Quite sentence examples

quite
  • You're growing into quite the young lady.

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  • It is quite near the park gate.

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  • He was getting to be quite a handsome young man.

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  • But she didn't feel quite ready yet.

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  • I must have made quite a spectacle.

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  • There was a barber shop and I could see a calendar on the wall but I couldn't quite read it.

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  • That didn't come out quite right.

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  • "You've said quite enough for one evening," she answered with equal composure.

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  • I am considered quite unusual.

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  • It didn't quite work out as he planned.

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  • It was quite impossible to understand these sounds.

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  • I quite agree with you!

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  • He'd likely be away with Jule for quite a while.

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  • It is quite a romance.

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  • It wasn't quite morning when he returned her to the extra bed in Jonny's room.

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  • Natalie is quite well again now, isn't she?

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  • There were clothes in the dresser, not quite her size but not too far off.

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  • His dark gaze was steady, his body rippling with the power she couldn't quite pin down.

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  • At that time I eagerly absorbed everything I read without a thought of authorship, and even now I cannot be quite sure of the boundary line between my ideas and those I find in books.

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  • They were curious and thought she was quite a spectacle.

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  • Also, my hat is quite empty.

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  • Quite young, I grieve to say; and all of my brothers and sisters that you see here are practically my own age.

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  • Pierre pushed his way into the middle of the group, listened, and convinced himself that the man was indeed a liberal, but of views quite different from his own.

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  • Now there was life and light in his eyes, even if he wasn't quite the man Jule remembered.

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  • Heavy brush had totally obscured the entrance until someone had quite recently cut and pulled away the branches, exposing the opening.

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  • Neighbors are quite close by.

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  • And I was quite sure they would be accepted as props.

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  • Quite sure, my Prince.

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  • And you may even—reasonably, optimistically—think it to be quite likely.

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  • She'd never done anything quite so disobedient—so stupid.

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  • Quite a few, and they're pulling in everyone from the east coast to Miami and Orlando.

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  • As I see it you were quite right, and I told Natasha so.

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  • She was never quite sure how to respond to Martha's candor though the two continued to be best of friends.

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  • She still didn't quite trust he'd keep his word, but she prayed with every ounce of her soul that he did.

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  • He was quite an old little man and his head was long and entirely bald.

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  • "That is a matter I have not quite decided upon," was the reply.

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  • But fortunately for us both, I am a little stronger, and quite as obstinate when I set out.

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  • He'd fulfilled his end of the bargain and crossed quite a few things off her bucket list last night.

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  • Adraksin was in uniform, and whether as a result of the uniform or from some other cause Pierre saw before him quite a different man.

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  • It must have been quite an exciting time to be alive.

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  • We've been in the dark quite a while, and you may as well explain what has happened.

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  • While this Greenbriar Road property is not quite so inviting, a spring lock on a back door was no serious test.

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  • Cynthia sighed, not quite sure how to answer.

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  • Yeah, quite a few.

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  • From what Fred says after snooping on the Internet, Mr. Westlake is quite wealthy.

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  • The Wizard carried his satchel, which was quite heavy, and Zeb carried the two lanterns and the oil can.

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  • Mr. Jefferson's, beautiful, pathetic representation quite carried me away with delight.

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  • I do not understand quite what that means.

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  • He must have made quite an impression on little eighteen-year-old Jennifer.

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  • It was one thing to tell herself everything was resolved, but quite another to thoroughly accept something she had always considered wrong.

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  • I've been quite a problem to you, haven't I?

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  • I assure you I know quite enough.

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  • Edward could spell nearly all the words in his primer, and he could read quite well.

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  • He seemed to feel quite well and strong.

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  • After the guests had drunk quite a little of it, they began to talk foolishly and sing loudly; and some of them went to sleep.

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  • But we shall not be quite separated; we shall see each other every day, I hope.

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  • He lay quite still till the animal was very near.

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  • So you may imagine that we look quite like peacocks, only we've no trains....

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  • And Boris, having apparently relieved himself of an onerous duty and extricated himself from an awkward situation and placed another in it, became quite pleasant again.

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  • I need a teacher quite as much as Helen.

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  • He was a very little boy, but before he was three years old he could read quite well.

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  • "Quite right," said the Englishman.

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  • "Look at Papa!" shouted Natasha to the whole company, and quite forgetting that she was dancing with a grown-up partner she bent her curly head to her knees and made the whole room ring with her laughter.

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  • But as if this angered him, he bent his head quite low and muttered:

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  • I was sorely perplexed, and felt quite discouraged, and wasted much precious time, especially in Algebra.

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  • His mother smiled, for she felt quite sure that there was no danger.

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  • But it is quite likely you will need fewer workers.

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  • I did not know then what she was doing, for I was quite ignorant of all things.

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  • It merely confirmed that she had left childhood behind... quite gracefully.

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  • She's discovered quite a few annoying little powers of her own while you were gone.

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  • His older brothers were quite willing that he should go to sea.

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  • And I think that helps explain why no one quite foresaw the rise of the Internet: because it doesn't have an offline corollary of its own.

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  • So while such an attack and its aftermath would not derail our eventual arrival at the next golden age, it quite possibly would delay it.

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  • I could not quite convince myself that there was much world left, for I regarded Boston as the beginning and the end of creation.

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  • When the reception was over we went back to the hotel and teacher slept quite unconscious of the surprise which was in store for her.

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  • The overall economic output of the planet, GWP (gross world product), will rise dramatically in the years to come, but its distribution will be quite skewed.

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  • The queen was standing quite near to it with the two wreaths still in her hands.

