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quintilian

quintilian

quintilian Sentence Examples

  • The only ancient writer who mentions him is Quintilian (Instil.

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  • 6.8, Brutus, 76, 263.78, 271; Quintilian, Instil.

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  • Of George Sand's style a foreigner can be but an imperfect judge, but French critics, from Sainte-Beuve, Nisard and Caro down to Jules Lemaitre and Faguet, have agreed to praise her spontaneity, her correctness of diction, her easy opulence - the lactea ubertas that Quintilian attributes to Livy.

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  • I, 93 (where it is stated that some (not Quintilian) preferred him to Tibullus), Ov.

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  • Pollio was a distinguished orator; his speeches showed ingenuity and care, but were marred by an affected archaism (Quintilian, Inst.

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  • to) and Cicero (Quintilian, Inst.

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  • I, 22) and professed to detect in Livy's style certain provincialisms of his native Padua (Quintilian, i.

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  • Quintilian (Instit.

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  • The chief argument in favour of this identity is the fact that many passages quoted by Quintilian from Cornificius are reproduced in the Rhetorica.

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  • In one of his epistles he describes how he recovered Quintilian, part of Valerius Flaccus, and the commentaries of Asconius Pedianus at St Gall.

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  • For Cicero's opinion see Brutus, 82; Quintilian x.

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  • Quintilian is said to have been the first public teacher who enjoyed this imperial favour.

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  • Quintilian credits him with a vigorous and poetical genius (Instit.

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  • But the gossip, not discouraged by Terence, lived and throve; it crops up in Cicero and Quintilian, and the ascription of the plays to Scipio had the honour to be accepted by Montaigne and rejected by Diderot.

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  • Quintilian applies to his writings the word elegantissima.

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  • According to ancient authorities, the writer was very outspoken in his denunciations, and his relatives considered it necessary to strike out the most offensive passages of the work before it was widely circulated (Quintilian, Instit.

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  • In the middle of words between vowels f was originally regularly voiced: life, lives; wife, wives, &c. The Latin V, however, was not a labio-dental spirant like the English v, but a bi-labial semivowel like the English w, as is clear from the testimony of Quintilian and of later grammarians.

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  • He had the reputation of being an excellent raconteur, and Quintilian (x.

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  • Asconius Pedianus and Thrasea Paetus were natives of the town; and Quintilian speaks of the directness and simplicity of their diction as Patavinitas, comparing it with the artificial obscurity of the writers of Rome itself.

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  • The only extant prose work which may be assigned to the end of this period is the treatise on rhetoric known by the title Ad Herennium (c. 84) a work indicative of the attention bestowed on prose style and rhetorical studies during the last century of the republic, and which may be regarded as a precursor of the oratorical treatises of Cicero and of the work of Quintilian.

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  • The reign of Domitian, although it silenced the more independent spirits of the time, Tacitus and Juvenal, witnessed more important contributions to Roman literature than any age since the Augustan, - among them the Institutes of Quintilian, the Punic War of Silius Italicus, the epics and the Silvae of Statius, and the Epigrams of Martial.

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  • Fabius Quintilianus, or Quintilian (c. 35-95), is brought forward by Juvenal as a unique instance of a thoroughly successful man of letters, of one not belonging by birth to the rich or official class, who had risen to wealth and honours through literature.

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  • But it is not in the Silvae, nor in the epics and tragedies of the time, nor in the cultivated criticism of Quintilian that the age of Domitian lives for us.

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  • He afterwards studied philosophy and rhetoric under Nicetes Sacerdos and Quintilian (vi.

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  • See Quintilian, Instit.

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  • He has been variously identified with Julius Florus, a distinguished orator and uncle of Julius Secundus, an intimate friend of Quintilian (Instil.

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  • Persius, Juvenal and Quintilian vouch for the admiration with which he was regarded in the first century of the empire.

