Q sentence example

q
  • There is hardly one of Wagner's orchestral innovations which is not inseparably connected with his adaptation of music to the re q uirements of drama; and modern conductors, in treating Wagner's orchestration, as the normal standard by which all previous and contemporary music must be judged, are doing their best to found a tradition which in another fifty years will be exploded as thoroughly as the tradition of symphonic additional accompaniments is now exploded in the performances of Bach and Handel.
    1
    0
  • One very great advantage in this method is that the instrument used between P and Q may be of any ordinary form, i.e.
    1
    0
  • The new capital of Persis was Istakhr on the Pulwar, about q m.
    1
    0
  • Between A and B, A and C, and A and D, there may be a string of stations, p, q, r, s, &c., all receiving goods from a, b, c and d, and it would manifestly be inconvenient and wasteful of time and trouble if the trains serving those intermediate stations were made up with, say, six wagons from a to p next the engine, five from b to p at the middle, and four from c to p near the end.
    1
    0
  • The form q`tal illustrates one main peculiarity of Aramaic, as opposed to the other Semitic languages, viz.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The simple active q`tal makes its passive ethq`tel; the intensive gattel makes.
    0
    0
  • His family belonged to the clan of the Achaemenidae - in the inscription on the pillars and columns of the palace of Pasargadae (Murghab) he says: "I am Cyrus the king, the Achaemenid" - the principal clan (cbprp'q) of the Persian tribe of the Pasargadae.
    0
    0
  • Q, Sac containing nutritive mb, Mantle-skirt.
    0
    0
  • The anomaly AFQ of Q at any moment is called the mean anomaly, and the angle QFP by which the true anomaly exceeds it at that moment is the equation of the centre.
    0
    0
  • If triple bonds, q in number, occur also, and the energy of such a bond be Z, the equation for H becomes H = nE-+-mn -1-p(2X - Y) +q(3X - Z).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Let x be the number of molecules which dissociate per second when the number of undissociated molecules in unit volume is unity, then in a dilute solution where the molecules do not interfere with each other, xp is the number when the concentration is p. Recombination can only occur when two ions meet, and since the frequency with which this will happen is, in dilute solution, proportional to the square of the ionic concentration, we shall get for the number of molecules re-formed in one second ye where q is the number of dissociated molecules in one cubic centimetre.
    0
    0
  • P y q +...
    0
    0
  • All symmetric functions are expressible in terms of the quantities ap g in a rational integral form; from this property they are termed elementary functions; further they are said to be single-unitary since each part of the partition denoting ap q involves but a single unit.
    0
    0
  • The number of partitions of a biweight pq into exactly i biparts is given (after Euler) by the coefficient of a, z xPy Q in the expansion of the generating function 1 - ax.
    0
    0
  • Recalling the formulae above which connect s P4 and a m, we see that dP4 and Dp q are in co-relation with these quantities respectively, and may be said to be operations which correspond to the partitions (pq), (10 P 01 4) respectively.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • We may remark the particular result (-) p + p q!
    0
    0
  • The Hessian in that case is a factor of f, and Q is the third power of u2,...
    0
    0
  • The General Term Of A Seminvariant Of Degree 0, 0 And Weight W Will Be A A A Appb°Ob°1B°2...B°4 _ 0 1 2 P 0 1 2 Q P Q P Q Where Ep S =0, Eas=0 And Esp, A Es,=W.
    0
    0
  • Q 1 The Unreduced Generating Function Which Enumerates The Covariants Of Degrees 0, 0' In The Coefficients And Order E In The Variables.
    0
    0
  • Here compounds of divalent lead have not yet been obtained; by acting with zinc ethide on lead chloride, lead tetraethide, Pb(C 2 IH Q) 4, is obtained, with the separation of metallic lead.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Under the influence of the transient current, the galvanometer needle undergoes a momentary deflection, or " throw," which is proportional to Q, and therefore to 8B, and thus, if we know the deflection produced by the discharge through the galvanometer of a given quantity of electricity, we have the means of determining the value of 8B.
    0
    0
  • If V is the volume of a ball, H the strength of the field at its centre, and re its apparent susceptibility, the force in the direction x is f= K'VH X dH/dx; and if K',, and are the apparent susceptibilities of the same ball in air and in liquid oxygen, K' Q -K'o is equal to the difference between the susceptibilities of the two media.
    0
    0
  • His development of the equation x m +- px = q in an infinite series was extended by Leonhard Euler, and particularly by Joseph Louis Lagrange.
    0
    0
  • For multiplication, for instance, we have the statement that, if P and Q are two quantities, containing respectively p and q of a particular unit, then p X Q = q X P; or the more abstract statement that p X q= q X p.
    0
    0
  • It should be observed that, by analogy with the definition of a fraction, a P l q mean (al/q)P, not (aP)llq.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Proceeding in this way, we may be able to express P= Q as the sum of a finite number of terms k+m/r+n/r 2 +..