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  • But I soon discovered that college was not quite the romantic lyceum I had imagined.

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  • One of us discovered this ability last fall, quite by accident.

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  • There is quite a list, isn't there?

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  • She said that Maud was born deaf and lost her sight when she was only three months old, and that when she went to the Institution a few weeks ago, she was quite helpless.

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  • The aurists then tried their experiments with quite different results.

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  • This is like the effect of the slow dwelling on long words, not quite well managed, that one notices in a child who is telling a solemn story.

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  • She gropes her way without much certainty in rooms where she is quite familiar.

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  • It made me laugh quite hard, for I know my father is Arthur Keller.

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  • Did I tell you in my last letter that I had a new dress, a real party dress with low neck and short sleeves and quite a train?

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  • No. I'm quite, quite all right.

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  • "Are we really quite lost, your excellency?" he asked again.

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  • Quite close to the barn was a garden.

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  • Coriolanus pitched his camp quite near to the city.

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  • The old man who had bought the first turkey was standing quite near.

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  • Additionally, I am quite interested in the history of food.

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  • But the French troops quite rightly did not consider that this suited them, since death by hunger and cold awaited them in flight or captivity alike.

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  • Well, here we are, not quite halfway through our list of ways the Internet, technology, and civilization will come together to end war.

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  • I have never yet met a man who was quite awake.

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  • So the histories say, and it is all quite wrong, as anyone who cares to look into the matter can easily convince himself.

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  • That redoubt was quite senseless in front of the position where the battle was accepted.

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  • At last they reached a great forest, and, being quite tired, they decided to rest awhile and look for nuts before going any further.

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  • Once, when berrying, I met with a cat with young kittens in the woods, quite wild, and they all, like their mother, had their backs up and were fiercely spitting at me.

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  • That is quite a gene pool you two have.

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  • I also discuss the political situation with my dear father, and we decide the most perplexing questions quite as satisfactorily to ourselves as if I could see and hear.

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  • The fog lay unbroken like a sea down below, but higher up at the village of Schlappanitz where Napoleon stood with his marshals around him, it was quite light.

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  • It is quite light.

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  • When few people own land and most people live in cities, it is quite common to have high degrees of hunger in a nation that is exporting food.

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  • He is never quite so happy as when he has a little deaf child in his arms.

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  • My little children are all well except Nancy, and she is quite feeble.

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  • He has found out that doors have locks, and that little sticks and bits of paper can be got into the key-hole quite easily; but he does not seem very eager to get them out after they are in.

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  • We thought everything was arranged: but we found Monday that Mrs. Elliott would not be willing to let us invite more than fifty people, because Mrs. Howe's house is quite small.

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  • Now reason suggested quite the opposite.

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  • Women's fuss! muttered Alpatych to himself and started on his journey, looking round at the fields of yellow rye and the still- green, thickly growing oats, and at other quite black fields just being plowed a second time.

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  • But he was kind and gentle only to those of his regiment, to Timokhin and the like--people quite new to him, belonging to a different world and who could not know and understand his past.

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  • Princess Mary could not quite make out what he had said, but from his look it was clear that he had uttered a tender caressing word such as he had never used to her before.

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  • Not merely in these cases but continually did that old man--who by experience of life had reached the conviction that thoughts and the words serving as their expression are not what move people--use quite meaningless words that happened to enter his head.

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  • But you did wake up... come back, or whatever you call it, quite easily.

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  • She couldn't quite understand what the poison was; it wasn't a normal infection, and yet it couldn't be anything else.

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  • While she didn't quite know where she was, she felt a sense of belonging.

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  • I can't answer that for sure, but don't you think their sudden interest in the property and the discovery of the bones is quite a coincidence?

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  • He'd told her the chances were slim long ago, but she wasn't ready for him to admit defeat quite yet.

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  • They could be seen very plainly, for here the ground was quite muddy.

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  • The decision made to face death soon, the only thing she hadn't quite worked out was how she planned to do it.

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  • Yes, and he was quite tall.

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  • Shakespeare was undoubtedly the greatest master the English language has ever known and, quite probably, will ever know.

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  • It was quite early, the sun had not been up very long; the birds were just beginning to sing joyously.

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  • Once more something whistled, but this time quite close, swooping downwards like a little bird; a flame flashed in the middle of the street, something exploded, and the street was shrouded in smoke.

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  • Quite beside themselves, Yakov Alpatych; they've fetched another barrel.

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  • On the other question, how the battle of Borodino and the preceding battle of Shevardino were fought, there also exists a definite and well- known, but quite false, conception.

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  • She was quite for a moment, thoughtful.

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  • He hadn't met a woman quite as rough around the edges as his was.

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  • He didn't need his people to see someone quite so … unusual.

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  • The two of you seem quite close.

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  • He wasn't quite ready for sleep so he wandered back to the parlor, sat in the back corner and picked up a biking magazine.

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  • Yes. It's quite tender.

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  • Corday rose, and asked, not quite casually enough.

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  • Donald Ryland, although I haven't quite figured why.

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  • This is quite a turn around, isn't it?

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  • He didn't quite understand why she needed that.

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  • Some were red, some white, and others pale pink, and they were just peeping out of the green leaves, as rosy-faced children peep out from their warm beds in wintertime before they are quite willing to get up.

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  • I think the expedition is quite feasible.

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  • Peronskaya was quite ready.

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  • Yes, quite a bit actually.

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  • I'm usually quite tired the next day.

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  • We are all discoverers in one sense, being born quite ignorant of all things; but I hardly think that is what she meant.

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  • Oct. 23, 1894. ...The school is very pleasant, and bless you! it is quite fashionable....

