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rams

rams Sentence Examples

  • Sheep, rams, bullocks, fowls are given sacrificial salt to lick, and then sacrificed by the priest and deacon, who has the levitical portions of the victim as his perquisite.
  • Ewes as well as rams generally have short horns, and the wool is long and very fine.
  • - Euarthropoda having two prosthomeres (somites which have passed from a post-oral to a prae-oral position), the appendages of the first represented by eyes, of the second by solitary rams which are rarely antenniform, more usually chelate.
  • The expression "incense (ketoreth) of rams" in Ps.
  • The slighting references to it by the Christian fathers are no more an argument against its existence in the primitive church than the similar denunciations by the Jewish prophets of burnt-offerings and sacrifices are any proof that there were no such rites as the offering of incense, and of the blood of bulls and fat of rams, in the worship of the temple at Jerusalem.
  • These attachments, first invented by Jeremiah Howard, and described in the United States Patent Journal in 1858, are simply hydraulic rams fitted into the side or top caps of the mill, and pressing against the side or top brasses in such a manner as to allow the side or top roll to move away from the other rolls, while an accumulator, weighted to any desired extent, keeps a constant pressure on each of the rams. An objection to the top cap arrangement is, that if the volume or feed is large enough to lift the top roll from the cane roll, it will simultaneously lift it from the megass roll, so that the megass will not be as well pressed as it ought to be;' and an objection to the side cap arrangement on the megass roll as well as to the top cap arrangement is, that in case more canes are fed in at one end of the rolls than at the other, the roll will be pushed out farther at one end than at the other; and though it may thus avoid a breakdown of the rolls, it is apt, in so doing, to break the ends off the teeth of the crown wheels by putting them out of line with one another.
  • The udad is distinguished by the abundant hair on the throat and fore-quarters of the rams, and the length of the tail.
  • None of the various "rams" built abroad for the "rebel" government ever came into action.
  • Standing as high as a large donkey, the argali is the finest of all the wild sheep, the horns of the rams, although of inferior length, being more massive than those of Ovis poli of the Pamirs.
  • The general colour is bluegrey with black "points" and white markings and belly; and the horns of the rams are olive-brown and nearly smooth, with a characteristic backward curvature.
  • Owing to the difficulty of securing a durable motor with a simple and trustworthy means of automatically regulating the quantity of water used to the power needed at various times from the motor, not much advance has been recently made in the use of water motors with reciprocating rams or pistons.
  • The movement of S is obtained by means of a relay engine, in which there are two rams of different diameters; a constant pressure is always acting on the smaller of these when the motor is at work, while the governor (or handpower if desired) admits or exhausts pressurewater from the face of the other, and the movements to and fro thus given to the two rams alter the position of the stud S, and thus change the stroke of the plungers of the main engine.
  • and the vast columnar hall of Rameses II.; the temple of and the well-preserved temple of Khons; the temple of Luxor and avenues of rams and sphinxes connecting all these.
  • (The architect being at that time also the contractor.) The chapters are -- (1) on various machines, such as scaling-ladders, windmills, &c.; (2) on windlasses, axles, pulleys and cranes for moving heavy weights, such as those used by Chersiphron in building the great temple of Diana at Ephesus, and on the discovery by a shepherd of a quarry of marble required to build the same temple; (3) on dynamics; (4) on machines for drawing water; (5) on wheels for irrigation worked by a river; (6) on raising water by a revolving spiral tube; (7) on the machine of Ctesibius for raising water to a height; (8) on a very complicated water engine, the description of which is not intelligible, though Vitruvius remarks that he has tried to make the matter clear; (9) on machines with wheels to register the distance travelled, either by land or water; (10) on the construction of scorpiones for hurling stones; (11) and (12) on balistae and catapults; (13) on battering rams and other machines for the attack of a fortress; (14) on shields (testudines) to enable soldiers to fill up the enemy's ditches; (15) on other kinds of testudines; (16) on machines for defence, and examples of their use in ancient times.
  • His son Amenophis III., C. 1400 u.c., was a mighty builder, especially at Thebes, where his reign marks a new epoch in the history of the great temples, Luxor being his creation, while avenues of rams, pylons, &c., were added on a vast scale to Karnak.
  • Horses and black bulls, boars and rams were offered to him, sometimes human beings.
  • It is remarkable for the great size of the horns of the old rams and the wide open sweep of their curve, so that the points stand boldly out on each side, far away from the animal's head, instead of curling round nearly in the same plane, as in most of the allied species.