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  • Hist., praefatio, 20; Tacitus, Dialogus de Oratoribus, 23; Quintilian, Instil.

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  • Quintilian asserts that he was far superior to any writer of tragedies he had known, and Tacitus expresses a high opinion of his literary abilities.

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  • 28; Quintilian, Inst.

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  • Cicero calls his style "copious and polished," Quintilian, "sweet, pure and flowing"; Longinus says he was "the most Homeric of historians"; Dionysius, his countryman, prefers him to Thucydides, and regards him as combining in an extraordinary degree the excellences of sublimity, beauty and the true historical method of composition.

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  • 13; Quintilian, Instil.

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  • Cicero afterwards boasted openly that he had thrown dust in the eyes of the jury (Quintilian, Instil.

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  • 90), who laments his recent death as a great loss, although it does not follow that he died young; as Quintilian's work was finished about A.D.

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  • Quintilian (Instil.

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  • His most famous pupil was Varro (116-27), the six surviving books of whose great work on the Latin language are mainly concerned with the great grammatical controversy on analogy and anomaly - a controversy which also engaged the attention of Cicero and Caesar, and of the elder Pliny and Quintilian.

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  • Their own poems soon became the theme of criticism and of comment; and, by the time of Quintilian and Juvenal, they shared the fate (which Horace had feared) of becoming textbooks for use in schools.

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  • 88 Quintilian was placed at the head of the first state-supported school in Rome.

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  • In the general scheme of education the authority followed was Quintilian.

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  • Thirteen of Cicero's speeches were found by him at Cluny and Langres, and elsewhere in France or Germany; the commentary of Asconius, a complete Quintilian, and a large part of Valerius Flaccus were discovered at St Gallen.

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  • Among the Latin authors studied were Virgil and Lucan, with selections from Horace, Ovid and Juvenal, besides Cicero and Quintilian, Sallust and Curtius, Caesar and Livy.

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  • Among his lost works may be mentioned: Aetolica, a prose history of Aetolia; Heteroeumena, a mythological epic, used by Ovid in the Metamorphoses and epitomized by Antoninus Liberalis; Georgica and Melissourgica, of which considerable fragments are preserved, said to have been imitated by Virgil (Quintilian x.

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  • Here we can read the young Aristotle, writing in the form of the dialogue like Plato, avoiding hiatus like Isocrates, and justifying the praises accorded to his style by Cicero, Quintilian and Dionysius.

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  • 68-69), written in his second period, took according to Quintilian a similar view.

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  • 2; Quintilian i.

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  • 3; Quintilian iii.

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  • 7, I), by separating the declamatory (E7rt6ELKTLK011) from the deliberative (bjwjyoptcOv, av,u ovXEVTLKOV) and judicial (SLKavtKOV); whereas his rival Isocrates had considered that laudation and vituperation, which Aristotle elevated into species of declamation, run through every kind (Quintilian iv.

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  • Quintilian (iii.

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  • to, 43; Quintilian, Instit.

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  • Quintilian, Instit.

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  • writings of Poliziano, the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, Dante's Divine Comedy, Petrarch's poems, a collection of early Latin poets of the Christian era, the letters of the younger Pliny, the poems of Pontanus, Sannazzaro's Arcadia, Quintilian, Valerius Maximus, and the Adagia of Erasmus were printed, either in first editions, or with a beauty of type and paper never reached before, between the years 1495 and 1514.

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  • Though a man of profligate and arrogant character, he enjoyed a great reputation as a teacher; Quintilian and Persius are said to have been his pupils.

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  • Stesichorus indeed made a new departure by using lyric poetry to celebrate gods and heroes rather than human feelings and passions; this is what Quintilian (Instit.

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  • He was famed in antiquity for the richness and splendour of his imagination and his style, although Quintilian censures his redundancy and Hermogenes remarks on the excessive sweetness that results from his abundant use of epithets.