    0
    0
  • Having obtained R, which is less than Q, we now repeat with Q and R the process that we adopted with P and Q; i.e.
    0
    0
  • Suppose we find Q = sR+T, then we repeat the process with R and T; and so on.
    0
    0
  • Hence u is the greatest common measure of p and q.
    0
    0
  • Similarly the statements P+Q - R - S = T and P+ Q - R= T+ S are the same.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Thus from P+Q - R+S=T we deduce P+(Q - R+S)=P+(T - P).
    0
    0
  • Thus, if we have an equation P=Q, where P and Q are numbers involving fractions, we can clear of fractions, not by multiplying P and Q by a number m, but by applying the equal multiples P and Q to a number m as unit.
    0
    0
  • Thus 2 x 2 - I - x +x-2 (x _ I) (x+2) is equal to x + 2 q, except when x=1.
    0
    0
  • We therefore define algebraical division by means of algebraical multiplication, and say that, if P and M are multinomials, the statement " P/M = Q " means that Q is a multinomial such that MQ (or QM) and P are identical.
    0
    0
  • The application of the method to the calculation of (I +x) n, when n= p/q, q being a positive integer and p a positive or negative integer, involves, as in the case where n is a negative integer, the separate consideration of the form of the coefficients b 1, b 2, ...
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A quaternion is best defined as a symbol of the type q = Za s e s = aoeo + ales = ale, + a3e3, where eo, ...
    0
    0
  • Thus e 1 e 2 = - e2ei, and if q, q are any two quaternions, qq is generally different from q'q.
    0
    0
  • Putting q=a+,61+yj+bk, Hamilton calls a the scalar part of q, and denotes it by Sq; he also writes Vq for 01+yj+b �, which is called the vector part of q.
    0
    0
  • Thus every quaternion may be written in the form q = Sq+Vq, where either Sq or Vq may separately vanish; so that ordinary algebraic quantities (or scalars, as we shall call them) and pure vectors may each be regarded as special cases of quaternions.
    0
    0
  • The equations q'+x = q and y+q' = q are satisfied by the same quaternion, which is denoted by q - q'.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • On the other hand, the equations q'x = q and yq' = q have, in general, different solutions.
    0
    0
  • It is the value of y which is generally denoted by q= q'; a special symbol for x is desirable, but has not been established.
    0
    0
  • If we put qo= Sq' - Vq', then qo is called the conjugate of q', and the scalar q'qo = qoq' is called the norm of q' and written Nq'.
    0
    0
  • We imagine a wave-front divided o x Q into elementary rings or zones - often named after Huygens, but better after Fresnelby spheres described round P (the point at which the aggregate effect is to be estimated), the first sphere, touching the plane at 0, with a radius equal to PO, and the succeeding spheres with radii increasing at each step by IX.
    0
    0
  • Now as to the phase of the secondary wave, it might appear natural to suppose that it starts from any point Q with the phase of the primary wave, so that on arrival at P, it is retarded by the amount corresponding to QP. But a little consideration will prove that in that case the series of secondary waves could not reconstitute the primary wave.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • If the primary wave at 0 be cos kat, the effect of the secondary wave proceeding from the element dS at Q is dS 1 dS - p cos k(at - p+ 4 A) = - -- sin k(at - p).
    0
    0
  • It is thus sufficient to determine the intensity along the axis of p. Putting q = o, we get C = ffcos pxdxdy=2f+Rcos 'px 1/ (R2 - x2)dx, R being the radius of the aperture.
    0
    0
  • The limiting efficiency of the microscope is attained when the angular aperture amounts to 180°; and it is evident that a lateral displacement of the point under observation through -IX entails (at the old image) a phase-discrepancy B Q' of a whole period, one extreme ray FIG.
    0
    0
  • A similar expression can be found for Q'P - Q"A; and thus, if Q' A =v, Q' AO = where v =a cos (0", we get - - -AQ' = a sin w (sin 4 -sink") - - 8a sin 4 w(sin cktan 4 + sin 'tan cl)').
    0
    0
  • A tie between the middle point of the rod OA and Q can be used if thought desirable.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • For a point Q outside the shadow the integration extends over more than half the primary wave.
    0
    0
  • The position of Q corresponding to a given value of V, that is, to a band of given order, is by (19) BQ= aa b AD=V?
    0
    0
  • It is not probable that the sweet-smelling gums and resins of the countries of the Indian Ocean began to be introduced into Greece before the 8th or 7th century B.C., and doubtless XiOavos or X q /3avw-rOs first became an article of extensive commerce only after the Mediterranean trade with the East had been opened up by the Egyptian king Psammetichus (c. 664-610 B.C.).
    0
    0
  • Let P, Q denote the normal thrust across the sides bc, ca, and R the normal thrust across the base ab.
    0
    0
  • Then, since these three forces maintain equilibrium, and R makes equal angles with P and Q, therefore P and Q must be equal.
    0
    0
  • But the faces bc, ca, over which P and Q act, are also equal, so that the pressure on each face is equal.