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  • I read her lips almost exclusively, (she does not know the manual alphabet) and we get on quite well.

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  • Why, I can do long, complicated quadratic equations in my head quite easily, and it is great fun!

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  • "Yes, I was brought up quite differently," remarked the handsome elder daughter, Countess Vera, with a smile.

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  • She sighed and said: Yes, quite certain.

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  • Princess Mary grew quite unconscious of her face and coiffure.

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  • They're quite beside themselves; I have already told them...

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  • And not the face she had known ever since she could remember and had always seen at a distance, but the timid, feeble face she had seen for the first time quite closely, with all its wrinkles and details, when she stooped near to his mouth to catch what he said.

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  • He saw that his hero and commander was following quite a different train of thought.

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  • The infantry moved in the same way, sometimes running to quite other places than those they were ordered to go to.

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  • I am quite at your service.

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  • Is he quite well?

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  • That's quite a coincidence, isn't it?

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  • "Not quite," said he, finally.

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  • I think I shall keep this Wizard until a new Sorcerer is ready to pick, for he seems quite skillful and may be of use to us.

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  • We who live here much prefer to be invisible; for we can still hug and kiss one another, and are quite safe from the bears.

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  • At last, having become quite rich, he decided to go home.

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  • The horse cantered briskly along, and king and boy were soon quite well acquainted.

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  • No, quite the opposite: We live in what can only be termed the Age of Change.

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  • I was quite ill afterward, and I wonder if retribution also overtook the turkey.

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  • But from another source we gain quite a different idea of the relations.

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  • The form of the work was fatal to its success, and the subsequent Exegetisches Handbuch rendered it quite superfluous.

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  • Some of his recommendations are quite unsuitable to the state of the country, and display more of general knowledge and good intention than of either the theory or practice of agriculture.

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  • She didn't want to say it, but the bloodied immortal didn't look like he'd wake up for quite a while, especially if there was no Healer among the survivors.

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  • The stars didn't shine quite so bright in the immortal world, and the sky didn't seem as endless.

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  • "Wow. It's not quite what I remember," she said, leaning away from him to peer at the ground.

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  • The newest member of their family, Yully wasn't quite comfortable yet.

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  • We're quite a family, Darian said.

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  • The site is one of great natural strength and remarkable beauty, though quite unlike that of other Greek cities in Sicily.

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  • Extraordinary care has evidently been bestowed in adjusting the parallelism and distance of the planes and A, so that the movable wires shall almost, but not quite, touch the surface T.

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  • In the case of the original Repsold plan without clockwork the description is not quite exact, because both the process of following the object and correcting the aim are simultaneously performed; whilst, if the clockwork runs uniformly and the friction-disk is set to the proper distance from the apex of the cone, the star will appear almost perfectly at rest, and the observer has only to apply delicate corrections by differential gear - a condition which is exactly analogous to that of training a modern gun-sight upon a fixed object.

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  • Again, it is quite certain that the spiritual matters upon which concordats bear do not concern the two powers in the same manner and in the same degree; and in this sense concordats are not perfectly equal agreements.

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  • A breach with pope Julius followed, and at this time Maximilian appears to have entertained, perhaps quite seriously, the idea of seating himself in the chair of St Peter.

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  • Instead of these are cats with more or less abbreviated tails, showing in greater or less degree a decided kink or bend near the tip. In other cases the tail is of the short curling type of that of a bulldog; sometimes it starts quite straight, but divides in a fork-like manner near the tip; and in yet other instances it is altogether wanting, as in the typical Manx cats.

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  • The first kind lay quite beyond the power of man to receive it, the second was within man's reach.

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  • It is not quite easy to see why he abandoned this successful policy in order to hasten on a war with Sparta, and neither the Corcyrean alliance nor the Megarian decree seems justified by the facts as known to us, though commercial motives may have played a part which we cannot now gauge.

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  • At the same time he reproduces their scandalous anecdotes in a quite uncritical spirit, and accepts unquestioningly the 4th-century tradition.

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  • The Queen's Park and Titwood clubs in Glasgow have each three greens, and as they can quite comfortably play six rinks on each, it is not uncommon to see 144 players making their game simultaneously.

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  • The plotting of the torque curve is laborious, but the average torque acting, which is all that is required for the purposes of this article, can be found quite simply, thus: - Let p be the mean effective pressure acting in one cylinder, a, the area of the cylinder, and 1, the stroke.

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  • Each of the larger rivers is fed by smaller streams; their fall is usually gentle and quite uniform.

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  • Painful relations between father and son, quite apart from the personal antipathies already existing, were therefore inevitable.

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  • Albs were originally quite plain, but about the 10th century the custom arose of ornamenting the borders and the cuffs of the sleeves with strips of embroidery, and this became common in the 12th century.

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  • The roof must not be quite flat, for a slight fall is necessary in its upper surface to allow water to drain away into gutters placed at convenient points.

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  • I'm quite worn out by these callers.

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  • "I have read our protests about the Oldenburg affair and was surprised how badly the Note was worded," remarked Count Rostopchin in the casual tone of a man dealing with a subject quite familiar to him.

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  • I thought quite differently.

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  • But she is quite original, strange, new, and unknown.

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  • Let us be quite, quite friends.

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  • One's quite frozen and the other's an awful swaggerer.

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  • One was taller than the other; he wore an officer's hat and seemed quite exhausted.

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  • "Yes, yes," she said, answering something quite different.

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  • Pessimism, quite frankly, will get us all killed.

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  • I sometimes despair of getting anything quite simple and honest done in this world by the help of men.

