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ramsay

ramsay

ramsay Sentence Examples

  • The investigations of Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay had shown that indifference to chemical reagents did not sufficiently characterize an unknown gas as nitrogen, and it became necessary to reinvestigate other cases of the occurrence of "nitrogen" in nature.

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  • Miers drew Ramsay's attention to the work of W.

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  • Ramsay, repeating these experiments, found that the inert gas emitted refused xIIl.

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  • The density of helium has been determined by Ramsay and Travers as 1.98.

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  • - A bibliography and summary of the earlier work on helium will be found in a paper by Ramsay, Ann.

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  • Alexander Robert Maule Ramsay, third son of the 13th Earl of Dalhousie.

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  • Princess Patricia of Connaught resigned her royal title on her marriage, and elected to be known as Lady Patricia Ramsay.

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  • Ramsay and H.

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  • Ramsay and E.

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  • Ramsay, however, doubts this (The Church in the Roman Empire, London, 1893), and argues that it was due to a long series of instructions to provincial governors (mandata, not decreta) who interpreted their duty largely in conformity with the attitude of the reigning emperor.

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  • Ramsay, op. cit.; W.

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  • Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, and Church in the Roman Empire), but also to the Judaism of the Diaspora.

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  • Ramsay (Journ.

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  • Ramsay, Lancaster and York (2 vols., Oxford, 1892), and C. W.

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  • Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire (London, 1894); A.

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  • Ramsay, "Historical Geography of Asia Minor" (R.G.S.

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  • ALLAN RAMSAY (1686-1758), Scottish poet, was born at Leadhills, Lanarkshire, on the 15th of October 1686.

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  • The Tea-Table Miscellany is "A Collection of Choice Songs Scots and English," containing some of Ramsay's own, some by his friends, several well-known ballads and songs, and some Caroline verse.

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  • In The Ever Green, being a Collection of Scots Poems wrote by the Ingenious before 1600, Ramsay had another purpose, to reawaken an interest in the older national literature.

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  • Ramsay wrote little afterwards, though he published a few shorter poems, and new editions of his earlier work.

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  • Gay visited him in Edinburgh, and Pope praised his pastoral - compliments which were undoubtedly responsible for some of Ramsay's unhappy poetic ventures beyond his Scots vernacular.

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  • In 1755 he retired from his shop to the house on the slope of the Castle Rock, still known as Ramsay Lodge.

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  • Ramsay's importance in literary history is twofold.

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  • The Tea-Table Miscellany was reprinted in 1871 (2 vols., Glasgow; John Crum); The Ever Green in 1875 (2 vols., Glasgow; Robert Forrester); The Poems of Allan Ramsay in 1877 (2 vols., Paisley; Alex.

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  • Allan Ramsay (Painter) >>

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  • In 1907 he took a prominent part in advocating the ending, rather than the mending, of the House of Lords; and in 1908 he was elected chairman of the party, a post which he held for two years and to which he was reelected in the autumn of 1914 when the then chairman, Mr. Ramsay Macdonald, had to resign owing to his pacifist views.

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  • Mr. Henderson visited Paris in the company of Mr. Ramsay Macdonald to discuss the situation with Labour over there, but found that neither French, nor Belgian, nor Italian, nor American Labour was disposed to join.

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  • Ramsay, Angevin Empire (London, 1903); K.

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  • Ramsay, The Church in the' Roman Empire (1903); E.

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  • Some notices of Australian birds by Mr Ramsay and others are to be found in the Proceedings of the Linnaean Society of New South Wales and of the Royal Society of Tasmania.

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  • Ramsay, Church in the Roman Empire, pp. 320 seq.; V.

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  • Ramsay inclines to a remarkable rock-cut tomb beside Magnesia.

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  • There was a tradition in antiquity that the city of Tantalus had been swallowed up in a lake on the mountain; but the legend may, as Ramsay thinks, have been suggested by the vast ravine which yawns beneath the acropolis.

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  • Ramsay in Journal of Hellenic Studies, iii.; Frazer's Pausanias, iii.

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  • Ramsay and J.

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  • Ramsay; and it is borne out by the Armenian name Kermanig, which has been given to the place since at least the 12th century.

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  • SIR WILLIAM RAMSAY (1852-), British chemist, nephew of Sir A.

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  • C. Ramsay, was born at Glasgow on the 2nd of October 1852.

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  • Among the books written by Sir William Ramsay, who was created K.C.B.

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  • Sir William Mitchell Ramsay >>

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  • Ramsay and Shields suggested that there exists an equation for the surface energy of liquids, analogous to the volume-energy equation of gases, PV = RT.

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  • Ramsay and Shields found from investigations of the temperature coefficient of the surface energy that Tin the equation y(Mv) 3 = KT must be counted downwards from the critical temperature T less about 6°.

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  • The apparatus devised by Ramsay and Shields consisted of a capillary tube, on one end of which was blown a bulb provided with a minute hole.

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  • and iv.; Sir James Ramsay, Foundations of England, vol.

