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quay

quay

quay Sentence Examples

  • The Circular Quay at the head of Sydney Cove is 1300 ft.

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  • At Bridlington Quay there is excellent sea-bathing, and the parade and ornamental gardens provide pleasant promenades.

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  • At the quay point between these two basins there are vast state granaries.

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  • It has a fine quay, townhall and park.

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  • In February 1643 she landed at Burlington Quay, placed herself at the head of a force of loyalists, and marched through England to join the king near Oxford.

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  • Here an iron ladder led down on the quay and three of the party went down it.

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  • Here an iron ladder led down on the quay and three of the party went down it.

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  • The continental trains of the Great Eastern railway run to Parkeston Quay, r m.

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  • A narrow-gauge railway connects these with Port Penrhyn, at the mouth of the stream Cegid (hemlock, "cicuta"), which admits the entry of vessels of 300 tons to the quay at low water.

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  • On the quay are the landing-stages, the custom-house and the railway station.

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  • On the north side the Ring-Strasse gives place to the spacious Franz Josef's quay, flanking the Danube Canal.

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  • river) side of the Grasbrook dock is the quay at which the emigrants for South America embark, and from which the mail boats for East Africa, the boats of the Woermann (West Africa) line, and the Norwegian tourist boats depart.

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  • ROBERT STEPHENSON (1803-1859), English engineer, only son of George Stephenson, was born at Willington Quay on the 16th of October 1803.

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  • Two inclined roads lead from the centre of the boulevard to the quay 40 ft.

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  • A long stone quay next the harbour is backed by the new town climbing up the slopes behind.

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  • Each block formed a piece of the quay wall 12 ft.

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  • In 1882-1884 a dock some 7 acres in extent was constructed, with an entrance lock giving access to the quay sides for vessels of 3000 tons.

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  • 7, so that a load can be taken out of a vessel and deposited on a quay wall.

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  • Its harbour was of considerable importance in imperial times, as the nearest to Dalmatia, 2 and was enlarged by Trajan, who constructed the north quay, his architect being Apollodorus of Damascus.

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  • It is often very desirable to have the quay space as little obstructed by the cranes as possible, so as not to interfere with railway traffic; this has led to the introduction of cranes mounted on high trucks or gantries, sometimes also called " portal " cranes.

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  • There is a quay here where large vessels can discharge, and agricultural produce is exported.

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  • Alongside the quay are the landing-places of the steamboats navigating the Rhine.

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  • In building this quay a considerable area of foreshore was reclaimed and an evil-smelling beach done away with.

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  • In building this quay a considerable area of foreshore was reclaimed and an evil-smelling beach done away with.

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  • No charter has been found, but a judgment given under a writ of quo warranto in 1578 confirms to the burgesses freedom from toll, passage and pontage, the tolls and stallage of the quay and the right to hold two fairs - privileges which they claimed under charters of Baldwin de Redvers and Isabel de Fortibus, countess of Albemarle, in the 13th century, and Edward Courtenay, earl of Devon, in 1405.

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  • MATTHEW STANLEY QUAY (1833-1904), American political "boss," was born in Dillsburg, York county, Pennsylvania, on the 30th of September 1833.

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  • The ground about the hut was made solid and protected from corrosion by a palisade of wattled osiers, thus creating the earliest form of the fondamenta, or quay, which runs along the side of so many Venetian canals and is so prominent a feature in the construction of the city.

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  • Other principal public buildings, nearly all to be included in modern schemes of development, are the city hall, occupying the site of the old Linen Hall, in Donegall Square, estimated to cost £300,000; the commercial buildings (1820) in Waring Street, the customhouse and inland revenue office on Donegall Quay, the architect of which, as of the court house, was Sir Charles Lanyon, and some of the numerous banks, especially the Ulster Bank.

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  • The ground about the hut was made solid and protected from corrosion by a palisade of wattled osiers, thus creating the earliest form of the fondamenta, or quay, which runs along the side of so many Venetian canals and is so prominent a feature in the construction of the city.

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  • The southern quay was built in 1880, and the harbour is now protected by forts on the heights, while the place is the seat of the 7th army corps.

