Quebec sentence examples

quebec
  • Canada produces in Ontario and Quebec coarse Virginian type tobacco.

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  • He died at Montebello, in the province of Quebec, on the 24th of September 1871.

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  • of the Alleghanies was forbidden and on the 22nd of June 1774 parliament passed the Quebec Act which annexed the region to the province of Quebec. This was one of the grievances which brought on the War of Independence and during that war the North-West was won for the Americans by George Rogers Clark.

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  • Hence, even in countries where the Roman Church is established, such as Belgium, Italy, the Catholic states of Germany and cantons of Switzerland, most of the Latin republics of America, and the province of Quebec, and a fortiori where this Church is not established, there is now no discipline over the laity, except penitential, and no jurisdiction exercised in civil suits, except possibly the matrimonial questions of princes (of which there was an example in the case of the reigning prince of Monaco).

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  • The first important industry of the state was "rafting" lumber from Vermont through Lake Champlain and the Richelieu and St Lawrence rivers to Quebec. Burlington became a great lumber market for a trade moving in the direction of Boston after the Richelieu river was blocked to navigation and railway transportation began, and in 1882 Burlington was the third lumber centre in the United States.

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  • Tobacco is cultivated in localities scattered over almost the whole world, ranging as far north as Quebec, Stockholm and the southern shores of Lake Baikal in one hemisphere, and as far south as Chile, the Cape of Good Hope and Victoria in the other.

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  • He was educated at the seminary of Quebec, where he developed the gift of declamatory and persuasive oratory.

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  • About 4000 French Canadians, who had emigrated from Quebec to the United States, have also made the province their home, as well as Icelanders now numbering 20,000.

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  • In Quebec (Civil Code, Arts.

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  • On the death of Montgomery and the failure to take Quebec the army retreated to Crown Point, and its commander, General John Sullivan, was superseded by General Horatio Gates.

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  • The first Canadian review, the Quebec Magazine (1791-1793), was published quarterly in French and English.

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  • Later magazines were L'Echo du cabinet du lecture paroissial (Montreal, 18 59), 15 vols.; Le Foyer canadien (Quebec, 1863-1866), one of the most interesting French-Canadian reviews; La Revue canadienne, which was started at Montreal in 1864, and contained the best writings of contemporary French-Canadian litterateurs; La Revue de Montreal (1877-1881), edited by the abbe T.

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  • Chandonnet; the Canadian Journal (Toronto), commenced in 1852 under Henry Youle Hind and continued by Daniel Wilson; L'Abeille (Quebec, 1848-1881), and the Canadian Monthly (Toronto, 1872-1882).

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  • balsamea), a small tree resembling the last species in foliage, furnishes the "Canada balsam"; it abounds in Quebec and the adjacent provinces.

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  • Scotland, Devonshire, Spain, Hanover, Archangel, Vitebsk, Athabasca, Mackenzie, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Kentucky.

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  • In February 1789, guided by compass, he traversed the country, practically unknown to white men, from Frederickstown to Quebec, falling in with Indians by the way, with whom he fraternized; and in a subsequent expedition he was formally adopted at Detroit by the Bear tribe of Hurons as one of their chiefs, and made his way down the Mississippi to New Orleans, whence he returned to England.

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  • The bishop of Montreal and of Quebec, and a large number of the citizens, protested, but nothing less than bloodshed would satisfy the misguided patriots.

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  • In the church Wolfe, who died at Quebec (1759), and Tallis, the musician, are buried.

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  • (by water) north-east of Quebec, on the south shore of the St Lawrence river, and at the mouth of the Riviere du Loup, at the junction of the Intercolonial and Temiscouata railways.

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  • Samuel de Champlain, as governor of Quebec, entered what is now Vermont in July 1609 in an expedition against the Iroquois, and thus laid the basis for the French claim.

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  • as East Main River; Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay on the N.; and with indefinite boundaries toward Quebec on the S., and the coast strip of Labrador belonging to Newfoundland on the E.

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  • Shropshire, Wales, Bohemia, Sweden, Esthonia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania [?], Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, New Mexico, New Caledonia.

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  • After wearisome and disheartening failures, embittered by the pain of an internal disease, Wolfe crowned his work by the decisive victory on the Plains of Abraham (13th of September 1759) by which the French permanently lost Quebec. Twice wounded earlier in the fight, he had refused to leave the field, and a third bullet passing through his lungs inflicted a mortal injury.

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  • The Onondaga salt deposits were mentioned in the journal of the French Jesuit Lemoyne as early as 1653, and before the War of Independence the Indians marketed Onondaga salt at Albany and Quebec. In 1788 the state undertook, by treaty with the Onondaga Indians, to care for the salt springs and manage them for the benefit of both the whites and the Indians.

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  • due west of Quebec. It is bounded S.

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  • by the Canadian province of Quebec, E.

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  • In Canada the Canadian Pacific was the only transcontinental line, extending from St John, on the bay of Fundy, and from Quebec, on the river St Lawrence, to Vancouver, on the strait of Georgia, the distance from St John to Vancouver being approximately 3379 m.

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  • Contemporary magazines are the Canadian Magazine (1893), the Westminster, both produced at Toronto, La Nouvelle-France (Quebec), the Canada Monthly (London, Ontario), and the University Magazine, edited by Professor Macphail, of the McGill University.