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  • ALLAN RAMSAY (1713-1784), Scotch portrait-painter, the eldest son of the author of The Gentle Shepherd, was born at Edinburgh in 1713.

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  • Ramsay manifested an aptitude for art from an early period, and at the age of twenty we find him in London studying under the Swedish painter Hans Huyssing, and at the St Martin's Lane Academy; and in 1736 he left for Rome, where he worked for three years under Solimena and Imperiali (Ferna.ndi).

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  • This last-named work shows the influence of French art, an influence which helped greatly to form the practice of Ramsay, and which is even more clearly visible in the large collection of his sketches in the possession of the Royal Scottish Academy and the Board of Trustees, Edinburgh.

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  • Sir Andrew Crombie Ramsay >>

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  • Ramsay, Chem.

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  • Ramsay (Jour.

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  • Ramsay, Jour.

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  • Ramsay believes them to be direct descendants of the ancient Christian population; but there is reason to think they are partly sprung from more recent immigrants who moved in the r8th century from western Greece into the domain of the Karasmans of Manisa and Bergama, as recorded by W.

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  • Ramsay, Letters to the Seven Churches (1904); M.

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  • (1887); Sir James Ramsay, Foundations of England, vol.

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  • The battle is chiefly notable for the steadi- donor, ness with which the allied right, covered by the Light Division in squares, changed position in presence of the French cavalry; and for the extraordinary feat of arms of Captain Norman Ramsay, R.H.A., in charging through the French cavalry with his guns.

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  • Ramsay, "Sipylos and Cybele," in Journal of Hellenic Studies, iii.

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  • Hallam maintains that the only overt act of treason proved against Russell was his concurrence in the project of a rising at Taunton, which he denied, and which, Ramsay being the only witness, was not sufficient to warrant a conviction.

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  • St John's Episcopal church at the west end of Princes Street was the scene of the ministrations of Dean Ramsay, and St Paul's Episcopal church of the Rev. Archibald Alison, father of the historian.

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  • Sir John Steell's equestrian statue of the duke of Wellington stands in front of the Register House, and in Princes Street Gardens are statues of Livingstone, Christopher North, Allan Ramsay, Adam Black and Sir J.

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  • The Pentland range contains many points of interest and beauty, but these are mostly accessible only to the pedestrian, although the hills are crossed by roads, of which the chief are those by Glencorse burn and the Cauld Stane Slap. Habbie's Howe, the scene of Allan Ramsay's pastoral The Gentle Shepherd, is some 2 m.

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  • 1572), Buchanan (1582), Alexander Montgomery (1605), Drummond of Hawthornden (1649), Allan Ramsay (1757), Smollett (1771), Fergusson (1774), and Burns (1796), carried on the literary associations of the Scottish capital nearly to the close of the 18th century, when various causes combined to give them new significance and value.

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  • vi., 1900), a plea for Ramsay's authorship of the known text; also W.

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  • Selections have been frequently reprinted since Ramsay's Ever-Green (1724) and Hailes's Ancient Scottish Poems (1817).

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  • Ramsay, Was Christ born in Bethlehem ?

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  • Ramsay in 1907 (see their Thousand and One Churches, 1909).

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  • Ramsay at Konia; base silver seal, supported on three lions' claws, bought by D.

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  • Since all the Syrian monuments of the Hittite class, so far known, seem comparatively late (most show such strong Assyrian influence that they must fall after 110o B.C. and probably even considerably later), while the North Cappadocian monuments (as Sayce, Ramsay, Perrot and others saw long ago) are the earlier in style, we are bound to ascribe the origin of the civilization which they represent to the Cappadocian Hatti.

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  • Ramsay, " Syro-Cappadocian Monuments," in Athen.

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  • Hirschfeld, Radet, Sterrett, Lanckoronski, Ramsay, &c.), and show them to have attained under the Roman Empire to a degree of opulence and prosperity far beyond what we should have looked for in a country of predatory mountaineers.

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  • Large estates in Pisidia and the adjoining parts of Phrygia belonged to the Roman emperors; and their administration has been investigated by Ramsay and others.

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  • A few short Pisidian inscriptions have been published by Ramsay in Revue des etudes anciennes (18 95, pp. 353-3 62).

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  • Ramsay (St Paul the Traveller, ch.

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  • Ramsay (Lancaster and York) estimates that in the four years from 1399 to 1403 they had received from the king the sum of X41,750, which represented a very large capital in the 14th century, and they had also received considerable grants of land.

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  • Ramsay's Lancaster and York (Oxford, 1892).

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  • Ramsay, Historical Geography of Asia Minor (1890); St Paul the Traveller (1895); G.

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  • Ramsay's Angevin Empire (London, 1903); R.

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  • Ramsay, The Letters to the Several Churches (1904), and article in Hastings' Dict.

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  • See Ramsay, Histor.

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  • Ramsay in Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography; J.

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  • There is more than one meaning of William Ramsay discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • Ramsay, Letters to the Seven Churches (1904).