    0
    0
  • The varying direction of the inclining couple Pc may be realized by swinging the weight P from a crane on the ship, in a circle of radius c. But if the weight P was lowered on the ship from a crane on shore, the vessel would sink bodily a distance P/wA if P was deposited over F; but deposited anywhere else, say over Q on the water-line area, the ship would turn about a line the antipolar of Q with respect to the confocal ellipse, parallel to FF', at a distance FK from F FK= (k2-hV/A)/FQ sin QFF' (2) through an angle 0 or a slope of one in m, given by P sin B= m wA FK - W'Ak 2V hV FQ sin QFF', (3) where k denotes the radius of gyration about FF' of the water-line area.
    0
    0
  • I n a straight uniform current of fluid of density p, flowing with velocity q, the flow in units of mass per second across a plane area A, placed in the current with the normal of the plane making an angle 0 with the velocity, is oAq cos 0, the product of the density p, the area A, and q cos 0 the component velocity normal to the plane.
    0
    0
  • Generally if S denotes any closed surface, fixed in the fluid, M the mass of the fluid inside it at any time t, and 0 the angle which the outward-drawn normal makes with the velocity q at that point, dM/dt = rate of increase of fluid inside the surface, (I) =flux across the surface into the interior _ - f f pq cos OdS, the integral equation of continuity.
    0
    0
  • In plane motion (4) reduces to dH = 2q"= q /av q?
    0
    0
  • In particular, for a jet issuing into the atmosphere, where p=P, q 2 /2g = h - z, (9) or the velocity of the jet is due to the head k-z of the still free surface above the orifice; this is Torricelli's theorem (1643), the foundation of the science of hydrodynamics.
    0
    0
  • The components of velocity of the moving origin are denoted by U, V, W, and the components of angular velocity of the frame of reference by P, Q, R; and then if u, v, w denote the components of fluid velocity in space, and u', v', w' the components relative to the axes at a point (x, y, z) fixed to the frame of reference, we have u =U +u' - yR +zQ, v =V +v -zP +xR, w=W +w -xQ +yP.
    0
    0
  • The stream lines xBAJ, xA'J' are given by = 0, m; so that if c denotes the ultimate breadth JJ' of the jet, where the velocity may be supposed uniform and equal to the skin velocity Q, m=Qc, c=m/Q.
    0
    0
  • Ja - u  ?I a -a b -u' sh nS2=sh log (Q)=?a - b a - a' b - u' At x where = co, u = o, and q= go, (O n b - a ' a + a -b a' cio) - ?a-a'?b a-a' q In crossing to the line of flow x'A'P'J', b changes from o to m, so that with q = Q across JJ', while across xx the velocity is qo, so that i n = go.
    0
    0
  • Along the jet surface A'J', q = Q, b-a' ch nSl= cos 110= a-a la - b sh nft=i sin nO=i a'>u=a'erl"> -oo, giving the intrinsic equation.
    0
    0
  • From A to B, a>u >b, 0=0, ch S2= ch log Q=cos a-i sin 2a a-b I sh S2= sh log Q= I (a u-b-a/) s i n a Q = (u-b) cos a-2(a-a') sin 2 a+1,/ (a-u.u- a')sin a (8) u-b ds _ ds d4 _ Q dw Q du - Q d 4) du q du (u-b) cos a-2(a- a') sin 2 a (a-u.0 - a') sin a (9) it j- -j' AB _f a(2b - a - a')(u-b)-2(a-b)(b-a')+2V (a - b.
    0
    0
  • Taking Ox along OS, the Stokes' function at P for the source S is p cos PSx, and of the source H and line sink OH is p(a/f) cos PHx and - (p/a) (PO - PH); so that = p (cos PSx+f cos PHx PO a PH), (q) and Ili = -p, a constant, over the surface of the sphere, so that there is no flow across.
    0
    0
  • Thus if T is expressed as a quadratic function of U, V, W, P, Q, R, the components of momentum corresponding are dT dT dT (I) = dU + x2=dV, x3 =dW, dT dT dT Yi dp' dQ' y3=dR; but when it is expressed as a quadratic function of xi, 'x2, x3, yi, Y2, Y3, U = d, V= dx, ' w= ax dT Q_ dT dT dy 1 dy2 dy The second system of expression was chosen by Clebsch and adopted by Halphen in his Fonctions elliptiques; and thence the dynamical equations follow X = dt x2 dy +x3 d Y = ..., Z ..., (3) = dt1 -y2?y - '2dx3+x3 ' M =..
    0
    0
  • If p denotes the density of the air or medium W' = sird 3 xp, (23) W' I p __ W I -1 3 k12 I k22 x2 ±i a 2= 101-1 3 '111 2= 2 tan g S = Q (l - a) x 2+ I (26) in which a/p may be replaced by 800 times the S.G.
    0
    0
  • The curves Pa4Q, having a minimum at a4, Pa3Q, having a maximum at a 31 and Pa 5 Q, with neither a maximum nor minimum, correspond to the types i., ii., iii.