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  • LOUIS HONORE FRECHETTE (1839-1908), French-Canadian poet, was born at Levis, Quebec, on the 16th of November 1839, the son of a contractor.

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  • A gradual severance took place between him and his old chief, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, until in later years he became obsessed with the idea that Laurier's policy was fatal to the best interests of Canada and especially to Quebec. A speaker of extraordinary power and fascination, both in Parliament and on the platform, even Laurier himself could not sway the French Canadians as Bourassa could; and in spite of his extreme views he was heard with respect even in the strongholds of his opponents in Toronto.

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  • Champlain fixed on the site of Quebec and founded the first white settlement there in July 1608, giving it its present name.

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  • He now devoted himself to the growth and strengthening of Quebec. Every year he went to France with this end in view.

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  • It was followed by the British American Register i(Quebec, 1803), L'Abeille canadienne (Montreal, 1818), edited by H.

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  • Not a few of the leaders, notably Samuel de Champlain, who founded Quebec in 1608, were brave ingenious men, but the population provided no basis for a lasting colony.

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  • The position is the same now through all the British colonies (except, as already mentioned, Lower Canada or Quebec).

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  • In 1877 he was counsel for Great Britain before the Anglo-American fisheries arbitration at Halifax; in 1897 he was a joint delegate to Washington with Sir Wilfrid Laurier on the Bering Sea seal question; and in1898-1899a member of the Anglo-American joint high commission at Quebec.

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  • The long stretches of sheltered navigation from the Straits of Belle Isle north of Newfoundland to Quebec, and for 600 m.

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  • The St Lawrence is far the most important Canadian river from the historic and economic points of view, since it provided the main artery of exploration in early days, and with its canals past rapids and between lakes still serves as a great highway of trade between the interior of the continent and the seaports of Montreal and Quebec. It is probable that politically Canada would have followed the course of the States to the south but for the planting of a French colony with widely extended trading posts along the easily ascended channel of the St Lawrence and the Great Lakes, so that this river was the ultimate bond of union between Canada and the empire.

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  • North of the divide between the St Lawrence system and Hudson Bay there are many large rivers converging on that inland sea, such as Whale river, Big river, East Main, Rupert and Nottaway rivers coming in from Ungava and northern Quebec; Moose and Albany rivers with important tributaries from northern Ontario; and Severn, Nelson and Churchill rivers from the south-west.

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  • It includes Labrador, Ungava and most of Quebec on the east, northern Ontario on the south; and the western boundary runs from Lake-of-the-Woods north-west to the Arctic Ocean near the mouth of Mackenzie river.

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  • In most parts the Laurentian hills are bare roches moutonnees scoured by the glaciers of the Ice Age, but a broad band of clay land extends across northern Quebec and Ontario just north of the divide.

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  • The waterfalls are utilized at a few points to work up into wood pulp the forests of spruce which cover much of Labrador, Quebec and Ontario.

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  • The " maritime provinces " of eastern Canada, including Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, may be considered together; and to these provinces as politically bounded may be added, from a physical point of view, the analogous south-eastern part of Quebec - the entire area being designated the Acadian region.

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  • The main axis of disturbance and the highest remaining land runs through the south-eastern part of Quebec,forming the Notre Dame Mountains, and terminates in the Gaspe peninsula as the Shickshock Mountains.

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  • Copper and asbestos are the principal mineral products of that part of Quebec included in the region now under description, although many other minerals are known and already worked to some extent.

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  • from the city of Quebec to Lake Huron.

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  • In Quebec the chief portion is south of the St Lawrence on the low plain extending from Montreal to the mountains of the " Eastern Townships," while in Ontario it extends from the Archean on the north to the St Lawrence and Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron.

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  • In Quebec and northern Ontario the rainfall is diminished, ranging from 20 to 40 in., while the snows of winter are deep and generally cover the ground from the beginning of December to the end of March.

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  • There is a much lighter snowfall in winter than in northern Ontario and Quebec, with somewhat lower temperatures.

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  • The general flora of the Maritime Provinces, Quebec and Eastern Ontario is much the same, except that in Nova Scotia a number of species are found common also to Newfoundland that are not apparent inland.

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  • In New Brunswick the western flora begins to appear as well as immigrants from the south, while in the next eastern province, Quebec, the flora varies considerably.

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  • From the city of Quebec westwards there is a constantly increasing ratio of southern forms, and when the mountain (so called) at Montreal is reached the representative Ontario flora begins.

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  • At the higher levels the vegetation becomes more Arctic. Northwards the valleys of the Peace and other rivers differ little from those of Quebec and the northern prairies.

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  • The wapiti or American elk at one time abounded from Quebec to the Pacific, and as far north as the Peace river, but is now found only in small numbers from Manitoba westwards.

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  • 2 The areas assigned to Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and British Columbia are exclusive of the territorial seas, that to Quebec' is exclusive of the Gulf of St Lawrence (though including the islands lying within it), and that to Ontario is exclusive of the Canadian portion of the Great Lakes.

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  • In 1867 the Dominion was formed by the union of the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec (Lower Canada) and Ontario (Upper Canada).

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  • m.; in Nova Scotia it is 22.3; New Brunswick, 11.8; Ontario, 9.9; Manitoba, 4.9; Quebec, 4.8; Saskatchewan, 1 oi; Alberta, o 72; British Columbia, o 4; the Dominion, 1 8.

