Range Sentence Examples

range
  • Get yourself to the range and learn to shoot.

    577
    258
  • The trio was out of camera range a few steps later.

    251
    159
  • You're out of range up here.

    173
    93
  • In the King William range is the painted hall.

    144
    118
  • At any single station potential gradient has a wide range of values.

    84
    67
  • Vegetarians can choose from a wide range of options.

    15
    5
  • Colorado boasts a range of outdoor activities, ranging from skiing and snowshoeing to rafting, hiking, climbing and biking.

    14
    4
  • Columbus also boasts a wide range of world-class steak houses.

    10
    3
  • She flinched and moved away from the window to put the pot over a fire on the range.

    8
    3
  • A putting green, driving range and nine-hole golf course are popular as well.

    7
    3
    Advertisement
  • The restaurant's menu choices range from the typical (mostly fried) appetizers, burgers and salads to a full-entree menu that includes steaks, seafood and pasta.

    8
    4
  • It is true that our best authority, Arrian, fails to substantiate the traditional view satisfactorily; on the other hand those who maintain it urge that Arrian's interests were mainly military, and that the other authorities, if inferior in trustworthiness, are completer in range of vision.

    5
    2
  • Southern Albania, again, is almost wholly mountainous, with the exception of the plains of Iannina and Arta; the most noteworthy feature is the rugged range of the Tchika, or Khimara mountains, which skirt the sea-coast from south-west to northeast, terminating in the lofty promontory of Glossa (ancient Acroceraunia).

    5
    2
  • Pennsylvania offers visitors a wide range of outdoor activities.

    6
    3
  • The Mutan-kiang takes its rise, like the Sungari, on the northern slopes of the Chang pai Shan range, and not far from the sources of that river.

    4
    2
    Advertisement
  • We can build these machines to do an incomprehensibly large range of tasks.

    34
    32
  • As national income increases in a given country, the size of government as a portion of gross national product (GNP) rises and the range of services people expect the government to offer rises.

    24
    22
  • Known to many as a hangout for locals, the restaurant offers a full menu, with a range of choices from fajitas to fish and chips.

    6
    4
  • These restaurants are popular for good reason-the menu offers a wide range of options sure to appeal to fondue lovers and to make converts out of those who have yet to be introduced to fondue.

    6
    4
  • The restaurant's extensive margarita selection includes a range of tequilas and a "very secret" homemade sour mix.

    6
    4
    Advertisement
  • Alex had the foresight to have the builders install a gas range.

    4
    3
  • Gerry stayed outside his mindreading range up the beach, his movement stilled as he watched.

    23
    22
  • They'd be unable to sense her, until she was within striking range.

    4
    3
  • That God is love and that the purpose of His love is the moral organization of humanity in the "Kingdom of God" - this idea, with its immense range of application-.-is applied in Ritschl's initial datum.

    4
    3
  • They are all inhabitants of the open plains or the forests of the tropical and temperate parts of South America, with the exception of a few species which range as far north as Texas.

    4
    3
    Advertisement
  • The highland region of northern Albania is divided into two portions by the lower course of the Drin; the mountains of the northern portion, the Bieska Malziis, extend in a confused and broken series of ridges from Scutari to the valleys of the Ibar and White Drin; they comprise the rocky group of the Prokletia, or Accursed Mountains, with their numerous ramifications, including Mount Velechik, inhabited by the Kastrat and Shkrel tribes, Bukovik by the Hot, Golesh by the Klement, Skulsen (7533 ft.), Baba Vrkh (about 7306 ft.), Maranay near Scutari, and the Bastrik range to the east.

    5
    4
  • The greatest number of Jews is to be found at Paris, Lyons and Bordeaux, while the departments of the centre and of the south along the range of the Cvennes, where Calvinism flourishes, are the principal Protestant localities, Nimes being the most important centre.

    4
    3
  • An eastern system in South Australia touches at a few points a height of 3000 ft.; and the Stirling Range, belonging to the south-western system of South Australia, reaches to 2340 ft.

    2
    1
  • On the west the Darling Range faces the Indian Ocean, and extends from Point D'Entrecasteaux to the Murchison river.

    2
    1
  • This is Mount Wingen, situated in a spur of the Liverpool Range and close to the town of Scone.

    1
    0
  • Between the Russian Pamirs and Chinese Turkestan the rugged line of the Sarikol range intervenes, the actual dividing line being still indefinite.

    1
    0
  • Ejections of basaltic lava have been observed on the southern slope vo of this range, extending over wide areas on the plateau itself, over a stretch of more than 600 m.

    2
    1
  • The central Cevennes, comprising the volcanic chain of Vivarais, incline south-east and extend as far as the Lozere group. The northern portion of this chain forms the Boutieres range.

    3
    2
  • With such an enormous geographical range the species must of necessity present itself under a considerable number of local phases, differing from one another to a greater or less degree in the matters of size and colouring.

    2
    1
  • This range is also known under various local names.

    2
    1
  • At the very least, history can clearly show the range of outcomes that are likely.

    15
    14
  • That range between the smallest pea plant and the largest is the full spectrum of what that plant can be.

    11
    10
  • I think the range of problems that technology can solve is confined to technological problems.

    12
    11
  • The menu was designed to accommodate fine dining as well as family dining, offering a range of appetizers and entrees.

    4
    3
  • Besides the lofty central masses enumerated there are two other lofty peaks, outliers from the main range, and separated from it by valleys of considerable extent.

    0
    0
  • Not only did commune range itself against commune under the two rival flags, but party rose up against party within the city walls.

    0
    0
  • Lucretius thus recognizes the whole range of existence to which the doctrine of evolution may be applied.

    0
    0
  • Naturalists who deal specially with museum collections have been compelled, it is true, for other reasons to attach an increasing importance to what is called the type specimen, but they find that this insistence on the individual, although invaluable from the point of view of recording species, is unsatisfactory from the point of view of scientific zoology; and propositions for the amelioration of this condition of affairs range from a refusal of Linnaean nomenclature in such cases, to the institution of a division between master species for such species as have been properly revised by the comparative morphologist, and provisional species for such species as have been provisionally registered by those working at collections.

    0
    0
  • When an organ is stated to be variable, the biometricist demands statistics to show the range of the variations and the mode of their distribution.

    0
    0
  • Seeds are carried in soil adhering to their feet and plumage, and aquatic plants have in consequence for the most part an exceptionally wide range.

    0
    0
  • Amongst broadleaved trees Juglans has a similar Holarctic range, descending to the West Indies; so has Aesculus, were it not lacking in Europe; it becomes tropical in South America and Malaya.

    0
    0
  • Assuming that in its circumpolar origin the North Temperate flora was fairly homogeneous, it would meet in its centrifugal extension with a wide range of local conditions; these would favor the preservation of numerous species in some genera, their greater or less elimination in others.

    0
    0
  • As in the IndoMalayan sub-region, epiphytic orchids are probably most numerous in point of species, but the genera and even sub-tribes are far more restricted in their range than in the Old World; 4 sub-tribes with 74 genera of Vandeae are confined to South America, though varying in range of climate and altitude.

    0
    0
  • This place may either be a point, as in a volcanic cone, or a line, as in a mountain range or ridge of hills.