  • In their short summer coats the old rams of both species are nearly white.
  • Both breeds, which have short tails and small horns (present only in the rams), were regarded by the German naturalist Fitzinger as specifically distinct from the domesticated Ovis cries of Europe; and for the first type he proposed the name 0.
  • The ewes are hornless, but in Africa the rams have very short, thick and somewhat goatlike horns.
  • They are longwool sheep, derived from the old Teeswater breed by crossing with Leicester rams. They have a tuft of wool on the forehead.
  • In the unicorn sheep of Nepal or Tibet the two horns of the rams are completely welded together.
  • In the Himalayan and Indian hunia sheep, the rams of which are specially trained for fighting, and have highly convex foreheads, the tail is short at birth.
  • The rams are in much favour in Scotland and the N.
  • Breeders of Lincoln rams like best a darkish face, with a few black spots on the ears; and white legs.
  • With a greater proportion of Lincoln blood in the mixed flocks of the world there is a growing tendency to produce finer mutton by using Down rams, but at the sacrifice of part of the yield of wool.
  • They were gradually, like the Cotswolds, improved from the original type of slow-maturity sheep by selection in preference to the use of rams of the Improved Leicester breed.
  • Its most notable success in recent years is on the Scottish and English borders, where, at the annual ram sales at Kelso, a greater number of rams is auctioned of this than of any other breed, to cross with flocks of LeicesterCheviot ewes especially, but also with Border Leicesters and three-parts-bred ewes.
  • The Suffolk is another Down, which took its origin about 1790 in the crossing of improved Southdown rams with ewes of the old black-face Horned Norfolk, a breed still represented by a limited number of animals.
  • The rams sometimes have small, curved, wide horns like those of the Cheviot ram.
  • The ewes, although difficult to confine by ordinary fences, are in high favour in lowland districts for breeding fattening lambs to Down and other early maturity rams.
  • It is related to the Clun Forest and the Kerry Hill sheep. The draft ewes of all three breeds are in high demand for breeding to Down and longwool rams in the English midlands.
  • Its superior qualities in wool and mutton production have been fully demonstrated, and a demand for rams is springing up in S.
  • Merino cross with early-maturity longwool, Down, or other close-wooled rams, are good butchers' sheep, and most of the frozen mutton imported into the United Kingdom has had more or less of a merino origin.
  • All are assorted and mated to suitable rams. Most of the older ewes take the ram in September, but maiden ewes are kept back till October.
  • The rams come in from the hills on the 1st of January and are sent to winter on turnips.
  • The rams are turned out to the hills between the 15th and the 24th of November.
  • Lowland rams put to breed half-bred and cross lambs receive about I lb of grain daily to prevent their falling off too rapidly in condition, as they would do if exclusively supported on mountain fare.
  • From the waist to the feet her image resembles a pillar, narrowing downwards and sculptured all round with rows of animals (lions, rams and bulls).
  • The great temple avenues at Thebes are lined with recumbent rams, true sphinxes (a few late instances), and with the so-called criosphinxes or ram-sphinxes, having lion bodies and heads of the sacred animal of Ammon.
  • On this fiftieth day two wave-loaves made from the produce of the fields occupied by the worshipper ("your habitations") are offered together with seven unblemished lambs of the first year as well as one young bullock and two rams as a burnt offering.
  • On the left returning wall is a train of priestly attendants headed by the chief priest and priestess (the latter carrying a lituus), clad in the dress of the deities they serve and facing an altar, behind which is an image of a bull on a pedestal (representing the god); then comes an attendant leading a goat and three rams for sacrifice, followed by more priests with litui or musical instruments, after whom comes a bull bearing on his back the sacred cista (?).
  • The wave-induced motion of these joints is resisted by hydraulic rams, which pump high-pressure oil through hydraulic motors via smoothing accumulators.
  • Both teams will wear black armbands this evening in honor of former Rams manager Brian Clough, who died on Monday.
  • Six minutes were added to the match and the Rams time wasting tactics backfired as the home side drew level in added time.
  • In dynamic RAMS each bit of information is stored as an electrical charge on the gate capacitance of a field effect transistor.
  • crossbred ewes bred to terminal sire rams i.e. with all lambs intended for slaughter.
  • In both cases, these are for systems with crossbred ewes bred to terminal sire rams i.e. with all lambs intended for slaughter.