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  • This is not an indication of the density in settled parts; as in Quebec, Ontario and the western provinces there are large unpopulated districts, the area of which enters into the calculation.

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  • English, Irish and Scots and their descendants form the bulk of the population of Ontario, French-Canadians of Quebec, Scots of Nova Scotia, the Irish of a large proportion of New Brunswick.

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  • French is the language of the province of Quebec, though English is much spoken in the cities; both languages are officially recognized in that province, and in the federal courts and parliament.

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  • The male sex is slightly the more numerous in all the provinces except Quebec, the greatest discrepancy existing in British Columbia.

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  • The birth-rate is high, especially in Quebec, where families of twelve to twenty are not infrequent, but is decreasing in Ontario.

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  • Between 1891 and 1901 the number of farmers in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces decreased, and there seemed a prospect of the country being divided into a manufacturing east and an agricultural west, but latterly large tracts in northern Ontario and Quebec have proved suitable for cultivation and are being opened up.

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  • There is no established church in Canada, but in the province of Quebec certain rights have been allowed to the Roman Catholic church ever since the British conquest.

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  • There are four kinds of savings banks in Canada: - (1) the post-office savings banks; (2) the government savings banks of the Maritime provinces taken over at federation and being gradually merged with the former; (3) two special savings banks in the cities of Montreal and Quebec; (4) the savings bank departments of the chartered banks.

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  • A strong prejudice against direct taxation exists, and none is imposed by the federal government, though it has been tentatively introduced in the provinces, especially in Quebec, in the form of liquor licences, succession duties, corporation taxes, &c. British Columbia has a direct tax on property and on income.

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  • The chief seaports from east to west are Halifax, N.S., Sydney, N.S., St John, N.B., Quebec and Montreal on the Atlantic; and Vancouver, Esquimalt and Victoria, B.C.; on the Pacific. Halifax is the ocean terminus of the Intercolonial railway; St John, Halifax and Vancouver of the Canadian Pacific railway.

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  • Esquimalt, Halifax, Kingston (Ont.) and Quebec have wellequipped graving-docks.

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  • Numerous smaller canals bring Ottawa into connexion with Lake Champlain and the Hudson river via Montreal; by this route the logs and sawn lumber of Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick find their destination.

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  • From Quebec westwards, vast regions are still partly, or completely, unexplored.

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  • The principal fisheries are those on the Atlantic coast, carried on by the inhabitants of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and the eastern section of Quebec. Cod, herring, mackerel and lobsters are the fish chiefly caught, though halibut, salmon, anchovies and so-called sardines are also exported.

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  • The British North America Act imposes on the provincial legislatures the duty of legislating on educational matters, the privileges of the denominational and separate schools in Ontario and Quebec being specially safeguarded.

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  • These percentages have gradually risen ever since federation, especially in the province of Quebec, which was long in a backward state.

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  • In Quebec are a number of so-called classical colleges, most of them affiliated with Laval University.

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  • (1821); Laval University, Quebec, and Montreal, Que.

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  • At Quebec is a Dominion arsenal, rifle and ammunition factories.

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  • In 1908 there were 4355 of these factories, of which 1284 were in Ontario, 2806 in Quebec, and 265 in the remaining seven provinces of Canada.

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  • Its cultivation promises to be successful in parts of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia.

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  • The central experimental farm is situated at Ottawa, near the boundary line between Quebec and Ontario, where it serves as an aid to agriculture in these two important provinces.

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  • In 1608 he began the settlement which was named Quebec. From 1608 to his death in 1635 Champlain worked unceasingly to develop Canada as a colony, to promote the fur trade and to explore the interior.

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  • Already, in 1613, the English from Virginia had almost completely wiped out the French settlement at Port Royal, and when in 1629 a small English fleet appeared at Quebec, Champlain was forced to surrender.

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  • Five years later Cavelier de la Salle was making his toilsome way westward from Quebec to discover the true character of the great river and to perform the feat, perilous in view of the probable hostility of the natives, of descending it to the sea.

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  • In 1659 arrived at Quebec a young prelate of noble birth, Francois Xavier de LavalMontmorency, who had come to rule the church in Canada.

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  • Sir William Phips sailed from Boston in 1690, conquered Acadia, now Nova Scotia, and then hazarded the greater task of leading a fleet up the St Lawrence against Quebec. On the 16th of October 1690 thirty-four English ships, some of them only fishing craft, appeared in its basin and demanded the surrender of the town.

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  • Though the English, led by Sir Hovenden Walker, made in 1711 an effort to take Quebec which proved abortive, they seized Nova Scotia; and when the treaty of Utrecht was made in 1713, France admitted defeat in America by yielding to Britain her claims to Hudson Bay, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.

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  • It was a far cry from New Orleans to Quebec. If France could link them by a chain of settlements and shut in the English to their narrow strip of Atlantic seaboard there was good promise that North America would be hers.

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  • On the 13th of September 1 759 Wolfe won his great victory before Quebec, which involved the fall of that place, and a year later at Montreal the French army in Canada surrendered.

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  • In 1774 this was provided by the Quebec Act passed by the Imperial parliament.

