Rameses sentence example

rameses
  • The ancient Egyptians were famed as " geometers," and as early as the days of Rameses II.
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  • A specific Baal of the heavens appears to have been known among the Hittites in the time of Rameses II., and considerably later, at the beginning of the 7th century, it was the title of one of the gods of Phoenicia.
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  • Burckhardt, he was sent at Salt's charges to Thebes, whence he removed with great skill the colossal bust of Rameses II., commonly called Young Memnon, which he shipped for England, where it is in the British Museum.
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  • Towards the close of the 13th century the Egyptian king Merneptah (Mineptah) records a successful campaign in Palestine, and alludes to the defeat of Canaan, Ascalon, Gezer, Yenuam (in Lebanon) and (the people or tribe) Israel.3 Bodies of aliens from the Levantine coast had previously threatened Egypt and Syria, and at the beginning of the 12th century they formed a coalition on land and sea which taxed all the resources of Rameses III.
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  • In front of the pylon Rameses set up colossi and a pair of obelisks (one of which was taken to Paris in 1831 and re-erected in the Place de la Concorde).
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  • The oldest iron weapon known was hitherto supposed to be an Egyptian halbert-head of the time of Rameses III., but Mr. Randall Maclver has recently discovered in a tomb of the XII.
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  • The Babylonian temples received garments as payment in kind, and the Egyptian lists in the Papyrus Harris (Rameses III.) enumerate an enormous number of skirts, tunics and mantles, dyed and undyed, for the various deities.
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  • The first Pharaoh of the succeeding dynasty, Rameses I., came to terms with a Kheta king called Saplel or Saparura; but Seti I.
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  • The tombs of the XVIIIth Dynasty on the west bank and the sculptures in the temples reflect the brilliancy of these days, but even the reign of Rameses II.
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  • The Achaeans, under the name Akaiusha, already appear among the piratical invaders of Egypt in the time of Rameses III.
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  • Rameses' successor, Mineptah, remained on terms with the Kheta folk; but in the reign of Rameses III.
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  • No fragment of these papyri, indeed, carries us further back than the age of the Ptolemies; but the Greek inscriptions on the statues of Rameses II.
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  • They are not among the hordes enumerated by Rameses II.
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  • Rameses, however, collected a large fleet and an army of native troops and mercenaries and claimed decisive victories.
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  • The biblical evidence does not favour any continued Philistine domination since the time of Rameses III., who indeed, later in his reign, made an expedition, not against the Purasati, but into North Syria, and, as appears from the Papyrus Harris, restored Egyptian supremacy over Palestine and Syria.
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  • The influences, whether from the Levant or from the north, were not confined to the age of Rameses III.
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  • Rhampsinitus, the predecessor of Cheops, appears to represent Rameses III.
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  • Hence the Pharaoh of the Exodus is commonly supposed to have been Ramses (Rameses) II.'s successor, Merenptah (Mineptah).
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  • On these grounds the Exodus may have taken place under one of his successors, and since Mineptah or Merneptah (son of Rameses), in relating his successes in Palestine, boasts that Ysiraal is desolated, it would seem that the Israelites had already returned.
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  • This is confirmed by the monuments as far back as the age of Rameses II.
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  • The Ramesseum contains the remains of a stupendous seated colossus, in black granite, of its builder Rameses II., thrown on its face.
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  • The dagger grew longer and stouter, but the sword made its appearance late, probably first in the hands of the Sherdana (Sardinian?), mercenaries of the time of Rameses II.
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  • Professor Petrie has indeed suggested, chiefly on chronological grounds, that a table of stars on the ceiling of the Ramesseum temple and another in the tomb of Rameses VI.
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  • And soon after, under Rameses II., mere mechanical copying, hard lifeless routine of stone-cutting, regardless of truth and of nature, dominated the whole.
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  • He also built the simple and dignified temple of Medinet Habu at Thebes, which was afterward overshadowed by the grandiose work of Rameses III.
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  • The XXth Dynasty opened with the great builder Rameses III.
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  • Harmahib appears to have legitimated his rule by marriage to a royal princess, but it is probable that Rameses I., who suc XIxlh ceeded as founder of the XIXth Dynasty, was not Dynasty, closely related to him.