    0
    0
  • Thus, for example, in a mountain range at right angles to a prevailing sea-wind, it is the land forms which determine that one side of the range shall be richly watered and deeply dissected by a complete system of valleys, while the other side is dry, indefinite in its valley systems, and sends none of its scanty drainage to the sea.

    0
    0
  • Next in importance comes a mountain range, but here there is often difficulty as to the definition of the actual crest-line, and mountain ranges being broad regions, it may happen that a small independent state, like Switzerland or Andorra, occupies the mountain valleys between two or more great countries.

    0
    0
  • Flowing through the narrow valley between the Cordillera and coast range, it has only short tributaries, the principal ones being the Truando, Sucio and Murri.

    0
    0
  • The monuments discovered there, although only those in hard stone have survived, are more important than at any other site in the Delta except Tanis and cover a wider range, commencing with Khufu (Cheops) and continuing to the thirtieth dynasty.

    0
    0
  • Of families we find twenty-three, or maybe more, absolutely restricted thereto, besides at least eight which, being peculiar to the New World, extend their range into the Nearctic region, but are there so feebly developed that their origin may be safely ascribed to the southern portion of America.

    0
    0
  • Of other families which, however, extend their range more or less far into the Australian realm, may be mentioned Otididae, the bustards; Meropidae or bee-eaters; Muscicapidae or flycatchers; Sturnidae or starlings.

    0
    0
  • The most easterly of these chains, that forming the Pays de Gex in the extreme north-east of the department, contains the Cret de la Neige (6653 ft.) and other of the highest summits in the whole range.

    0
    0
  • Eveleth is served by the Duluth, Missabe & Northern and the Duluth & Iron Range railways.

    0
    0
  • It lies in the midst of the great red and brown hematite iron-ore deposits of the Mesabi Range - the richest in the Lake Superior district - and the mining and shipping of this ore are its principal industries.

    0
    0
  • The mountain forms the northern end of a range of hills which terminates southward in the Cape of Good Hope.

    0
    0
  • The western side of Table Mountain faces the Atlantic, and is flanked by the hills known as The Twelve Apostles; to the south Hout's Bay Nek connects it with the remainder of the range; on the east the mountain overlooks the Cape Flats.

    0
    0
  • In the north, where the province borders Semipalatinsk, it includes the western parts of the Tarbagatai range, the summits of which (10,000 ft.) do not reach the limit of perpetual snow.

    0
    0
  • Laoag is on an extensive coast plain, behind which is a picturesque range.

    0
    0
  • The upper Euphrates consists of two arms, which, rising on the Armenian plateau, and flowing west in long shallow valleys parallel to Mount Taurus, eventually unite and force their way southward through that range to the level of Mesopotamia.

    0
    0
  • It is penetrated by numerous spurs of this range, which strike the sea abruptly at right angles to the coast, and in many cases plunge down into it sheer.

    0
    0
  • The greater portion, however, of the numerous bands which visit the British Islands in autumn and winter doubtless come from the Continent - perhaps even from far to the eastward, since its range stretches across Asia to Japan, in which country it is as favourite a cage-bird as with us.

    0
    0
  • Between the western bend of the Cavalla river and the coast there is a somewhat broken mountain range with altitudes of from 2000 to 5000 ft.

    0
    0
  • The Pa range to the west of the St Paul's river may reach in places to 3000 ft.

    0
    0
  • As regards invertebrates, very few species or genera are peculiar to Liberia so far as is yet known, though there are probably one or two butterflies of local range.

    0
    0
  • Alembert's association with Diderot in the preparation of the Dictionnaire Encyclopedique led him to take a somewhat wider range than that to which he had previously confined himself.

    0
    0
  • Some families are very restricted in their range.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, it was of little practical importance even within its narrow range, for it does not appear to have been generally enforced.

    0
    0
  • In the United States a committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers, appointed to consider the question of rail manufacture in consequence of an increase in the number of rail-failures, issued an interim report in 1907 in which it suggested a range of carbon from 0-55 to 0-65% for the heaviest sections of Bessemer steel flange rails, with a phosphorus maximum of 0.085%; while the specifications of the American Society for Testing Materials, current at the same period, put the carbon limits at o 45 to 0-55%, and the phosphorus limit at o io.

    0
    0
  • For rails of basic open-hearth steel, which is rapidly ousting Bessemer steel, the Civil Engineers' specifications allowed from o 65 to 0-75% of carbon with 0-05% of phosphorus, while the specifications of the American Railway Engineering and Maintenance of Way Association provided for a range of 0.75 to 0-85% of carbon, with a maximum of 0.03% of phosphorus.

    0
    0
  • British railways also undertake the collection and delivery of freight, in addition to transporting it, and thus an extensive range of vans and wagons, whether drawn by horses or mechanically propelled, must be provided in connexion with an important station.

    0
    0
  • Compound working permits of a greater range of expansion than is possible with a simple engine, and incidentally there is less range of pressure per cylinder, so that the pressures and temperatures per cylinder have not such a wide range of variation.

    0
    0
  • It is a safe, steady-running and trustworthy engine, with excellent distribution of weight, and it is susceptible of a wide range of adaptability in power requirements.

    0
    0
  • Such trains, therefore, range in weight from 600 to 1800 tons or even more, and the journey speeds from terminus to terminus, including stops, vary from 15 to 30 m.

    0
    0
  • This body pursued the subject with more or less diligence, and in 1884 laid down the principle that the automatic coupler should be one acting in a vertical plane - that is, the engaging faces should be free to move up and down within a considerable range, in order to provide for the differences in the height of cars.

    0
    0
  • The investigation of Carpenter on unconscious cerebration and of Faraday on unconscious muscular action showed early in the movement that it was not necessary to look outside the medium's own personality for the explanation of even intelligent communications unconsciously conveyed through table-tilting, automatic writing and trance-speaking - provided the matter communicated was not beyond the range of the medium's own knowledge or powers.

    0
    0
  • Home, which have left him convinced of the genuineness of the wide range of physical phenomena which occurred through Home's mediumship.'

    0
    0
  • This is the Basin Range type of mountain.

    0
    0
  • The northern portion is hilly, and is crossed by a rugged range, the Wickham Heights, running east and west, and rising in some places to a height of nearly 2000 ft.

    0
    0
  • West Falkland is more hilly near the east island; the principal mountain range, the Hornby Hills, runs north and south parallel with Falkland Sound.

    0
    0
  • Excluding some varieties of domestic dogs, wolves are the largest members of the genus, and have a wide geographical range, extending over nearly the whole of Europe and Asia, and North America from Greenland to Mexico, but are not found in South America or Africa, where they are replaced by other members of the family.

    0
    0
  • In northern countries the fur is longer and thicker, and the animal generally larger and more powerful than in the southern portion of its range.

    0
    0
  • With an exceptional range of information thus afforded him, he wrote the opening of his history in July 1849; but, finding himself still unsettled in his work, he decided in the spring of the following year to carry out a long projected visit to England.

    0
    0
  • But, while Robertson was in some measure the initiator of a movement, Prescott came to his task when the range of information was incomparably wider and when progress in sociologic theory had thrown innumerable convergent lights upon the progress of events.

    0
    0
  • A great gun was fired to different points of the compass and all the country within its range, including the town of Cuddalore, passed into the possession of the English.