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  • Under this act the western territory which France had claimed, extending as far as the Mississippi and south to the Ohio, was included with Canada in what was called the Province of Quebec. This vast territory was to be governed despotically from Quebec; the Roman Catholic church was given its old privileges in Canada; and the French civil law was established permanently side by side with the English criminal law.

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  • They took Montreal and besieged Quebec during the winter of 1775-1776; but the prudent leadership of Sir Guy Carleton, afterwards Lord Dorchester, saved Quebec and in 1776 the revolutionary army withdrew unsuccessful from Canada.

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  • (For the history of Lower and Upper Canada, now Quebec and Ontario, the separate articles must be consulted.) Each province had special problems; the French in Lower Canada aimed at securing political power for their own race, while in Upper Canada there was no race problem, and the great struggle was for independence of official control and in all essential matters for government by the people.

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  • Canada suggested a wider plan to include herself and, in October 1864, a conference was held at Quebec. The conference outlined a plan of federation which subsequently, with slight modifications, passed the imperial parliament as " The British North America Act," and on the ist of July 1867, the Dominion of Canada came into existence.

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  • W.) When federation was accomplished in 1867 the Dominion of Canada comprised only the four provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

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  • The first session of parliament was opened on the 8th of November, but adjourned on the 21st of December till the 12th of March 1868, chiefly on account of the fact that members of the Dominion parliament were allowed, in Ontario and Quebec, to hold seats in the local legislatures, so that it was difficult for the different bodies to be in session simultaneously.

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  • Anticipating the order of chronology slightly, it may be mentioned here that in 1873 Prince Edward Island (q.v.), which had in 1865 decisively rejected proposals of the Quebec conference and had in the following year repeated its rejection of federation by a resolution of the legislature affirming that no terms Canada could offer would be acceptable, now decided to throw in its lot with the Dominion.

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  • That small colony, which had been represented at the Quebec conference, also rejected the proposals of the necessary capital, but as this was coupled with a voice in the decision of the route, it complicated the latter question, about which a keen contest arose.

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  • While Sir John Macdonald's administration was supported in Nova Scotia, it was weakened in Ontario on account of the clemency shown to Riel, and in Quebec by the refusal to grant a general amnesty to all who had taken part in the rebellion.

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  • The balance of power between parties in parliament was held by the province of Quebec, and there racial and religious feeling evoked no slight sympathy for Riel.

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  • But while a section of Quebec was eager to secure the rebel's pardon, Ontario was equally bent on the execution of justice, so that in the final vote on the question in parliament the defection of French Conservatives was compensated for by the support of Ontario Liberals.

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  • The Canadian Northern railway, already constructed from the Great Lakes westward to the neighbourhood of the Rockies, and with water and rail connexions reaching eastward to Quebec, began to transform itself into a complete transcontinental system, with an extension to the Hudson Bay.

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  • To a still more ambitious line, the Grand Trunk Pacific, extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific, aiming at extensive steamship connexion on both oceans, and closely associated with the Grand Trunk system of Ontario and Quebec, the government of Canada gave liberal support as a national undertaking.

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  • The commission, which included three members of the Canadian cabinet and a representative of Newfoundland, and of which Lord Herschell was appointed chairman, met at Quebec on the 23rd of August 1898.

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  • The sessions continued in Quebec at intervals until the 10th of October, when the commission adjourned to meet in Washington on the 1st of November, where the discussions were renewed for some weeks.

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  • The British commissioners appointed were: Lord Alverstone, lord chief justice of England; Sir Louis Jette, K.C., of Quebec; and A.

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  • In Quebec the Roman Catholic schools, which constitute the majority, are chiefly controlled by the local clergy of that church.

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  • In Ontario as well as in Quebec separate schools are allowed to Roman Catholics.

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  • It originally consisted of 72 members, 24 from Quebec, 24 from Ontario, and 24 from the maritime provinces, but this number has been from time to time slightly increased as new provinces have been added.

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  • The basis adopted in the British North America Act is that Quebec shall always have 65 representatives, and each of the other provinces such a number as will give the same proportion of members to its population as the number 65 bears to the population of Quebec at each census.

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  • In Nova Scotia and Quebec the bicameral system of an upper and lower house is retained; in the other provinces legislation is left to a single representative assembly.

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  • Much Scholarship And Research Have Been Devoted To Local And Special Historical Subjects, A Notable Example Of Which Is Arthur; Doughty'S Exhaustive Work On The Siege Of Quebec. J.

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  • The Golden Dog, William Kirby'S (1817-1906) Fascinating Romance Of Old Quebec, Appeared In 1877, In A Pirated Edition.

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  • Burpee, In North American Notes And Queries (Quebec), August And September 1900; "Poetry Of Bliss Carman," By J.

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  • The Poet Of This Little Band Of Authors Was I Octave Cremazie, A Quebec Bookseller, Who Failed In Business" And Spent His Last Years As A Penniless Exile In France.

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  • De Montmorency Laval, First Bishop Of Quebec, Brings Him Nearer To His Proper Themes, Which Are Found In Full Perfection In The Chant Du Vieux Soldat Canadien, Composed In 1856 To Honour The First French Man Of War That Visited British Quebec, And Le Drapeau De Carillon (1858), A Centennial Paean For Montcalm'S Canadians At Ticonderoga.