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  • Further reasons against this view have been urged by Ramsay, who sums up his main results as follows: (1) There was no express law or formal edict against the Christians.

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  • Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire, p. 223).

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  • Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire (ed.

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  • Ramsay found that a wide level plain, which had before been covered by water, intervened between Ujiji and the lake, but stated that no further sinking had taken place during the two previous years.

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  • Ramsay, in Verhandl.

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  • The town has a college called after Sir Henry Ramsay; a government high school; a Christian girls' school; and a large cantonment.

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  • Lord Rayleigh has made many investigations of the absolute densities of gases, one of which, namely on atmospheric and artificial nitrogen, undertaken in conjunction with Sir William Ramsay, culminated in the discovery of argon.

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  • The work of Ramsay, The Letters to the Seven Churches (1904), is a pure representative of this method.

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  • "JAMES RAMSAY MACDONALD (1866-), British politician, was born at Lossiemouth, and educated at a board school.

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  • Cavendish made many analyses: from more than soo determinations of air in winter and summer, in wet and clear weather, and in town and country, he discerned the mean composition of the atmosphere to be, oxygen 20 833% and nitrogen 79.167% The same experimenter noticed the presence of an inert gas, in very minute amount; this gas, afterwards investigated by Rayleigh and Ramsay, is now named argon.

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  • Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay (Phil.

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  • Ramsay (1883); see also H.

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  • Ramsay, St Paul the Traveller; Carl v.

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  • Ramsay, T.

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  • Ramsay's " Address on Efficiency in Education " (Glasgow, 1902, 17-20), from the Transactions of the Amer.

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  • Ramsay (Was Christ Born at Bethlehem?, 1898, pp. 1 49 ff.) defends the exact accuracy of St Luke's " first census " as witnessing to the (otherwise of course unknown) introduction into Syria of the periodic fourteen years' census which the evidence of papyri has lately established for Egypt, at least from A.D.

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  • 20, the periodic census should fall in 9 B.C., but Ramsay alleges various;causes for delay, which would have postponed the actual execution of the census till 7 B.C., and supposes that Quirinius was an imperial commissioner specially appointed to carry it out.

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  • Here we are dependent (i.) on general 1 This date appears to be satisfactorily established by Ramsay, " A Second Fixed Point in the Pauline Chronology," Expositor, August 1900.

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  • Ramsay's various works, and in Harnack's Chronologie der altchristlichen Litteratur bis Eusebius, i.

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  • Ramsay, Hist.

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  • Besides biogra p hical sketches of Defoe, Sir John Davies, Allan Ramsay, Sir David Lyndsay, Churchyard and others, prefixed to editions of their respective works, Chalmers wrote a life of Thomas Paine, the author of the Rights of Man, which he published under the assumed name of Francis Oldys, A.M., of the University of Pennsylvania; and a life of Ruddiman, in which considerable light is thrown on the state of literature in Scotland during the earlier part of the last century.

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  • Ramsay, Histor.

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  • Ramsay and S.

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  • Ramsay, The Letters to the Seven Churches, 1 55 f.), whose zeal for the Temple and the Mosaic ritual customs led to Paul's arrest in Jerusalem (Acts xix.

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  • Ramsay published at Lahore his useful Practical Dictionary of Western Tibet.

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  • Soc., April 1894.) At this stage it became clear that the complication depended upon some hitherto unknown body, and probability inclined to the existence of a gas in the atmosphere heavier than nitrogen, and remaining unacted upon during the removal of the oxygen - a conclusion afterwards fully established by Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay.

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  • The announcement to the British Association in 1894 by Rayleigh and Ramsay of a new gas in the atmosphere was received with a good deal of scepticism.

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  • The density of argon, prepared and purified by magnesium, was found by Sir William Ramsay to be 19.941 on the O = 16 scale.

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  • It may be added that helium has the same character as argon in respect of specific heats (Ramsay, Proc. Roy.

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  • An attempt, somewhat later, by Ramsay and J.

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  • More recently Ramsay and M.

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  • Sir William Ramsay considers that probably the volume of all of them taken together does not exceed part of that of the argon.

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  • See also Kate Norgate, England under the Angevin Kings (1887); Sir James Ramsay, Angevin Empire (1903); and C. E.

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  • Ramsay), partial decomposition into water, oxygen and nitrogen peroxide taking place.

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  • Ramsay: Pauline and other Studies (1907), p. 76, Hoennicke's Das Judenchristentum (1908), p. 156 seq., and Harnack's Mission and Expansion of Christianity, ii.

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  • Ramsay.

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  • Ramsay's The Angevin Empire (London, 1893); H.

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  • The young prince was educated at his father's miniature court in Rome, with James Murray, Jacobite earl of Dunbar, for his governor, and under various tutors, amongst whom were the learned Chevalier Ramsay, Sir Thomas Sheridan and the abbe Legoux.