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  • At its southern end, by the quay, is a bronze statue of Thiers, and at the northern end, the cathedral of St Augustine, a large church built in quasi-Byzantine style.

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  • Between the Parkeston Quay and Town railway stations is that of Dovercourt, an adjoining parish and popular watering-place.

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  • Hayes, by James Quay Howard (Cincinnati, 1876);; Life of R.

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  • At its mouth, on the north side, is the North Wall quay, where :the principal steamers lie, and in this vicinity are the docks.

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  • of quay walls, the wharfs being provided with electrical cranage.

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  • The quay on the harbour side was 2 7 ft.

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  • of Harwich, with a station between Parkeston Quay and Harwich town on the Great Eastern railway, 70 m.

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  • On the quay stands a marble statue erected to the memory of La Fontaine, who was born in the town in 1621; his house is still preserved in the street that bears his name.

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  • The government also turned its attention to the inadequate accommodation at the docks, and proposals for a new quay on the western side of the present basin, and for a second basin 900 yds.

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  • There is an extensive fish quay, and about 14,000 tons of fish are landed annually.

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  • Under the republic commercial shipping used to enter Venice by the Tort of San Nicole del Lido and lie along the quay called the Riva degli Schiavoni, in the basin of San Marco, and up the broad Giudecca Canal.

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  • They give the minimum of interference with quay space and have rapidly come into favour.

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  • The town has three parts: the Upper, built on the sides of a lofty foreland known as North Hill; the Lower; and the Quay Town, with many ancient houses, stretching for about a mile beside the harbour.

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  • The public buildings, which are large and handsome, include the government and customs offices on the quay opposite the spot where the mail boats anchor, the governor's house, state hospital, post office, and the Boma or barracks.

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  • The main part of the town is about a mile from the sea, with which it is connected by a winding street, ending at a quay surrounded by the fishing village of West Bay, where the railway terminates.

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  • It possesses an excellent harbour, a quay a mile in length, and a fine bridge.

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  • The roadstead is very shallow, and exposed to winds which cause great variations in the height of the water; it is, moreover, rapidly silting up. At the quay the depth of water is only 8 to 9 feet, and large ships have to lie 5 to 13 miles from the town.

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  • granted the tenants of Penzance whatever profits might accrue from the "ankerage, kylage and busselage" of ships resorting thither, so long as they should repair and maintain the quay and bulwarks for the safeguard of the ships and town.

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  • Down to the end of the 18th century there was only a primitive quay on the river side for shipping purposes.

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  • The grandee's well-known mansion on the English Quay glittered with innumerable lights.

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  • from the coast, while the modern houses of Bridlington Quay, the watering-place, fringe the shore of Bridlington Bay.

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  • Evelyn's plan differed from Wren's chiefly in proposing a street from the church of St Dunstan's in the East to the cathedral, and in having no quay or terrace along the river.

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  • On the Oude Gracht the roadway and quay are on different levels, the roadway lying over vaults, which open on the quay wall and are used as cellars and poor dwelling-houses.

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  • The lofty church of the Augustinians in Thomas Street; St Mary's, the pro-cathedral, in Marlborough Street, with Grecian ornamentation within, and a Doric portico; St Paul's on Arran Quay, in the Ionic style; and the striking St Francis Xavier in Gardiner Street, also Ionic, are all noteworthy, and the last is one of the finest modern churches in Ireland.

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  • Along the east side of the peninsula runs the Praya Grande, or Great Quay, the chief promenade in Macao, on which stand the governor's palace, the administrative offices, the consulates and the leading commercial establishments.

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  • Along the river front runs a tramway connecting Duke Town with Queen Beach, which is higher up and provided with excellent quay accommodation.

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  • A great obstacle to the development of the port is the absence of modern mechanical appliances for loading and unloading vessels, and of quay space and dock accommodation.

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  • It had a quay, of which remains have been discovered, and possessed a magazine of corn and other provisions for the supply of the stations in the interior.

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  • In the first example, which was erected on the quay at Newcastle in 1846, the necessary pressure was obtained from the ordinary water mains of the town; but the merits and advantages of the device soon became widely appreciated, and a demand arose for the erection of cranes in positions where the pressure afforded by the mains was insufficient.