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  • SIR WILFRID LAURIER (1841-), Canadian statesman, was born on the 10th of November 1841, at St Lin in the province of Quebec. The child of French Roman Catholic parents, he attended the elementary school of his native parish and for eight or nine months was a pupil of the Protestant elementary school at New Glasgow in order to learn English; his association with the Presbyterian family with whom he lived during this period had a permanent influence on his mind.

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  • The college, like all the secondary schools in Quebec then avail-.

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  • At Athabaska, the seat of one of the superior courts of Quebec, the population of the district was fairly divided between Frenchand English-speaking people, and Laurier's career was undoubtedly influenced by his constant association with English-speaking people and his intimate acquaintance with their views and aspirations.

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  • The Liberals of Quebec under the leadership of Sir Antoine Dorion were hostile to confederation, or at least to the terms of union agreed upon at the Quebec conference, and Laurier in editorials and speeches maintained the position of Dorion and his allies.

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  • He was elected to the Quebec legislature in 1871, and his first speech in the provincial assembly excited great interest, on account of its literary qualities and the attractive manner and logical method of the speaker.

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  • In the bye-election which followed Laurier's admission to the cabinet he was defeated-- the only personal defeat he ever sustained; but a few weeks later he was returned for Quebec East, a constituency which he held thenceforth by enormous majorities.

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  • After the defeat of the Mackenzie government, Laurier sat in Parliament as the leader of the Quebec Liberals and first lieutenant to the Hon.

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  • Notwithstanding that Quebec was almost solidly Roman Catholic the Rouges sternly resisted clerical pressure; they appealed to the courts and had certain elections voided on the ground of undue clerical influence, and at length persuaded the pope to send out a delegate to Canada, through whose inquiry into the circumstances the abuses were checked and the zeal of the ultramontanes restrained.

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  • David, Laurier et son temps (Montreal, 1905); see also Henri Moreau, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Premier Ministre du Canada (Paris, 1902); and the collection of Laurier's speeches from 1871 to 1890, compiled by Ulric Barthe (Quebec, 1890).

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  • In many parts all the finer trees have been cut down, but large woods of it still exist in the less accessible districts; it abounds especially near Lake St John, Quebec, and in Newfoundland is the prevalent tree in some of the forest tracts; it is likewise common in Maine and Vermont.

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  • In this family tree are men famous in arms and in the public service: Sir Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw, Admiral Sir John Ross, Field-Marshal Sir Hew Dalrymple Ross, Dr John Adair, in whose arms Wolfe died at Quebec, and the Rev. W.

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  • Ultimately the bishop of Quebec, unable to get a mandamus from the English privy council to dig him up, solemnly deconsecrated the ground down to the estimated depth of the lid of the wife's coffin.

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  • In September 1853 Alford removed to Quebec Chapel, London, where he had a large and cultured congregation.

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  • 252 et seq.; as well as in those colonies where French law has been followed (Codes of Civil Procedure of Quebec, arts.

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  • He was professor of classics in Trinity College, Toronto, from 1859 to 1862, when he became rector of the high school at Quebec. In 1867 he returned to Oxford, and was made vice-principal of St Mary Hall, a post which he held until 1885.

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  • After the fall of Quebec the place remained under French sovereignty until '777, when it was occupied by a British garrison.

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  • His most important measure was the constitution which he drew up for the province of Quebec, and which after his resignation of office became the Quebec Act of 1774.

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  • They also enabled the Roman Church to keep its hold on the French colonists of Quebec and Montreal, and were pioneers in California.

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  • The forests of northern New England and of the province of Quebec supply the raw material for the extensive saw-mills and planing-mills, the pulpand paper-mills, and the sulphite fibre mills, said to be the largest in existence.

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  • ANTICOSTI, an island of the province of Quebec, Canada, situated in the Gulf of St Lawrence, between 49° and 50° N., and between 61° 40 and 64° 30' W., with a length of 335 m.

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  • ONTARIO, a province of Canada, having the province of Quebec to the E., the states of New York, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota to the S., Manitoba to the W., and the district of Keewatin with James Bay to the N.

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  • The population is chiefly of British descent, though in the eastern counties numerous French Canadians are flocking in from Quebec and in some instances by purchase of farms replacing the British.

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  • The lumber industry exceeds that of any other part of the Dominion, though Quebec possesses greater timber areas untouched.

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  • From its centre at Quebec French civilization extended along the Mississippi and the Great Lakes, and also northwards to Hudson's Bay.

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  • The oligarchic constitution established in Canada in 1 774 by the Quebec Act did not suit men trained in the school of local self-government which Britain had unwittingly established in the American colonies, and the gift of representative institutions was soon necessary.

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  • Lord Durham's celebrated Report (1839, reprinted 1902) is less trustworthy on Ontario than on Quebec. R.

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  • In 1793 the see of Quebec was founded; Jamaica and Barbados followed in 1824, and Toronto and Newfoundland in 1839.

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  • Similarly he was able to celebrate worthily, in the presence of the then Prince of Wales, the acquisition by Quebec of the Plains of Abraham for public purposes, without hurting the susceptibilities of the French-Canadians.

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  • This, however, was never operative, for in 1774, by the famous Quebec Act, the Illinois country was annexed to the province of Quebec, and at the same time the jurisdiction of the French civil law was recognized.