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  • His pupil Quintilian calls him the greatest orator he had ever known; but he disgraced his talents by acting as public informer against some of the most distinguished personages in Rome.

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  • Quintilian quotes some of his witty sayings (dicta), collections of which were published, and mentions two books by him On Witnesses.

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  • 2 With these it is usual to include a treatise to Herennius by an anonymous author, a contemporary of Sulla, in modern times generally identified with a person named Cornificius, quoted by Quintilian Oratore, a treatise in three books dedicated to his brother Quintus.

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  • Cicero gives various clausulae which his ears told him to be good or bad, but his remarks are desultory, as also are those of Quintilian, whose examples were largely drawn from Cicero's writings.

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  • - -- U, this being the heroica clausula condemned by Quintilian.

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  • Cicero's speech for Milo at his trial was not a success, though, as Quintilian (ix.

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  • criticized for his jokes, and even Quintilian (ii.

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  • a quotation from it occurs in Quintilian.

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  • His most devoted admirers were the younger Pliny, who reproduced his oratorical style with considerable success, and Quintilian (x.

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  • It is possible that the writer may have used a quotation preserved from a real speech by Quintilian.

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  • 691; Quintilian i.

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  • 47; Plutarch, Marius, 44; Cicero, Orator, 5, Brutus, 37; Quintilian, Instit.

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  • He wrote satirical poems after the manner of Catullus, whose bitterness he rivalled, according to Quintilian (Instil.

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  • 72; Quintilian, Instil.

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  • The statement that he continued to write satires long before he gave them to the world accords well with the nature of their contents and the elaborate character of their composition, and might almost be inferred from the emphatic but yet guarded statement of Quintilian in his short summary of Roman literature.

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  • 22) and Quintilian (x.

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  • He is indeed the prince of chroniclers, and in this respect not unworthy to be classed even with Herodotus (Quintilian, x.

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  • It is true that here and there the "creamy richness" of his style becomes verbosity, and that he occasionally draws too freely on his inexhaustible store of epithets, metaphors and turns of speech; but these faults, which did not escape the censure even of friendly critics like Quintilian, are comparatively rare in the extant parts of his work.

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  • Quintilian (Inst.

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  • at Florence; and Humanists, like Erasmus, Ludovicus Vives and Nizolius, enamoured of the popular philo sophy of Cicero and Quintilian, poured out the vials of their contempt on scholastic barbarism with its " impious and thriceaccursed Averroes."

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  • When they passed away there arosg in their places such writers as the younger Seneca, the epic poet Lucan, the epigrammatist Martial, the literary critic Quintilian, besides a host of lesser names.

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  • He had a great reputation as a poet; Quintilian (Instit.

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  • The silence respecting him maintained by Quintilian and by Lucian may reasonably be taken to imply their agreement with Dionysius as to his merits as a master of style.

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  • Burmann edited the following classical authors: - Phaedrus (1698); Horace (1699); Valerius Flaccus (1702); Petronius Arbiter (1709); Velleius Paterculus (1719); Quintilian (1720); Justin (1722); Ovid (1727); Poetae Latini minores (1731); Suetonius (1736); Lucan (1740).

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  • Cicero held an unfavourable opinion of his methods, which were approved by Quintilian, although he considers that Hermagoras neglected the practical side of rhetoric for the theoretical.

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  • 6.8, Brutus, 76, 263.78, 271; Quintilian, Instil.

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  • Of George Sand's style a foreigner can be but an imperfect judge, but French critics, from Sainte-Beuve, Nisard and Caro down to Jules Lemaitre and Faguet, have agreed to praise her spontaneity, her correctness of diction, her easy opulence - the lactea ubertas that Quintilian attributes to Livy.

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  • I, 93 (where it is stated that some (not Quintilian) preferred him to Tibullus), Ov.

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  • Pollio was a distinguished orator; his speeches showed ingenuity and care, but were marred by an affected archaism (Quintilian, Inst.