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  • And I am afraid of him; I have now become quite calm, quite calm.

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  • The clothing was obviously quite old and now that it was out of its container, reeked of dampness and dirt.

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  • Jackson was quite familiar with it.

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  • I'm told I'm quite tasty.

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  • In heels, she stood as tall as Jackson and they made quite a pair.

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  • Yes, and you better not embarrass them when they come down, or you and I won't be making noise for quite some time.

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  • In fact it will be quite pleasant for you.

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  • Oregon. That's quite a commute.

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  • Elisabeth tells me you are quite an accomplished musician.

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  • You have been through quite an ordeal.

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  • Carmen must be quite a woman to inspire such admiration from Katie.

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  • He's not quite thirty.

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  • It was one thing to covertly admire Alex, but quite another to stand here discussing him as though he were high dollar merchandise at a low bid auction... and why was Katie so concerned?

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  • And just for the record, I think you're quite a woman.

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  • He was quite the man with flowery statements, but did they mean anything?

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  • Texan is quite a horseman.

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  • He's quite a man, and he just saved my life.

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  • She's quite a woman.

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  • He gave up everything to be with her, and they died quite old, holding hands even in the end.

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  • All was not quite as it seemed in the peaceful compound.

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  • "You kept her alive for quite a while," Tim said.

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  • "That's not quite what I'm saying.  I know you understand that great sacrifice is sometimes warranted for a greater good.  And what you might be learning is that the greater good also sometimes requires doing what might be called evil," she said.

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  • Doesn't quite seem real yet, though.

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  • I couldn't quite place it, but it was sweet and yummy.

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  • She's quite a looker, isn't she?

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  • Mayer said, "And quite a lady."

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  • That's one fine woman back there and quite a looker.

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  • They've been running errands for the family for quite a few months now.

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  • There hasn't been any mail for quite awhile but the rent is still paid—for anoth­er two months.

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  • Inside, a white-jacketed attendant, who looked like a high­schooler, casually checked Dean's credentials while Cynthia wait­ed, not quite out of ear shot.

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  • Gently laying Cynthia on his bed, he tried to revive her but it was obvious she would be in the land of dreams for quite some time.

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  • Courting a widow was one thing, but harboring a nagging feeling she might not be widowed was quite another matter.

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  • Quite frankly, he was never sure he could trust her.

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  • "Not quite all," Fred answered.

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  • Some. Quite a bit, actually.

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  • He's working out to be quite a find.

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  • Actually, he had been contemplating her gift for quite a while before she took him to the mountain.

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  • At least he wasn't quite so willing to accept the idea that she had been unfaithful.

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  • I need Darian alive, in case the plan to rule the mortal world doesn't quite work out for me.

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  • She heard his words but couldn't quite digest that Darian would knowingly destroy any world.

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  • She hadn't quite yet surrendered to her fate at his side; this much he sensed.

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  • She didn't expect her life to change quite so fast or to be accepted into the White God's family with such ease.

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  • Claire appeared pleased, and he couldn't quite get over just how unconcerned she was with what she'd done to him.

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  • She'd never seen a man quite like he who stood before her.

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  • He's quite a warrior, he said.

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  • Alex was quite a treasure and she was proud of him, but the truth was, this was the first time she had been in charge of anything so detailed and she wanted his support.

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  • He's had quite a bad day.

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  • It must have been quite an ordeal for both of you … all three of you.

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  • It's quite another to do so only because they are the current trend.

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  • It was one thing to love and protect, but quite another to blindly accept total domination.

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  • This must have been quite an ordeal for her.

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  • I never thought of it quite that way, but you have a point.

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  • His attempts at braiding her dark hair the way she liked it had ended up in a series of knots, because he didn't quite understand how to do it and his man-sized fingers were too clumsy.

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  • He was stronger than she was, had been for quite some time.

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  • We can't quite figure out what.

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  • Her eyes flickered to Jessi, who couldn't quite read the expression on her face.

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  • "Quite a bit, I'd say," Toni added.

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  • Not quite panic, not quite desire.

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  • Yet it made sense on a level that she didn't quite understand.

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  • Or maybe she was right, and he was avoiding the obvious, because he couldn't quite handle the thought of being vulnerable to anyone.

    0
    0
  • What bothered him: by making the choice he did, he was faced with a new set of consequences, ones he didn't quite know how to handle and definitely couldn't control.

    0
    0
  • Quite another, when you have to deal with it, Xander replied.

    0
    0
  • It was quite another to realize the weapon was him and the gem was merely the key to access it.

    0
    0
  • But, in attempting to make this conception quite clear and thinkable, we are forced to represent the connexion of things as a universal substance, the essence of which we conceive as a system of laws which underlies everything and in its own self connects everything, but imperceptible, and known to us merely through the impressions it produces on us, which we call things.

    0
    0
  • If 127 parts of iodine, which is an almost black solid, and loo parts of mercury, which is a white liquid metal, be intimately mixed by rubbing them together in a mortar, the two substances wholly disappear, and we obtain instead a brilliant red powder quite unlike the iodine or the mercury; almost the only property that is unchanged is the weight.

    0
    0
  • Two chlorides of copper are known, one a highly coloured substance, the other quite white.

    0
    0
  • Verres may not have been quite so black as he is painted by Cicero, on whose speeches we depend entirely for our knowledge of him, but there can hardly be a doubt that he stood pre-eminent among the worst specimens of Roman provincial governors.

    0
    0
  • It is of course quite possible that isolated cases of officers being put to death for their faith occurred during Maximinian's reign, and on some such cases the legend may have grown up during the century and a half between Maximinian and Eucherius.