    0
    0
  • In such a diagram, a point P defines a particular mixture, both as to percentage, composition and temperature; a vertical line through P corresponds to the mixture at all possible temperatures, the point Q being its freezing-point.
    0
    0
  • If the two small conducting spheres are placed with centres at a distance d centimetres, and immersed in an insulator of dielectric constant K, and carry charges of Q and Q' electrostatic units respectively, measured as above described, then the mechanical force between them is equal to QQ'/Kd 2 dynes.
    0
    0
  • If a small conducting body is charged with Q electrostatic units of electricity, and placed in any electric field at a point where the electric force has a value E, it will be subject to a mechanical force equal to QE dynes, tending to move it in the direction of the resultant electric force.
    0
    0
  • In the same manner, if an electrified body carries a positive charge Q electrostatic units and is placed in an electric field at a place where the electric force or electromotive intensity has a value E units, it is urged in the direction of the electric force with a mechanical force equal to QE dynes.
    0
    0
  • We must, however, assume that the charge Q is so small that it does not sensibly disturb the original electric field, and that the dielectric constant of the insulator is unity.
    0
    0
  • Returning to the case of the charged body with the space around it cut up into electric cells by the tubes of force and shells of potential, it is obvious that the number of these cells is represented by the product QV, where Q is the charge and V the potential of the body in electrostatic units.
    0
    0
  • An electrified conductor is a store of energy, and from the definition of potential it is clear that the work done in increasing the charge q of a conductor whose potential is v by a small amount dq, is vdq, and since this added charge increases in turn the potential, it is easy to prove that the work done in charging a conductor with Q units to a potential V units is z QV units of work.
    0
    0
  • Thus, consider a sphere uniformly charged with Q units of positive electricity.
    0
    0
  • But the charge is Q = 21rra, and therefore the capacity of the thin wire is given by C =1/2 log e llr (2).
    0
    0
  • Thus if Q is the surface density, S the thickness of the shell at any point, and p the assumed volume density of the matter of the shell, we have v =Abp. Then the quantity of electricity on any element of surface dS is A times the mass of the corresponding element of the shell; and if Q is the whole quantity of electricity on the ellipsoid, Q =A times the whole mass of the shell.
    0
    0
  • This mass is equal to 47rabcp,u; therefore Q = A47rabcp s and b =pp, where p is the length of the perpendicular let fall from the centre of the ellipsoid on the tangent plane.
    0
    0
  • Hence the density v is given by 47rabc (x2/a4+y2/b4-I-z2/c4), and the potential at the centre of the ellipsoid, and therefore its potential as a whole is given by the expression, adS Q dS V f r 47rabc r' (x2/a4-I-y2/b4+z2/c4) Accordingly the capacity C of the ellipsoid is given by the equation 1 I J dS C 47rabc Y (x 2 +y 2 + z2) V (x2/a4+y2/b4+z2/c4) (5) It has been shown by Professor Chrystal that the above integral may also be presented in the form,' foo C 2 J o J { (a2 + X) (b +X) (c 2 + X) } (6).
    0
    0
  • If we consider a length l of the cylinder, the charge Q on the inner cylinder is Q=27rR l ly, where v is the surface density, and by Coulomb's law v = E i /47r, where E 1 = A/R 1 is the force at the surface of the inner Ai cylinder.
    0
    0
  • Let V 1 and V2 be the potentials of the plates, and let a charge Q be given to one of them.
    0
    0
  • Then this produces a charge - Q on the inside of the enclosing spherical shell, and a concentric charge +Q on the outside of the shell.
    0
    0
  • Then when the inner cylinder is at potential V 1 and the outer one kept at of two potential V 2 the lines of electric force between the cylinders Q (4).
    0
    0
  • For if C l and C2 are the capacities and Q i and Q2 are the charges after contact, then Qi/CI and Q2/C2 are the potential differences of the coatings and must be equal.
    0
    0
  • Hence Qi /CI =Q2/C2 or Q I /Q 2 =C I /C 2.
    0
    0
  • It has been shown above that the potential due to a charge of q units placed on a very small sphere, commonly called a point-charge, at any distance x is q/x.
    0
    0
  • Then the electric force due to the point s' charge q at distance x is q/x, and the resolved part normal to the element of surface dS is q cos0/x 2.
    0
    0
  • Accordingly, since the total solid angle round a point is 47r, it follows that the total flux through the closed surface due to the single point charge q is 41rq, and what is true for one point charge is true for any collection forming a total charge Q of any form.
    0
    0
  • Hence the total electric flux due to a charge Q through an enclosing surface is 41rQ, and therefore is zero through one enclosing no electricity.
    0
    0
  • The electric force due to a point-charge q at a distance r is defined to be q/r 2, and the total flux or induction through the sphere of radius r is therefore 41rq.