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  • Within the limits of the city itself, on the west bank of the Tigris, are the remains of a quay, first observed by Sir Henry Rawlinson, at a period of low water, in 1849, built of bricks laid in bitumen, and bearing an inscription of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon.

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  • In Bowerston Quay, wait until the fighter gang arrives.

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  • prolonged the quay, and an inferior imitation of Trajan's arch was set up; he also erected a lazaretto at the south end of the harbour, now a sugar refinery, Vanvitelli being the architect-in-chief.

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  • Second in importance to George Street is Pitt Street, which runs parallel to it from the Circular Quay to the railway station; Macquarie Street runs alongside the Domain and contains a number of public buildings, including the treasury, the office of public works, the houses of parliament and the mint.

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  • Quay >>

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  • To the west there are the Broadstone station, Dominion Street, and beyond this the large workhouse, prison, asylum and other district buildings, while the Royal barracks front the river behind Albert Quay.

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  • The harbour, a natural basin, is protected on the south-east by cliffs and has a quay.

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  • above the quay.

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  • A small trade is carried on at Strangford Lough by means of vessels up to loo tons, which discharge at Quoile quay, about 1 m.

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  • from the town; but vessels of larger tonnage can discharge at a steamboat quay lower down the Quoile.

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  • The principal quay is the Boompjes ("little trees"), forming the riverfront on the north side.

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  • The exchange (Borsen), on the quay to the east, is an ornate gabled building erected in 1619-1640, surmounted by a remarkable spire, formed of four dragons, with their heads directed to the four points of the compass, and their bodies entwining each other till their tai, come to a point at the top. To the south is the arsenal (Tbjhus) with a collection of ancient armour.

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  • It is connected with the main railway station by means of a circular railway, while a short branch connects it with the ordinary custom-house quay.

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  • KIMHI, or Quay', the family name of three Jewish grammarians and biblical scholars who worked at Narbonne in the r 2th century and the beginning of the 13th, and exercised great influence on the study of the Hebrew language.

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  • This harbour consists of a broad quay with 6J7 ft.

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  • A tablet on the quay commemorates the landing of Bernadotte after his election as successor to the throne in 1810.

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  • The wall was pierced by "the gate of Assur," "the gate of the Sun-god," "the gate of the Tigris," &c., and on the river side was a quay of burnt brick and limestone cemented with bitumen.

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  • A fine promenade extends along the shore; there are a quay and a pier, a winter garden, and all the appointments of a seaside resort.

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  • Then, to raise funds for the cause, he returned to America; his fervid appeals enabled him to collect about $60,000, which he spent on provisions and clothing, and he established a relief depot near Aegina, where he started works for the refugees, the existing quay, or American Mole, being built in this way.

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  • Including Kirn and Hunter's Quay, it presents a practically continuous front of seaside villas.

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  • Hunter's Quay is the yachting headquarters, the Royal Clyde Yacht Club's house adjoining the pier.

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  • At the end of the quay are the works for supplying Port Said with water.

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  • The inner ring is connected by the Vaczi Korut (Waitzner-Ring) with the Grosse Ring-Strasse, a succession of boulevards, describing a semicircle beginning at the Margaret bridge and ending at the Boraros Platz, near the custom-house quay, through about the middle of the town.

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  • There is a quay on the river front, but the depth alongside does not exceed 18 ft.

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  • In 1888 the gates of Wellington dock were widened to admit a larger type of Channel steamers; new coal stores were erected on the Northampton quay; the slipway was lengthened 40 ft., and widened for the reception of vessels up to 800 tons.

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  • These three breakwaters, with a united length of rather more than 14 m., are each built of massive concrete blocks in the form of a practically vertical wall founded on the solid chalk and rising to a quay level of 10 ft.

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  • On the main quay is a statue of William Tell by the sculptor Vincenzo Vela (1820-1891), a native of the town, while other works by him are in the gardens of private villas in the neighbourhood.

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  • Plague-rats have rarely been found in ships sailing from infected ports; and though millions of these animals must have been carried backwards and forwards from quay to quay betweenHong-Kong, Bombay and the great European ports, they have not brought the disease ashore.