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  • 67, - evidently refers to "the president of the church," and in a recently discovered papyrus which Ramsay dates 303 a certain bishop is described as Xaov 7rpoIQTaµevov, Studies in Roman Provinces, pp. 125-126.

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  • Modern: Sir James Ramsay, Foundations of England, vol.

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  • Ramsay has argued in his St Paul the Traveller that the visit of Paul to Jerusalem with the famine relief is the meeting between Paul and Peter referred to in Gal.

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  • According to Ramsay, then, Peter was present during the famine, and made a private agreement with Paul that the latter should preach to the Gentiles, and so far Gentile Christianity was recognized, but the conditions of the intercourse between Gentile and Jewish Christians were not defined, and the question of circumcision was perhaps not finally settled.

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  • Ramsay the matter is simpler.

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  • Ramsay, in his Church in the Roman Empire, has adopted a different line of argument.

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  • The Lady Mary Ramsay grammar school dates from 1594.

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  • Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics, i.

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  • (Ramsay in Kuhn's Zeitsch.

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  • Ramsay is inclined to attribute to the influence of Athenodorus the striking resemblances which can be established between Seneca and Paul, the latter of whom must certainly have been acquainted with his teachings.

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  • Ramsay in the Expositor, September 1906, pp. 268 ff.) 2.

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  • Ramsay, St Paul the Traveller, pp. 257-261; art.

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  • Among his officers we see the names of Napier, Ramsay, Haliburton and Polwarth.

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  • By 1342 Roxburgh, Stirling and Edinburgh castles were again in Scottish hands, though the Knight of Liddesdale captured and starved to death, in Hermitage castle, his gallant companion in arms, Sir Alexander Ramsay, who had relieved the garrison of Dunbar.

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  • King David, a lad of eighteen, had returned from France and had removed this Douglas from the sheriffdom of Teviotdale, superseding him by Alexander Ramsay.

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  • Ramsay, as we have seen, and though David was obliged to overlook the crime, the Knight of Liddesdale henceforth was not to be trusted as loyal against England.

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  • He next arrested Albany's secretary and the Lord Montgomery: the story, accepted by our historians, that he also seized twenty-six notables, has been finally disproved by Sir James Ramsay.

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  • was not to make open war on Scotland, but to intrigue secretly, especially with the treacherous Douglas, earl of Angus, and with Ramsay, earl of Bothwell under James III., but soon dispossessed.

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  • It is not known whether the mysterious events that culminated in the slaying of the earl of Gowrie and his brother, by John Ramsay, in their own house in Perth, on the 5th of August 1600, had any connexion with James's attitude to England and the kirk.

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  • 15 a the 18th century revival begun in Ramsay.

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  • There is, of course, frequent interaction between these two movements, but recognition of their separate development is necessary to the understanding of such contemporary contrasts as the Thrissil and the Rois and Peblis to the Play, Drummond and Montgomerie, Ramsay and Hume.

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  • The historical student will be mainly interested in discovering anticipations of the later style and purpose of Ramsay, Fergusson and Burns, and in finding therein early evidence of what has been too often treated as the characteristics of later Scotticism.

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  • If the work begun by Allan Ramsay, continued by Fergusson and completed by Burns, were matter for separate treatment, it would be necessary to show not only that the editorial zeal which turned these writers to the forgotten vernacular and to " popular " themes was inspired by the general conditions of reaction against the artificiality of the century; but that it was because these poets were Scots, and in Scotland, that they chose this line of return to nature and naturalness, and did honour, partly by protest, to the slighted efforts of the " vulgar " muse.

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  • Athen., &c., and his book Gordium (1904); Humann and Judeich, Hierapolis (1898); Radet in his work En Phrygie; Ramsay [in addition to articles in Mittheil.

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  • Ramsay, 1909) Palace and Mosque at Ukhaider (1914).

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  • Ramsay in the Expositor, Nov.

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  • This Appears To Be Actually The Case For Monatomic Gases Such As Mercury Vapour (Kundt And Warburg, 1876), Argon And Helium (Ramsay, 1896).

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  • This approximate relation has been employed by Ramsay and Young (Phil.

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  • 1902), under Ramsay's direction, for comparing solubilities which are in many respects analogous to vapour-pressures.

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  • Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i.

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  • Ramsay, op. cit.

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  • Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire (1893).

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  • Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia (1895), and Impressions of Turkey (1898).

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  • Ramsay, St Paul the Traveller and Roman Citizen, 1895), but was hardly likely to be shared by one of the next.

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  • Ramsay and others argue that the latter visit itself coincided with the Relief visit, and even see in Gal.

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  • Ramsay's researches.

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  • In the recovery of a more real standard, we owe much to men like Mommsen, Ramsay, Blass and Harnack, trained amid other methods and traditions than those which had brought the constructive study of Acts almost to a deadlock.

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  • Among these are the supposed traces of 2nd-century Gnosticism and " hierarchical " ideas of organization; but especially the argument from the relation of the Roman state to the Christians, which Ramsay has reversed and turned into proof of an origin prior to Pliny's correspondence with Trajan on the subject.