  • In both cases, these are for systems with crossbred ewes bred to terminal sire rams i.e. with all lambs intended for slaughter.
  • genotype rams attracted the most money.
  • Group 1 scrapie genotype rams attracted the most money.
  • The motion of the sections activates hydraulic rams which charge hydraulic accumulators.
  • The motion at the joints produced by the wave is resisted by hydraulic rams, which pumps high-pressure oil through hydraulic motors.
  • The motion of the sections activates hydraulic rams which charge hydraulic accumulators.
  • Both Rams head and Spiral wedging involve the folding of the clay on itself too build up an ever tightening spiral of clay platelets.
  • Messrs Bowman went on to have an overall sale average of £ 747 for 10 shearling rams.
  • Messrs Bowman went on to have an overall sale average of £ 747 for 10 shearling rams.
  • scrapie genotype rams attracted the most money.
  • shearling rams.
  • Dorset Horn rams are terminal sires in flocks using natural ' frequent lambing ' to achieve year-round production of top quality fattened lambs.
  • In extra time one goal from the Rams ' Peter Doherty and two from Jackie Stamps sealed the win.
  • Sheep, rams, bullocks, fowls are given sacrificial salt to lick, and then sacrificed by the priest and deacon, who has the levitical portions of the victim as his perquisite.
  • to N.E.; a long paved road bordered by recumbent rams led from the facade to the temples of Karnak (q.v.) in a somewhat more easterly direction, and Rameses II.
  • Ewes as well as rams generally have short horns, and the wool is long and very fine.
  • - Euarthropoda having two prosthomeres (somites which have passed from a post-oral to a prae-oral position), the appendages of the first represented by eyes, of the second by solitary rams which are rarely antenniform, more usually chelate.
  • The expression "incense (ketoreth) of rams" in Ps.
  • The slighting references to it by the Christian fathers are no more an argument against its existence in the primitive church than the similar denunciations by the Jewish prophets of burnt-offerings and sacrifices are any proof that there were no such rites as the offering of incense, and of the blood of bulls and fat of rams, in the worship of the temple at Jerusalem.
  • These attachments, first invented by Jeremiah Howard, and described in the United States Patent Journal in 1858, are simply hydraulic rams fitted into the side or top caps of the mill, and pressing against the side or top brasses in such a manner as to allow the side or top roll to move away from the other rolls, while an accumulator, weighted to any desired extent, keeps a constant pressure on each of the rams. An objection to the top cap arrangement is, that if the volume or feed is large enough to lift the top roll from the cane roll, it will simultaneously lift it from the megass roll, so that the megass will not be as well pressed as it ought to be;' and an objection to the side cap arrangement on the megass roll as well as to the top cap arrangement is, that in case more canes are fed in at one end of the rolls than at the other, the roll will be pushed out farther at one end than at the other; and though it may thus avoid a breakdown of the rolls, it is apt, in so doing, to break the ends off the teeth of the crown wheels by putting them out of line with one another.
  • The udad is distinguished by the abundant hair on the throat and fore-quarters of the rams, and the length of the tail.
  • None of the various "rams" built abroad for the "rebel" government ever came into action.
  • Standing as high as a large donkey, the argali is the finest of all the wild sheep, the horns of the rams, although of inferior length, being more massive than those of Ovis poli of the Pamirs.
  • The general colour is bluegrey with black "points" and white markings and belly; and the horns of the rams are olive-brown and nearly smooth, with a characteristic backward curvature.
  • Owing to the difficulty of securing a durable motor with a simple and trustworthy means of automatically regulating the quantity of water used to the power needed at various times from the motor, not much advance has been recently made in the use of water motors with reciprocating rams or pistons.
  • The movement of S is obtained by means of a relay engine, in which there are two rams of different diameters; a constant pressure is always acting on the smaller of these when the motor is at work, while the governor (or handpower if desired) admits or exhausts pressurewater from the face of the other, and the movements to and fro thus given to the two rams alter the position of the stud S, and thus change the stroke of the plungers of the main engine.
  • and the vast columnar hall of Rameses II.; the temple of and the well-preserved temple of Khons; the temple of Luxor and avenues of rams and sphinxes connecting all these.