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  • above the banks of the Oka and the Volga, and in the centre of a very lively traffic. Piles of salt line the salt wharves on the Oka; farther down are the extensive storehouses and heaps of grain of the corn wharves; then comes the steamboat quay on the Volga, opposite the Kremlin, and still farther east the timber wharves.

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  • New Quay, High Mead, Oakford, &c.; but many of such names are of modern invention, dating chiefly from the 18th and 19th centuries.

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  • At the broad shipping quay (Skeppsbro) which flanks the palace on the north and east, most of the sea-going steamers lie; and the exchange, custom-house, numerous banks and merchants' offices are in the immediate vicinity.

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  • East of Skeppsholm an inlet, Ladugardslandsviken, so named from the proximity of the former royal farm-yard (ladugard), and bordered on the mainland by a quay with handsome houses called Strandvagen, throws off a narrow branch (Djurgardsbrunnsviken) and separates from the mainland an island about 2 m.

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  • The steamers for the White and the Blue Nile start from the quay along the esplanade.

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  • The common quay was on the west bank; all ships coming in had to lie in the river bed or in a natural tidal basin known as Fabian's Bay, on the east.

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  • From the quay a broad esplanade has been constructed northwards round the bay, and there is an excellent golf course.

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  • The passenger steamers to Great Britain, mainly under the control of the City of Cork Steam Packet Company, serve Fishguard, Glasgow, Liverpool, Plymouth and Southampton, London and other ports, starting from Penrose Quay on the North Channel.

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  • The main part of the town, on the right bank, is surrounded by shady promenades, the Ringstrasse and the quay.

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  • The custom house on the old steamboat quay, in classic style with a Doric portico, dates from 1818.

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  • The quayage exceeds ioo acres in area and the quay walls are over 3 m.

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  • of quay, was completed in 1848 and called Victoria Dock in honour of the queen's visit to the city in that year.

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  • The main street is a winding thoroughfare named in different parts Thorndon Quay, Lambton Quay, Wills Street and Manners Street.

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  • The city is built chiefly along the banks of the river, occupying for the most part low and level ground except at its western extremity, and excepting the quay and the Mall, which connects with the southern end of the quay, its internal appearance is hardly of a piece with the beauty of its environs.

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  • At the extremity of the quay is a large circular tower, called Reginald's Tower, forming at one time a portion of the city walls, and occupying the site of the tower built by Reginald the Dane in 1003.

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  • The quay, at which there is a depth of 22 ft.

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  • There were also monumental gateways, and the island was protected by a stone quay all round with the necessary staircases, &c., and a Nilometer.

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  • For some distance outside the Galata bridge, both shores of the Golden Horn have been provided with a quay at which large steamers can moor to discharge or embark their passengers and cargo.

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  • The Galata quay, completed in 1889, is 756 metres long and 20 metres wide; the Stamboul quay, completed in 1900, is 378 metres in length.

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  • Quay in the United States Senate; in 1905 he was re-elected to the Senate for the full term.

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  • Slaughden Quay on the Alde admits small vessels, and fishing is carried on.

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  • Additional works, begun in 1873 by the company, to extend the old harbour and lengthen the quay by 4000 ft., were opened by King Edward VII.

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  • Its first quay was constructed by means of a grant from Charles V.

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  • A new quay was built in 1766-1768, and extended in 1859; the harbour was further improved in 1864, and after 1892, when the Musel harbour of refuge was created at the extremity of the bay.

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  • The modern quay has encroached considerably on the sea, and the coast-line of the Greek time was about 90 yds.

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  • distant, where the Anatolian Railway Company have established their workshops and have built docks and a quay.

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  • Opposite the breakwater is a quay 1 475 ft.

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  • long, which was widened in1903-1907to a breadth of 306 ft.; at each end of the quay a pier 656 ft.

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  • from the coast, while the modern houses of Bridlington Quay, the watering-place, fringe the shore of Bridlington Bay.

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  • At Bridlington Quay there is excellent sea-bathing, and the parade and ornamental gardens provide pleasant promenades.

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  • Two inclined roads lead from the centre of the boulevard to the quay 40 ft.

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  • On the quay are the landing-stages, the custom-house and the railway station.

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  • There is also a considerable coasting trade in coal in conjunction with the South-Eastern & Chatham railway company, who are the owners of the harbour, which accommodates vessels of about 400 tons alongside the quay.