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  • Ramsay, The Letters to the Seven Churches, ch.

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  • In his later work, on St Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen (1895), Ramsay's views gain both in precision and in breadth.

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  • For modern accounts see especially Sir James Ramsay's Lancaster and York, and The Political History of England, vol.

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  • The most important lives are those of John Marshall (Philadelphia, 1804-1807), David Ramsay (New York, 2807), Washington Irving (New York, 1855-1859), E.

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  • Thomson, Sir William Crookes, Sir William Ramsay and others in England.

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  • Ramsay, " Religion of Greece and Asia Minor," in Hastings' Diet.

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  • Ramsay, but a recent Roman Catholic scholar, Dr A.

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  • Ramsay's Historical Commentary on Galatians (1899) contains archaeological and historical material which is often illuminating.

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  • Ramsay (Hastings' Diet.

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  • Ramsay), the latter showed a dangerous tendency to lightness and reaction, and later events show that the pagan tradition of Artemis continued very strong and perhaps never became quite extinct in the Ephesian district.

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  • Ramsay, Letters to the Seven Churches (1904); O.

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  • Ramsay, Lancaster and York 1 3991485 (Oxford, 1892).

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  • Ramsay's opinion, was for that reason referred to in Rev. ii.

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  • Ramsay, Letters to the Seven Churches (1904); and especially the publication by the Royal Museum of Berlin, Alterthumer von Pergamon (1885 sqq.); "Operations at Pergamon 1906-1907," in Athenische Mitteil.

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  • Ramsay's Pauline and other Studies (1907), 219 f.

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  • Ramsay, Ber., 1877, 10, p. 736); by heating pyrrol with sodium methylate and methylene iodide to 200° C. (M.

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  • C. Ramsay, Physical Geography and Geology of Great Britain, edited by H.

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  • Ramsay's Lancaster and York; Political History of England, vol.

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  • For modern authors, consult Sir James Ramsay's Lancaster and York (1892), and the Political History of England, vol.

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  • 687), was succeeded by one dedicated in 1214, which was the scene of the seizure of Sir Alexander Ramsay of Dalhousie in 1342 by Sir William Douglas.

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  • Ramsay, Foundations of England, ii.

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  • From 1216 we have nothing but Ramsay, Stubbs, Longmans Political History and monographs (some of them good), until we come to Wylies Henry IV.

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  • The pathetic song of "Lochaber no more" was written by Allan Ramsay.

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  • Among the clergy of postRevolution days the most eminent are Bishop Sage, a well-known patristic scholar; Bishop Rattray, liturgiologist; John Skinner, of Longside, author of Tullochgorum; Bishop Gleig, editor of the 3rd edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Dean Ramsay, author of Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character; Bishop A.

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  • Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i.-ii.

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  • Older histories are Alexander Hewatt, Historical Account of the Rise and Progress of the Colonies of South Carolina and Georgia (London, 1779), freely used by later writers; David Ramsay, History of South Carolina (2 vols., Charleston, 1809), little more than a reprint, without acknowledgments, of Hewatt; and William J.

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  • Older books on the subject are David Ramsay, History of the Revolution of South Carolina from a British Colony to an Independent State (2 vols., Trenton, 1785); William Moultrie, Memoirs of the American Revolution, so far as it related to the States of North and South Carolina and Georgia (2 vols., New York, 1802); John Drayton, Memoirs of the American Revolution relating to the State of South Carolina (2 vols., Charleston, 1821); and R.

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  • Ramsay in the Journal of Hellenic Studies, ii.

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  • Ramsay, Letters to the Seven Churches (1904) and article in Hastings's Dict.

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  • Ramsay, Church in the Roman Empire (1893).

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  • Where Greek influence affects the native religion, emphasis tends to be laid on the god, but the character of the religion remains everywhere ultimately the same (see Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, ch.

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  • The nonchalant attitude by the police to the bus burning has got a few people in Ramsay Street talking.

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  • The earliest entry found was in 1825: " Turnbull & Ramsay, manufacturing chemists, 107 Geo.

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  • BRIDGE OF ALLAN Home to Stirling's university with a bustling high street with some great shops, including Clive Ramsay's wonderful deli.

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  • The promotion of 5 of his squad did not faze Doug Ramsay, whose Third Team continue to set the pace in their division.

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  • You have to remember that Gordon Ramsay is his own best publicist.

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  • rightful owners in Ramsay Street.

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  • This proliferation makes rather risible the Guardian's expressions of expletive fatigue in relation to Gordon Ramsay's television appearances.

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  • William ramsay X-rays.

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  • Of the auctions be freed up was interest in william Ramsay X-rays.

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  • Hardy, Christianity and the Roman Government (1894), pp. 1 45 sqq., which criticizes both Neumann and Ramsay; Leonard Alston, Stoic and Christian of the 2nd century (1906); J.

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  • He also received many grants of land, including the lordship of Bothwell, which had been taken from John Ramsay, Lord Bothwell (d.