    0
    0
  • Liebig and Pasteur were in agreement on the point that fermentation is intimately connected with the presence of yeast in the fermenting liquid, but their explanations concerning the mechanism of fermentation were quite opposed.

    0
    0
  • She cut off her hair and sent it to Musset as a token of penitence, but Musset, though he still flirted with her, never quite forgave her infidelity and refused to admit her to his deathbed.

    0
    0
  • The phenomenon was quite common between 9.30 A.M.

    0
    0
  • Wilson considers that convection currents in the upper atmosphere would be quite inadequate, but conduction may, he thinks, be sufficient alone.

    0
    0
  • Surrounding the green is a space called a ditch, which is nearly but not quite on a level with the green and slopes gently away from it, the side next the turf being lined with boarding, the ditch itself bottomed with wooden spars resting on the foundation.

    0
    0
  • This sort of knowledge stands quite apart from that produced by "theoretic" and "disinterested" judgments.

    0
    0
  • Strasburg was French territory in 1713, but Silbermann's organ is not quite a whole tone below.

    0
    0
  • an amount p 2 which seems small but which would be quite sufficient to destroy one or more of the joints if provision were not made to prevent damage.

    0
    0
  • The theological views of these teachers proved quite incompatible with the Arminianism of Wesley, and a definite breach between them and him took place in 1770.

    0
    0
  • In one sense tt may be said to stand to theological literature in Scotland in something of the same position as that occupied by the Canon Mirificus with respect to the scientific literature, for it is the first published original work relating to theological interpretation, and is quite without a predecessor in its own field.

    0
    0
  • Briggs also used decimals, but in a form not quite so convenient as Napier.

    0
    0
  • Tail not quite so long as the body, and covered with short hairs.

    0
    0
  • Broom believes Thylacoleo to have been "a purely carnivorous animal, and one which would be quite able to, and probably did, kill animals as large or larger than itself."

    0
    0
  • Some writers place it north of the Temple on the site afterwards occupied by the fortress of Antonia, but such a position is not in accord with the descriptions either in Josephus or in the books of the Maccabees, which are quite consistent with each other.

    0
    0
  • Other writers again have placed the Acra on the eastern side of the hill upon which the church of the Holy Sepulchre now stands, but as this point was probably quite outside the city at the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, and is at too great a distance from the Temple, it can hardly be accepted.

    0
    0
  • Other evidence allows us to link together the Kenites, Calebites and Danites in a tradition of some movement into Palestine, evidently quite distinct from the great invasion of Israelite tribes which predominates in the existing records.

    0
    0
  • But this certainly was not the leading point of view with the mass of the Rabbins; 1 and at any rate it is quite certain that the synagogue is a post-exilic institution, and therefore that the Sabbath in old Israel must have been entirely different from the Sabbath of the Scribes.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Paul had quite distinctly laid down from the first days of Gentile Christianity that the Jewish Sabbath was not binding on Christians (Rom.

    0
    0
  • It is quite possible that shabattum and nubattum are from the same root and originally denoted much the same thing - a pause, abstention, from whatever cause or for ceremonial purposes.

    0
    0
  • It is quite consistent with the evidence to suppose that a seven-day week was in use in Babylonia, but each item may be explained differently, and a definite proof does not exist.

    0
    0
  • Ritchie, " that, in the various dialogues in which Plato speaks of immortality, the arguments seem to be of different kinds, and most of them quite unconnected with one another.

    0
    0
  • The history of Rhodes during the Persian wars is quite obscure.

    0
    0
  • A great plain, covering quite 500,000 sq.

    0
    0
  • Naked crags, when they do appear, lift themselves from a sea of green, and a tropical vegetation, quite Malaysian in character, covers everything.

    0
    0
  • The absence of active volcanoes in Australia is a state of things, in a geological sense, quite new to the continent.

    0
    0
  • In some instances the cones are quite intact, and the beds of ash and scoriae are as yet almost unaffected by denuding agencies.

    0
    0
  • With these might be associated the gigantic lily of Queensland (Nymphaea gigantea), the leaves of which float on water, and are quite 18 in.

    0
    0
  • Although the financial operations of the Commonwealth and the states are quite distinct, a statement of the total revenue of the Australian Commonwealth and states is not without interest as showing the weight of taxation and the different sources from which revenue is obtained.

    0
    0
  • On the Gascoyne river, too, were seen natives of an olive colour, quite good-looking; and in the neighbourhood of Sydney rock-carvings have been also found.

    0
    0
  • His account of the country was quite as unfavourable as Pelsaert's.

    0
    0
  • Stansfeld was vigorously defended by Bright and Forster, and his explanation was accepted as quite satisfactory by Palmerston.

    0
    0
  • He was quite aware that the industrial wealth of the great Flemish communes was financially the mainstay of his power, but their very prosperity made them the chief obstacle to his schemes of unifying into a solid dominion the loose aggregate of states over which he was the ruler.

    0
    0
  • The ruffed grouse (or "partridge") is the most common of game birds, but woodcock, ducks and geese are quite common.

    0
    0
  • On the higher elevations it is generally stony and sterile, but in the valleys and on many of the lower hills, where it consists largely of clay and sand, it is quite productive.

    0
    0
  • The alternate leaves are more or less deeply sinuated or cut in many species, but in some of the deciduous and many of the evergreen kinds are nearly or quite entire on the margin.

    0
    0
  • The wood is hard, heavy and of fine grain, quite equal to the best British oak for indoor use, but of very variable durability where exposed to weather.