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  • Largely owing to Howe's statesmanship responsible government was finally conceded in 1848 by the imperial authorities, and was thus gained without the bloodshed and confusion which marked its acquisition in Ontario and Quebec. In 1850 he was appointed a delegate to England on behalf of the Intercolonial railway, for which he obtained a large imperial guarantee.

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  • and presented to Pitt a plan for a campaign against the French in Canada, to begin with the investment of Quebec. In 1757 Pitt appointed him governor of Massachusetts,' in which officehe heartily supported Pitt's policy during the Seven Years' War, and in 1758 encouraged the equipment of a force of 7000 men, to be recruited and armed in New England; but the French power in America once broken, Pownall came more directly under the influence of the lords of trade, and his unwillingness, to carry out the repressive policies of that body caused his.

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  • From September 1806 till August 1810 he was in charge of the garrison at Quebec; in the latter year he assumed the command of the troops in Upper Canada, and soon afterwards took over the civil administration of that province as provisional lieutenant-governor.

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  • EDWARD JOHN ROUTH (1831-1907), English mathematician, was born at Quebec on the 20th of January 1831.

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  • "CHARLES JOSEPH DOHERTY (1855-), Canadian statesman, was born at Montreal, Quebec, May it 1855.

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  • He was called to the Quebec bar in 1877, and became a Q.C. in 1887.

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  • It was his discernment that selected Wolfe to lead the attack on Quebec, and gave him the opportunity of dying a victor on the heights of Abraham.

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  • The white inhabitants, still mostly French, were subjected to an English rule that until the Quebec Act of 1774 was chiefly military, and as a consequence many of the more thrifty sought homes elsewhere, and the Indians, most of whom had been allies of the French, were so ill-treated, both by the officers and traders, that under Pontiac, chief of the Ottawas, a simultaneous attack on the English posts was planned.

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  • The colony gave many proofs of its loyalty to the mother country: it furnished three companies of troops for Admiral Vernon's unfortunate expedition against Cartagena in 1741; in King George's War it raised £ 2000 for supplies, furnished troops for the capture of Louisburg and sent over six hundred men to Albany; and in the French and Indian (or Seven Years') War its militia participated in the capture of both Quebec and Havana.

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  • "SIR LOMER GOUIN (1861-), Canadian statesman, was born at Grondines, Quebec, in 1861 and was educated at Laval and McGill Universities.

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  • He was called to the Canadian bar in 1884, and became Q.C. in 1900, being elected BatonnierGeneral of the Quebec bar in 1910.

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  • He was a member of the Quebec Legislature from 1897; and, after holding minor offices, in 1905-20 was Prime Minister and Attorney-General in the province of Quebec. Attempts were made by Sir Robert Borden to get him to join his Coalition Ministry, but these failed, and subsequently Sir Lomer declared his allegiance to the Liberal Opposition.

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  • He derived considerable importance from the fact that he was the Quebec representative on the boards of large Canadian financial institutions.

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  • 1904) was a daughter of Honore Mercier, a former Premier of Quebec. On the Liberal victory in Dec. 1921 he was included in the new Cabinet of Mr. Mackenzie King.

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  • by the Canadian province of Quebec; N.

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  • During the War of Independence, the town of Falmouth (now Portland), which had ardently resisted the claims of the British, was bombarded and burned, in 1775; in the same year Benedict Arnold followed the course of the Kennebec and Dead rivers on his expedition to Quebec; and from 1779 to 1783 a British force was established at Castine.

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  • In the winter of 1775 he accompanied General Benedict Arnold to Canada, and in the assault on Quebec (Dec. 31) he and his riflemen penetrated well into the city, where he was hemmed in and was forced to surrender.

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  • 1768); Hall, Graptolites of the Quebec Group (1865); Barrande, Graptolites de Boheme (1850); Carruthers, Revision of the British Graptolites (1868); H.

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  • After the fall of Quebec the British took possession of the other forts, but not at once of Vincennes, which remained for several years under the jurisdiction of New Orleans, both under French and Spanish rule.

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  • All Indiana was united with Canada by the Quebec Act (1774), but it was not until three years later that the forts and Vincennes were occupied by the British, who then realized the necessity of ensuring possession of the Mississippi Valley to prevent its falling into the hands of the rebellious colonies.

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  • In 1759 Quebec fell before Wolfe, who died at the moment of victory.

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  • On the day when the Quebec Bill was to come on again, Fox called upon Burke, and the pair walked together from Burke's house in Duke Street down to Westminster.

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  • The Quebec Bill was recommitted, and Burke at once rose and soon began to talk his usual language against the Revolution, the rights of man, and Jacobinism whether English or French.

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  • Pitt, Grey, Lord Sheffield, all plunged into confused and angry debate as to whether the French Revolution was a good thing, and whether the French Revolution, good or bad, had anything to do with the Quebec Bill.

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  • Twenty years later Pierre Esprit, Sieur de Radisson, and Medard Chouart, Sieur des Groseilliers, started (16J4) from Quebec, crossed Lakes Huron and Michigan, wintered in Wisconsin, ascended the Fox, crossed to the Wisconsin and possibly reached the Mississippi river eighteen years before Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet.

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  • In 1774 was passed the Quebec Act for the government of the Province of Quebec into which the Wisconsin region was incorporated by this act, but it had little effect on the French settlements west of Lake Michigan, which remained throughout the entire British period a group of detached and periodically self-governing communities.