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  • In the volume of poems published in 1722 Ramsay had shown his bent to this genre, especially in "Patie and Roger," which supplies two of the dramatis personae to his greater work.

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  • See Sir James Ramsay, Foundations of England, vol.

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  • The synthesis of nitric acid by passing electric sparks through moist air by Cavendish is a famous piece of experimental work, for in the first place it determined the composition of this important substance, and in the second place the minute residue of air which would not combine, although ignored for about a century, was subsequently examined by Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay, who showed that it consists of a mixture of elementary substances - argon, krypton, neon and xenon (see Argon).

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  • The first, made by Sir William Ramsay in 1896, was that the mineral evolved a peculiar gas when treated with sulphuric acid; this gas, helium (q.v.), proved to be identical with a constituent of the sun's atmosphere, detected as early as 1868 by Sir Norman Lockyer during a spectroscopic examination of the sun's chromosphere.

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  • Ramsay and Shields found from investigations of the temperature coefficient of the surface energy that Tin the equation y(Mv) 3 = KT must be counted downwards from the critical temperature T less about 6°.

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  • Ramsay, The Island of Cuba (New York, 1896); Coleccion de reales ordenes, decretos y disposiciones (Havana, serial, 1857-1898); Spanish Rule in Cuba.

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  • Ramsay - is really conclusive for the reign of Vespasian (A.D.

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  • Sir William Ramsay has also shown that martyrdoms in Phrygia were rare during the end of the 2nd and the whole of the 3rd century, a spirit of religious compromise prevailing between the Christian and pagan populations (see a paper by H.

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  • I I (see, for the parallel with the case of Vespasian and Titus, Ramsay, St Paul the Roman Traveller, p. 387), so that the fifteenth year would be roughly A.D.

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  • Ramsay has been the principal advocate of the adoption of the South-Galatian theory, which maintains that they were the churches planted in Derbe, Lystra, Iconium and Antioch (see GALATIANS).

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  • Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, vol.

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  • du Fresne de Beaucourt's Histoire de Charles VII., Dr Gairdner's Introductions to the Paston Letters, Sir James Ramsay's Lancaster and York (x892), and The Political History of England, vol.

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  • Ramsay, Ber., 1877, 10, p. 736); by heating pyrrol with sodium methylate and methylene iodide to 200° C. (M.

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  • The dogs are returned to their rightful owners in Ramsay Street.

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  • This proliferation makes rather risible the Guardian 's expressions of expletive fatigue in relation to Gordon Ramsay 's television appearances.

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  • Elsewhere in Ramsay Street, Cheryl 's daughter Janine attempts to shake off her sordid past once more.

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  • But some people who followed them william ramsay x-rays.

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  • Of the auctions be freed up was interest in william ramsay x-rays.

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  • The reality show Hell's Kitchen thrust Gordon Ramsay into the spotlight as the tough-as-nails chef who put wannabes through their paces to gain the top spot and their own restaurant.

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  • Now, Ramsay is opening his own New York City eatery.

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  • Gordon Ramsay brought in viewers with his prickly ways and the popular Fox show launched the careers of some well-deserving chefs.

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  • The restaurant will be located inside of the London NYC Hotel, and will be called (simply enough) Gordon Ramsay at The London.

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  • Yep, he's got one of those too - the best-selling Gordon Ramsay Makes it Easy.

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  • Gordon Ramsay's potty mouth has the Australian parliament telling him to get out of the kitchen.

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  • If you've ever worked in a kitchen, you know all about chefs' tempers and if you've ever watched Hell's Kitchen or Kitchen Nightmares you know Chef Ramsay's temper is probably among the worst.

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  • Here's the crux of the issue: Ramsay's shows air in Australia after 8:30 p.m., a time determined to keep small children's ears safe from Ramsay's language.

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  • Meaning, Ramsay's tirades are heard in their entirety.

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  • The Aussie government wants to "protect" its viewers' ears from being subjected to Ramsay's favorite expletives by introducing new rules regarding bad language on Australian television.

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  • Apparently they based this on counting how many F-bombs Ramsay used in one Kitchen Nightmares show, which was 80 times in 40 minutes.

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  • Jackson, Ben Stiller, Kate Winslet, Orlando Bloom, David Bowie and Gordon Ramsay.

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  • Ramsay Way, STE 112, Kent, WA 98032 (253) 856-9595Located in the middle of the city, the Kent Campus is ideal for AA degree students who are seeking flexible course schedules, small class sizes, and easy access to transportation.

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  • Neighbours is an Australian soap opera that follows the trials and tribulations of families who live on Ramsay Street, a cul-de-sac in the fictional town of Erinsborough.

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  • It's no surprise, then, that since its inception, Neighbours has made a habit of casting a bevy of beauties to reside on Ramsay Street.

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  • These well known names aren't the only women who have made their mark on Ramsay Street, though.

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  • The serial is set in the fictional middle class suburb of Erinsborough and follows the lives of the families who live in six houses at the end of Ramsay Street.