    0
    0
  • In Britain the evergreen oak is quite hardy in ordinary winters, and is useful to the ornamental planter from its capacity for resisting the sea gales; but it generally remains of small size.

    0
    0
  • From its rugged silvery bark and dark-green foliage, it is a handsome tree, quite hardy in Cornwall and Devonshire, where it has grown to a large size.

    0
    0
  • The south-moving currents originating from melting ice are probably quite shallow.

    0
    0
  • The new ship canal from Zeebrugge will not revive the ancient port, as it follows a different route, leaving Damme and Ecluse quite untouched.

    0
    0
  • The dates of the rest of the extant plays, here given in alphabetical order, are quite uncertain, namely, Amphitruo, Aulularia, Bacchides, Captivi, Casina, Curculio, Epidicus, Menaechmi, Mercator (probably later than the Rudens, as shown by F.

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    0
  • 12, 45); though from the lips of slaves and other low persons in the plays we no doubt hear expressions which, while they are quite in keeping with the characters to whom they are allotted, would have shocked the ears of polite society in the 2nd century B.C.

    0
    0
  • Marsollier's longer life, in two volumes (1700), is quite untrustworthy; still more so that by Loyau d 'Amboise (1833), which is rather a romance than a biography.

    0
    0
  • It was quite small by the time of Eusebius.

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    0
  • "It is hardly necessary to add," he remarks, "that anything which any insulated body or system of bodies can continue to furnish without limitation cannot possibly be a material substance; and it appears to me to be extremely difficult, if not quite impossible, to form any distinct idea of anything capable of being excited and communicated in the manner that heat was excited and communicated in these experiments, except it be motion."

    0
    0
  • Trans., 18 53, p. 357, 18 54, p. 321, and 1862, p. 579) showed that the statement that no internal work is done when a gas expands or contracts is not quite true, but the amount is very small in the cases of those gases which, like oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen, can only be liquefied by intense cold and pressure.

    0
    0
  • Already Mozart divides his violas into two parts quite as often as he makes them play with the basses.

    0
    0
  • But both are quite right.

    0
    0
  • Thus there was quite as much important solo music for the flute as for the violin; and almost more music for the viola da gamba than for the violoncello.

    0
    0
  • 17 and a thickness of insulating material which formerly would have been considered quite insufficient is now very generally adopted with complete success.

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    0
  • Normally a switch attached to the key cuts the battery off, and connects the line direct through the receiving relay; this switch is turned to " send " when transmission commences, and is moved back to " receive " when it ceases: this movement is done quite mechanically by the telegraphist, and as it is practically never forgotten, automatic devices (which have often been suggested) to effect the turning are wholly unnecessary.

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    0
  • This slip is then passed through a transmitter fitted with brush contacts and connected to the two line wires of a metallic loop. One circuit is formed by the loop itself, and a second, quite independent, by the two wires in parallel, earthed at each end.

    0
    0
  • These springs are so adjusted that they are not quite able to release the armature.

    0
    0
  • This method of communication by magnetic induction through space establishes, therefore, a second method of wireless telegraphy which is quite independent of and different from that due to conduction through earth or water.

    0
    0
  • The magnetic and electric forces are directed alternately in one direction and the other, and at distances which are called multiples of a wave length the force is in the same direction at the same time, but in the case of damped waves h.as not quite the same intensity.

    0
    0
  • This result created a great sensation, and proved that Transatlantic electric wave telegraphy was quite feasible and not inhibited by distance, or by the earth's curvature even over an arc of a great circle 3000 m.

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    0
  • The metal is quite permanent in dry air, but in moist air it becomes coated with a superficial layer of the oxide; it burns on heating to redness, forming a brown coloured oxide; and is readily soluble in mineral acids with formation of the corresponding salts.

    0
    0
  • The box was filled nearly, but not quite full, of granulated hard carbon.

    0
    0
  • The eucalyptus is of quite modern introduction; it has been extensively planted in malarious districts.

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    0
  • The houses in Uzhitse are quite unlike those of more prosperous Servian towns, being tall, narrow structures of timber, frequently blackened by the damp. Pop. (1900) about 7000.

    0
    0
  • On grounds of policy and morality alike the act was quite indefensible; but it is perhaps some palliation of his perjury that it was committed to satisfy the last urgent wish of a dying man, and that he alone remained true to the nine days' queen when the others who had with him signed Edward's device deserted her.

    0
    0
  • That is a task quite beyond what is generally recognized as Natural Theology.

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    0
  • It can never quite confine attention to the problem of the being of God.

    0
    0
  • Of course the cosmological argument is rarely or never left to stand quite alone.

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    0
  • Chalmers 1° put it, would have yielded, by the same process of natural law as ours, quite a different universe from ours.

    0
    0
  • Quite a different view of necessity is the moral necessity pointed to by Kant's " Practical Reason."

    0
    0
  • Realist make him almost if not quite intuitionalist; while there is also an idealist reading possible.

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    0
  • On the present occasion it was evidently regarded as quite a formal and introductory matter, and the same remark applies to the general grant of liberties to all freemen and their heirs, with which the chapter concludes.

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    0
  • Not only does the rainfall at one place vary from year to year, but there is an extraordinary difference in the returns for places quite close to one another.

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    0
  • They are black, with woolly hair, and in their eyes and countenances there is something quite frightful ....

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    0
  • Of their massacres of shipwrecked crews, even in quite modern times, there is no doubt, but the policy of conciliation unremittingly pursued for the last forty years has now secured a friendly reception for shipwrecked crews at any port of the islands except the south and west of Little Andaman and North Sentinel Island.

