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rabies

rabies

rabies Sentence Examples

  • There's no chance of rabies, is there?

  • We're treating her for rabies, just in case.

  • I don't want to sleep with some sadistic man-whore, and I don't want rabies.

  • I don't want that moment immortalized, the only thing the world ever knows about me, that some sadistic man-whore with rabies bit me on the beach.

  • I don't have rabies.

  • All the treated dogs lived; all the untreated died from rabies.

  • The Rabies order was passed in 1886, and the number of counties in Great Britain in which cases of rabies in dogs were reported in each subsequent year is shown in Table XXIII.

  • In addition there have been some cases of rabies in animals other than dogs.

  • - Cases of Rabies in Dogs in Great Britain, 1887-1902.

  • rabies and rule to facilitate the employment of fractions.

  • He was weary of the rabies theologorum, and dreamed that the evangelical leaven, if tolerated, would purify the church's life and doctrine.

  • There's no chance of rabies, is there?

  • We're treating her for rabies, just in case.

  • I don't want to sleep with some sadistic man-whore, and I don't want rabies.

  • I don't want that moment immortalized, the only thing the world ever knows about me, that some sadistic man-whore with rabies bit me on the beach.

  • I don't have rabies.

  • alfalfa mosaic virus was used to produce rabies vaccine in spinach and tobacco [15] .

  • bat rabies in Peru.

  • rabies encephalitis has virtually a 100% mortality, only 6 people worldwide are recorded as having survived episodes.

  • Rabies is an acute, progressive, incurable viral encephalomyelitis first described in Mesopotamian civilisations about 4000 years ago.

  • Can he infiltrate the gang 's base and fool the likes of Rabies?

  • Vitamin C was also able to inactivate other viruses in vitro, including herpes simplex, rabies, and tobacco mosaic virus.

  • Polio, rabies and other vaccines were tested safe in primates but killed humans.

  • In the case of severe exposure vaccination is often accompanied by injection of rabies immunoglobulin (IG ).

  • I had to get a passport and have a rabies jab (ouch!

  • Rabies The risk to travelers in endemic areas is proportional to their exposure to potentially rabid animals.

  • rabies transmitted by bats to humans, bites are not reported.

  • Avoid contact with local animals, which may carry rabies.

  • Letters reproduced from the Dundee Courier regarding rabies in bats.

  • Charles is shocked to learn that he may have contracted rabies through a dog bite on his arm.

  • Admittedly, using vaccines in bait for foxes and wild boar, the government ist trying to control rabies and swine pest.

  • This is how an animal can contract a fatal disease, including rabies, or be injured, killed or stolen.

  • rabies in bats in the UK may well be on the increase.

  • rabies in these animals.

  • rabies in domestic dogs required care and caution over interpretation of the results.

  • Epidemiology of human rabies in the United States, 1980 to 1996.

  • Bat rabies is different from classical rabies and rarely affects animals other than bats.

  • This relatively low incidence rate reflects the current situation in similar African countries for canine rabies.

  • Contingency planning for major notifiable disease outbreaks e.g. rabies, foot and mouth.

  • rabies vaccination is effective for many years more than state laws require booster vaccination.

  • rabies vaccine on man for the first time.

  • rabies jab (ouch!

  • rabies virus is good at ' hiding ' from the immune system.

  • rabies outbreak.

  • rabies prevention policies.

  • Laboratory investigation of human deaths from vampire bat rabies in Peru.

  • saliva of infected animals, rabies is usually transmitted by bites from infected animals.

  • Vitamin C was also able to inactivate other viruses in vitro, including herpes simplex, rabies, and tobacco mosaic virus.

  • Animals that appear unusually tame may be dying of rabies.

  • vaccinated against rabies for export.

  • vaccinated regularly against rabies.

  • rabies vaccination must be given the animal not more than 6 months ago and not less than 15 days before departure.

  • Recommended vaccinations include Hepatitis A and B, typhoid, yellow fever, polio, meningococcal diseases and rabies.

  • Note for Pet Owners: Rabies is a serious zoonosis which can be transmitted to humans from animals.