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  • Regardless of its twisted plots and endlessly evolving cast changes, Neighbours remains steadfast to its original premise of following families at the end of the Ramsay Street cul-de-sac.

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  • Every Hell's Kitchen winner spends a high-stress, fast paced season trying to impress Chef Gordon Ramsay enough to be his next protégé.

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  • She was a young culinary student that seemed to have a bit of a superiority complex, especially after she got a few compliments from Chef Ramsay.

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  • After both finalists chose their teams from the group of previously voted off chefs, Petrozza and Christina got to work on the race to win the $250,000 prize and one year contract at Ramsay's London West Hollywood restaurant.

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  • Both menus impressed Ramsay but he favored Petrozza's just a bit more.

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  • The prize for every winner of Hell's Kitchen is a one year contract as Executive Chef at one of Ramsay's many restaurants.

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  • His prize was job in London working directly under Chef Ramsay.

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  • If you're a fan of the show and Gordon Ramsay's you probably can't wait to hear him call someone a "donkey" or "doughnut".

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  • For someone like Gordon Ramsay, who simply loves his expletives, calling someone a doughnut, banana or donkey out of anger seems really tame…and just a little bit funny.

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  • He's one of the most instantly recognizable chefs on television, and any Gordon Ramsay biography helps to shed light on his rise to fame.

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  • Ramsay is best known as the foul-mouthed host of reality TV show Hell's Kitchen and he's also at the helm of other shows, including Kitchen Nightmares.

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  • Gordon Ramsay was born in Scotland on November 8, 1966.

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  • His initial career path had nothing at all to do with food or cooking; Ramsay had planned to become a soccer star.

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  • When he was 19, Ramsay - who had already expressed an interest in cooking - entered college to study Hotel Management.

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  • Ramsay also spent several years in France studying cooking.

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  • Ramsay's first job as head chef was at the Tante Claire restaurant in London in 1993.

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  • In 1998, he opened his first restaurant, Gordon Ramsay at Royal Hospital Road.

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  • Chef Ramsay won three Michelin Awards at this restaurant, making him the first Scottish chef to earn this honor.

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  • After being featured in several television programs in the United Kingdom, Ramsay was introduced to U.S. viewers with the reality TV show Hell's Kitchen.

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  • The show is a competition-based series that pits aspiring head chefs against each other under the direction and scrutiny of Gordon Ramsay.

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  • Each week at least one of the chefs is eliminated, and the winner receives a head chef job at one of Ramsay's restaurants.

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  • Critics of the show point to Ramsay's foul language and harsh treatment of the chefs on the show, but most fans actually enjoy this aspect of the program.

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  • Indeed, Ramsay is much different than any garden-variety reality show host.

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  • Ramsay's second reality show in the U.S. is Kitchen Nightmares.

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  • In this show, Ramsay enters struggling restaurants and - with the sometimes reluctant help of the owners - transforms both the building and the menu.

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  • Here again, Ramsay comes off as extremely harsh with restaurant owners and staff.

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  • Another one of Ramsay's cooking shows is called The F-Word.

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  • This program features a variety of different segments, from following the raising and eventual slaughter of animals for food to a cooking competition between Ramsay and his guests.

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  • In 2010, the FOX network gave Ramsay yet another show titled MasterChef.

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  • Serving as both co-producer and host/judge, Gordon Ramsay showed audiences a bit of a softer side to his personality in dealing with the amateur competitors.

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  • No Gordon Ramsay biography would be complete without mentioning the large library of cookbooks he has authored.

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  • Ramsay has also penned two autobiographical books, Humble Pie and Playing with Fire.

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  • Gordon Ramsay has been married to Tana Hutcheson since 1996.

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  • Hutcheson's father, Chris, handles the day-to-day business operations for all of Ramsay's restaurants.

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  • Kitchen Nightmares is one of celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay's reality TV shows.

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  • Ramsay travels to restaurants that are struggling to make ends meet and guides them toward profitability through drastic transformations, based on their menus and kitchen staff.

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  • Kitchen Nightmares began as Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares in the United Kingdom, premiering in April, 2004.

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  • In September 2007, the FOX network brought the show to an American audience, dropping Ramsay's name from the title.

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  • Since Ramsay's other reality show, Hell's Kitchen (also a British import), was doing well in the ratings, FOX decided that a double dose of the chef would likely appeal to fans.

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  • In each episode of Kitchen Nightmares, Ramsay starts things off with a brief introduction to the restaurant and its owners, giving details about how long the business has been running and how much its sales have dropped off.

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  • Then Ramsay enters the establishment and observes how a usual service is run, making comments and asking questions along the way.

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  • After his observations, Ramsay presents his opinions to the restaurant owners and pinpoints where he believes the problems lie.

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  • Ramsay promises to overhaul the menu and fix the problems within one week.

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  • Gordon Ramsay often comes across as rude, gruff, and uncaring, but in this show you can truly see that he is extremely passionate about food and the people preparing it.