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  • 7, so that a load can be taken out of a vessel and deposited on a quay wall.

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  • The pressure is conveyed to the crane by means of j ointed " walking " pipes, or flexible hose, connected to hydrants placed at regular intervals along the quay.

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  • It is often very desirable to have the quay space as little obstructed by the cranes as possible, so as not to interfere with railway traffic; this has led to the introduction of cranes mounted on high trucks or gantries, sometimes also called " portal " cranes.

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  • Where warehouses or station buildings run parallel to the quay line, the high truck is often extended, so as to span the whole quay; on one side the " long leg " runs on a rail at the quay edge, and on the other the " short leg " runs on a runway placed on the building.

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  • They give the minimum of interference with quay space and have rapidly come into favour.

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  • The jib is usually inclined, so as to enable the travel to be performed by gravity in one direction, and the object of the transporter mechanism is to ensure that pulling in or slacking out the lifting rope shall perform the cycle of operations in the following order: - Supposing the load is ready to be lifted out of a vessel on to a quay, the pull of the lifting rope raises the load, the travelling jenny being meanwhile locked in position.

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  • The town has three parts: the Upper, built on the sides of a lofty foreland known as North Hill; the Lower; and the Quay Town, with many ancient houses, stretching for about a mile beside the harbour.

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  • The continental trains of the Great Eastern railway run to Parkeston Quay, r m.

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  • Between the Parkeston Quay and Town railway stations is that of Dovercourt, an adjoining parish and popular watering-place.

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  • No charter has been found, but a judgment given under a writ of quo warranto in 1578 confirms to the burgesses freedom from toll, passage and pontage, the tolls and stallage of the quay and the right to hold two fairs - privileges which they claimed under charters of Baldwin de Redvers and Isabel de Fortibus, countess of Albemarle, in the 13th century, and Edward Courtenay, earl of Devon, in 1405.

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  • MATTHEW STANLEY QUAY (1833-1904), American political "boss," was born in Dillsburg, York county, Pennsylvania, on the 30th of September 1833.

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  • A long stone quay next the harbour is backed by the new town climbing up the slopes behind.

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  • The roadstead is very shallow, and exposed to winds which cause great variations in the height of the water; it is, moreover, rapidly silting up. At the quay the depth of water is only 8 to 9 feet, and large ships have to lie 5 to 13 miles from the town.

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  • Under the republic commercial shipping used to enter Venice by the Tort of San Nicole del Lido and lie along the quay called the Riva degli Schiavoni, in the basin of San Marco, and up the broad Giudecca Canal.

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  • The government also turned its attention to the inadequate accommodation at the docks, and proposals for a new quay on the western side of the present basin, and for a second basin 900 yds.

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  • granted the tenants of Penzance whatever profits might accrue from the "ankerage, kylage and busselage" of ships resorting thither, so long as they should repair and maintain the quay and bulwarks for the safeguard of the ships and town.

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  • The public buildings, which are large and handsome, include the government and customs offices on the quay opposite the spot where the mail boats anchor, the governor's house, state hospital, post office, and the Boma or barracks.

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  • It has a fine quay, townhall and park.

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  • There is a quay here where large vessels can discharge, and agricultural produce is exported.

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  • Within the limits of the city itself, on the west bank of the Tigris, are the remains of a quay, first observed by Sir Henry Rawlinson, at a period of low water, in 1849, built of bricks laid in bitumen, and bearing an inscription of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon.

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  • (1100 B.C.) The quay of Nebuchadrezzar, mentioned above, establishes the fact that this ancient city of Baghdadu was located on the site of western or old Bagdad (see further under Caliphate: Abbasids, sections 2 foil.).

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  • Down to the end of the 18th century there was only a primitive quay on the river side for shipping purposes.

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  • At the quay point between these two basins there are vast state granaries.

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  • river) side of the Grasbrook dock is the quay at which the emigrants for South America embark, and from which the mail boats for East Africa, the boats of the Woermann (West Africa) line, and the Norwegian tourist boats depart.

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  • of Harwich, with a station between Parkeston Quay and Harwich town on the Great Eastern railway, 70 m.