    0
    0
  • The highest point within the state is Wheeler Peak, near the centre of the eastern boundary, with an elevation of 13,058 ft.; the lowest points are along the Colorado river, where the altitudes range from 700 to Boo ft.

    0
    0
  • The Sierra Nevada range, which forms the western rim of the Basin, sends into the state a single lofty spur, the Washoe Mountains.

    0
    0
  • At the foot of this range there is, relatively speaking, a depression, with an altitude of about 3850 feet.

    0
    0
  • The mountains also increase in height and importance as far as the East Humboldt range, a lofty mass about 60 m.

    0
    0
  • This range is the water-parting for nearly all the westward-flowing streams of the state, and is by far the steepest and most rugged within Nevada, a number of its peaks attaining a height of 11,000 or 12,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • In the Washoe Mountains, as in the rest of the Sierra Nevada range, there is a heavy growth of conifers, extending down to the very valleys; but in many places these mountains have been almost deforested to provide timbers for the mines.

    0
    0
  • It is situated in the valley of the Aar, on the right bank of that river, and at the southern foot of the range of the Jura.

    0
    0
  • To a geographical distribution of the widest extent, Diptera add a range of habits of the most diversified nature; they are both animal and vegetable feeders, an enormous number of species acting, especially in the larval state, as scavengers in consuming putrescent or decomposing matter of both kinds.

    0
    0
  • But on the death of Alcimus Bacchides retired and Jonathan with his followers settled down beyond the range of the Syrian garrisons.

    0
    0
  • The workers of these ants range over the country in large armies, killing and carrying off all the insects and spiders that they find and sometimes attacking 'vertebrates.

    0
    0
  • To General the west of Kashgar the central depression is limited by physio- the meridional range of Sarikol and the great elevation graphs* of the Pamir, of which the Sarikol is the eastern face.

    0
    0
  • The level of this depression (once a vast inland sea) between the mountains which enclose the sources of the Hwang-ho and the Sarikol range probably never exceeds 2000 ft.

    0
    0
  • A mountain range such as this, attaining altitudes at which vegetable life ceases, and the support of animal life is extremely difficult, constitutes an almost impassable barrier against the spread of all forms of living creatures.

    0
    0
  • The southern and south-western face follows the coast closely up the Persian Gulf from the mouth of the Indus, and is formed farther west by the mountain scarp, which, rising in many points to 10,000 ft., flanks the Tigris and the Mesopotamian plains, and extends along Kurdistan and Armenia nearly to the 40th meridian; beyond which it turns along the Taurus range, and the north - eastern angle of the Mediterranean.

    0
    0
  • The north-eastern portion of this range is of great altitude, and separates the headwaters of the Oxus, which run off to the Aral Sea, from those of the Indus and its Kabul tributary, which, uniting below Peshawar, are thence discharged southward into the Arabian Sea.

    0
    0
  • The western part of the range, which received the name of Paropamisus Mons from the ancients, diminishes in height west of the 65th meridian and constitutes the northern face of the Afghan and Persian plateau, rising abruptly from the plains of the Turkoman desert, which lies between the Oxus and the Caspian.

    0
    0
  • Along the south coast of the Caspian this line of elevation is prolonged as the Elburz range(not to be confused with the Elburz of the Caucasus), and has its culminating point in Demavend, which rises to 19,400 ft.

    0
    0
  • Below the north-east declivity of this range lies Georgia, on the other side of which province rises the Caucasus, the boundary of Asia and Europe between the Caspian and Black Seas, the highest points of which reach an elevation of nearly 19,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • West of Ararat high hills extend along the Black Sea, between which and the Taurus range lies the plateau of Asia Minor, reaching to the Aegean Sea; the mountains along the Black Sea, on which are the Olympus and Ida of the ancients, rise to 6000 or 7000 ft.; the Taurus is more lofty, reaching 8000 and 10,000 ft.; both ranges decline in altitude as they approach the Mediterranean.

    0
    0
  • From the north of Manchuria the Khingan range stretches southward to the Chinese frontier near Peking, east of which the drainage falls into the Amur and the Yellow Sea, while to the west is an almost rainless region, the inclination of which is towards the central area of the continent, Mongolia.

    0
    0
  • From the western end of the Yablonoi range, on the 115th meridian, a mountainous belt extends along a somewhat irregular line to the extremity of Pamir, known under various names Mongolia.

    0
    0
  • The central area bounded on the north and north-west by the Yablonoi Mountains and their western extension in the Tian-shan, on the south by the northern face of the Tibetan plateau, and on the east by the Khingan range before alluded to, forms the great desert of central Asia, known as the Gobi.

    0
    0
  • In the southern half of the range are the chief mining districts of Russia.

    0
    0
  • Formosa, which is situated under the northern tropic, near the coast of China, is traversed by a high range of mountains, reaching nearly 13,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • In 1876 he visited the Lop Nor and discovered the Altyn Tagh range.

    0
    0
  • On the western edge of the Kashgar plains, the political boundary between Russia and China is defined by the meridional range of Sarikol.

    0
    0
  • This range (known to the ancients as Taurus and in medieval times as Bolor) like many others of the Chinese .

    0
    0
  • In the extreme north, in the Verkhoyansk range and in the mountains of the Taimyr peninsula, there are indications of another zone of folding of Mesozoic or later date, but our information concerning these ranges is very scanty.

    0
    0
  • The Triassic deposits of the Verkhoyansk Range show that this land did not extend to the Bering Sea; while the marine Mesozoic deposits of Japan on the east, the western Tian-shan on the west and Tibet on the south give us some idea of its limits in other directions.

    0
    0
  • The Polynemidae, which range from the Atlantic through the Indian Ocean to the Pacific, supply animals from which isinglass is prepared; one of them, the mango-fish, esteemed a great delicacy, inhabits the seas from the Bay of Bengal to Siam.

    0
    0
  • Ashland has an excellent harbour, has large iron-ore and coal docks, and is the principal port for the shipment of iron ore from the rich Gogebec Range, the annual ore shipment approximating 3,500,000 tons, valued at $12,000,000, and it has also an extensive export trade in lumber.

    0
    0
  • Pomerania is one of the flattest parts of Germany, although east of the Oder it '.s traversed by a range of low hills, and there are also a few isolated eminences to the west.

    0
    0
  • They range from a millimetre or so (smaller species of Aeolosoma) to 6 ft.

    0
    0
  • The range of the Western Ghats enabled the Mahrattas to rise against their Mahommedan conquerors, to reassert their Hindu nationality against the whole power of the Mogul Empire, and to establish in its place an empire of their own.

    0
    0
  • Thus Raghoji Bhonsla established himself in the tracts lying underneath the southern base of the Satpura range (namely, Nagpur and Berar), overran Orissa and entered Bengal.

    0
    0
  • From this last branches off the highest range in the entire series, namely, the Zangezur, which soars up to 10,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • The principal approach to Caucasia from Russia by rail is the line that runs from Rostov-on-Don to Vladikavkaz at the foot of the central Caucasus range.

    0
    0
  • To the ancient Greeks Caucasia, and the mighty range which dominates it, were a region of mystery and romance.

    0
    0
  • The most elevated tracts are on the west, where the surface rises towards the culminating range of hills, and on the south, where it rises to the elevated tableland of Mysore.