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  • In the campaign of 1759 Amherst's own share was the capture of Ticonderoga and Crown Point, while Fort Niagara fell to another column, and Quebec was taken by Wolfe.

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  • The new governor arrived in Quebec on the 12th of September 1672.

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  • The church in Canada had been administered for many years by the religious orders; for the see of Quebec, so long contemplated, had not yet been erected.

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  • But three years after the arrival of Frontenac a former vicar apostolic, Francois Xavier de Laval de Montmorenci, returned to Quebec as bishop, with a jurisdiction over the whole of Canada.

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  • When, therefore, on the 15th of October 1689, Frontenac arrived in Quebec as governor for the second time, he received an enthusiastic welcome, and confidence was at once restored in the public mind.

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  • Quebec was not long to enjoy the blessing of peace.

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  • Le Sueur (Toronto, 1906); Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV, by Francis Parkman (Boston, 1878); Le Comte de Frontenac, by Henri Lorin (Paris, 1895); Frontenac et ses amis, by Ernest Myrand (Quebec, 1902).

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  • At the age of twenty-two he became the editor of the Conservative Courrier de St Hyacinthe, and in this journal supported the policy of the Sicotte administration, which then represented the interests of Quebec, under the Act of Union (1840); but when Sicotte accepted a seat on the bench Mercier joined the Opposition, and contributed largely to the defeat of the Ministerial candidate.

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  • At the commencement of the year 1871 the national party was organized in Quebec, and Mercier supported the candidates of the party on the platform.

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  • Joly from the leadership of the Liberal party in Quebec in 1883 Mercier was chosen as his successor.

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  • For a few years he was the idol of the people of Quebec, and French Canada loomed large in the public eye; but towards the end of 1891 serious charges were preferred against his ministry, on the ground that subsidies voted for railways had been diverted to political use, and he was dismissed by the lieutenant-governor.

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  • At least Dean had heard of Quebec, the Alps, and France, but locations and climbs like Cerro Torre in Patagonia (the place, not the clothing), Frankenjura, Orizaba and Cayambe were places he never knew existed.

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  • chrysotile production is worth $ 225 million a year; the chrysotile mining industry provides work for nearly 2,500 Quebec inhabitants.

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  • Quebec Unregistered Cohabitation, 1999 Same-sex cohabitants treated equally to opposite sex cohabitants.

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  • Canada adopted a constitution in 1982 which Quebec has never accepted.

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  • On 30 August the regiment entrained for Valcartier, Quebec.

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  • Some Quebec attractions to see: Sugar Shack The Sugar Shack is where the famous 100% pure maple syrup is made.

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  • On the latest survey data, more than 50% of Quebec's lawyers, for instance, now use a microcomputer.

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  • McDonald's pulled the same stunt in Quebec in 1998.

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  • Canada Road and Quebec Way are lined by quite young sycamores and maples.

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  • Greater love hath no bearded little troll for Quebec than he live in the Beltway.

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  • 'Morgan, Sketches of Celebrated Canadians (Quebec, 1862); Rose's Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography Annual Register, 1836-1837; Sir Spencer Walpole, History of England (5 vols., London, 1878-1886), vol.

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  • Le Canada francais (Quebec, 1888-1891), edited by the staff of the Laval University, and Canadiana (1889-1890), were important historical and literary reviews.

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  • Very shortly afterwards he sailed, and on the ist of June 1759 the Quebec expedition sailed from Louisburg (see Quebec).

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  • (6) The Quebec bridge (fig.

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  • boundary), and by Halls Stream which separates it from Quebec. The state has an area of 9341 sq.

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  • This affords the largest stretch of arable land in eastern Canada, including the southern parts of Ontario and Quebec with an area of some 38,000 sq.

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  • from Lake Superior to the Pacific. Then Manitoba was principally inhabited by English and French half-breeds (or Metis), descendants of Hudson's Bay Company's employes, or adventurous pioneers from Quebec, together with Scottish settlers, descendants of those brought out by Lord Selkirk (q.v.), some English army pensioners and others, and the van of the immigration that shortly followed from Ontario.

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  • He was forced also to maintain a long conflict with the ultramontane element of the Roman Catholic church in Quebec, which for many years had a close working alliance with the Conservative politicians of the province and even employed spiritual coercion in order to detach votes from the Liberal party.

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  • Apart from the natural fear that he would arouse prejudice in the English-speaking provinces, the second Riel rebellion was then still fresh in the public mind, and the fierce nationalist agitation which Kiel's execution had excited in Quebec had hardly subsided.

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  • ANTICOSTI, an island of the province of Quebec, Canada, situated in the Gulf of St Lawrence, between 49° and 50° N., and between 61° 40 and 64° 30' W., with a length of 335 m.

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  • McDonald 's pulled the same stunt in Quebec in 1998.

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  • Ontario ski areas are not as famous as those in other parts of Canada, such as Quebec, Banff and British Columbia.

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  • Take a Walk on the "Wild" Side: African Safari cruises, Australian cruises or a river cruise in Quebec, Canada, can provide you with stunning views of wildlife and pristine natural habitats.

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  • Last I checked, you'd have to be in Quebec or Ottawa before a significant proportion of the population can understand French.

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  • Similarly, there are bans in place in Quebec and Newfoundland as well.