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  • Second in importance to George Street is Pitt Street, which runs parallel to it from the Circular Quay to the railway station; Macquarie Street runs alongside the Domain and contains a number of public buildings, including the treasury, the office of public works, the houses of parliament and the mint.

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  • The Circular Quay at the head of Sydney Cove is 1300 ft.

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  • It is situated in the Trastevere near the Ripa Grande quay, where in earlier days the Ghetto was located, and gives a "title" to a cardinal priest.

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  • Wren proposed to build main thoroughfares north and south, and east and west, to insulate all the churches in conspicuous positions, to form the most public places into large piazzas, to unite the halls of the twelve chief companies into one regular square annexed to Guildhall and to make a fine quay on the bank of the river from Blackfriars to the Tower.

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  • Evelyn's plan differed from Wren's chiefly in proposing a street from the church of St Dunstan's in the East to the cathedral, and in having no quay or terrace along the river.

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  • A narrow-gauge railway connects these with Port Penrhyn, at the mouth of the stream Cegid (hemlock, "cicuta"), which admits the entry of vessels of 300 tons to the quay at low water.

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  • ROBERT STEPHENSON (1803-1859), English engineer, only son of George Stephenson, was born at Willington Quay on the 16th of October 1803.

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  • On the north side the Ring-Strasse gives place to the spacious Franz Josef's quay, flanking the Danube Canal.

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  • Alongside the quay are the landing-places of the steamboats navigating the Rhine.

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  • Other principal public buildings, nearly all to be included in modern schemes of development, are the city hall, occupying the site of the old Linen Hall, in Donegall Square, estimated to cost £300,000; the commercial buildings (1820) in Waring Street, the customhouse and inland revenue office on Donegall Quay, the architect of which, as of the court house, was Sir Charles Lanyon, and some of the numerous banks, especially the Ulster Bank.

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  • Its harbour was of considerable importance in imperial times, as the nearest to Dalmatia, 2 and was enlarged by Trajan, who constructed the north quay, his architect being Apollodorus of Damascus.

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  • prolonged the quay, and an inferior imitation of Trajan's arch was set up; he also erected a lazaretto at the south end of the harbour, now a sugar refinery, Vanvitelli being the architect-in-chief.

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  • The southern quay was built in 1880, and the harbour is now protected by forts on the heights, while the place is the seat of the 7th army corps.

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  • Along the east side of the peninsula runs the Praya Grande, or Great Quay, the chief promenade in Macao, on which stand the governor's palace, the administrative offices, the consulates and the leading commercial establishments.

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  • At its southern end, by the quay, is a bronze statue of Thiers, and at the northern end, the cathedral of St Augustine, a large church built in quasi-Byzantine style.

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  • of quay walls, the wharfs being provided with electrical cranage.

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  • On the Oude Gracht the roadway and quay are on different levels, the roadway lying over vaults, which open on the quay wall and are used as cellars and poor dwelling-houses.

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  • In the first example, which was erected on the quay at Newcastle in 1846, the necessary pressure was obtained from the ordinary water mains of the town; but the merits and advantages of the device soon became widely appreciated, and a demand arose for the erection of cranes in positions where the pressure afforded by the mains was insufficient.

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  • It had a quay, of which remains have been discovered, and possessed a magazine of corn and other provisions for the supply of the stations in the interior.

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  • On the quay stands a marble statue erected to the memory of La Fontaine, who was born in the town in 1621; his house is still preserved in the street that bears his name.

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  • In 1882-1884 a dock some 7 acres in extent was constructed, with an entrance lock giving access to the quay sides for vessels of 3000 tons.

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  • In February 1643 she landed at Burlington Quay, placed herself at the head of a force of loyalists, and marched through England to join the king near Oxford.

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  • At its mouth, on the north side, is the North Wall quay, where :the principal steamers lie, and in this vicinity are the docks.

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  • To the west there are the Broadstone station, Dominion Street, and beyond this the large workhouse, prison, asylum and other district buildings, while the Royal barracks front the river behind Albert Quay.

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  • The lofty church of the Augustinians in Thomas Street; St Mary's, the pro-cathedral, in Marlborough Street, with Grecian ornamentation within, and a Doric portico; St Paul's on Arran Quay, in the Ionic style; and the striking St Francis Xavier in Gardiner Street, also Ionic, are all noteworthy, and the last is one of the finest modern churches in Ireland.