    0
    0
  • The elevation of the land as a whole proceeds gradually from south to north, the highest points being found in the north-west, as the Peak, in which neighbourhood several points exceed a height of 2000 ft., while Axe Edge, south of Buxton, and many other points throughout the district, range from 1500 ft.

    0
    0
  • The principal structural feature is the broad anticline, its axis running north and south, which has brought up the Carboniferous Limestone; this uplifted region is the southern extremity of the Pennine Range.

    0
    0
  • As the distance between his rows appeared much greater than was necessary for the range of the roots of the plants, he begins by showing that these roots extend much farther than is commonly believed, and then proceeds to inquire into the nature of their food.

    0
    0
  • In the British Isles wheat is, as a rule, sown in the autumn on a heavier soil, and has four or five months in which to distribute its roots, and so it gets possession of a wide range of soil and subsoil before barley is sown in the spring.

    0
    0
  • The field experiments on leguminous plants at Rothamsted have shown that land which is, so to speak, exhausted so far as the growth of one leguminous crop is concerned, may still grow very luxuriant crops of another plant of the same natural order, but of different habits of growth, and especially of different character and range of roots.

    0
    0
  • It is the leguminous fodder crops-especially clover, which has a much more extended period of growth, and much wider range of collection within the soil and subsoil, than any of the other crops of the rotation-that yield in their produce the largest amount of nitrogen per acre.

    0
    0
  • But the reprinted papers give no just idea of the immense range of Mill's energy at this time.

    0
    0
  • But the net result of the development of the doctrine of rent is that all problems in which this factor appears, and they embrace the whole range of economic theory, must apparently be treated on their merits.

    0
    0
  • It is clear that, if we start from the condition of full eversion of the tube and watch the process of introversion, we shall find that the pleurecbolic variety is introverted by the apex of the tube sinking inwards; it may be called acrembolic, whilst conversely the acrecbolic tubes are pleurembolic. Further, it is obvious enough that the process either of introversion or of eversion of the tube may be arrested at any point, by the development of fibres connecting the wall of the introverted tube with the wall of the body, or with an axial structure such as the oesophagus; on the other hand, the range of movement of the tubular introvert may be unlimited or complete.

    0
    0
  • The acrembolic proboscis or frontal introvert of the Nemertine worms has a complete range.

    0
    0
  • So too the acrembolic eye-tentacle of the snail has a complete range of movement, and also the pleurembolic proboscis of the Rhabdocoel prostoma.

    0
    0
  • The introvert is not a simple one with complete range both in eversion and introversion, but is arrested in introversion by the fibrous bands at c, and similarly in eversion by the fibrous bands at b.

    0
    0
  • The memoirs (which may be accepted as mainly Napoleon's, though Montholon undoubtedly touched them up) range over most of the events of his life from Toulon to Marengo.

    0
    0
  • A wide range in space was proved by the identification of the Inselsteine and the Ialysus vases with the new style, and a wide range in time by collation of the earlier Theraean and Hissarlik discoveries.

    0
    0
  • Geographical Distribution The class Hexapoda has a world-wide range, and so have most of its component orders.

    0
    0
  • Many insects, however, can readily extend their range, and a careful study of their distribution leads us to discriminate between faunas rather than definitely to map regions.

    0
    0
  • Oriental types range far northwards into China and Japan.

    0
    0
  • The Australian fauna is rich in characteristic and peculiar genera, and New Zealand, while possessing some remarkable insects of its own, lacks entirely several families with an almost world-wide range - for example, the Notodontidae, Lasiocampidae, and other families of Lepidoptera.

    0
    0
  • In this scheme birds are arranged according to what the author considered to be their natural method and sequence; but the result exhibits some unions as ill-assorted as can well be met with in the whole range of tentative arrangements of the class, together with some very unjustifiable divorces.

    0
    0
  • After the Miranzai Expedition of 1891 this range was occupied by British troops and eleven posts were established along its crest, the two chief posts being Fort Lockhart and Fort Gulistan.

    0
    0
  • A range of low hills intervenes between Felanitx and the Mediterranean; upon one summit, the Puig de San Sebastian, stands a Moorish castle with a remarkable series of subterranean vaults.

    0
    0
  • It is situated on the summit of the Great Dividing Range, and is the centre of the rich pastoral and agricultural district of Darling Downs.

    0
    0
  • The range of the genus extends from the southern bank of the Bramaputra in Assam to southern China, the Malay Peninsula, Java, Sumatra and Borneo.

    0
    0
  • The main water-parting is formed by a range of hills which are composed chiefly of drift and extend W.S.W.

    0
    0
  • There is, however, a well defined watershed extending from the hills east of Stefanie to the Harrar range.

    0
    0
  • Between this central barrier and the northern frontier range of Cnemis (3000 ft.) is the narrow but fertile valley of the Cephissus, along which most of the Phocian townships were scattered.

    0
    0
  • Under the southern slope of Parnassus were situated the two small plains of Crisa and Anticyra, separated by Mt Cirphis, an offshoot from the main range.

    0
    0
  • Now frequency of movement, average daily price variation, and range of price movements are matters of fundamental importance to the public. Hence for practical purposes we require several kinds of measurement of price movements, and it is impossible to weigh exactly the one against the other in respect of importance.

    0
    0
  • The difference between the highest and lowest price, we may observe, is a very imperfect indication of the range of movement (though, taken in conjunction with the standard deviation, it is the best at our disposal), because either of the extreme prices might be accidental and quite out of relation to all others.

    0
    0
  • In one day, for instance, when the net drop was 33 points and the range of variation 59 points (namely, 8.45 to 7.86), 150 price fluctuations were recorded.

    0
    0
  • Expressed both absolutely and as percentages of the price averaged from the 1st of October to the 31st of July, the range of movement, standard deviation, and mean weekly movement calculated between the times mentioned above (October 1st to July 31st), after diminishing significantly for some years after the later 'sixties, have risen appreciably on the whole of late years.

    0
    0
  • Of these the Sungari, which is the largest, rises on the northern slopes of the Chang pai Shan range, and runs in a north-westerly direction to its junction with the Nonni, from which point it turns north-east until it empties itself into the Amur.

    0
    0
  • Wells in Pennsylvania now range in depth from 300 ft.

    0
    0
  • Various arrangements have been proposed and patented for the continuous distillation of petroleum, in which crude oil is supplied to a range of stills as fast as the distillates pass off.

    0
    0
  • Petroleum spirit is tested for specific gravity, range of boilingpoints, and results of fractional distillation.

    0
    0
  • The folds are approximately parallel to those of the Taurus, and geologically these mountains may be said to belong to that range.'

    0
    0
  • The mammals of Syria are rather sharply to be distinguished into those which range only north of Mt Carmel, and those which pass that limit.

    0
    0
  • The name Coelesyria (n KmXrt /vpia), no doubt, was applied originally to the valley (" hollow ") between Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, but was afterwards extended to the district stretching eastwards from the latter range.

    0
    0
  • From Mont aux Sources, table-shaped, and called by the Basutos Potong (Antelope), a second range of mountains, the Maluti, runs S.W.

    0
    0
  • The Caledon runs north of the Maluti, the Senku south of that range.

    0
    0
  • The upper part of the Maluti range consists of flows of melaphyres and diabases belonging to the volcanic beds.

    0
    0
  • Each of these balances is made to cover a certain range of reading.