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  • OPMD is most common among French Canadian families in Quebec and in Spanish-American families in the southwestern United States.

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  • For employees who work in the province of Quebec, the unemployment insurance premium rate is set at $1.38 for every $100 of salary earned (up to the maximum insurance amount of $42,300).

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  • However, there are two additional centers in Canada: Quebec and Toronto.

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  • Holt Renfrew: Canadian locations that carry Spanx include Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Toronto, and Vancouver.

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  • In fact, she was the youngest child of Adhemar Dion and Therese Tanguay in Charlemagne, Quebec in Canada.

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  • It should be noted that the scene with Burke took place in the course of the debate on the Quebec Bill, in which Fox displayed real statesmanship by criticizing the division of Upper from Lower Canada, and other provisions of the bill, which in the end proved so injurious as to be unworkable.

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  • He edited La Patrie and other French papers in the Dominion; and in 1889 was appointed clerk of the Quebec legislative council.

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  • JAMES WOLFE (1727-1759), British general, the hero of Quebec, was born at Westerham in Kent on the 2nd of January 1727.

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  • It was now that the famous expedition against Quebec was decided upon, Wolfe to be in command, with the local rank of major-general.

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  • In the governor's garden, in Quebec, there is also a monument to the memory of Wolfe and his gallant opponent Montcalm, who survived him only a few hours, with the inscription " Wolfe and Montcalm.

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  • At the outbreak of the War of Independence he abandoned the study of medicine to enter the American army, and he served with General Benedict Arnold in the Quebec campaign and was later under General Horatio Gates, acting from May 1777 to March 1778 as adjutant-general of the Northern Department.

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  • Born in London on the 6th of September 1817, he emigrated to Canada in 1835, and settled in Sherbrooke, in the province of Quebec, where he entered the service of the British American Land Company, of which he rose to be chief commissioner.

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  • In the same year he retired from parliament but re-entered it in 1853, and was till 1872 the chief representative of the English-speaking Protestants of Quebec province.

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  • His father, James Clinton (1736-1812), served as a captain of provincial troops in the French and Indian War, and as a brigadier-general in the American army in the War of Independence, taking part in Montgomery's attack upon Quebec in 1775, unsuccessfully resisting at Fort Montgomery, along the Hudson, in 1777 the advance of Sir Henry Clinton, accompanying General John Sullivan in 177 9 in his expedition against the Iroquois in western New York, and in 1781 taking part in the siege of Yorktown, Virginia.

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  • Phips, who had succeeded in an attack on Port Royal, had ignominiously failed when he led the Massachusetts fleet against Quebec in 1690; and the later expedition of 1711 was no less a failure.

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  • Five years before this, however, a periodical enumeration by families and individuals had been established in the colony of New France, and was continued in Quebec from 1665 till 1754.

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  • Thus the boundary between New York and the province of Quebec, Canada, is wholly artificial.

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  • The two great political issues of the time were the secularization of the clergy reserves in Ontario, and the abolition of seigniorial tenure in Quebec. Both of these reforms Macdonald long opposed, but when successive elections had proved that they were sup ported by public opinion, he brought about a coalition of Conservatives and moderate reformers for the purpose of carrying them.

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  • Macdonald, at the head of a representative delegation from Ontario and Quebec, met the public men of the maritime provinces in conference at Charlottetown in 1864, and the outline of confederation then agreed upon was filled out in detail at a conference held at Quebec soon afterwards.

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  • - Quebec Bridge (original design).

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  • The northern section includes the Shickshock Mountains and Notre Dame Range in Quebec, scattered elevations in Maine, the White Mountains and the Green Mountains; the central comprises, besides various minor groups, the Valley Ridges between the Front of the Allegheny Plateau and the Great Appalachian Valley, the New York-New Jersey Highlands and a large portion of the Blue Ridge; and the southern consists of the prolongation of the Blue Ridge, the Unaka Range, and the Valley Ridges adjoining the Cumberland Plateau, with some lesser ranges.

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  • He was a member of the Quebec Legislative Assembly in 1908-12.

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  • Three ships were sent out under letters of marque commanded by David, Lewis and Thomas Kirke, and Quebec, already on the verge of starvation, was compelled to surrender (1629).

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  • He accompanied Arnold's expedition into Canada in 1775, and on arriving before Quebec he disguised himself as a Catholic priest and made a dangerous journey of 120 m.

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  • by the Canadian province of Quebec; E.

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  • Fort Ticonderoga, the key to the passage of Lakes George and Champlain to Canada, was surprised and, taken on the 10th of May by a small band under Colonel Ethan Allen, while Colonel Benedict Arnold headed an expedition through the Maine woods to effect the capture of Quebec, where Sir Guy Carleton commanded.

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  • Arnold joined General Richard Montgomery, who was already near the city, and the combined force assaulted Quebec on the 31st of December, only to meet with complete defeat.

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  • The relief of Quebec by Captain - afterwards Sir Charles - Douglas in May 1776 forced the American general Arnold to retreat.

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  • On the death of Bishop Stewart of Quebec the Canadian see was divided, and Strachan was made bishop of Toronto in August 1839.

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  • FRASERVILLE (formerly Riviere du Loup en Bas), a town and watering-place in Temiscouata county, Quebec, Canada, 107 m.

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