    0
    0
  • Every tube of electric force must therefore begin and end on electrified surfaces of opposite sign, and the quantities of positive and negative electricity on its two ends are equal, since the force E just outside an electrified surface is normal to it and equal to a/41r, where a is the surface density; and since we have just proved that for the ends of a tube of force EdS = E 1 dS', it follows that adS = a'dS', or Q = Q', where Q and Q' are the quantities of electricity on the ends of the tube of force.
    0
    0
  • If then we put a negative point-charge -qr/d at B, it follows that the spherical surface will be a zero potential surface, for q rq 1 (24).
    0
    0
  • If we make a distribution of negative electricity over it, which has a density a varying according to the law a = -(d 2 -r 2) q /42rr AP3.
    0
    0
  • The brass tube, strengthened at the bearing points by strong truly turned collars, rotates in the cast iron cradle q attached to the declination axis.
    0
    0
  • The tube V, on the contrary, is attached to the cradle, and merely forms a support for the finder Q, the handles at f and p, and the moving ring P. The latter gives quick motion in position angle; the handles at p clamp and give slow motion in position angle, those at f clamp and give slow motion in right ascension and declination.
    0
    0
  • Of the rest, P and Q are imperfect.
    0
    0
  • Its area is 999 s q.
    0
    0
  • Two equal sprocket wheels Q 1, Q 2, are fastened, the one to the spring pulley, the other to the shaft.
    0
    0
  • If a force Q acting at R maintains equilibrium, QR/4 = (P - p)r =T.
    0
    0
  • Q is supplied by a spring, the extensions of which are recorded on a drum driven proportionally to the angular displacement of the driving pulley; thus a work diagram is obtained.
    0
    0
  • The force Q, usually measured by a spring, required to maintain the beam in its central position is proportional to (P - p).
    0
    0
  • If the angle 0 1 =0 2 =120 0, Q = (P - p) neglecting friction.
    0
    0
  • If the system is supposed to obey the conservation of energy and to move solely under its own internal forces, the changes in the co-ordinates and momenta can be found from the Hamiltonian equations aE aE qr = 49 - 1 57., gr where q r denotes dg r ldt, &c., and E is the total energy expressed as a function of pi, qi,.
    0
    0
  • As might have been anticipated, this caused no break in the policy of the English king and his parliament, and a series of famous acts passed in the year 1534 completed and confirmed the independence of the Church of England, which, except during five years under Queen Mary, p g Y Q Y?
    0
    0
  • They held frequent Art of y q war.
    0
    0
  • The introduction of trunnionless guns recoiling axially through a fixed cradle enabled sights to be attached to the non-recoil parts of the mounting, so that the necessity of removing a delicate telescopic sight every round disappeared, and Q?'
    0
    0
  • If a .JP solid circle be fixed in any one position and a tube be pivoted on its centre so as to move; and if the line C D be drawn upon the circle pointing towards any object Q in the heavens which lies in the plane of the circle, by turn ing the tube A B towards any other object P in the plane of the circle, the angle B 0 D will be the angle subtended by the two objects P and Q at the eye.
    0
    0
  • Then MA'B'N is a right trapezium, whose area is equal to that of Cabd; and it is related to the latter in such a way that, if any two lines parallel to AC and BD meet AB, CD, MN, A'B', in E, G, P, E', and F, H, Q, F', respectively, the area of the piece PE'F'Q of the right trapezium 'B.
    0
    0
  • Another method of verifying the formula is to take a point Q in the mid-section, and divide up the prismoid into two pyramids with vertex Q and bases ABCD ...
    0
    0
  • This would involve p and q; but, for our purposes, the data are the sides pa+q and pb+q and the base b - a, and the expression of the integral in terms of these data would require certain eliminations.
    0
    0
  • By drawing Ac and Ad parallel to BC and BD, so as to meet the plane through CD in c and d, and producing QP and RS to meet Ac and Ad in q and r, we see that the area of Pqrs is (x/h - x 2 /h 2) X area of cCDd; this also is a quadratic function of x.
    0
    0
  • The methods of §§ 59 and 60 can similarly be extended to finding the position of the central ordinate of a briquette, or the mean q th of elements of the briquette from a principal plane.
    0
    0
  • The general method of constructing the formulae of § 7 0 for chordal areas is that, if p, q, r, ...
    0
    0
  • Combining this with the first equation, we obtain the values of P, Q, R, ..
    0
    0
  • The general expression, if p, q, r,..
    0
    0
  • At J the displacement is forward, but since the curve at Q is parallel to the axis the displacement is approximately the same for all the points close to J, and the air is neither extended nor compressed, but merely displaced bodily a distance represented by JQ.
    0
    0
  • Take a point P in the disturbed part, and a point Q which the disturbance has not yet reached.
    0
    0
  • Since the conditions in the region PQ remain always the same, the momentum perpendicular to AB entering the region at Q is equal to the momentum perpendicular to AB leaving the region at P. But, since the motion at Q is along AB, there is no momentum there perpendicular to AB.
    0
    0
  • The 2nd Army then turned northward (3rd, q th, 5th and 6th divisions).