    0
    0
  • Kelvin ampere balances are made in two types - (i) a variable weight type suitable for obtaining the ampere value of any current within their range; and (2) a fixed weight type intended to indicate when a current which can be varied at pleasure has a certain fixed value.

    0
    0
  • Numerous varieties of soaps are made; the purposes to which they are applied are varied; the materials employed embrace a considerable range of oils, fats and other bodies; and the processes adopted undergo many modifications.

    0
    0
  • The range from the same point of view presents a singularly uniform outline, having the appearance of an unbroken wall; in reality, however, it is traversed by a number of deep ravines (wadis), of which the most important are the Yabis, the Ajlun, the Rajib, the Zerka (Jabbok), the Hesban, and the Zerka Ma`in.

    0
    0
  • The .great mass of the Gilead range is formed of Jura limestone, the base slopes being sandstone partly covered by white marls.

    0
    0
  • In the next place comes the evidence derived from the whole range of ancient literature and specially from descriptions of the city or its different localities.

    0
    0
  • It is pleasantly situated at the foot of a lofty range of hills, which here dip down to the river, at the junction of the main lines of railway from Bremen and Hanover to Hamburg, which are carried to the latter city over two grand bridges crossing the southern and the northern arms of the Elbe.

    0
    0
  • In the north is Getsurobi-zan (4101 ft.); and on either side of Setzu-zan, with which they form a range running due east and west across the island, are Jusampunzan (4698 ft.) and Kali-zan (7027 ft.).

    0
    0
  • A range of mountains, varying in height from 2000 ft.

    0
    0
  • The Central Provinces are divided into two parts by the Satpura range of hills (q.v.), which runs south of the Nerbudda river from east to west; so that, speaking generally, it consists of districts north of the Satpuras, districts on the Satpura Provinces.

    0
    0
  • Towards the river, though rich in parts, this tract of country is generally wild and desolate, but nearer the base of the hill range there is a large natural basin of fertile land which is highly cultivated.

    0
    0
  • Berar consists mainly of the valley lying between the Satpura range of mountains in the north and the Ajanta range in the south.

    0
    0
  • The Gawilgarh hills, a range belonging to the Satpura mountains, form the northern border.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the Melghat mountain tract which walls it in on the north, Berar is divided into two sections, the Payanghat or lowland country, bounded on the north by the Gawilgarh hills, and on the south by the outer scarps of the Ajanta range, and the Balaghat or upland country above the Ajanta ridge, sloping down southwards beyond the ghats or passes which lead up to it.

    0
    0
  • To the south of the Nerbudda the Satpura range stretches across the province, containing the greater part of five districts, its crystalline and sandstone rocks rising in places through the superficial stratum of trap, and with large areas of shallow stony land still covered to a great extent with forest interspersed by black-soil valleys of great fertility.

    0
    0
  • From the Scandinavian peninsula and the British Islands the range of the fox extends eastwards across Europe and central and northern Asia to Japan, while to the south it embraces northern Africa and Arabia, Persia, Baluchistan, and the northwestern districts of India and the Himalaya.

    0
    0
  • The Pegu Yoma range separates it from Toungoo district, and forms the water-parting between the rivers Irrawaddy and Sittang; there are also many small elevations.

    0
    0
  • The interior of Cutch is studded with hills of considerable elevation, and a range of mountains runs through it from east to west, many of them of the most fantastic shapes, with large isolated masses of rock scattered in all directions.

    0
    0
  • The dolmen-builders of the New Stone Age are now known to have long occupied both Korea and Japan, from which advanced Asiatic lands they may have found little difficulty in spreading over the Polynesian world, just as in the extreme west they were able to range over Scandinavia, Great Britain and Ireland.

    0
    0
  • Its culminating point is toward the western extremity of the Mantiqueira range where the Itatiaya, or Itatiaia-assu, peak rises to an elevation of 8898 ft.

    0
    0
  • The more northern rivers are subject to periodical variations in volume caused by wet and dry seasons, but the greater distance of the coast range and the more gradual breaking down of the plateau toward the sea, give them longer courses and a greater extent of navigable water.

    0
    0
  • The largest of these and the only one of commercial value is the Ribeira de Iguape, which has its source on the tablelands of Parana and after receiving several affluents west of the Serra do Mar breaks through a depression in that range and discharges into the Atlantic"some miles below Santos on the southern boundary of the state of Sao Paulo.

    0
    0
  • At Santos the rainfall is exceptionally heavy and the mean temperature high, but below that point the climatic conditions are considerably modified, the range in temperature being greater, the mean annual temperature lower, and the rainfall more evenly distributed throughout the year.

    0
    0
  • Of the amphibious rodents, the pi-ea (Cavia aperea), mod, (C. rupestris), paca (Coelogenys paca), cutia (Dasyprocta aguti) and capybara (Hydrochoerus capybara) are noteworthy for their size and extensive range.

    0
    0
  • The range of the sloth is from the Guianas south into Minas Geraes, the armadillo as far south as the Argentine pampas and the ant-eater from the Amazon south to Paraguay, though it is found in the Amazon region principally.

    0
    0
  • The former are found over a wide range of country, extending into Bolivia and Argentina, and are noted for their impetuous pugnacity.

    0
    0
  • The tapir also has an extensive range between the coast and the foothills of the Andes, and from northern Argentina to south-eastern Colombia.

    0
    0
  • The range in size is a wide one - from the tiny humming-bird to the ema, rhea, or American ostrich.

    0
    0
  • The Brazilian flora is also rich in medicinal and aromatic plants, dye-woods, and a wide range of gum and resin-producing shrubs and trees.

    0
    0
  • The first two sections of this great railway, which carry it across the coast range, were opened to traffic in 1858 and 1864.

    0
    0
  • The exports cover a wide range of agricultural, pastoral and natural productions, including coffee, rubber, sugar, cotton, cocoa, Brazil nuts, mate (Paraguay tea), hides, skins, fruits, gold, diamonds, manganese ore, cabinet woods and medicinal leaves, roots and resins.

    0
    0
  • It includes a herbarium and palm house, with an extensive range of hot-houses, a museum of economic botany, a lecture-room and other requisites for the study of botany.

    0
    0
  • Facing the crags on the south-west are the spots familiar to readers of The Heart of Midlothian, where stood Jeanie Deans's cottage, and between the crags and Arthur's Seat lies Hunter's Bog, used as a shooting range.

    0
    0
  • The Pentland range contains many points of interest and beauty, but these are mostly accessible only to the pedestrian, although the hills are crossed by roads, of which the chief are those by Glencorse burn and the Cauld Stane Slap. Habbie's Howe, the scene of Allan Ramsay's pastoral The Gentle Shepherd, is some 2 m.

    0
    0
  • The eastern portion of Laconia consists of a far more broken range of hill country, rising in Mt.

    0
    0
  • The range of Taygetus is well watered and was in ancient times covered with forests which afforded excellent hunting to the Spartans, while it had also large iron mines and quarries of an inferior bluish marble, as well as of the famous rosso antico of Taenarum.

    0
    0
  • Of more marine habit are P. philippensis and P. fuscus, the former having a wide range in Southern Asia, and, it is said, reaching Madagascar, and the latter common on the coasts of the warmer parts of both North and South America.

