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quincke

quincke Sentence Examples

  • Quincke -0 797.at 18° C. Wied.

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  • Quincke (Pogg.

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  • The earliest is that of Quincke, who coated a glass grating with a chemical silver deposit, subsequently thickened with copper in an electrolytic bath.

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  • According to Quincke, the surface tension of pure water in contact with air at 20° C. is 81 dynes per linear centimetre, while that of alcohol is only 25.5 dynes; and a small percentage of alcohol produces much more than a proportional decrease in the surface tension when added to pure water.

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  • Mond, Langer and Quincke, Jour.

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  • He did not, however, enter into the explanation of particular phenomena, as this had been done already by Laplace, but he pointed out to physicists the advantages of the method of Segner and Gay Lussac, afterwards carried out by Quincke, of measuring the dimensions of large drops of mercury on a horizontal or slightly concave surface, and those of large bubbles of air in transparent liquids resting against the under side of a horizontal plate of a substance wetted by the liquid.

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  • The experiments of Quincke and others seem to show that the extreme range of the forces which produce capillary action lies between a thousandth and a twenty-thousandth part of a millimetre.

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  • Quincke makes it 128° 52'.

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  • Marangoni, van der Mensbrugghe, Quincke, have all arrived at results inconsistent with the reality of Neumann's triangle.

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  • To Quincke belongs the credit of dissipating the apparent exception.

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  • The process described by Quincke is somewhat elaborate; but there is little difficulty in repeating the experiment if the mistake be avoided of using a free surface already contaminated, as almost inevitably happens when the mercury is poured from an ordinary bottle.

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  • The tension for clean water thus found is considerably lower than that (81) adopted by Quincke, but it seems to be entitled to confidence, and at any rate the deficiency is not due to contamination of the surface.

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  • Thus a= 2.54 cros., or one inch very nearly.] Tables Of Surface-Tension In the following tables the units of length, mass and time are the centimetre, the gramme and the second, and the unit of force is that which if it acted on one gramme for one second would communicate to it a velocity of one centimetre per second: - Table of Surface-Tension at 20° C. (Quincke).

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  • Quincke has determined the surface-tension of a great many substances near their point of fusion or solidification.

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  • If K is the height of the flat surface of the drop, and k that of the point where its tangent plane is vertical, then T = 1(K - k) 2gp. Quincke finds that for several series of substances the surfacetension is nearly proportional to the density, so that if we call Surface-Tensions of Liquids at their Point of Solidification.

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  • From Quincke.

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  • It solidifies at - 21° C. (Quincke) to a dark brown solid.

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  • Mond, Quincke and Langer (Jour.

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  • Quincke have shown that they depend upon the size and form of the apertures and upon the state of the surface on which they are traced.

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  • Quincke, C. W.

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  • Quincke -0 797.at 18° C. Wied.

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  • Quincke (Pogg.

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  • The earliest is that of Quincke, who coated a glass grating with a chemical silver deposit, subsequently thickened with copper in an electrolytic bath.

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    0
  • According to Quincke, the surface tension of pure water in contact with air at 20° C. is 81 dynes per linear centimetre, while that of alcohol is only 25.5 dynes; and a small percentage of alcohol produces much more than a proportional decrease in the surface tension when added to pure water.

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    0
  • Mond, Langer and Quincke, Jour.

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    0
  • He did not, however, enter into the explanation of particular phenomena, as this had been done already by Laplace, but he pointed out to physicists the advantages of the method of Segner and Gay Lussac, afterwards carried out by Quincke, of measuring the dimensions of large drops of mercury on a horizontal or slightly concave surface, and those of large bubbles of air in transparent liquids resting against the under side of a horizontal plate of a substance wetted by the liquid.

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    0
  • The experiments of Quincke and others seem to show that the extreme range of the forces which produce capillary action lies between a thousandth and a twenty-thousandth part of a millimetre.

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    0
  • Quincke makes it 128° 52'.

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    0
  • Marangoni, van der Mensbrugghe, Quincke, have all arrived at results inconsistent with the reality of Neumann's triangle.

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    0
  • To Quincke belongs the credit of dissipating the apparent exception.

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    0
  • The process described by Quincke is somewhat elaborate; but there is little difficulty in repeating the experiment if the mistake be avoided of using a free surface already contaminated, as almost inevitably happens when the mercury is poured from an ordinary bottle.

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    0
  • The tension for clean water thus found is considerably lower than that (81) adopted by Quincke, but it seems to be entitled to confidence, and at any rate the deficiency is not due to contamination of the surface.

    0
    0
  • Thus a= 2.54 cros., or one inch very nearly.] Tables Of Surface-Tension In the following tables the units of length, mass and time are the centimetre, the gramme and the second, and the unit of force is that which if it acted on one gramme for one second would communicate to it a velocity of one centimetre per second: - Table of Surface-Tension at 20° C. (Quincke).

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  • Quincke has determined the surface-tension of a great many substances near their point of fusion or solidification.

    0
    0
  • If K is the height of the flat surface of the drop, and k that of the point where its tangent plane is vertical, then T = 1(K - k) 2gp. Quincke finds that for several series of substances the surfacetension is nearly proportional to the density, so that if we call Surface-Tensions of Liquids at their Point of Solidification.

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  • From Quincke.

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  • It solidifies at - 21° C. (Quincke) to a dark brown solid.

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  • Mond, Quincke and Langer (Jour.

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  • Quincke have shown that they depend upon the size and form of the apertures and upon the state of the surface on which they are traced.

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  • Quincke, C. W.

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  • Also called angioneurotic edema, giant urticaria, Quincke's disease, or Quincke's edema.

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  • Also called angioneurotic edema, giant urticaria, Quincke's disease, or Quincke's edema.

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