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  • The ocean freight has to be added before the grain can be delivered free on the quay at Liverpool.

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  • Hayes, by James Quay Howard (Cincinnati, 1876);; Life of R.

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  • The harbour, a natural basin, is protected on the south-east by cliffs and has a quay.

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  • A great obstacle to the development of the port is the absence of modern mechanical appliances for loading and unloading vessels, and of quay space and dock accommodation.

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  • The main part of the town is about a mile from the sea, with which it is connected by a winding street, ending at a quay surrounded by the fishing village of West Bay, where the railway terminates.

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  • There is an extensive fish quay, and about 14,000 tons of fish are landed annually.

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  • Along the river front runs a tramway connecting Duke Town with Queen Beach, which is higher up and provided with excellent quay accommodation.

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  • It possesses an excellent harbour, a quay a mile in length, and a fine bridge.

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  • The political organization founded by Simon Cameron and strengthened by his son, James Donald Cameron, Matthew Stanley Quay and Boies Penrose (b.

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  • Each block formed a piece of the quay wall 12 ft.

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  • above the quay.

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  • The quay on the harbour side was 2 7 ft.

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  • A small trade is carried on at Strangford Lough by means of vessels up to loo tons, which discharge at Quoile quay, about 1 m.

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  • from the town; but vessels of larger tonnage can discharge at a steamboat quay lower down the Quoile.

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  • The principal quay is the Boompjes ("little trees"), forming the riverfront on the north side.

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  • The exchange (Borsen), on the quay to the east, is an ornate gabled building erected in 1619-1640, surmounted by a remarkable spire, formed of four dragons, with their heads directed to the four points of the compass, and their bodies entwining each other till their tai, come to a point at the top. To the south is the arsenal (Tbjhus) with a collection of ancient armour.

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  • It is connected with the main railway station by means of a circular railway, while a short branch connects it with the ordinary custom-house quay.

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  • KIMHI, or Quay', the family name of three Jewish grammarians and biblical scholars who worked at Narbonne in the r 2th century and the beginning of the 13th, and exercised great influence on the study of the Hebrew language.

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  • This harbour consists of a broad quay with 6J7 ft.

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  • A tablet on the quay commemorates the landing of Bernadotte after his election as successor to the throne in 1810.

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  • The wall was pierced by "the gate of Assur," "the gate of the Sun-god," "the gate of the Tigris," &c., and on the river side was a quay of burnt brick and limestone cemented with bitumen.

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  • A fine promenade extends along the shore; there are a quay and a pier, a winter garden, and all the appointments of a seaside resort.

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  • Then, to raise funds for the cause, he returned to America; his fervid appeals enabled him to collect about $60,000, which he spent on provisions and clothing, and he established a relief depot near Aegina, where he started works for the refugees, the existing quay, or American Mole, being built in this way.

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  • Including Kirn and Hunter's Quay, it presents a practically continuous front of seaside villas.

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  • Hunter's Quay is the yachting headquarters, the Royal Clyde Yacht Club's house adjoining the pier.

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  • At the end of the quay are the works for supplying Port Said with water.

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  • The inner ring is connected by the Vaczi Korut (Waitzner-Ring) with the Grosse Ring-Strasse, a succession of boulevards, describing a semicircle beginning at the Margaret bridge and ending at the Boraros Platz, near the custom-house quay, through about the middle of the town.

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  • There is a quay on the river front, but the depth alongside does not exceed 18 ft.

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  • In 1888 the gates of Wellington dock were widened to admit a larger type of Channel steamers; new coal stores were erected on the Northampton quay; the slipway was lengthened 40 ft., and widened for the reception of vessels up to 800 tons.

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  • These three breakwaters, with a united length of rather more than 14 m., are each built of massive concrete blocks in the form of a practically vertical wall founded on the solid chalk and rising to a quay level of 10 ft.

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  • On the main quay is a statue of William Tell by the sculptor Vincenzo Vela (1820-1891), a native of the town, while other works by him are in the gardens of private villas in the neighbourhood.