    0
    0
  • Neither Pope nor Swift, who perhaps excelled him in particular branches of literary production, approached him in range of genius, or in encyclopaedic versatility.

    0
    0
  • The rocky barrier which shuts off this land is part of the Drakensberg range.

    0
    0
  • It continues to the foot of the Drakensberg range, the mountains rising towards the S.W., with almost perpendicular sides, 6000 to 7000 ft.

    0
    0
  • Spurs from the Drakensberg, at right angles to the main range, cross the plateaus.

    0
    0
  • It is one of the transverse chains connecting the eastern coast range with the higher terraces and goes under a variety of names, such as Elands Berg and Ingome Mountains.

    0
    0
  • A second range, the Biggarsberg, starts from the Drakensberg near Mount Malani and goes E.S.E.

    0
    0
  • This range contains, in Indumeni (7200 ft.), the highest mountain in Natal outside the main Drakensberg.

    0
    0
  • A third range runs N.E.

    0
    0
  • A fourth range also diverges from Giant's Castle and ramifies in various branches over a large tract "of country, one branch running by Pietermaritzburg to the Berea hills overlooking Durban.

    0
    0
  • Albert and no doubt stood on a higher level than Anselm and Abelard, not merely by their wider range of knowledge but also by the intellectual massiveness of their achieve ments; but it may be questioned whether the earlier writers did not possess a greater force of originality and a keener talent.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the influence of this new material is everywhere evident in the wider range of questions which are discussed by the doctors of the period.

    0
    0
  • Geographically, Mongolia may thus be said to occupy both terraces of the great plateau of east Asia, which stretches in the south of Siberia, between the Sailughem range of the Great Altai and the Great Khingan - with the exception of the Dzungarian depression.

    0
    0
  • It appears, however, from Russian explorations during the last third of the 19th North- century, that it has all the characteristics of an elevated western plateau, of a rhomboid shape (like Bohemia), bounded by four mountain ranges; namely, the Russian Altai on the N.W., the Sayans on the N.E., the Kentei range on the S.E., and the Ektagh Altai on the S.W.

    0
    0
  • The border-ridge character of the Sayans (Ergik-targak-taiga) is well established, and the same orographic character is confirmed by recent explorers with regard to the Sailughem range of the Altai.

    0
    0
  • The south-western portion of this range is specially called Bakony Forest, while the ramifications to the north-east are known as the Vertes group (1575 ft.), and the Pilis group (2476 ft.).

    0
    0
  • Those of John Kis, the friend of Berzsenyi, cover a wide range of subjects, and comprise, besides original poetry, many translations from the Greek, Latin, French, German and English, among which last may be mentioned renderings from Blair, Pope and Thomson, and notably his translation, published at Vienna in 1791, of Lowth's " Choice of Hercules."

    0
    0
  • It would be difficult, in the whole range of scientific literature, to point to a memoir of equal brilliancy with that published (divided into three parts) in the volumes of the Academy for 1784, 1 785 and 1786.

    0
    0
  • The extension of the range of subjects to which mathematical methods can be applied, accompanied as it is by an extension of the range of study which is useful to the ordinary worker, has led in the latter part of the 19th century to an important reaction against the specialization mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

    0
    0
  • The western slopes of this range drain to the Oxus either north-westwards, by the Kokcha and the Ragh, or else they twist their streams into the Shiwa, which runs due north across Darwaz.

    0
    0
  • Germain a roughly triangular district north of the Karawanken range was referred to a popular plebiscite.

    0
    0
  • In some cases a pair of animals pro- ‘ duce ten million offspring, and in such a number a large range of congenital variation is possible.

    0
    0
  • In the direction (suppose horizontal) for which n=o, /f=sin 0, the phases of the secondary waves range over a complete period when sin 0 =X/a, and, since all parts of the horizontal aperture are equally effective, there is in this direction a complete compensation and consequent absence of illumination.

    0
    0
  • When sin 0 = 2A/a, the phases range one and a half periods, and there is revival of illumination.

    0
    0
  • The obliquity, corresponding to u =7, is such that the phases of the secondary waves range over a complete period, i.e.

    0
    0
  • This is necessarily a question of degree; but it does not require detailed calculations in order to show that the discrepancy first becomes conspicuous when the phases corresponding to the various secondary waves which travel from P to B range over a complete period.

    0
    0
  • The dark lines which separate the bands are the places at which the phases of the secondary wave range over an integral number of periods.

    0
    0
  • It appears therefore that there are no bands at all unless a lies between o and +4h,, and that within these limits the best bands are formed at the middle of the range when us =21 4 .

    0
    0
  • If the slit be narrow, so that the arc is short, the intensity is constant over a wide range, and does not fall off to an important extent until the discrepancy of the extreme phases reaches about a quarter of a period.

    0
    0
  • They range from rude menhirs a few feet high to elaborately sculptured monoliths of too ft.

    0
    0
  • Thus, though the psalms represent a great range of individual religious experience, they avoid such situations and expressions as are too unique to be used in acts of public devotion.

    0
    0
  • Except as regards philosophical and religious speculation, his writings show a range of interest and knowledge quite unparalleled in that generation.

    0
    0
  • Other auriferous reefs are found all along the eastern escarpment of the Drakensberg and are worked in the De Kaap (Barberton) district, on the Swaziland frontier, in the Lydenburg district, in the Murchison Range and in other places in the Zoutpansberg.

    0
    0
  • From that day the role of the Natal Field Force was changed from that of a mobile field army into that of a garrison, and two days later it was completely isolated, but not before General French had succeeded in escaping south by train, and the naval authorities had been induced by Sir George White's urgent appeals to send into the town a naval brigade with a few guns of sufficient range and calibre to cope with the heavy position artillery which Joubert was now able to bring into action against the town.

    0
    0
  • But in addition to these distinctive characters, living matter has some other peculiarities, the chief of which are the dependence of all its activities upon moisture and upon heat, within a limited range of temperature, and the fact that it usually possesses a certain structure or organization.

    0
    0
  • Its range extends from the Creation to the author's own day, and it was largely used by Barhebraeus in compiling his own Chronicle.

    0
    0
  • The Vosges, and their continuation the Hardt, run through the land from south to north and divide it into the fertile and mild plain of the Rhine, together with the slope of the Hardt range, on the east, and the rather inclement district on the west, which, running between the Saarbriick carboniferous mountains and the northern spurs of the Hardt range, ends in a porphyrous cluster of hills, the highest point of which is the Donnersberg (2254 ft.).

    0
    0
  • The population is estimated at about 6,124,000 The country consists chiefly of a range of plateaus and wooded mountains, running north and south and declining on the coast to a narrow band of plain varying between 12 and 50 m.

    0
    0
  • The extraordinary result obtained by Terence is that, while he has left no trace in any of his comedies of one sketching from the life by which he was surrounded, there is perhaps no more truthful, natural and delicate delineator of human nature, in its ordinary and more level moods, within the whole range of classical literature.

    0
    0
  • From the Galera, the southernmost range of hills north of the Orinoco basin, the traveller saw a vast plain thickly grown with low trees.

    0
    0
  • In the latter range a few Ordovician fossils have been found, but in general the oldest strata which have yielded organic remains belong to the Cretaceous system.

    0
    0
  • The flora of Venezuela covers a wide range because of the vertical climatic zones.