  • It is no less than a cure for the dread disease of hydrophobia in man and of rabies in animals; and the interest of the achievement is not only that he successfully combated one of the most mysterious and most fell diseases to which man is subject, but also that this was accomplished in spite of the fact that the special microbe causing the disease had not been isolated.

  • To begin with, Pasteur, in studying the malady in dogs, came to the conclusion that the virus had its seat in the nerve centres, and he proved that the injection of a portion of the matter of the spinal column of a rabid dog into the body of a healthy one produces in the latter with certainty the symptoms of rabies.

  • All the treated dogs lived; all the untreated died from rabies.

  • It was not, however, till October 1886 that anthrax and rabies were officially declared to be contagious diseases for the purposes of certain sections of the act of 1878.

  • Under the Diseases of Animals Acts 1894 and 1896 weekly returns are issued by the Board of Agriculture of outbreaks of anthrax, foot-and-mouth disease, glanders (including farcy), pleuro-pneumonia, rabies and swine fever in the counties of Great Britain; also monthly returns of outbreaks of sheep-scab.

  • The Rabies order was passed in 1886, and the number of counties in Great Britain in which cases of rabies in dogs were reported in each subsequent year is shown in Table XXIII.

  • In addition there have been some cases of rabies in animals other than dogs.

  • - Cases of Rabies in Dogs in Great Britain, 1887-1902.

  • Thus, in the year ending June 1905, they included 4 outbreaks of anthrax, 219 of swine-fever and 343 of sheepscab, while there were no cases of rabies.

  • rabies and rule to facilitate the employment of fractions.

  • He was weary of the rabies theologorum, and dreamed that the evangelical leaven, if tolerated, would purify the church's life and doctrine.

  • Louis Pasteur came along around this same time and proffered the germ theory of disease and a vaccine for rabies.

  • Two years later, an anthrax vaccine; the year after that, a rabies vaccine.

  • Rabies The risk to travelers in endemic areas is proportional to their exposure to potentially rabid animals.

  • In many cases of rabies transmitted by bats to humans, bites are not reported.

  • Avoid contact with local animals, which may carry rabies.

  • Letters reproduced from the Dundee Courier regarding rabies in bats.

  • Charles is shocked to learn that he may have contracted rabies through a dog bite on his arm.

  • Admittedly, using vaccines in bait for foxes and wild boar, the government ist trying to control rabies and swine pest.

  • This is how an animal can contract a fatal disease, including rabies, or be injured, killed or stolen.

  • The prevalence of rabies in bats in the UK may well be on the increase.

  • Rural communities, especially women and children usually the main victims, would benefit most through efforts to control rabies in these animals.

  • The serological tests to detect rabies in domestic dogs required care and caution over interpretation of the results.

  • Epidemiology of human rabies in the United States, 1980 to 1996.

  • Bat rabies is different from classical rabies and rarely affects animals other than bats.

  • This relatively low incidence rate reflects the current situation in similar African countries for canine rabies.

  • Contingency planning for major notifiable disease outbreaks e.g. rabies, foot and mouth.

  • Clearly, the rabies vaccination is effective for many years more than state laws require booster vaccination.

  • On July 6 1885, Pasteur tested his pioneering rabies vaccine on man for the first time.

  • The rabies virus is good at ' hiding ' from the immune system.

  • The greatest fear about foxes is their potential role in a rabies outbreak.

  • On 17 November 2005, Defra announced a review of the UK 's rabies prevention policies.

  • Caused by a virus that is in the saliva of infected animals, rabies is usually transmitted by bites from infected animals.

  • Animals that appear unusually tame may be dying of rabies.

  • They can also be vaccinated against rabies for export.

  • All dogs and cats must be vaccinated regularly against rabies.

  • Rabies vaccination must be given the animal not more than 6 months ago and not less than 15 days before departure.

  • Recommended vaccinations include Hepatitis A and B, typhoid, yellow fever, polio, meningococcal diseases and rabies.

  • Note for Pet Owners: Rabies is a serious Zoonosis which can be transmitted to humans from animals.

  • The kitten will need shots like rabies and distemper.