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    0
  • The process carrying the otolith outer side of a or concretion hk, formed by endoderm cells, is tentacle, two enclosed by an upgrowth forming the " vesicle," nerves run round which is not yet quite closed in at the top. the base of the (After Hertwig.) tentacle to it.

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    0
  • Normally the medusae are liberated in quite an immature state; they swim away, feed, grow and become adult mature el individuals.

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    0
  • In individuals either of the male or female sex, germ-cells which are quite undifferentiated and neutral in character, become amoeboid, and wander into the endoderm.

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    0
  • It is quite possible that the characters of the nematocysts might afford data as useful to the systematist in this group as do the spicules of sponges, for instance.

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    0
  • Until quite recently the hydroids (Gymnoblastea) and the medusae (Anthomedusae) have been classified separately, since the connexion between them was insufficiently known.

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    0
  • It is quite possible that some of these medusae will be found to be truly hypogenetic, that is to say, with a life-cycle secondarily simplified by suppression of metagenesis.

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    0
  • Hickson considers that the families Milleporidae and Stylasteridae should stand quite apart from one another and should not be united in one order.

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    0
  • He here observes that " all quite down from us the descent is by easy steps, and a continued series of things, that in each remove differ very little from one another."

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    0
  • BM- Within quite recent years, however, a special school q Y P has arisen with the main object of treating the processes of evolution quantitatively.

    0
    0
  • On the 26th of December 1076 Boleslaus encircled his own brows with the royal diadem, a striking proof that the Polish kings did not even yet consider their title quite secure.

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    0
  • With this use of the word, philologically inexact, but historically quite defensible, may be compared the use of the word English, which is not exactly the language of the Angles, or of the word French, which is not exactly the language of the Franks.

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    0
  • anbar, probably through the Spanish, but this word referred originally to ambergris, which is an animal substance quite distinct from yellow amber.

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    0
  • Whilst succinite is the common variety of European amber, the following varieties also occur: Gedanite, or "brittle amber," closely resembling succinite, but much more brittle, not quite so hard, with a lower meltingpoint and containing no succinic acid.

    0
    0
  • The construction of the wooden external dome, and the support of the stone lantern by an inner cone of brickwork, quite independent of either the external or internal dome, are wonderful examples of his, constructive ingenuity.

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    0
  • The layers below have progressively fewer of these, the central cells being quite colorless.

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    0
  • The branches may be quite free or they may be united laterally to form a solid body of more or less firm and compact consistency.

    0
    0
  • I, N.) have been quite recently shown to possess a peculiar structure.

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    0
  • In the majority of ferns, at a higher level, after the stele has increased greatly in diameter, a large-celled true pith or medulla, resembling the cortex in its characters, and quite distinct from conjunctive, from which it is separated by an internal endodernlis, appears in the centre.

    0
    0
  • The protoxylem of each is a leaftrace, while the metaxylem consisting of a right and a left portion forms a quite distinct cauline system.

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    0
  • These collateral bundles are separated from one another by bands of conjunctive tissues called primary medullary rays, which may be quite narrow or of considerable width.

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    0
  • When the leaves are developed early, they often quite overshadow thi actual apex of the stem, and the rapid formation of leaf-tissui disturbs the obviousness of, and perhaps actually destroys, th~ stratified arrangement of the shoot initials.

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    0
  • In other cases a most intricate arrangement of secondary tissue masses is produced, quite impossible to interpret unless all stages of their development have been followed.

    0
    0
  • In nearly all plants which produce secondary vascular tissues by means of a cambium there is another layer of secondary meristem arising externally to, but in quite the same fashion as, Ph II

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    0
  • turn to a cell mass, the individual units of which are at first quite uniform.

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    0
  • This explanation is unsatisfactory from many points of view, but till quite recently no acceptable alternative has been advanced.

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    0
  • While they are quite capable of taking up nitrates from the soil where and so long as these are present, they can grow and thrive in soil which contains no combined nitrogen at all, deriving their supplies of this element in these cases from the air.

    0
    0
  • As the tube grows down the hair it maintains its own independence, and does not fuse with the contents of the root-hair, whose protoplasm remains quite distinct and separate.

    0
    0
  • It is not quite certain whether a true pepsin exists in plants, but many trypsins have been discovered, and one form of erepsin, at least, is very widespread.

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    0
  • If we consider a leaf of the common fern we find that in its young condition it is closely rolled up, the upper or ventral surface being quite concealed.

    0
    0
  • The effects of frost and of sunburn are frequently quite local.

    0
    0
  • Although many plants typical of fresh water are able to grow also in brackish water, there are only a few species which appear to be quite confined to the latter habitats in this country.

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    0
  • For instance, the animal traps of carnivorous plants (Drosera, Nepenihes, &c.) did not, presumably, originate as such; they began as organs of quite another kind which became adapted to their present function in consequence of animals having been accidentally caught.

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    0
  • In endeavouring to trace the causation of adaptation, it is obvious that it must be due quite as much to properties inherent in the plant as to the action of external conditions; the plant must possess adaptive capacity.

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    0
  • Three-quarters of the native species are endemic; they seem, however, to be quite unable to resist the invasion of new-comers, and already 600 plants of foreign origin have succeeded in establishing themselves.

    0
    0
  • The coins demonstrate that Hellenism had become quite extinct in Persis, while the old historical and mythical traditions and the Zoroastrian religion were supreme.

    0
    0
  • It is quite clear that Pomponius Mela (c. A.D.

    0
    0
  • The phosphate thus produced forms an efficacious turnip manure, and is quite equal in value to that produced from any other source.