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  • to) and Cicero (Quintilian, Inst.

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  • I, 22) and professed to detect in Livy's style certain provincialisms of his native Padua (Quintilian, i.

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  • Quintilian (Instit.

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  • CORNIFICIUS, the author of a work on rhetorical figures, and perhaps of a general treatise (ars, Tixvn) on the art of rhetoric (Quintilian, Instit., iii.

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  • The chief argument in favour of this identity is the fact that many passages quoted by Quintilian from Cornificius are reproduced in the Rhetorica.

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  • In one of his epistles he describes how he recovered Quintilian, part of Valerius Flaccus, and the commentaries of Asconius Pedianus at St Gall.

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  • His prose works on various subjects - Prometheus, Symposium (a banquet at which Virgil, Horace and Messalla were present), De cultu suo (on his manner of life) - were ridiculed by Augustus, Seneca and Quintilian for their strange style, the use of rare words and awkward transpositions.

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  • For Cicero's opinion see Brutus, 82; Quintilian x.

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  • Quintilian is said to have been the first public teacher who enjoyed this imperial favour.

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  • Quintilian credits him with a vigorous and poetical genius (Instit.

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  • Quintilian (xi.

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  • But the gossip, not discouraged by Terence, lived and throve; it crops up in Cicero and Quintilian, and the ascription of the plays to Scipio had the honour to be accepted by Montaigne and rejected by Diderot.

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  • Quintilian applies to his writings the word elegantissima.

    0
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  • According to ancient authorities, the writer was very outspoken in his denunciations, and his relatives considered it necessary to strike out the most offensive passages of the work before it was widely circulated (Quintilian, Instit.

    0
    0
  • In the middle of words between vowels f was originally regularly voiced: life, lives; wife, wives, &c. The Latin V, however, was not a labio-dental spirant like the English v, but a bi-labial semivowel like the English w, as is clear from the testimony of Quintilian and of later grammarians.

    0
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  • He had the reputation of being an excellent raconteur, and Quintilian (x.

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  • Asconius Pedianus and Thrasea Paetus were natives of the town; and Quintilian speaks of the directness and simplicity of their diction as Patavinitas, comparing it with the artificial obscurity of the writers of Rome itself.

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  • The only extant prose work which may be assigned to the end of this period is the treatise on rhetoric known by the title Ad Herennium (c. 84) a work indicative of the attention bestowed on prose style and rhetorical studies during the last century of the republic, and which may be regarded as a precursor of the oratorical treatises of Cicero and of the work of Quintilian.

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  • The fervid temperament of a fresh and vigorous race, which received the Latin discipline just as Latium had tw9 or three centuries previously received the Greek discipline, revealed itself in the writings of the Senecas, Lucan, Quintilian, Martial and others, who in their own time added literary distinction to the Spanish towns from which they came.

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  • Though it was not one of the great eras in the annals of literature, yet the century which produced Martial, Juvenal and Tacitus cannot be pronounced barren in literary originality, nor that which produced Seneca and Quintilian devoid of culture and literary taste.

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  • The reign of Domitian, although it silenced the more independent spirits of the time, Tacitus and Juvenal, witnessed more important contributions to Roman literature than any age since the Augustan, - among them the Institutes of Quintilian, the Punic War of Silius Italicus, the epics and the Silvae of Statius, and the Epigrams of Martial.

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  • Fabius Quintilianus, or Quintilian (c. 35-95), is brought forward by Juvenal as a unique instance of a thoroughly successful man of letters, of one not belonging by birth to the rich or official class, who had risen to wealth and honours through literature.

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  • But it is not in the Silvae, nor in the epics and tragedies of the time, nor in the cultivated criticism of Quintilian that the age of Domitian lives for us.

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  • He afterwards studied philosophy and rhetoric under Nicetes Sacerdos and Quintilian (vi.

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  • See Quintilian, Instit.