    0
    0
  • Our range must embrace a much wider area - must comprise, in fact, all living matter - if we are ever to arrive at a scientific conception of what disease really means.

    0
    0
  • The oil separates from the fat-cells and is found lying free, while the sulphuretted hydrogen evolved as one of the products of putrefaction reacts upon the iron of the blood and throws down a precipitate of sulphide of iron, which in course of time imparts to the limb a range of colour commencing in green and terminating in black.

    0
    0
  • It has a very wide range, which nearly coincides with that of the cod, although of a somewhat more southern character, as it extends to both east and west coasts of the North Atlantic, and is occasionally found in the Mediterranean.

    0
    0
  • His power of initiative in poetry was very small, and the range of poetic ground which he could cover strictly limited.

    0
    0
  • In 1872, Hoppe-Seyler (1825-1895) gave a new beginning to our knowledge of the chemistry of secretion and of excretion; and later students have increased the range of physiological and pathological chemistry by investigations not only into the several stages of albuminoid material and the transitions which all foodstuffs undergo in digestion, but even into the structure of protoplasm itself.

    0
    0
  • On the west this valley is bounded by the Congo mountains, which form the wall of the rift-valley, on the east by the mighty range of Ruwenzori, whose heights tower over 16,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • It seems probable that, in a period geologically not very remote, the " Albertine " system will consist of one great river, extending from the northern slopes of the Kivu range, where the Ruchuru has its rise, to the existing junction of the Victoria Nile with Albert Nyanza.

    0
    0
  • But this superficiality was accompanied by such wonderful acuteness within a certain range, by such an absolutely unsurpassed literary aptitude and sense of style in all the lighter and some of the graver modes of literature, by such untiring energy and versatility in enterprise, that he has no parallel among ready writers anywhere.

    0
    0
  • There is no modern name covering the whole range, but its different parts have separate names.

    0
    0
  • Somerset House (1776-1786), a massive range of buildings by Sir William Chambers, surrounding a quadrangle, and having its front upon the Strand and back upon the Victoria Embankment, occupies the site of a palace founded by the protector Somerset, c. 1548.

    0
    0
  • Provision was made in the design, by Sir Aston Webb, for the extension of the Mall to open upon Trafalgar Square, through gateways in a semicircular range of buildings to be occupied by government offices, and for a wide circular space in front of the Palace, with a statue of the Queen by Thomas Brock in its centre.

    0
    0
  • Chimpanzees, of which there appear to be at least two species, range through the tropical forest-zone of Africa from the west coast to Uganda.

    0
    0
  • Such cars are in use at a number of deep inclined shafts in the Lake Superior copper district, where the depths range from 3000 to 5000 ft.

    0
    0
  • If the batteries and their artillery were somewhat out of date, the fact remained that warships steaming up the defile would be compelled to pass these fortifications at very close quarters, when the lack of range of their guns would cease to tell.

    0
    0
  • As Turkish detachments watching this strip of coastline were known to number only about 2,000 men - the Ottoman authorities never contemplating a hostile landing in force in the locality - the design was to put most of the attacking troops ashore during the night of the 6th-7th as a surprise, and that they should then push on at once and master a range of hills 4 or 5 m.

    0
    0
  • A footing had no doubt been gained at Suvla, giving the Allies control of a fairly well-sheltered inlet on the outer coast of the peninsula; but as the high ground within easy artillery range of the landing-places, and which overlooked the whole occupied area, remained in the hands of the Turks, much of the benefit hoped for from the acquisition was in reality neutralized.

    0
    0
  • It is this range, crowned by peaks of 22,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • Baber always calls the range Hindu Kush, and the way in which he speaks of it shows clearly that it was a range that was meant, not a solitary pass or peak (according to modern local use, as alleged by Elphinstone and Burnes).

    0
    0
  • Burnes first crossed the range (1832).

    0
    0
  • Of these Arakan is a strip of country lying on the seaward slopes of the range of hills known as the Arakan Yomas.

    0
    0
  • This tract consists mostly of undulating lowlands, but it is broken towards the south by the Pegu Yomas, a considerable range of hills which divides the two remaining tracts of the Irrawaddy basin.

    0
    0
  • It is a narrow strip of country lying between the Bay of Bengal and the high range of hills which form the eastern boundary of the province towards Siam.

    0
    0
  • They then form part of a system of ranges which curve north of the sources of the Chindwin river, and with the Kumon range and the hills of the Jade and Amber mines, make up a highland tract separated from the great Northern Shan plateau by the gorges of the Irrawaddy river.

    0
    0
  • On the east the Kachin, Shan and Karen hills, extending from the valley of the Irrawaddy into China far beyond the Salween gorge, form a continuous barrier and boundary, and tail off into a narrow range which forms the eastern watershed of the Salween and separates Tenasserim from Siam.

    0
    0
  • The Kumon range running down from the Hkamti country east of Assam to near Mogaung ends in a peak known as Shwedaunggyi, which reaches some 5750 ft.

    0
    0
  • The Chindwin, called in its upper reaches the Tanai, rises in the hills south-west of Thama, and flows due north till it enters the southeast corner of the Hukawng valley, where it turns north-west and continues in that direction cutting the valley into two almost equal parts until it reaches its north-west range, when it turns almost due south and takes the name of the Chindwin.

    0
    0
  • The rainfall in the hills varies very considerably, but seems to range from about 60 in.

    0
    0
  • It is a further striking fact, not unconnected with those just enumerated, that the extreme range of optical properties covered even by the relatively large number of optical glasses now available is in reality very small.

    0
    0
  • The wheels range in diameter from 18 in.

    0
    0
  • The wheels range from 2 in.

    0
    0
  • As liquidity might be looked upon as the ne plus ultra of softness, this is the right place for stating that, while most metals, when heated up to their melting points, pass pretty abruptly from the solid to the liquid state, platinum and iron first assume, and throughout a long range of temperatures retain, a condition of viscous semi-solidity which enables two pieces of them to be "welded" together by pressure into one continuous mass.

    0
    0
  • Mercury, within XVIII.7 a a certain range of temperatures situated close to its boiling point, combines slowly with oxygen into the red oxide, which, however, breaks up again at higher temperatures.

    0
    0
  • The puma has an exceedingly wide range of geographical distribution, extending over a hundred degrees of latitude, from Canada in the north to Patagonia in the south, and formerly was generally diffused in suitable localities from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, but the advances of civilization have curtailed the extent of the districts which it inhabits.

    0
    0
  • This vast flat, the modern El-Jezireh, is about 250 miles in length, interrupted only by a single limestone range, rising abruptly out of the plain, and branching off from the Zagros mountains under the names of Sarazur, Hamrin and Sinjar.

    0
    0
  • The Sahyadri range stretches from north to south; the watershed is formed by the Chander range, which runs east and west.

    0
    0
  • All the streams to the south of that range are tributaries of the Godavari.

    0
    0
  • So far, the majority of our Hittite inscriptions, like those first found at Hamah, are in relief (cameo); but the incised characters, first observed in the Tyana district, have since been shown, by discoveries at Marash, Babylon, &c., to have had a wider range.

    0
    0
  • Such are the Amazon stories, whose local range was very extensive, and the myths of Memnon and Pelops.

    0
    0
  • Alcoy s is built on high ground at the entrance to a gorge in the Moncabrer range (4547 ft.).