  • Maintaining routine vaccinations against feline AIDS, rabies, distemper, feline leukemia, rhinotracheitis and other regional diseases and viruses is essential to the health of any domesticated cat.

  • Three weeks ago I took her to the vet for her annual check up and she received her FVRCP and rabies booster.

  • I keep reading that it is not necessary to give a booster every year except for the rabies vaccine.

  • My three-year-old female has to have her rabies done a week apart from her FVRCP because she became very lethargic after her first booster.

  • The laws of most states require our pets receive an annual rabies vaccination, so we have to abide by that.

  • As long as there is no law requiring anything more than the rabies booster, you have the right to refuse the rest and opt for the every three years plan.

  • There are known cases of rabies in your area, or the animal was behaving oddly.

  • Rabies symptoms in cats vary according to the stage of the disease.

  • If you suspect that a cat you don't know has rabies, you should stay away from it and call animal control.

  • Rabies is transmitted by a bite from an infected animal.

  • If your pet is not vaccinated and is bitten by an infected animal, she may or may not develop rabies.

  • The rabies virus does not live very long outside of the animal, so it's unlikely that your pet will get rabies from drinking from a shared water or food dish.

  • Once an animal is bitten and contracts rabies, the virus will begin to spread through the nerves of the animal and to the brain.

  • It takes the virus about two to six weeks to reach the brain and cause the cat to develop all of the rabies symptoms.

  • Before the virus gets to the brain, the cat is generally not symptomatic and is not able to pass rabies on to other organisms.

  • The only way to diagnose rabies is to send brain cells for examination.

  • There is currently no treatment for rabies.

  • The best way to protect your cat is to make sure that she has regular check ups, receives rabies vaccines as suggested by your vet and is kept indoors.

  • The current recommendation by the health department is that an unvaccinated animal that is exposed to rabies should be euthanized immediately.

  • Even if a cat is vaccinated and is exposed to rabies, it is recommended that she be isolated for 45 days to make sure that the rabies doesn't develop anyway.

  • The core vaccines are usually limited to the calicivirus, panleukopenia, viral rhinotracheitis and rabies.

  • The average pet owner will typically know nothing about the first three diseases and will possess a partial knowledge of rabies.

  • There has been a large amount of controversy regarding certain vaccines such as the rabies and feline leukemia virus vaccine.

  • The rabies vaccine raises several issues mainly because, where outdoor cats are concerned, this vaccine is a necessity.

  • Rabies is a disease that can be transferred easily, not just from cat to cat, but also to other species including humans.

  • Although owners must follow their local municipality's laws regarding rabies vaccinations, there is a high risk of sarcoma associated with this vaccine.

  • Make sure his rabies vaccination is current and the tag is added to his collar.

  • Make sure your pet's vaccinations are all current, especially the rabies vaccination.

  • Pet quarantine rules applying to dogs are largely designed to prevent the spread of the deadly rabies virus, especially into regions where the virus has not yet infiltrated the population.

  • Your pet's vaccinations must be current at the time of the trip, especially the rabies vaccination.

  • Additionally, nearly every country has regulations for vaccinating your pet against the rabies virus.

  • The first shot is usually required between three and six months of age, followed by an annual rabies booster thereafter.

  • One being rabies (because most skunks are not out during the day), and the other is being sprayed by this mysterious skunk.

  • If they have rabies, being bit can lead to a series of rabies shots that are not pleasant.

  • Puppies must be old enough to have received all rabies vaccinations and boosters.

  • Vet check-up: Make sure your pet is healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations, especially the rabies vaccine.

  • Put together a small travel bag for your pet that includes identification papers, the current rabies certificate and a leash.

  • Animal bites should always be examined and the possibility of rabies infection determined.

  • In the case of animal bites on the face or head, the child may be given passive or active immunization against rabies if there is a chance that the animal is rabid.

  • This precaution is particularly important, as the incubation period of the rabies virus is much shorter for bites on the head and neck than for bites elsewhere on the body.

  • If the child has been bitten by an animal, the injury must be cleansed as soon as possible to lower the risk of rabies.