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  • Plague-rats have rarely been found in ships sailing from infected ports; and though millions of these animals must have been carried backwards and forwards from quay to quay betweenHong-Kong, Bombay and the great European ports, they have not brought the disease ashore.

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  • above the banks of the Oka and the Volga, and in the centre of a very lively traffic. Piles of salt line the salt wharves on the Oka; farther down are the extensive storehouses and heaps of grain of the corn wharves; then comes the steamboat quay on the Volga, opposite the Kremlin, and still farther east the timber wharves.

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  • New Quay, High Mead, Oakford, &c.; but many of such names are of modern invention, dating chiefly from the 18th and 19th centuries.

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  • At the broad shipping quay (Skeppsbro) which flanks the palace on the north and east, most of the sea-going steamers lie; and the exchange, custom-house, numerous banks and merchants' offices are in the immediate vicinity.

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  • East of Skeppsholm an inlet, Ladugardslandsviken, so named from the proximity of the former royal farm-yard (ladugard), and bordered on the mainland by a quay with handsome houses called Strandvagen, throws off a narrow branch (Djurgardsbrunnsviken) and separates from the mainland an island about 2 m.

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  • The steamers for the White and the Blue Nile start from the quay along the esplanade.

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  • The Wrexham, Mold & Connah's Quay railway, which was taken over by the Great Central company in 1905, helped to bring the mineral wealth of Flint and North Wales generally into the Birkenhead docks.

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  • The common quay was on the west bank; all ships coming in had to lie in the river bed or in a natural tidal basin known as Fabian's Bay, on the east.

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  • From the quay a broad esplanade has been constructed northwards round the bay, and there is an excellent golf course.

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  • The passenger steamers to Great Britain, mainly under the control of the City of Cork Steam Packet Company, serve Fishguard, Glasgow, Liverpool, Plymouth and Southampton, London and other ports, starting from Penrose Quay on the North Channel.

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  • The main part of the town, on the right bank, is surrounded by shady promenades, the Ringstrasse and the quay.

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  • The custom house on the old steamboat quay, in classic style with a Doric portico, dates from 1818.

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  • The quayage exceeds ioo acres in area and the quay walls are over 3 m.

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  • of quay, was completed in 1848 and called Victoria Dock in honour of the queen's visit to the city in that year.

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  • The main street is a winding thoroughfare named in different parts Thorndon Quay, Lambton Quay, Wills Street and Manners Street.

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  • The city is built chiefly along the banks of the river, occupying for the most part low and level ground except at its western extremity, and excepting the quay and the Mall, which connects with the southern end of the quay, its internal appearance is hardly of a piece with the beauty of its environs.

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  • At the extremity of the quay is a large circular tower, called Reginald's Tower, forming at one time a portion of the city walls, and occupying the site of the tower built by Reginald the Dane in 1003.

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  • The quay, at which there is a depth of 22 ft.

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  • There were also monumental gateways, and the island was protected by a stone quay all round with the necessary staircases, &c., and a Nilometer.

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  • For some distance outside the Galata bridge, both shores of the Golden Horn have been provided with a quay at which large steamers can moor to discharge or embark their passengers and cargo.

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  • The Galata quay, completed in 1889, is 756 metres long and 20 metres wide; the Stamboul quay, completed in 1900, is 378 metres in length.

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  • Quay in the United States Senate; in 1905 he was re-elected to the Senate for the full term.

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  • Slaughden Quay on the Alde admits small vessels, and fishing is carried on.

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  • Additional works, begun in 1873 by the company, to extend the old harbour and lengthen the quay by 4000 ft., were opened by King Edward VII.

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  • Its first quay was constructed by means of a grant from Charles V.

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  • A new quay was built in 1766-1768, and extended in 1859; the harbour was further improved in 1864, and after 1892, when the Musel harbour of refuge was created at the extremity of the bay.

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  • The modern quay has encroached considerably on the sea, and the coast-line of the Greek time was about 90 yds.

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  • distant, where the Anatolian Railway Company have established their workshops and have built docks and a quay.

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  • Opposite the breakwater is a quay 1 475 ft.

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  • long, which was widened in1903-1907to a breadth of 306 ft.; at each end of the quay a pier 656 ft.

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