    0
    0
  • Draw a vertical at D, intersecting fh, kg, in s and q.
    0
    0
  • The polarization itself is determined from the electric force (P,Q,R) by the usual statical formula of linear type which becomes tor an isotropic medium (.f',g',h') = c2(P,Q,R), because any change of the dielectric constant K arising from the convection of the material through the aether must be independent of the sign of v and therefore be of the second order.
    0
    0
  • Now the electric force (P,Q,R) is the force acting on the electrons of the medium moving with velocity v; consequently by Faraday's electrodynamic law (P,Q,R) = (P',Q' - vc, R'+vb) where (P',Q',R') is the force that would act on electrons at rest, and (a,b,c) is the magnetic induction.
    0
    0
  • If v varies with respect to locality, or if there is a velocity of convection (p,q,r) variable with respect to direction and position, and analytical expression of the relation (ii) assumes a more complex form; we thus derive the most general equations of electrodynamic propagation for matter treated as continuous, anyhow distributed and moving in any manner.
    0
    0
  • The ectoderm loses entirely the ciliation which it had in the planula and actinula stages and commonly secretes on its external surface a protective or supporting investment, the perisarc. Contrasting with this, the anthopolyp is generally of s q uat form, the diameter often exceeding the height; the peristome is wide, a hypostome is lacking, and the ectoderm, or so much of it as is exposed, i.e.
    0
    0
  • It never had a chance contedera- q tion of Bar.
    0
    0
  • Now, since v sec i (54) di sec i dq C f(q sec i)' and multiplying by /dt or q, (55) dx C q sec i dq - f (q sec i)' and multiplying by dy/dx or tan i, (56) dy C q sec i tan dq - f (q sec i) ' also (57) di Cg dq g sec i .f (g sec i)' (58) d tan i C g sec i dq - q.
    0
    0
  • Replacing then the angle i on the right-hand side of equations (54) - (56) by some mean value, t, we introduce Siacci's pseudovelocity u defined by (59) u = q sec, t, so that u is a quasi-component parallel to the mean direction of the tangent, say the direction of the chord of the arc.
    0
    0
  • Since loge(I +x) =x-2x 2 -3x 3 - 4x4+&c., we have, by changing the sign of x, log e (I - x) _ - x - zx 2 - 3x 3 - x 4 - &c.; whence g 1 +x to=2(x+ix'+1x5+&c.), e l - x and, therefore, replacing x by p +q, log e q =2 p +q +3 () 3T ?
    0
    0
  • It was, however, a consequence of his work that in q 1786 the provinces and kingdoms were replaced by twelve intendencias (Guadalajara, Zacatecas, Durango, Sonora, Puebla, Vera Cruz, Merida, Oaxaca, Valladolid, Guanajato, San Luis Potosi, Mexico), whose governors and minor officials were directly dependent on the viceroy, the former alcaldes, mayores and corregidores, who were very corrupt, being abolished.
    0
    0
  • Thus we regard Rotifers as an independent stem branching off at the outset of the rise from the Platode type to higher Invertebrata The Polyzoa (q v), which in many ways recall Rotifers, appear to be equally independent.
    0
    0
  • One of these diminutive convents is appropriated to the "oblati" or novices (Q), the other to the sick monks as an "infirmary" (R).
    0
    0
  • As peculiarities of arrangement may be noticed the position of the kitchen (Q), between the refectory and calefactory, and of the infirmary (W) (unless there is some error in its designation) above the river to the west, adjoining the guest-houses (XX).
    0
    0
  • The general equation to a circle in this system of co-ordinates is deduced as follows: If p be the radius and 1p+mg+nr=o the centre, we have p= (lpl+mgi+nri)/(l+m+n), in which i, q i, r i is a line distant p from the point 1p+mq+nr= o.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Q to Quo.
    0
    0
  • Among the Chinese the name of the silkworm is " si, " Korean " soi "; to the ancient Greeks it became known as Q?p, the nation whence it came was to them ?r?pE S and the fibre itself o ptKc v, whence the Latin sericum, the French soie, the German Seide and the English silk.
    0
    0
  • A discussion of band spectra on a very broad basis was given by Thiele,' who recommends a formula - q +qi(s+c)+ +qr(s+c)r n in the discharge, except within the region of the kathode glow.
    0
    0
  • But some have maintained that the source in question also contained a good many narratives, and in order to avoid any premature assumption as to its contents and character several recent critics have named it " Q."
    0
    0
  • On the other hand there are two or three forms called Sabine by Latin writers which do appear to show the sound q unchanged, especially the name of the Sabine god Quirinus, which seems to be at least indirectly connected with the name of the Sabine town Cures.
    0
    0
  • Omitting correction terms depending on the temperature and on the inductive effect of the earth's magnetism on the moment of the deflecting magnet, if 0 is the angle which the axis of the deflected magnet makes with the meridian when the centre of the deflecting magnet is at a distance r, then zM sin B=I+P+y2 &c., in which P and Q are constants depending on the dimensions and magnetic states of the two magnets.