  • In the case of animal bites, the child may be given passive or active immunization against rabies if there is a chance that the dog or other animal is rabid.

  • This precaution is particularly important for animal bites on the nose or other parts of the face, as the incubation period of the rabies virus is much shorter for bites on the head and neck than for bites elsewhere on the body.

  • Have pet dogs or cats immunized against rabies.

  • Rabies is rare among pet dogs in the United States, most of which have been vaccinated against the disease.

  • Some vaccines, such as the rabies vaccine, are given only when a child comes in contact with the virus that causes the disease, such as through a dog bite.

  • Such treatments are vaccine or immune globulin for hepatitis A, typhoid, meningitis, Japanese encephalitis, and rabies.

  • Rabies is most often spread by animal bites from dogs, cats, mice, raccoons, squirrels, and bats and may cause encephalitis.

  • Rabies vaccine is available for animals; it is also given to people after exposure.

  • Rabies vaccine is an injection that provides protection against the rabies virus that can be transmitted to humans via the saliva of an infected animal.

  • Rabies is fatal in humans unless it is prevented with a vaccine.

  • Rabies are caused by viruses of the genus Lyssavirus in the family Rhabdoviridae.

  • Although all mammals are thought to be susceptible to rabies infection, the primary hosts are carnivores and bats.

  • Most human exposure to rabies occurs via an animal bite in which the skin is broken and the virus is transmitted from the infected animal's saliva to the blood and tissues of the victim.

  • The rabies virus infects the human nervous system causing acute encephalomyelitis, an inflammation of the brain and spinal cord.

  • Cases of human rabies are very rare in the United States due to the routine vaccination of domestic animals.

  • In the past most human rabies resulted from bites by infected dogs.

  • However as the incidence of rabies in dogs has decreased dramatically, rabies among wildlife has increased across the continental United States.

  • Bat bites are now the most common source of human rabies infection.

  • Between 1990 and 2003, there were 39 diagnosed cases of rabies among Americans.

  • Every year an estimated 18,000 Americans receive rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis and an additional 16,000-39,000 receive post-exposure prophylaxis as a result of animal bites.

  • Rabies is common in some parts of the world, particularly in the developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

  • Rabies has been eradicated in the United Kingdom.

  • Rabies is considered to be a reemerging viral disease because it is poorly controlled in many developing countries despite widely available human and animal vaccines.

  • WHO estimates that every year about 10-12 million people worldwide receive post-exposure prophylaxis and that about 35,000 people-primarily children-die of rabies every year.

  • However the incidence of rabies in the developing world is believed to be severely underreported.

  • Most rabies exposures are from bites by unvaccinated dogs.

  • The French scientist Louis Pasteur developed the first vaccine against rabies.

  • Over the following century several generations of rabies vaccines were developed.

  • The vaccine consists of killed rabies virus that, when injected, induces the child's immune system to produce antibodies that bind to and destroy the virus.

  • A second type of rabies vaccine, rabies immune globulin (RIG), provides immediate, short-term protection after exposure to the virus.

  • Routine rabies vaccination and booster immunizations are necessary only for those in high-risk professions such as veterinarian medicine and laboratory workers.

  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis is particularly important for children who may be exposed to rabies in places where vaccines, if available, may cause adverse reactions.

  • Children traveling internationally are at particular risk for rabies exposure because they may not exhibit caution in approaching animals.

  • When a child is bitten by a healthy domestic dog, cat, or ferret, the animal is usually confined for 10 days and observed for signs of rabies prior to initiating post-exposure prophylaxis.

  • The rabies status of an animal also can be determined by testing for antibodies against rabies in its blood or by killing the animal and testing its brain tissue.

  • For example, post-exposure prophylaxis should be considered if an unattended child is found in a room with a bat and the bat cannot be tested for rabies.

  • Four formulations of three inactivated rabies virus vaccines are licensed for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  • Human diploid cell vaccines (HDCVs) use inactivated rabies viruses.

  • PCEC is made from rabies virus grown in cultures of chicken embryos and then inactivated.

  • Rabies vaccine adsorbed (RVA) is manufactured from virus grown in cell cultures of fetal rhesus monkey lung cells and then inactivated.

