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quarter sessions

quarter sessions

quarter sessions Sentence Examples

  • The assizes are held at Enniskillen, quarter sessions at Enniskillen and Newtownbutler.

  • It has one court of quarter sessions and is divided into fifteen petty sessional divisions.

  • The boroughs of Derby, Chesterfield and Glossop have separate commissions of the peace, and that of Derby has also a separate court of quarter sessions.

  • The justices were authorized to fix wages at the Easter quarter sessions.

  • The great sessions for the county were during their whole existence from 1542 to 1830 held at Cardiff, but the assizes (which replaced them) have since then been held at Swansea and Cardiff alternately, as also are the quarter sessions for Glamorgan.

  • It was granted a separate court of quarter sessions in 1890, it was constituted a county borough in 1888, and, by letters patent dated the 28th of October 1905, it was created a city and the dignity of lord mayor conferred on its chief magistrate.

  • The arrangements of quarter-sessions, justices, coroners, sheriffs, &c., were thus brought into line with other counties, except in so far as the ordinary organization is modified by the existence of the central criminal court, the metropolitan police, police courts and magistrates, and a paid chairman of quarter-sessions.

  • The chief courts for the trial of criminal cases are the Central Criminal Court and the Court of Quarter-sessions.

  • Quarter-sessions for the county of London are held thirty-six times annually, for the north side of the Thames at the Sessions-house in Clerkenwell (Finsbury) and for the south side at that in Newington Causeway, Southwark.

  • A statute of 1553 made the breaking or defacing of an altar, crucifix or cross in any church, chapel or churchyard punishable with three months' imprisonment on conviction before two justices, the imprisonment to be continued unless the offender entered into surety for good behaviour at quarter sessions.

  • Assizes are held at Armagh, and quarter sessions at Armagh,Ballybot, Lurgan,Markethill and Newtown-Hamilton.

  • The boroughs having separate commissions of the peace and courts of quarter sessions are Canterbury, Deal, Dover, Faversham, Folkestone, Gravesend, Hythe, Maidstone, Margate, Rochester, Sandwich and Tenterden; while those of Lydd, New Romney, Ramsgate and Tunbridge Wells have separate commissions of the peace.

  • The justices of the Cinque Ports exercise certain jurisdiction, the non-corporate members of the Cinque Ports of Dover and Sandwich having separate commissions of the peace and courts of quarter sessions.

  • The liberty of Romney Marsh has petty and quarter sessions under its charters.

  • The assize town is Belfast, and quarter sessions are held at Ballymena, Ballymoney, Belfast, Lame and Lisburn.

  • A chancery and exchequer for the counties of Brecknock and Radnor were also established at Brecon Castle, and from 1542 till 1830 the great sessions, and since then the assizes, and at all times the quarter sessions for the county, have been held at Brecon.

  • The borough had also a separate court of quarter sessions till 1835.

  • Assizes are held at Castlebar, and quarter sessions at Ballina, Ballinrobe, Belmullet, Castlebar, Claremorris, Swineford and Westport.

  • The judges of the common pleas are also judges of the courts of oyer and terminer, quarter sessions of the peace and general gaol delivery, and the orphans' courts, although there are separate orphans' courts in the counties (ten in 1909) having a population of more than one hundred and fifty thousand.

  • The borough of Brecon has a separate commission of the peace, but no separate court of quarter sessions.

  • The borough of Denbigh has a separate commission of the peace, but no separate court of quarter sessions.

  • The assizes and quarter sessions for Glamorgan are held at Swansea alternately with Cardiff.

  • The borough has a separate commission of the peace, and, since 1891, a court of quarter sessions.

  • For centuries before, from the reign of Edward III., under a number of statutes and commissions, the administrative work in the counties had been in the hands of the country gentlemen and the clergy, acting as justices of the peace, and sitting in petty sessions and quarter sessions.

  • The second is the quarter sessions borough, which forms part of the county for certain specified purposes only.

  • The larger quarter sessions boroughs, i.e.

  • All such boroughs form part of the county for the purposes of pauper lunatics, analysts, reformatory and industrial schools, fish conservancy, explosives, and, of course, the purposes for which the larger quarter sessions boroughs also form part of the county, such as main roads, and are assessed to county rate accordingly.