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  • Ramsay takes care to create new menus that will suit both the restaurant's target clientele as well as local offerings and customs.

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  • When Ramsay's week is finished, he sticks around and becomes a customer for one meal.

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  • After several months, Ramsay usually returns to the restaurants he's worked with to order a meal and check on their progress.

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  • Viewers are updated on how the restaurants are doing now and whether or not Ramsay's suggested changes actually survived past the week he was there.

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  • Roughly half of the American establishments that Ramsay has worked in have closed or sold to new management.

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  • Ramsay and his production staff on both sides of the ocean have been to court for allegedly staging elements of the show.

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  • In the British case, Ramsay actually sued The London Evening Standard for reporting claims that the show had staged scenes from a restaurant to make it look worse than it really was.

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  • In the U.S., a restaurant owner sued Ramsay for staging scenes to add drama to the show.

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  • Hell's Kitchen features British chef Gordon Ramsay as he auditions young chefs for a chance of working as an executive chef in a top restaurant.

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  • In later seasons of Hell's Kitchen, winners were given the choice between accepting $250,000 in prize money without accepting a job or working for a year as a chef in a restaurant Ramsay places them and earn that $250,000 as a salary.

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  • Every week, Ramsay eliminates one chef from the competition until there are only two left.

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  • The two finalists compete in a grand finale event from which Ramsay selects the winner.

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  • After an initial challenge which involves cooking their signature dish for Ramsay, chefs are split into two teams, usually along gender lines.

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  • The winning team from the first challenge usually gets some sort of prize, often involving time with Ramsay, while the losing team has to do extra work, such as prepping the food for dinner service.

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  • The teams must complete a dinner service under the watchful eye of Ramsay.

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  • Ramsay tastes most dishes before they go out, and he throws away things he doesn't like.

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  • If a team is falling behind, Ramsay might move the contestants around to different stations.

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  • When the service falls behind irreparably, or if the food is not up to his standards, Ramsay shuts down the restaurant mid-service and sends the customers home.

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  • Ramsay selects the winning and losing team after each service.

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  • Ramsay also sometimes eliminates someone mid-service if they cannot keep up or if he doesn't like their attitude.

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  • Dedicated fans of the show know that you might not actually get a meal, but you will get a chance to see Chef Ramsay and the contestants in action.

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  • Naturally, Chef Ramsay can opt to "shut it down" at any time during the dinner service, so the diners who order from the Hell's Kitchen menu may not get their food.

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  • This popular reality show, which is based on a cooking competition overseen by chef Gordon Ramsay, has had many winners who have gone on to land high paying jobs at some of Ramsay's own restaurants.

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  • The choice of who gets sent home is left to Ramsay himself.

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  • To determine who won Hell's Kitchen, Ramsay once again makes the decision himself.

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  • Comment cards are filled out by patrons of the restaurant as the services end, but ultimately, it's Gordon Ramsay's show and he is the sole judge.

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  • Fans were drawn to Ramsay's over-the-top personality and his tendency toward hurling abuse and foul language at the contestants.

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  • Wray was offered a job as head chef in one of Ramsay's London based restaurants, but eventually declined the offer.

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  • The winner was Heather West, who took on a job as senior chef at Ramsay's Terra Rosa restaurant.

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  • The winner was Christina Machamer, whose prize consisted of the position of executive chef at one of Gordon Ramsay's West Hollywood restaurants.

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  • Many fans of Gordon Ramsay's reality show are interested in getting tickets to Hell's Kitchen restaurant, where the cooking segments of the show are filmed.

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  • These tickets are not easy to get, but it is possible to be in the dining room while contestants simultaneously cook and get berated by Ramsay himself.

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  • The show features Gordon Ramsay, an exceptional chef with a fiery temper and penchant for curse words, as he searches for new head chefs for this restaurants.

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  • Various cooking challenges, mostly based in the Hell's Kitchen restaurant, provide Ramsay with the information he needs to eliminate contestants one by one.

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  • Restaurant guests often have to suffer through long wait times for their meals, incorrect or inedible food, and Ramsay's outbursts as he supervises the kitchens.

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  • Still, many people want to be a part of the action on the show, and eagerly look forward to hearing Ramsay's diatribes first hand.

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  • If things are going especially badly in the kitchens, Ramsay will shut down the entire service and send patrons out.

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  • Snider made an appearance on the second season of the Gordon Ramsay reality show Kitchen Nightmares, in which he donated a motorcycle to be auctioned off through the Handlebar restaurant.

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  • Hell's Kitchen is hosted by British chef Gordon Ramsay.

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  • In 2005 Ramsay and his format were brought to the United States, and the show is currently very successful in both countries.

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  • Ramsay has also been doing a double dose of another reality show, Kitchen Nightmares, in both Britain and America.

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  • I think that his books (savage black stallion who loves only Alec Ramsay) hit the same cord as urban fantasy/paranormal romance have with the vampires/werewolves (big scary monster who would eat other people alive, but loves me).

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