  • (The architect being at that time also the contractor.) The chapters are -- (1) on various machines, such as scaling-ladders, windmills, &c.; (2) on windlasses, axles, pulleys and cranes for moving heavy weights, such as those used by Chersiphron in building the great temple of Diana at Ephesus, and on the discovery by a shepherd of a quarry of marble required to build the same temple; (3) on dynamics; (4) on machines for drawing water; (5) on wheels for irrigation worked by a river; (6) on raising water by a revolving spiral tube; (7) on the machine of Ctesibius for raising water to a height; (8) on a very complicated water engine, the description of which is not intelligible, though Vitruvius remarks that he has tried to make the matter clear; (9) on machines with wheels to register the distance travelled, either by land or water; (10) on the construction of scorpiones for hurling stones; (11) and (12) on balistae and catapults; (13) on battering rams and other machines for the attack of a fortress; (14) on shields (testudines) to enable soldiers to fill up the enemy's ditches; (15) on other kinds of testudines; (16) on machines for defence, and examples of their use in ancient times.
  • His son Amenophis III., C. 1400 u.c., was a mighty builder, especially at Thebes, where his reign marks a new epoch in the history of the great temples, Luxor being his creation, while avenues of rams, pylons, &c., were added on a vast scale to Karnak.
  • Horses and black bulls, boars and rams were offered to him, sometimes human beings.
  • In the unicorn sheep of Nepal or Tibet the two horns of the rams are completely welded together.
  • It is remarkable for the great size of the horns of the old rams and the wide open sweep of their curve, so that the points stand boldly out on each side, far away from the animal's head, instead of curling round nearly in the same plane, as in most of the allied species.
  • In their short summer coats the old rams of both species are nearly white.
  • These bighorns are characterized by the absence of face-glands, and the comparatively smooth front surface of the horns of the old rams, which are thus very unlike the strongly wrinkled horns of the argali group. The typical bighorn is the khaki-coloured and white-rumped Rocky Mountain animal; but on the Stickin river there is a nearly black race, with the usual white areas (0.
  • Both breeds, which have short tails and small horns (present only in the rams), were regarded by the German naturalist Fitzinger as specifically distinct from the domesticated Ovis cries of Europe; and for the first type he proposed the name 0.
  • The ewes are hornless, but in Africa the rams have very short, thick and somewhat goatlike horns.
  • In the Himalayan and Indian hunia sheep, the rams of which are specially trained for fighting, and have highly convex foreheads, the tail is short at birth.
  • The majority of the true mountain breeds are horned, the males only in the cases of Cheviot, Herdwick, Penistone and Welsh, though most Cheviot and many Herdwick rams are hornless.
  • They are longwool sheep, derived from the old Teeswater breed by crossing with Leicester rams. They have a tuft of wool on the forehead.
  • The rams are in much favour in Scotland and the N.
  • Breeders of Lincoln rams like best a darkish face, with a few black spots on the ears; and white legs.
  • With a greater proportion of Lincoln blood in the mixed flocks of the world there is a growing tendency to produce finer mutton by using Down rams, but at the sacrifice of part of the yield of wool.
  • They were gradually, like the Cotswolds, improved from the original type of slow-maturity sheep by selection in preference to the use of rams of the Improved Leicester breed.
  • Its most notable success in recent years is on the Scottish and English borders, where, at the annual ram sales at Kelso, a greater number of rams is auctioned of this than of any other breed, to cross with flocks of LeicesterCheviot ewes especially, but also with Border Leicesters and three-parts-bred ewes.
  • The Suffolk is another Down, which took its origin about 1790 in the crossing of improved Southdown rams with ewes of the old black-face Horned Norfolk, a breed still represented by a limited number of animals.
  • The rams sometimes have small, curved, wide horns like those of the Cheviot ram.
  • The ewes, although difficult to confine by ordinary fences, are in high favour in lowland districts for breeding fattening lambs to Down and other early maturity rams.
  • It is related to the Clun Forest and the Kerry Hill sheep. The draft ewes of all three breeds are in high demand for breeding to Down and longwool rams in the English midlands.
  • Its superior qualities in wool and mutton production have been fully demonstrated, and a demand for rams is springing up in S.
  • Merino cross with early-maturity longwool, Down, or other close-wooled rams, are good butchers' sheep, and most of the frozen mutton imported into the United Kingdom has had more or less of a merino origin.
  • All are assorted and mated to suitable rams. Most of the older ewes take the ram in September, but maiden ewes are kept back till October.
  • The rams come in from the hills on the 1st of January and are sent to winter on turnips.
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The word usage examples above have been gathered from various sources to reflect current and historial usage. They do not represent the opinions of YourDictionary.com.