  • And in a borough, whether a quarter sessions borough or not, which had in 1881 a population of less than io,000, all the powers which the borough council formerly possessed as to police, analysts, diseases of animals, gas meters, and weights and measures cease and are transferred to the county council, the boroughs becoming in fact part of the area of the county for these purposes.

  • The county council may, with the consent of the Local Government Board, borrow money on the security of the county fund or any of its revenues, for consolidating the debts of the county; purchasing land or buildings; any permanent work or other thing, the cost of which ought to be spread over a term 'of years; making advances in aid of the emigration or colonization of inhabitants of the county; and any purpose for which quarter sessions or the county council are authorized by any act to borrow.

  • Elaborate provision is made for the distribution of the surplus (if any), with a view to securing a due share being paid to the quarter sessions boroughs.

  • Act 1888 the only form of countygovern 1' S' g lent in England was that of the justices in quarter sessions (q.v.).

  • The principal object of the act of 1888 was to transfer these powers and duties from the quarter sessions to the new representative body - the county council; and it may be said that substantially the whole of the administrative business of quarter sessions was thus transferred.

  • In addition to the business of quarter sessions thus transferred, there was also transferred to the county council certain business of the justices of the county out of session, that is to say, in petty or special sessions.

  • The powers, duties and liabilities of the quarter sessions and justices out of session with respect to the county police were vested in the quarter sessions and the county council jointly, and are now exercised through the standing joint-committee of the two bodies.

  • The committee are also charged with the duties of appointing or removing the clerk of the peace, and they have jurisdiction in matters relating to justices' clerks, the provision of accommodation for quarter sessions or justices out of session, and the like, and their expenses are paid by the county council out of the county fund.

  • As already stated, the powers of the quarter sessions under the act of 1878 were transferred to the county council under the Local Government Act of 1888, and that body alone has now power to declare a road to be a main road.

  • Part of the business transferred from quarter sessions to the council was that which related to pauper lunatics, but the whole.

  • The councils of all administrative counties and county boroughs and the councils of a few specified quarter sessions boroughs, which before 1890 were independent areas for purposes of the Lunacy Acts, are local authorities for the purposes of the Lunacy Acts, and each of them is under an obligation to provide asylum accommodation for pauper lunatics.

  • the borough has quarter sessions or a separate commission or not, the mayor, by virtue of his office, is a justice for the borough, and continues to be such justice during the year next after he ceases to be mayor.

  • The crown may also on petition of the council grant a separate court of quarter sessions for the borough, and in that event a recorder has to be appointed by the crown.

  • The recorder sits as sole judge of the court of quarter sessions of the borough.

  • He has all the powers of a court of quarter sessions in a county, including the power to hear appeals from the borough justices; but to this there are a few exceptions, notably the power to grant licences for the sale of intoxicating liquor.

  • The grant of a separate court of quarter sessions also involves the appointment by the council of a clerk of the peace for the borough.

  • It should be added that the grant of a court of quarter sessions to any borough other than a county borough after the passing of the Local Government Act 1888, does not affect the powers, duties or liabilities of the county council as regards that borough, nor exempt the parishes in the borough from being assessed to county rate for any purposes to which such parishes were previously liable to be assessed.

  • And where the borough has a separate court of quarter sessions the council appoint Sheriff, a fit and proper person, not an alderman or councillor, to coroner.

  • In the quarter sessions boroughs other than county boroughs they have some only of these powers.

  • In quarter sessions boroughs, however, where the council have the duty of appointing a public analyst, they are under an obligation to put the acts in force from time to time, as occasion may arise.

  • Mackenzie); Archbold, Law of Quarter Sessions (4th ed., by Mead and Croft); J.

  • It has one court of quarter-sessions, and is divided into eight petty sessional divisions.

  • The boroughs of Bedford, Dunstable and Luton have separate commissions of the peace, and Bedford has a separate court of quarter-sessions.

  • At the first vacancy the title and rank of chief baron of the exchequer will be abolished and the office reduced to a puisne judgeship. By the County Officers and Courts (Ireland) Act 1877, it was provided that the chairmen of quarter sessions should be called " county court judges and chairmen of quarter sessions " and that their number should be reduced to twenty-one, which was to include the recorders of Dublin, Belfast, Cork, Londonderry and Galway.

  • The assizes are held at Enniskillen, quarter sessions at Enniskillen and Newtownbutler.

