rashbam and TAM), as well as others of his descendants, carried on the family tradition for learning, adding lustre to Rashi's fame.

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  • The latter part of Rashi's life was saddened by the incidents connected with the first Crusade.

    0
    0
  • According to legend, Rashi and Godfrey of Bouillon - of the foremost leaders of the Crusade - were intimate friends.

    0
    0
  • Rashi died peacefully in Troyes in 1105.

    0
    0
  • Rashi was the most conspicuous medieval representative of the Jewish spirit.

    0
    0
  • A century later Maimonides was to give a new turn to Jewish thought, by the assimilation of Aristotelianism with Mosaism, but Rashi was a traditionalist pure and simple.

    0
    0
  • Besides minor works, such as a recension of the Prayer-Book (Siddur), the Pardes and ha-Orah, Rashi wrote two great commentaries on which his fame securely rests.

    0
    0
  • Rashi unites homily with grammatical exegesis in a manner which explains the charm of the commentary.

    0
    0
  • Even more important was Rashi's commentary on the Talmud, which became so acknowledged as the definitive interpretation that Rashi is cited simply under the epithet of "the Commentator."

    0
    0
  • It is no exaggeration to assert that the modern world owes its power to understand the Talmud to Rashi.

    0
    0
  • He practically edited the text of the Talmud besides explaining it, and the Talmud is never printed without Rashi's commentary on the margin.

    0
    0
  • An important feature of Rashi's commentaries is the frequency of French translations of words.

    0
    0
  • Liber, Rashi (1906), published as a memorial of Rashi on the 800th anniversary of his death.

    0
    0
  • Rashi's commentary on the Bible has been translated into Latin by Breithaupt (1710-1714); and into German (Pentateuch) by Dukes (1833-38) and others.

    0
    0
  • The foundation of recent investigation into Rashi's life is Zunz's Salomon b.

    0
    0
  • A critical edition of Rashi's Pentateuch commentary was published by A Berliner (2nd ed., 1905).

    0
    0
  • Among his most important work was the elucidation of Old French by means of the many glosses in the medieval writings of Rashi and other French Jews.

    0
    0
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