  • Human rabies immune globulin (RIG, HRIG) is a vaccine made from human serum that contains high levels of antibodies against rabies.

  • RIG provides immediate but short-lived protection against rabies.

  • Numerous procedures are used to clear the serum of rabies virus.

  • Although the four types of inactivated-rabies vaccines and the two RIGs are the only rabies vaccines available in the United States, various other rabies vaccines are produced throughout the world.

  • In developing countries, rabies vaccines often contain nerve tissue which can cause adverse effects.

  • Inactivated-rabies vaccines are injected, either before or after exposure to the virus, in 1.0-ml. doses containing at least 2.5 IU/ml. of rabies virus antigen.

  • Although the same rabies vaccine usually is used throughout an immunization series, there is no evidence of adverse reactions or loss of effectiveness when two different vaccines are used in the same series.

  • Modern rabies vaccines are relatively painless.

  • For preventative rabies immunization in an unexposed child, an inactivated-rabies vaccine is administered in three 1.0-ml. doses, with the second dose seven days after the first, and the third dose 21 or 28 days after the first.

  • Studies have found that this regimen produces adequate antibodies against rabies in the blood serum of all subjects.

  • Following an animal bite or contact between a child's mucous membranes and an animal's saliva, an attempt is usually made to determine whether the animal has rabies.

  • If there is a threat of rabies, an unvaccinated child receives RIG and a series of five rabies vaccinations over a 28-day period.

  • Children exposed to rabies following vaccination receive a 1.0-ml. dose of vaccine immediately and a second dose three days later.

  • Children with suppressed immune systems should not receive pre-exposure prophylaxis against rabies.

  • Medical conditions and medications that suppress the immune system can interfere with antibody production in response to a rabies vaccine.

  • If a child has exhibited a serious hypersensitivity to a previous rabies vaccine, antihistamines may be used concurrently.

  • A minor illness, such as a cold, does not preclude rabies vaccination.

  • Children receiving post-exposure prophylaxis outside of the United States should have their antibody levels against rabies measured after their return.

  • Side effects from the rabies vaccines currently used in the United States are much less common and less severe than the side effects of earlier rabies vaccines.

  • However side effects may vary with the brand of vaccine and adverse reactions to rabies vaccines used in some other countries are quite common.

  • However, a physician should be consulted if a high fever or behavioral changes occur following rabies vaccination.

  • Although any vaccine is capable of inducing an allergic reaction, serious reactions to rabies vaccine are very rare.

  • Immune system-suppressing treatments, including cancer drugs and radiation and steroids, can interfere with the antibody response to rabies vaccination.

  • Children who will be taking anti-malarial drugs while traveling in areas with endemic rabies should begin the three-dose regimen of ID vaccine one month prior to travel, before they begin taking drugs to prevent malaria.

  • Encephalomyelitis-Encephalitis or another acute inflammation of the brain and spinal cord that can be caused by the rabies virus.

  • Human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV)-A rabies vaccine in which the virus is grown in cultures of human cells, concentrated, and inactivated for IM or ID injection.

  • Purified chicken embryo cell vaccine (PCEC)-A rabies vaccine in which the virus is grown in cultures of chicken embryo cells, inactivated, and purified for IM injection.

  • Rabies immune globulin (RIG or HRIG)-A human serum preparation containing high levels of antibodies against the rabies virus; used for post-exposure prophylaxis.

  • Rabies virus adsorbed (RVA)-A rabies vaccine in which the virus is grown in cultures of lung cells from rhesus monkeys, inactivated, and adsorbed to aluminum phosphate.

  • "Rabies Vaccines: From the Past to the 21st Century."

  • CDC's Rabies Web Page That's Just for Kids!

  • "First Rabies Cases from Organ Transplant Reported."

  • "Human Rabies Prevention-United States, 1999 Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)."

  • Rabies. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • "Rabies: A History and Update on Prophylaxis Regimens in the U.S." U.S. Pharmacist. [cited August 10, 2004].

  • Rabies is an acute viral disease of the central nervous system that is transmitted through saliva from the bite of an infected animal.