    0
    0
  • Alphonse de Candolle (Origin of Cultivated Plants, p. 158) points out that the epoch of its introduction into different countries agrees with the idea that its origin was in India, Cochin-China or the Malay Archipelago, and regards it as most probable that its primitive range extended from Bengal to Cochin-China.

    0
    0
  • It was a rugged and mountainous district, comprising some of the loftiest portions of the great range of Mt Taurus, together with the offshoots of the same chain towards the central table-land of Phrygia.

    0
    0
  • This was situated in the extreme north-east of the district immediately on the frontier of Phrygia, between Lake Egerdir and the range of the Sultan Dagh and was reckoned in the Greek and earlier Roman period, e.g.

    0
    0
  • Thus in 1906 from Cavalla and Xanthi 11,000 tons were exported of a value of about £1,101,000, the range of the various qualities per kilo (2·1 lb) being Ghienbek.

    0
    0
  • Thus led to confront the questions of necessity and free will, his own views became unsettled, and the further he pursued his inquiries the more he was inclined to assert the freedom of man and limit the range of the unconditional decrees of God.

    0
    0
  • From the Pir-Panjal range of Kashmir the markhor extends westwards into Baltistan, Astor, Hunza, Afghanistan and the trans-Indus ranges of the Punjab.

    0
    0
  • The site is shut off from the sea coast by a range of high rugged mountains.

    0
    0
  • Telford's road, raised on the lower Berwyn range side and overlooking the Dee, opens up the picturesqueness of Corwen, historically interesting from the reminiscences of Wales's last struggle for independence under Owen Glendower.

    0
    0
  • On the north-east and east the plateau shelves gradually to the Euphrates and the Persian Gulf; only in the extreme east is this general easterly slope arrested by the lofty range of Jebel Akhdar, which from Ras Musandan to Ras el Had borders the coast of Oman.

    0
    0
  • This tract, known as the Hamad, is a Syrian gravelly plain unbroken by any considerable range of hills desert.

    0
    0
  • Jebel Shammar, from which the northern district of Nejd takes its name, is a double range of mountains some 20 m.

    0
    0
  • On the west they rise somewhat steeply, exposing high cliffs of white limestone, which perhaps gave Palgrave the impression that the range is of greater absolute height than is actually the case.

    0
    0
  • On the main route from Hodeda to Sana the first coffee plantations are reached at Usil, at an altitude of 4300 ft., and throughout the western slopes of the range up to an altitude of 7000 ft.

    0
    0
  • From the crest of the range there is a short drop of 2000 or 3000 ft.

    0
    0
  • Hadramut; the two others run for a long distance through fertile valleys and, like many of the wadis on the seaward side of the range, have perennial streams down to within a few miles of the sea.

    0
    0
  • Snow falls on the Harra and on the Tehama range in northern Arabia, and Nolde records a fall of snow which lay on the Nafud on the 1st of February 1893.

    0
    0
  • Considerable forests are said to exist in Asir, and Burton found a few fine specimens which he regarded as the remains of an old forest, on the Tehama range in Midian.

    0
    0
  • It thrives on the seaward slopes of the western range in the zone of the tropical rains, at Coffee.

    0
    0
  • It occupies the Jucar valley, south of the Sierra de Zorras, a low range of hills which terminates eastward in Cape Cullera, a conspicuous headland surmounted by a lighthouse.

    0
    0
  • In most parts of its range it is migratory, and in Britain every autumn its numbers receive considerable accession from passing visitors.

    0
    0
  • Thus within eight years the range of territory from which Vienna drew its former throngs of wealthy pleasure-seeking visitors and more or less permanent inhabitants - Italian, German and Hungarian - was enormously restricted.

    0
    0
  • It grows in Mexico along the mountain range of the Sierra Gorda in the neighbourhood of San Luis de la Paz, from which district it is carried down to Tampico, whence it is exported.

    0
    0
  • The township is at the head of navigation on the Charles, and occupies the fertile undulating plains along the river running back to a range of hills, the highest of which are Whitney Hill (200 ft.) and Meeting House Hill (250 ft.).

    0
    0
  • The genus Cedrus contains two other species closely allied to C. Libani - Cedrus Deodara, the deodar, or "god tree" of the Himalayas, and Cedrus atlantica, of the Atlas range, North Africa.

    0
    0
  • Externally the finest part of the building is the west front, in which the note struck by the range of arches running round the base is repeated by four open arcades.

    0
    0
  • The lowest range of semicircular arches consists of twenty columns and the second of sixty; and above this is a row of eighteen windows in the same style separated by as many pilasters.

    0
    0
  • The basement is surrounded by a range of semicircular arches supported by fifteen columns, and above this rise six arcades with thirty columns each.

    0
    0
  • The range of the Saharan Atlas of Algeria divides (roughly speaking) into two at the Tunisian frontier.

    0
    0
  • The others, rising in the outer range, which does not reach the snow-line and receives less moisture, carry a volume of water to the sea during the rainy season, but for the rest of the year are nearly dry.

    0
    0
  • Passing the summit of that range, it rushes down as a cool and dry wind on the Pacific slopes beyond.

    0
    0
  • The Nepena, Casma, Huarmey, Fortaleza and Supe rivers rise on the slope of an outer range called the Cordillera Negra, and are consequently dry during the great part of the year.

    0
    0
  • Here the maritime range approaches the ocean, leaving a narrower strip of coast, but the fertile valleys are closer and more numerous.

    0
    0
  • Most of the rivers here have their sources in the central range, and are well supplied with water.

    0
    0
  • At the point where the river Santa breaks through the Cordillera Negra that range begins to subside, while the Maritime Cordillera continues as one chain to and beyond the frontier of Ecuador.

    0
    0
  • The Eastern Andes is a magnificent range in the southern part of Peru, of Silurian formation, with talcose and clay slates, many quartz veins and eruptions of granitic rocks.

    0
    0
  • The eastern range is cut through by six rivers in Peru, namely, the Maranon and Huallaga, the Perene, Mantaro, Apurimac, Vilcamayu and Paucartambo, the last five being tributaries of the Ucayali.

    0
    0
  • The range of the Andes in south Peru has a high plateau to the west and the vast plains of the Amazonian basin to the east.

    0
    0
  • The whole range is highly auriferous, and the thickness of the strata is not less than 10,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • The Andes lose their majestic height to the northward; and beyond Cerro Pasco the eastern chain sinks into a lower range between the Huallaga and Ucayali.

    0
    0
  • It breaks through the range at the Pongo de Chasuta and falls into the Maranon.

    0
    0
  • In ascending from the coast-valleys there is first an arid range, where the great-branched cacti rear themselves up among the rocks.

    0
    0
  • Sheep are reared over a somewhat wider range, exclusively for their wool.

    0
    0
  • It is found in Brazil, Guiana and Paraguay, and extends its range to the Rio del Norte, but is rare north of the isthmus of Panama.

    0
    0
  • The "Monitor" had the advantage of being able to out-manoeuvre her heavier and more unwieldy adversary; but the revolving turret made firing difficult and communications were none too good with the pilot house, the position of which on the forward deck lessened the range of the two turret-guns.

    0
    0
  • They range from the 7th magnitude to the smallest object perceptible in large telescopes.

    0