  • It has one court of quarter sessions and is divided into fifteen petty sessional divisions.

  • The boroughs of Derby, Chesterfield and Glossop have separate commissions of the peace, and that of Derby has also a separate court of quarter sessions.

  • The justices were authorized to fix wages at the Easter quarter sessions.

  • Romford was included in the liberty of Havering-atte-Bower, which until 1892 had a jurisdiction of its own distinct from that of the county, with a high steward, magistrates, clerk of the peace, coroner and quarter sessions.

  • The great sessions for the county were during their whole existence from 1542 to 1830 held at Cardiff, but the assizes (which replaced them) have since then been held at Swansea and Cardiff alternately, as also are the quarter sessions for Glamorgan.

  • It was granted a separate court of quarter sessions in 1890, it was constituted a county borough in 1888, and, by letters patent dated the 28th of October 1905, it was created a city and the dignity of lord mayor conferred on its chief magistrate.

  • The arrangements of quarter-sessions, justices, coroners, sheriffs, &c., were thus brought into line with other counties, except in so far as the ordinary organization is modified by the existence of the central criminal court, the metropolitan police, police courts and magistrates, and a paid chairman of quarter-sessions.

  • The chief courts for the trial of criminal cases are the Central Criminal Court and the Court of Quarter-sessions.

  • Quarter-sessions for the county of London are held thirty-six times annually, for the north side of the Thames at the Sessions-house in Clerkenwell (Finsbury) and for the south side at that in Newington Causeway, Southwark.

  • A statute of 1553 made the breaking or defacing of an altar, crucifix or cross in any church, chapel or churchyard punishable with three months' imprisonment on conviction before two justices, the imprisonment to be continued unless the offender entered into surety for good behaviour at quarter sessions.

  • Assizes are held at Armagh, and quarter sessions at Armagh,Ballybot, Lurgan,Markethill and Newtown-Hamilton.

  • The boroughs having separate commissions of the peace and courts of quarter sessions are Canterbury, Deal, Dover, Faversham, Folkestone, Gravesend, Hythe, Maidstone, Margate, Rochester, Sandwich and Tenterden; while those of Lydd, New Romney, Ramsgate and Tunbridge Wells have separate commissions of the peace.

  • The justices of the Cinque Ports exercise certain jurisdiction, the non-corporate members of the Cinque Ports of Dover and Sandwich having separate commissions of the peace and courts of quarter sessions.

  • The liberty of Romney Marsh has petty and quarter sessions under its charters.

  • The assize town is Belfast, and quarter sessions are held at Ballymena, Ballymoney, Belfast, Lame and Lisburn.

  • A chancery and exchequer for the counties of Brecknock and Radnor were also established at Brecon Castle, and from 1542 till 1830 the great sessions, and since then the assizes, and at all times the quarter sessions for the county, have been held at Brecon.

  • The borough had also a separate court of quarter sessions till 1835.

  • Assizes are held at Castlebar, and quarter sessions at Ballina, Ballinrobe, Belmullet, Castlebar, Claremorris, Swineford and Westport.

  • The judges of the common pleas are also judges of the courts of oyer and terminer, quarter sessions of the peace and general gaol delivery, and the orphans' courts, although there are separate orphans' courts in the counties (ten in 1909) having a population of more than one hundred and fifty thousand.

  • The borough of Brecon has a separate commission of the peace, but no separate court of quarter sessions.

  • The borough of Denbigh has a separate commission of the peace, but no separate court of quarter sessions.

  • The assizes and quarter sessions for Glamorgan are held at Swansea alternately with Cardiff.

  • The borough has a separate commission of the peace, and, since 1891, a court of quarter sessions.

  • For centuries before, from the reign of Edward III., under a number of statutes and commissions, the administrative work in the counties had been in the hands of the country gentlemen and the clergy, acting as justices of the peace, and sitting in petty sessions and quarter sessions.

  • The second is the quarter sessions borough, which forms part of the county for certain specified purposes only.

  • The larger quarter sessions boroughs, i.e.

  • All such boroughs form part of the county for the purposes of pauper lunatics, analysts, reformatory and industrial schools, fish conservancy, explosives, and, of course, the purposes for which the larger quarter sessions boroughs also form part of the county, such as main roads, and are assessed to county rate accordingly.