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  • Rameses in his brief reign of two years planned and began the great colonnaded hall of Karnak, proving that he was a man of great ideas, though probably too old to carry them out; this task he left to his son Seti I., who reigned one year with his father and on the latters death was ready at once to subdue the Bedouin Shasu, who had invaded Palestine and withheld all tribute.
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  • In his fifth year, near Kadesh on the Orontes, his army was caught unprepared and divided by a strong force of chariots of the Hittites and their allies, and Rameses himself was placed in the most imminent danger; but through his personal courage the enemy was kept at bay till reinforcements came up and turned the disaster into a victory.
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  • Mineptah, C. 1225 B.C., succeeding his father Rameses II., had to fight many battles for the preservation of.
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  • The Sherden had been in the armies of Rameses II., and are distinguished by their remarkable helmets and apparently body armour of metal.
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  • Mineptah, the thirteenth son in the huge family of Rameses, must have been old when he ascended the throne; after his first years of reign his energies gave way, and he was followed by a quick succession of inglorious rulers, Seti II., the queen Tuosri, Amenmesse, Siptah; the names of the last two were erased from their monuments.
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  • A great papyrus written after the death of Rameses III.
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  • Rameses led out his army and fleet against them and struck them so decisive a blow that the migrating swarm submitted to his rule and paid him tribute.
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  • Rameses III., however, was not a great ruler.
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  • It is evident that Rameses II.
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  • Nine kings of the name of Rameses now followed each other ingloriously in the space of about eighty years to the end of the XXth Dynasty, the power of the high priests of Ammon ever growing at their expense.
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  • The authority of the last king of the XXth Dynasty, Rameses XII., was shadowy.
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  • The name of the Lycians, Lukki, is first met with in the Tel el-Amarna tablets (1400 B.C.) and in the list of the nations from the eastern Mediterranean who invaded Egypt in the reign of Mineptah, the successor of Rameses II.
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  • Excepting the list of kings and a panegyric on Rameses II., the subjects are not historical but mythological.
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  • Nevertheless, Egypt seems to have enjo y ed a fresh spell of extended supremacy, and Rameses apparently succeeded in recovering Palestine and some part of Syria.
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  • The earliest name yet found is that of Rameses II.
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  • It was still in Egyptian hands under Seti I., and under Rameses III.
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  • Invading armies from the south have often been opposed near Homs, from the time of Rameses II., who had to fight the battle of Kadesh, to that of Ibrahim Pasha, who broke the first line of Ottoman defence in 1831 by his victory there.
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  • The Assyrian inscriptions have shown that the Assyrians had never crossed the Halys, much less known the name of Lydia, before the age of Assur-bani-pal, and consequently the theory which brought the Heraclids from Nineveh must be given up. But the Hittites, another Oriental people, deeply imbued with the elements of Babylonian culture, had overrun Asia Minor and established themselves on the shores of the Aegean before the reign of the Egyptian king Rameses II.
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  • One of the first indications of this change that has been traced is the appearance of the Aramaean Darmesek for Damascus in an inscription of Rameses III.
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  • The name Rameses was in use before the 13th century, and could have been associated with someone else.
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  • In a few cases, indeed, we find very complicated systems of fortification - a wall of circumvallation with towers at the corners, protecting a small settlement of nuraghe-like buildings, as in the case of the Nuraghe Losa near Abbasanta and the Nuraghe Saurecci near Guspini; 2 or, as in the It has been widely believed that the Shardana, who occur as foreign mercenaries in Egypt from the time of Rameses II.
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  • Kadesh, however, was not captured, and after further contests, in his twenty-first year Rameses and the Hittite king Khattusil (Kheta-sar) made peace, with a defensive alliance against foreign aggression and internal revolt (see HITTITES).
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  • This is another 12-day cruise tour, boasting rare sights of Rameses II and Nefertari, temples, pyramids, the Sphinx and more.
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  • You get to see the world's oldest step pyramid, the Sphinx, temples, statues of Rameses and Nefertari, and more.
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  • Forced back by Seti, the Kheta returned and were found holding Kadesh by Rameses II., who, in his fifth year, there fought against them and a large body of allies, drawn probably in part from beyond Taurus, the battle which occasioned the monumental poem of Pentaur.
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