    0
    0
  • The value of the constants P and Q can be obtained by making deflexion experiments at three distances.
    0
    0
  • It is, however, possible by suitably choosing the proportions of the two magnets to cause either P or Q to be very small.
    0
    0
  • Thus it is usual, if the magnets are of similar shape, to make the deflected magnet 0.467 of the length of the deflecting magnet, in which case Q is negligible, and thus by means of deflexion experiments at two distances the value of P can be obtained.
    0
    0
  • It was by its constant reliance on monachism that the papacy of the 12th century had attained this result, and the popes of that period were especially fortunate in having for their champion the monk St Bernard, whose admirable qualities enabled him to dominate public q P opinion.
    0
    0
  • At C a new o° A C liquid phase appears - the B solution of water in liquid ' r q Ivater 50 Phenol phenol, the solubility of which FIG.
    0
    0
  • This outer court also contains the guest-chambers (P), the stables and lodgings of the lay brothers (N), the barns and granaries (Q), the dovecot (H) and the bakehouse (T).
    0
    0
  • The other images on the parhelic circle are the paranthelia (q) and the anthelion (a) (from the Greek av-ri, opposite, and iXcos, the sun).
    0
    0
  • The paranthelia (q) may be due to two internal or two external reflections.
    0
    0
  • Let A and C be two fixed disks, and B a disk which can be brought at will within a very short distance of either A or C. Let us suppose all the plates to be equal, and let the capacities of A and C in presence of B be each equal to p, and the coefficient of induction between A and B, or C and B, be q.
    0
    0
  • A small charge Q is communicated to A, and A is insulated, and B, uninsulated, is brought up to it; the charge on B will be - (q/p)Q.
    0
    0
  • It is obvious that at the end of n such operations the charge on A will be r n Q, so that the charge goes on increasing in geometrical progression.
    0
    0
  • Q' Penan?h g Prov.Welleley 3 s 0 -.._ .,.0 1=Higher 2 = Longitude East too ore Arch.
    0
    0
  • Before the teleutospore reaches maturity the nuclei fuse, and the uninucleate condition Q C then continues again until aeci dium formation.
    0
    0
  • When the gradually falling temperature reaches 1430° (q), the mass begins to freeze as -y-iron or austenite, called " primary " to distinguish it from that which forms part of the eutectic. But the freezing, instead of completing itself at a fixed temperature as that of pure water does, continues until the temperature sinks to r on the line Aa.
    0
    0
  • In other words, the composition of the frozen part and that of the mother-metal respectively are p and q at the beginning of the freezing, and r and t' at the end; and during freezing they slide along Aa and AB from p to r and from q to t'.
    0
    0
  • Reicher proved with sulphur: aT /aP = AvT/q, v being the change in volume which accompanies the change from rhombic to prismatic sulphur, and q the heat absorbed.
    0
    0
  • H:r ° Huy', Theu?c„ ?, ' r,Grchieso encienne Catelet Le y ubeuge iGppevil e e Q ?
    0
    0
  • To take the simple case of the " wall " or flat plate considered by Fourier for the definition of thermal conductivity, suppose that a quantity of heat Q passes in the time T through an area A of a plate of conductivity k and thickness x, the sides of which are constantly maintained at temperatures B' and 8".
    0
    0
  • If Q is expressed in terms of this unit in equation (I), it is necessary to divide by c, or to replace k on the right-hand side by the ratio k/c. This ratio determines the rate of diffusion of temperature, and is called the thermometric conductivity or, more shortly, the diffusivity.
    0
    0
  • The heat Q transmitted in a given time T may be deduced from an observation of the rise of temperature of the water, and the amount which passes in the interval.
    0
    0
  • The heat per second gained by conduction by an element dx of the bar, of conductivity k and cross section q, at a point where the gradient is dB/dx, may be written gk(d 2 6/dx 2)dx.
    0
    0
  • The last expression in terms of k/k' is very simple, but the first is more useful in practice, as the quantities actually measured are E, C, 1, q, and the difference of temperature.
    0
    0
  • Density thgllsh per q.
    0
    0
  • Wars and con conquests between Greeks and Greeks, especially on the q p y part of Syracuse, though not wanting, have been on the whole less constant than in old Greece.
    0
    0
  • In Rome, in 1844, his eldest da q ghter, Julia Romana (afterwards the wife of Michael Anagnos, Dr Howe's assistant and successor), was born, and in September the travellers returned to America, and Dr Howe resumed his activities.
    0
    0
  • Girga (q,v.), pop. 19,893, iS 22 m.
    0
    0
  • The loss of Norway necessitated considerable reductions of expenditure, but the economies actually practised fell far short of the requirements of y P q after 1815.
    0
    0
  • These offices, however, are purely minis q > P Y terial, are not necessarily limited to students, and give no place in the hierarchy and no particular consideration or social status.