  • And in a borough, whether a quarter sessions borough or not, which had in 1881 a population of less than io,000, all the powers which the borough council formerly possessed as to police, analysts, diseases of animals, gas meters, and weights and measures cease and are transferred to the county council, the boroughs becoming in fact part of the area of the county for these purposes.

  • The county council may, with the consent of the Local Government Board, borrow money on the security of the county fund or any of its revenues, for consolidating the debts of the county; purchasing land or buildings; any permanent work or other thing, the cost of which ought to be spread over a term 'of years; making advances in aid of the emigration or colonization of inhabitants of the county; and any purpose for which quarter sessions or the county council are authorized by any act to borrow.

  • Elaborate provision is made for the distribution of the surplus (if any), with a view to securing a due share being paid to the quarter sessions boroughs.

  • Act 1888 the only form of countygovern 1' S' g lent in England was that of the justices in quarter sessions (q.v.).

  • The principal object of the act of 1888 was to transfer these powers and duties from the quarter sessions to the new representative body - the county council; and it may be said that substantially the whole of the administrative business of quarter sessions was thus transferred.

  • In addition to the business of quarter sessions thus transferred, there was also transferred to the county council certain business of the justices of the county out of session, that is to say, in petty or special sessions.

  • The powers, duties and liabilities of the quarter sessions and justices out of session with respect to the county police were vested in the quarter sessions and the county council jointly, and are now exercised through the standing joint-committee of the two bodies.

  • The committee are also charged with the duties of appointing or removing the clerk of the peace, and they have jurisdiction in matters relating to justices' clerks, the provision of accommodation for quarter sessions or justices out of session, and the like, and their expenses are paid by the county council out of the county fund.

  • As already stated, the powers of the quarter sessions under the act of 1878 were transferred to the county council under the Local Government Act of 1888, and that body alone has now power to declare a road to be a main road.

  • Part of the business transferred from quarter sessions to the council was that which related to pauper lunatics, but the whole.

  • The councils of all administrative counties and county boroughs and the councils of a few specified quarter sessions boroughs, which before 1890 were independent areas for purposes of the Lunacy Acts, are local authorities for the purposes of the Lunacy Acts, and each of them is under an obligation to provide asylum accommodation for pauper lunatics.

  • Among the powers and duties of quarter sessions transferred to county councils were those arising under the acts relating Diseases of to contagious diseases of animals.

  • the borough has quarter sessions or a separate commission or not, the mayor, by virtue of his office, is a justice for the borough, and continues to be such justice during the year next after he ceases to be mayor.

  • The crown may also on petition of the council grant a separate court of quarter sessions for the borough, and in that event a recorder has to be appointed by the crown.

  • The recorder sits as sole judge of the court of quarter sessions of the borough.

  • He has all the powers of a court of quarter sessions in a county, including the power to hear appeals from the borough justices; but to this there are a few exceptions, notably the power to grant licences for the sale of intoxicating liquor.

  • The grant of a separate court of quarter sessions also involves the appointment by the council of a clerk of the peace for the borough.

  • It should be added that the grant of a court of quarter sessions to any borough other than a county borough after the passing of the Local Government Act 1888, does not affect the powers, duties or liabilities of the county council as regards that borough, nor exempt the parishes in the borough from being assessed to county rate for any purposes to which such parishes were previously liable to be assessed.

  • And where the borough has a separate court of quarter sessions the council appoint Sheriff, a fit and proper person, not an alderman or councillor, to coroner.

  • In the quarter sessions boroughs other than county boroughs they have some only of these powers.

  • In quarter sessions boroughs, however, where the council have the duty of appointing a public analyst, they are under an obligation to put the acts in force from time to time, as occasion may arise.

  • Mackenzie); Archbold, Law of Quarter Sessions (4th ed., by Mead and Croft); J.

  • It has one court of quarter-sessions, and is divided into eight petty sessional divisions.

  • The boroughs of Bedford, Dunstable and Luton have separate commissions of the peace, and Bedford has a separate court of quarter-sessions.

  • At the first vacancy the title and rank of chief baron of the exchequer will be abolished and the office reduced to a puisne judgeship. By the County Officers and Courts (Ireland) Act 1877, it was provided that the chairmen of quarter sessions should be called " county court judges and chairmen of quarter sessions " and that their number should be reduced to twenty-one, which was to include the recorders of Dublin, Belfast, Cork, Londonderry and Galway.

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