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    0
  • There is very little grey matter in the cortex of the hemispheres, the surface of which is devoid of convolutions, mostly quite smooth; in others, for instance pigeons, fowls and birds of prey, a very slight furrow might be compared with the Sylvian fissure.

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    0
  • Their function is not quite clear.

    0
    0
  • Attempts to derive the anacromyodian and the katacromyodian from the diacromyodian condition are easy on paper, but quite hopeless when hampered by the knowledge of anatomical facts and how to use them.

    0
    0
  • The third or outermost chamber, the proctodaeum, is closed externally by the sphincter ani; the orifice is quite circular.

    0
    0
  • It is, of course, quite impossible, in a survey of extinct birds, to divide them into those which are bona fide fossil, sub-fossil, recently extirpated and partially exterminated.

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    0
  • harrisi of the Galapagos, survive its quite recent discovery?

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    0
  • His keenly logical intellect, and his impatience of authority where it clashed with his own convictions, quite unfitted him for that unquestioning obedience which the Church demanded.

    0
    0
  • 25 sqq.) is quite in accordance with Oriental custom and explains the growth of the present extremely complex sources.

    0
    0
  • Thus it is quite in accordance with the outlook of the classical period that Plato in his Laws (909-910) should prohibit all possession of private shrines or performance of private rites; "let a man go to a temple to pray, and let any one who pleases join with him in the prayer."

    0
    0
  • Their religion was pagan, being quite distinct from Buddhism; but in Assam they gradually became Hinduized, and their kings finally adopted Hindu names and titles.

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    0
  • By far the larger part of the valley is quite uncultivated, and much of it is occupied by tamarisk jungles, the home of countless wild pigs.

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    0
  • Here the river turns quite sharply eastward.

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    0
  • Twentysix miles farther down lies the town of Deir, where the river divides into two channels and the river valley opens out into quite extensive plains.

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    0
  • With the acquisition of the Suez Canal, moreover, the value of this route from the British standpoint was so greatly diminished that the scheme, so far as England was concerned, was quite abandoned.

    0
    0
  • But in Sicily we see the quite different phenomenon of three, four, five classes of men living side by side, each keeping its own nationality and speaking its own tongue.

    0
    0
  • Patricians and plebeians went on as orders defined by law, till the distinction died out in the confusion of things under the empire, till at last the word "patrician" took quite a new meaning.

    0
    0
  • And, as the old distinction survived in law and religion after all substantial privileges were abolished, so presently a new distinction arose of which law and religion knew nothing, but which became in practice nearly as marked and quite as important as the older one.

    0
    0
  • The case is again often misunderstood because the words "patrician" and "plebeian," like so many other technical Roman and Greek words, have come in modern language to be used in a way quite unlike their original sense.

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    0
  • The Athenian eb rarpl8at, who were thus gradually brought down from their privileged position, seem to have been quite as proud and exclusive as the Roman patricians; but when they lost their privileges they lost them far more thoroughly, and they did not, as at Rome, practically hand on many of them to a new nobility, of which they formed part, though not the whole.

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  • When one branch of a family was admitted and one shut out we have an analogy to the patrician and plebeian Claudii, though the distinction had come about in quite another way.

    0
    0
  • In not a few of the Italian cities nobility had an origin and ran a course quite unlike the origin and the course which were its lot at Venice.

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  • But in the more strictly crown, even if of quite humble origin, are "commanded" to court functions with their husbands.

    0
    0
  • inland the climate is not quite so rainy, and the weather is much cooler during the dry season.

    0
    0
  • The birds of Liberia are not quite so peculiar as the mammals.

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    0
  • 1 may or may not be affected by Philo; it is almost or quite solitary in the N.T.) Similarly, the immortality of the soul may be maintained on Platonic or quasi-Platonic lines, as by St Athanasius (Contra Gentes, § 33) - a writer who repeatedly quotes the Alexandrian Book of Wisdom, in which Platonism and the Old Testament had already joined partnership. This.

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  • Intolerant reliance upon force presents greater difficulties to them; soon it grows quite obsolete.

    0
    0
  • And the inner mind of Butler has moral anchorage in the Analogy, quite as much as in the Sermons.

    0
    0
  • The picturesque Bureya Mountains above the Amur, the forest-clad Sikhota-alin on the Pacific, and the volcanic chains of Kamchatka belong, however, to quite another orographical construction, being the border-ridges of the terraces by which the great plateau formation descends to the depths of the Pacific Ocean.

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  • Oligocene, quite similar to that of N.

    0
    0
  • The peasants, as already stated, form a class apart, untouched by the influence of Western civilization, the principles of which they are quite incapable of understanding or appreci.

    0
    0
  • basin, thinly-peopled and available only for cattle-breeding and for hunting, is quite isolated from Russia by the Timan ridge.

    0
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  • Vast areas in Russia are quite unfit for cultivation, 19% of the aggregate surface of European Russia (apart from Poland and Finland) being occupied by lakes, marshes, sand, &c., 39% by forests, 16% by prairies, and only 26% being under cultivation.

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  • The sable has quite disappeared, being found only on the Urals; the beaver may be trapped at a few places in Minsk, and the otter is very rare.

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    0
  • Any idea of proselytism is quite foreign to the ordinary Russian mind, and the outbursts of proselytizing zeal occasionally manifested by the clergy are really due to the desire for " Russification," and traceable to the influence of the higher clergy and of the government.

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  • The amount of iron and steel produced in the Urals is not quite 20% of the total in all European Russia and Poland.

    0
    0
  • It is quite possible, as some apologists suggest, that the number of his victims may have been exaggerated, but that they are to be counted by thousands there can be no doubt.

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