  • Rabies affects humans and other mammals but is most common in carnivores (flesh eaters).

  • Rabies is almost exclusively transmitted through saliva from the bite of an infected animal.

  • Another name for the disease is hydrophobia, which literally means fear of water, a symptom shared by half of all people infected with rabies.

  • If rabies is not prevented by immunization, it is almost always fatal.

  • In late 2002, rabies re-emerged as an important public health issue.

  • In one case, a man who had contracted rabies in the Philippines was not diagnosed until he began to feel ill in the United Kingdom.

  • Cases of rabies in humans are very infrequent in the United States, averaging one or two a year (down from over 100 cases annually in 1900), but the worldwide incidence is estimated to be between 30,000 and 50,000 cases each year.

  • Rabies is most common in developing countries in Africa, Latin America, and Asia, particularly India.

  • Worldwide, the highest risk groups for contracting rabies are boys under the age of fifteen.

  • Most deaths from rabies in the United States result from bat bites.

  • This group includes those in the fields of veterinary medicine, animal control, wildlife work, and laboratory work involving live rabies virus.

  • People in these occupations and residents of or travelers to areas where rabies is a widespread problem should consider being immunized.

  • Rabies is caused by a rod- or bullet-shaped virus that belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae.

  • The rabies virus may lie dormant in the body for several weeks or months, but rarely much longer, before symptoms appear.

  • The two most common diagnostic tests are the fluorescent antibody test and isolation of the rabies virus from an individual's saliva or throat culture.

  • If specific proteins, called antibodies, that are produced only in response to the rabies virus are present, they will bind with the fluorescent dye and become visible.

  • Because of the extremely serious nature of a rabies infection, the need for rabies immunizations should be carefully considered for anyone who has been bitten by an animal, based on a personal history and results of diagnostic tests.

  • Rabies vaccination may or not be given, based on the available information.

  • If the animal does not develop rabies within four to seven days, then no immunizations are required.

  • If the animal is suspected of being rabid, it is killed, and the brain is examined for evidence of rabies infection.

  • In cases involving bites from domestic animals in which the animal is not available for examination, the decision for vaccination is made based on the prevalence of rabies within the region where the bite occurred.

  • If the bite was from a wild animal and the animal was captured, it is generally killed because the incubation period of rabies is unknown in most wild animals.

  • These rabies vaccines are equally effective and carry a lower risk of side effects than some earlier treatments.

  • Inactivated viral material (antigenic) is then given to stimulate the patient's own immune system to produce antibodies against rabies.

  • In those rare instances in which rabies has progressed beyond the point where immunization would be effective, the patient is given medication to prevent seizures, relieve some of the anxiety, and relieve painful muscle spasms.

  • If preventative treatment is sought promptly, rabies need not be fatal.

  • If immunizations do not prove effective or are not received, rabies is nearly always fatal within a few days of the onset of symptoms.

  • Domesticated animals, including household pets, should be vaccinated against rabies.

  • If a pet is bitten by an animal suspected to have rabies, its owner should contact a veterinarian immediately and notify the local animal control authorities.

  • Because rabies is transmitted through saliva, a person should wear rubber gloves when handling a pet that has had an encounter with a wild animal.

  • Some victims of rabies have been attacked by infected animals, particularly bats, that entered through unprotected openings.

  • State or county health departments should be consulted for information about the prevalence of rabies in an area.

  • Preventative vaccination against rabies should be considered if one's occupation involves frequent contact with wild animals or non-immunized domestic animals.

  • Bites from mice, rats, or squirrels rarely require rabies prevention because these rodents are typically killed by any encounter with a larger, rabid animal, and would, therefore, not be carriers.

  • "Rabies." In Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics.

  • R., et al. "Risk Factors Associated with Travel to Rabies Endemic Countries."

  • L., et al. "Emerging Pattern of Rabies Deaths and Increased Viral Infectivity."

  • National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Inc. "Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control, 2003."

  • Smith, J., et al. "Case Report: Rapid Ante-Mortem Diagnosis of a Human Case of Rabies Imported into the UK from the Philippines."

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