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  • He has been variously identified with Julius Florus, a distinguished orator and uncle of Julius Secundus, an intimate friend of Quintilian (Instil.

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  • Persius, Juvenal and Quintilian vouch for the admiration with which he was regarded in the first century of the empire.

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  • Hist., praefatio, 20; Tacitus, Dialogus de Oratoribus, 23; Quintilian, Instil.

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  • Quintilian asserts that he was far superior to any writer of tragedies he had known, and Tacitus expresses a high opinion of his literary abilities.

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  • 28; Quintilian, Inst.

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  • Cicero calls his style "copious and polished," Quintilian, "sweet, pure and flowing"; Longinus says he was "the most Homeric of historians"; Dionysius, his countryman, prefers him to Thucydides, and regards him as combining in an extraordinary degree the excellences of sublimity, beauty and the true historical method of composition.

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  • 13; Quintilian, Instil.

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  • Cicero afterwards boasted openly that he had thrown dust in the eyes of the jury (Quintilian, Instil.

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  • The only ancient writer who mentions him is Quintilian (Instil.

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  • 90), who laments his recent death as a great loss, although it does not follow that he died young; as Quintilian's work was finished about A.D.

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  • Quintilian (Instil.

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  • His most famous pupil was Varro (116-27), the six surviving books of whose great work on the Latin language are mainly concerned with the great grammatical controversy on analogy and anomaly - a controversy which also engaged the attention of Cicero and Caesar, and of the elder Pliny and Quintilian.

    0
    0
  • Their own poems soon became the theme of criticism and of comment; and, by the time of Quintilian and Juvenal, they shared the fate (which Horace had feared) of becoming textbooks for use in schools.

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  • 88 Quintilian was placed at the head of the first state-supported school in Rome.

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  • In the general scheme of education the authority followed was Quintilian.

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  • Thirteen of Cicero's speeches were found by him at Cluny and Langres, and elsewhere in France or Germany; the commentary of Asconius, a complete Quintilian, and a large part of Valerius Flaccus were discovered at St Gallen.

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    0
  • Among the Latin authors studied were Virgil and Lucan, with selections from Horace, Ovid and Juvenal, besides Cicero and Quintilian, Sallust and Curtius, Caesar and Livy.

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  • 22) wrote: de Caesare ita judico, ilium omnium fere oratorum Latine loqui elegantissime, while Quintilian (x.

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  • Among his lost works may be mentioned: Aetolica, a prose history of Aetolia; Heteroeumena, a mythological epic, used by Ovid in the Metamorphoses and epitomized by Antoninus Liberalis; Georgica and Melissourgica, of which considerable fragments are preserved, said to have been imitated by Virgil (Quintilian x.

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  • Here we can read the young Aristotle, writing in the form of the dialogue like Plato, avoiding hiatus like Isocrates, and justifying the praises accorded to his style by Cicero, Quintilian and Dionysius.

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  • 68-69), written in his second period, took according to Quintilian a similar view.

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  • 2; Quintilian i.

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  • 3; Quintilian iii.

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  • 7, I), by separating the declamatory (E7rt6ELKTLK011) from the deliberative (bjwjyoptcOv, av,u ovXEVTLKOV) and judicial (SLKavtKOV); whereas his rival Isocrates had considered that laudation and vituperation, which Aristotle elevated into species of declamation, run through every kind (Quintilian iv.

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  • Quintilian (iii.

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  • to, 43; Quintilian, Instit.

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  • Quintilian, Instit.

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  • writings of Poliziano, the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, Dante's Divine Comedy, Petrarch's poems, a collection of early Latin poets of the Christian era, the letters of the younger Pliny, the poems of Pontanus, Sannazzaro's Arcadia, Quintilian, Valerius Maximus, and the Adagia of Erasmus were printed, either in first editions, or with a beauty of type and paper never reached before, between the years 1495 and 1514.

