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purpura

purpura

purpura Sentence Examples

  • It is the adrectal gland, and in the genera Murex and Purpura secretes a colourless liquid which turns purple upon exposure to the atmosphere, and was used by the ancients as a dye.

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  • - Female of Purpura lapillus removed from its shell; the mantleskirt cut along its left line of attachment and thrown over to the right side of the animal so as to expose the organs on its inner face.

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  • Fusus, Pyrula, Purpura, Murex, Nassa, Trophon, Voluta, &c. The float of the pelagic Janthina, to which the egg-capsules are attached, probably is also formed by the secretion of the pedal gland.

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  • Paludina, Purpura, Nassa, Vermetus, Neritina.

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  • In the veliger stage many Pectinibranchia (Purpura, Nassa, &c.) exhibit, in the dorsal region behind the head, a contractile area of the body-wall.

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  • In some cases all the eggs in a capsule develop; in other cases one egg only in a capsule (Neritina), or a small proportion (Purpura, Buccinum), advance in development; the rest are arrested either after the first process of cell-division (cleavage) or before that process.

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  • Purpura, British.

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  • It commonly results from injury, as the tearing or cutting of a blood-vessel, but certain forms result from disease, as in scurvy and purpura.

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  • " Anomia " (1854), " Mytilus " (1856), " Dentalium " (1856-1857), " Purpura " (1859), " Haliotis (1859), " Vermetus " (1860).

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  • Formerly it was used, as the origin of the name shows, of the deep crimson colour called in Latin Purpura, purpureus and in Greek 7rop41upa, irop4 peos (from 7ropcupecv, to grow dark, especially used of the sea).

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  • This was properly the name of the shellfish (Purpura, Murex) which yielded the famous Tyrian dye, the particular mark of the dress of emperors, kings, chief magistrates and other dignitaries, whence "the purple" still signifies the rank of emperors or kings.

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  • Purpura >>

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  • Oysters do not flourish in water containing less than 3% salt; and hence they are absent from the Baltic. The chief enemies of oysters are the dog-whelk, Purpura lapillus, and the whelk-tingle, Murex erinaceus, which bore through the shells.

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  • Bleeding from tiny blood vessels in the skin may produce small purplish spots (called purpura) on the legs.

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  • These drugs are sometimes used to treat patients with a low platelet count due to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP ).

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  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura occurs in approximately one person in a million (Elkins et al, 1996 ).

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  • Bruising, purpura and petechiae have also been reported.

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  • purpura haemorrhagica is very low, its occurrence cannot be ruled out completely.

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  • However, in the condition known as thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura the use of platelet concentrates is in fact particularly hazardous.

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  • Post-transfusion purpura Post-transfusion purpura (PTP) is a rare but serious transfusion reaction occurring 5 to 12 days after the transfusion of blood.

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  • There is an associated increase in capillary fragility which presumably can account for the occasional cases of non- thrombocytopenic purpura.

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  • Post transfusion purpura (5) accounted for 1.7% and 4 transfusion transmitted infections were reported.

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  • thrombocytopenia purpura the use of platelet concentrates is in fact particularly hazardous.

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  • It is the adrectal gland, and in the genera Murex and Purpura secretes a colourless liquid which turns purple upon exposure to the atmosphere, and was used by the ancients as a dye.

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  • Next beyond (to the left of) the gill-plume we find the so-called parabranchia, which is here simple, but sometimes lamellated as in Purpura (fig.

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  • - Female of Purpura lapillus removed from its shell; the mantleskirt cut along its left line of attachment and thrown over to the right side of the animal so as to expose the organs on its inner face.

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  • Fusus, Pyrula, Purpura, Murex, Nassa, Trophon, Voluta, &c. The float of the pelagic Janthina, to which the egg-capsules are attached, probably is also formed by the secretion of the pedal gland.

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  • Paludina, Purpura, Nassa, Vermetus, Neritina.

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  • In the veliger stage many Pectinibranchia (Purpura, Nassa, &c.) exhibit, in the dorsal region behind the head, a contractile area of the body-wall.

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  • In some cases all the eggs in a capsule develop; in other cases one egg only in a capsule (Neritina), or a small proportion (Purpura, Buccinum), advance in development; the rest are arrested either after the first process of cell-division (cleavage) or before that process.

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  • Purpura, British.

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  • It commonly results from injury, as the tearing or cutting of a blood-vessel, but certain forms result from disease, as in scurvy and purpura.

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  • " Anomia " (1854), " Mytilus " (1856), " Dentalium " (1856-1857), " Purpura " (1859), " Haliotis (1859), " Vermetus " (1860).

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  • Formerly it was used, as the origin of the name shows, of the deep crimson colour called in Latin Purpura, purpureus and in Greek 7rop41upa, irop4 peos (from 7ropcupecv, to grow dark, especially used of the sea).