    0
    0
  • There is a central region, roughly triangular in shape, with its base resting upon the Quaternary K Triassic Tertiary Carboniferous q & Metamorphic 7 Jurassic Aegean Sea and its apex in Servia.
    0
    0
  • Adams (ed.), Memoirs of John Q uincy Adams, comprising portions of his diary from 1795 to 1848 (12 vols., Philadelphia, 1874-1877).
    0
    0
  • The mixture is fed in continuously to the central pan (e), whence it overflows into the compartments (c'), (c 2), (c 3) successively until it reaches the circumference, where it is discharged continously by o and into the collecting-box (q), being now converted into salt-cake.
    0
    0
  • The current is supplied by accumulators, and the switch-board is ^ q attached to the platform in a position convenient for use by the astronome his assistant.
    0
    0
  • A small graduated circle p concentric with A is attached to the circular base b and read by the microscopes q r, attached to a.
    0
    0
  • P Q B R' S R S being the sun.
    0
    0
  • As we see from Lotze's own defence, the conclusion cannot be drawn without another premise or premises to the effect that " S, Q, R, are /, and is the one real subject of M."
    0
    0
  • Les valeurs de p, q, r, p', q,' r', qui satisferaient a cette condition seraient absurdes; mais seraient-elles imaginaires, reductibles a la forme generale A+B - 1 ?
    0
    0
  • Any quaternion may now be expressed in numerous simple forms. Thus we may regard it as the sum of a number and a line, a+a, or as the product, fly, or the quotient, be-', of two directed lines, &c., while, in many cases, we may represent it, so far as it is required, by a single letter such as q, r, &c.
    0
    0
  • And one of Hamilton's earliest advances in the study of his system (an advance independently made, only a few months later, by Arthur Cayley) was the interpretation of the singular operator q()q1, where q is a quaternion.
    0
    0
  • Clifford makes use of a quasi-scalar w, commutative with quaternions, and such that if p, q, &c., are quaternions, when p-I-wq= p'+wq', then necessarily p= p', q = q'.
    0
    0
  • The axis of the member xQ+x'Q' of the second-order complex Q, Q' (where Q=nq+wr, Q'=nq'+wr' and x, x' are scalars) is parallel to a fixed plane and intersects a fixed transversal, viz.
    0
    0
  • If Q= Ep+nq+wr and we put Q= (I +Zwt)(Ep-i-nq)X (1 Zwt) -1 we find that the quaternion t must be 2f (r) /f (q - p), where f(r)=rq - Kpr.
    0
    0
  • The point p=Vt may be called the centre of Q and the length St may be called the radius.
    0
    0
  • If Q and Q' are commutative, that is, if QQ' = Q'Q, then Q and Q' have the same centre and the same radius.
    0
    0
  • Assuming dH/do = 0.305 for saturated steam, he found that S was nearly independent of the pressure at constant temperature, but that it varied with the temperature from o 387 at 100° C. to o 665 at 160° C. Writing Q for the Joule-Thomson " cooling effect," dO/dp, or the slope BC/AC of the line of constant total heat, he found that Q was nearly independent of the pressure at constant temperature, a result which agrees with that of Joule and Thomson for air and COs; but that it varied with the temperature as (1/0) 3.8 instead of (i/0) 2.
    0
    0
  • Callendar's experiments on the cooling effect for steam by the throttling calorimeter method gave n =3-33 and c =26.3 c.c. at 100° C. Grindley's experiments gave nearly the same average value of Q over his experimental range, but a rather larger value for n, namely, 3.8.
    0
    0
  • Regnault's formula for the total heat is here again seen to be inadmissible, as it would make the latent heat of steam vanish at about 870° C. instead of at 365° C. It should be observed, however, that the assumptions made in deducing the above formulae apply only for moderate pressures, and that the formulae cannot be employed up to the critical point owing to the uncertainty of the variation of the specific heats and the cooling effect Q at high pressures beyond the experimental range.
    0
    0
  • I ancaste r ?r y q 1 4N ?U N „?;?'
    0
    0
  • It therefore made the aspirates A, E, Q and the semi-vowel I into vowels, and apparently converted the semi-vowel Y = w into the vowel which it placed at the end of the alphabet and substituted for it as the sixth symbol of the alphabet the letter F with the old value of w.
    0
    0
  • For the Greek digamma Etruscan used both 3 and q, but the former only was borrowed by the other languages.
    0
    0
  • Q is found on Etruscan inscriptions, but not in the alphabet series preserved; neither Umbrian nor Oscan has this form.
    0
    0
  • Lobo wrote an account of his travels in Portuguese, which appears never to have been printed, but is deposited in the monastery of St Ro q ue, Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • It gives shelter not only to vessels plying to its adjoining ports but serves as a harbour of refuge for shipping bound up or down the Atlantic coast, and is fre q uently used for the assembling of naval fleets.
    0
    0
  • Thus, if the two forces P,Q be represented by the lines OA, OB, they can be replaced by a single force FIG.
    0
    0