    0
    0
  • Though a man of profligate and arrogant character, he enjoyed a great reputation as a teacher; Quintilian and Persius are said to have been his pupils.

    0
    0
  • Stesichorus indeed made a new departure by using lyric poetry to celebrate gods and heroes rather than human feelings and passions; this is what Quintilian (Instit.

    0
    0
  • He was famed in antiquity for the richness and splendour of his imagination and his style, although Quintilian censures his redundancy and Hermogenes remarks on the excessive sweetness that results from his abundant use of epithets.

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    0
  • A sentence of Quintilian expresses the feeling of reverence for his genius and character, mixed with distaste for his rude workmanship, with which the Romans of the early empire regarded him: "Let us revere Ennius as we revere the sacred groves, hallowed by antiquity, whose massive and venerable oak trees are not so remarkable for beauty as for the religious awe which they inspire" (Inst.

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  • His pupil Quintilian calls him the greatest orator he had ever known; but he disgraced his talents by acting as public informer against some of the most distinguished personages in Rome.

    0
    0
  • Quintilian quotes some of his witty sayings (dicta), collections of which were published, and mentions two books by him On Witnesses.

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    0
  • 2 With these it is usual to include a treatise to Herennius by an anonymous author, a contemporary of Sulla, in modern times generally identified with a person named Cornificius, quoted by Quintilian Oratore, a treatise in three books dedicated to his brother Quintus.

    0
    0
  • Cicero gives various clausulae which his ears told him to be good or bad, but his remarks are desultory, as also are those of Quintilian, whose examples were largely drawn from Cicero's writings.

    0
    0
  • - -- U, this being the heroica clausula condemned by Quintilian.

    0
    0
  • Cicero's speech for Milo at his trial was not a success, though, as Quintilian (ix.

    0
    0
  • criticized for his jokes, and even Quintilian (ii.

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    0
  • a quotation from it occurs in Quintilian.

    0
    0
  • His most devoted admirers were the younger Pliny, who reproduced his oratorical style with considerable success, and Quintilian (x.

    0
    0
  • It is possible that the writer may have used a quotation preserved from a real speech by Quintilian.

    0
    0
  • 691; Quintilian i.

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  • 47; Plutarch, Marius, 44; Cicero, Orator, 5, Brutus, 37; Quintilian, Instit.

    0
    0
  • He wrote satirical poems after the manner of Catullus, whose bitterness he rivalled, according to Quintilian (Instil.

    0
    0
  • 72; Quintilian, Instil.

    0
    0
  • The statement that he continued to write satires long before he gave them to the world accords well with the nature of their contents and the elaborate character of their composition, and might almost be inferred from the emphatic but yet guarded statement of Quintilian in his short summary of Roman literature.

    0
    0
  • 22) and Quintilian (x.

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  • He is indeed the prince of chroniclers, and in this respect not unworthy to be classed even with Herodotus (Quintilian, x.

    0
    0
  • It is true that here and there the "creamy richness" of his style becomes verbosity, and that he occasionally draws too freely on his inexhaustible store of epithets, metaphors and turns of speech; but these faults, which did not escape the censure even of friendly critics like Quintilian, are comparatively rare in the extant parts of his work.

    0
    0
  • Quintilian (Inst.

    0
    0
  • at Florence; and Humanists, like Erasmus, Ludovicus Vives and Nizolius, enamoured of the popular philo sophy of Cicero and Quintilian, poured out the vials of their contempt on scholastic barbarism with its " impious and thriceaccursed Averroes."

    0
    0
  • When they passed away there arosg in their places such writers as the younger Seneca, the epic poet Lucan, the epigrammatist Martial, the literary critic Quintilian, besides a host of lesser names.

    0
    0
  • He had a great reputation as a poet; Quintilian (Instit.

    0
    0
  • The silence respecting him maintained by Quintilian and by Lucian may reasonably be taken to imply their agreement with Dionysius as to his merits as a master of style.

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    0
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