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  • This was properly the name of the shellfish (Purpura, Murex) which yielded the famous Tyrian dye, the particular mark of the dress of emperors, kings, chief magistrates and other dignitaries, whence "the purple" still signifies the rank of emperors or kings.

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  • Oysters do not flourish in water containing less than 3% salt; and hence they are absent from the Baltic. The chief enemies of oysters are the dog-whelk, Purpura lapillus, and the whelk-tingle, Murex erinaceus, which bore through the shells.

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  • Bleeding from tiny blood vessels in the skin may produce small purplish spots (called purpura) on the legs.

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  • These drugs are sometimes used to treat patients with a low platelet count due to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

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  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura occurs in approximately one person in a million (Elkins et al, 1996).

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  • Bruising, purpura and petechiae have also been reported.

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  • As the incidence of purpura haemorrhagica is very low, its occurrence cannot be ruled out completely.

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  • However, in the condition known as thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura the use of platelet concentrates is in fact particularly hazardous.

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  • Post-transfusion purpura Post-transfusion purpura (PTP) is a rare but serious transfusion reaction occurring 5 to 12 days after the transfusion of blood.

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  • There is an associated increase in capillary fragility which presumably can account for the occasional cases of non- thrombocytopenic purpura.

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  • Post transfusion purpura (5) accounted for 1.7% and 4 transfusion transmitted infections were reported.

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  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder caused by an abnormally low level of blood platelets, small disc-shaped cells essential to blood clotting (coagulation).

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  • ITP is as of 2004 often called immune thrombocytopenic purpura rather than idiopathic because studies in the early 2000s have shown the presence of autoimmune antibodies in the blood.

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  • Other names for ITP include purpura hemorrhagica and essential thrombocytopenia.

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  • Bleeding into the skin takes the form of purpura or petechiae.

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  • Purpura, a purplish or reddish-brown rash or discoloration of the skin, and petechiae, small round pinpoint hemorrhages, are both caused by the leakage of blood from tiny capillaries under the skin.

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  • In addition to purpura and petechiae, spontaneous bruises may occur.

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  • The most common childhood vasculitides are Kawasaki syndrome (sometimes called Kawasaki disease) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

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  • The disorders in this category include Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) and Wegener's granulomatosis.

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  • Some of the childhood vasculitides affect the skin, producing rashes, ulcers, or reddish-purple spots known as purpura.

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  • HSP is an acute but self-limited illness characterized by a low-grade fever (around 100.4°F[38°C]), purpura, joint pains (usually in the ankles and knees), abdominal pain, bleeding in the digestive tract, and inflammation of the kidneys.

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  • The doctor will examine the child's skin for purpura, other skin rashes or ulcers, reddening or swelling of the skin, and will note the locations of these abnormalities.

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  • Henoch-Schönlein purpura usually resolves on its own without any specific therapy.

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  • Purpura comes from the Latin word for "purple" and refers to the reddish-purple spots on the skin caused by leakage of blood from inflamed capillaries.

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  • "Clinical Study on Treatment of Childhood Henoch-Schonlein Purpura Nephritis with Colquhounia Root Tablet."

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  • Jones, MD, and Nanette Silverberg, MD. "Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura." eMedicine.

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  • In idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), platelets are destroyed at abnormally high rates.

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  • Autoimmune disorders: Conditions in which the immune system turns on the body itself, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or purpura, often have a characteristic rash.

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  • Quickly (within hours), the blood vessel damage increases, and large bleeding areas on the skin (purpura) are seen.

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  • Purpura refers to bruising as the result of a disease condition.

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  • In a condition known as purpura simplex, there is a tendency to bruise easily due to an increased fragility of the blood vessels.

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  • In the condition known as purpura senilis, the elderly develop bruises from minimal contact that may take up to several months to completely heal.

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  • Allergic purpura (AP), a form of vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels), is a disease characterized by inflammation of the small arterial vessels (capillaries) in the skin, kidneys, and intestinal tract.

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  • AP is also called Henoch-Schonlein purpura, named after the two German physicians who first recognized and described it in the 1880s.

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  • AP is also referred to as anaphylactoid purpura or vascular purpura.

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  • Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: A Medical Dictionary, Bibliography, and Annotated Research Guide to Internet References.

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  • Scheinfeld, Noah S., et al. "Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura." emedicine, October 8, 2004.

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  • Autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP), rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune thyroiditis, and systemic lupus erythematosus are sometimes associated with CVID.

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  • Thrombocytopenic purpura (skin hemorrhages because of decreased platelet count) occur in one out of 3000 cases.

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  • Purpura, small red or blue spots or dots that don't lose their color when pressed, represent bleeding underneath the skin.

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  • Purpura can be caused by a number of dangerous conditions; it's a good reason to call your doctor right away.

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