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puritans

puritans Sentence Examples

  • On the Pilgrims and Puritans: See article Plymouth; also E.

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  • The Puritans were invited to a conference with the king at Hampton Court (1604).

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  • Roman Catholics and Puritans alike wished for a modification of the laws which bore hardly on them.

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  • The ancient Banbury Cross, celebrated in a familiar nursery rhyme, was destroyed by Puritans in 1610.

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  • If the Puritans regarded bowls with no friendly eye, as Lord Macaulay asserts, one can hardly wonder at it.

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  • The former, settled largely by people from New England and Long Island, was dominated by Puritans; the latter by Quakers.

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  • But even the Puritans could not suppress betting.

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  • New England is prominent in American colonial history as the "Land of the Puritans" and the home of the corporate colony.

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  • He would have reduced episcopacy to narrow limits; and his views had considerable influence on the Puritans of Elizabeth's reign, when many editions of Hooper's various works were published.

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  • From New England, as has been seen, Puritan settlers established Presbyterian churches (or churches which immediately became Presbyterian) in Long Island, on New Jersey, and in South Carolina; but the Puritans who remained in New England usually established Congregational churches.

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  • In 1604 Chaderton was appointed one of the four divines for managing the cause of the Puritans at the Hampton Court conference; and he was also one of the translators of the Bible.

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  • Some of the Puritans, but by no means all, wore the hair closely cropped round the head, and there was thus an obvious contrast between them and the men of fashion with their long ringlets.

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  • The story of the many attempts made in the interval by " forward " or advanced Puritans to secure vital religious fellowship within the queen's Church, and of the few cases in which these shaded off into practical Separatism, is still wrapped in some obscurity.

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  • About 1628 the religious troubles in England led to the emigration of a large number of Puritans; the colony of Massachusetts Bay was founded in 1628-1630 by settlers led by John Endicott and John Winthrop, and a church on congregational lines was founded at Salem in 1629, and another soon afterwards at Boston, which became the centre of the colony.

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  • He must have been a fine specimen of the more cultured Puritans - possessed of a robust common-sense in admirable contrast with some of his contemporaries.

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  • Anne Hutchinson was, in fact, voicing a protest against the legalism of the Massachusetts Puritans, and was also striking at the authority of the clergy in an intensely theocratic community.

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  • - Brook's Puritans, iii.

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  • The Puritans, who aimed at setting up the Genevan model, objected; and the visitation articles of the bishops in Charles I.'s time make frequent inquisition i nto the neglect of the clergy to obey the law in this England.

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  • He was buried in Bunhill Fields; and many Puritans, to whom the respect paid by Roman Catholics to the reliques and tombs of saints seemed childish or sinful, are said to have begged with their dying breath that their coffins might be placed as near as possible to the coffin of the author of the Pilgrim's Progress.

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  • She sided with the scribes, Burghley and Sir Robert Cecil, against the men of war, Essex and Raleigh; and she abetted Whitgifts rigorous persecution of the Puritans whose discontent with her via media was rancorously expressed in the Martin Marprelate tracts.

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  • They declared that they were no Puritans themselves, but that, with such a dearth of able ministers, it was not well to lose the services of any one who was capable of preaching the gospel.

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  • Neal, History of the Puritans (1822); and T.

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  • At Charleston a mixed congregation of Scotch Presbyterians and English Puritans was organized in 1690.

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  • But he was 10th to execute judgments upon English Puritans, and modern high churchmen complain of his infirmity of purpose, his opportunism and his failure to give Parker adequate assistance in rebuilding the shattered fabric of the English Church.

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  • Burghley wished to conciliate the moderate Puritans and advised Grindal to mitigate the severity which had characterized Parker's treatment of the nonconformists.

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  • There was from the first much trouble between its Anglican settlers sent over by Mason and the Puritans from Massachusetts, and in 1641 Massachusetts extended her jurisdiction over this region.

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  • The first settlement in New Haven (called Quinnipiac, its Indian name, until 1640) was made in the autumn of 1637 by a party of explorers in search of a site for colonization for a band of Puritans, led by Theophilus Eaton and the Rev. John Davenport, who had arrived at Boston, Massachusetts, from England in July 1637.

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  • As for copes, in some places they were ordered to be worn, and were worn at the Holy Communion, 4 while elsewhere they were thrown into the bonfires with the rest.5 The difficulty seems to have been not to suppress the chasuble, of the use of which after 1559 not a single authoritative instance has been adduced, but to save the surplice, which the more zealous Puritans looked on with scarcely less disfavour.

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  • But the radical " Puritans " (the above documents in the State Paper Office are endorsed " Bishop of London: Puritans ") felt that this meant treason to the Headship of Christ in His Church; and that until the prince should set aside " the superstition and commandments of men," and " send forth princes and ministers [like another ], and give them the Book of the Lord, that they may bring home the people of God to the purity and truth of the apostolic Church," they could do no other than themselves live after that divine ideal.

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  • They were all Puritans, but not all Independents - indeed, at first only the men from Leiden were, and they were throughout more enlightened and tolerant than the men of the other settlements.

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  • Newark was settled in 1666 by about thirty Puritans from Milford, Connecticut, who were followed in the next year by about the same number of their sect from Branford and Guilford.

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  • Like the mass of the nation, he grew more Protestant as time wore on; he was readier to persecute Papists than Puritans; he had no love for ecclesiastical jurisdiction, and he warmly remonstrated with Whitgift over his persecuting Articles of 1583.

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  • In the same year Massachusetts encouraged friendly Puritans to settle Hampton on the same purchase, and about a year later this colony organized Hampton as a town with the right to send a deputy to the General Court.

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  • Indeed, his attitude was hardly distinguishable from that of the Elizabethan Puritans, but he gradually modified it under the stress of office and responsibility.

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  • He declared himself on the side of the Puritans by subscribing "The testimony of the ministers in Somersetshire to the truth of Jesus Christ" and "The Solemn League and Covenant," and assisted the commissioners of the parliament in their work of ejecting unsatisfactory ministers.

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  • Macaulay's description of Whitgift as "a narrow, mean, tyrannical priest, who gained power by servility and adulation," is tinged with rhetorical exaggeraticn; but undoubtedly Whitgift's extreme High Church notions led him to treat the Puritans with exceptional intolerance.

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  • In his policy against the Puritans, and in his vigorous enforcement of the subscription test, he thoroughly carried out the queen's policy of religious uniformity.

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  • The following is a list of Kingsley's writings: - Saint's Tragedy, a drama (1848); Alton Locke, a novel (1849); Yeast, a novel (1849) Twenty-five Village Sermons (1849); Phaeton, or Loose Thoughts for Loose Thinkers (1852); Sermons on National Subjects (1st series,1852); Hypatia, a novel (1853); Glaucus, or the Wonders of the Shore (1855); Sermons on National Subjects (2nd series, 1854); Alexandria and her Schools (1854); Westward Ho I a novel (1855); Sermons for the Times (1855); The Heroes, Greek fairy tales (1856); Two Years Ago, a novel (1857); Andromeda and other Poems (1858); The Good News of God, sermons (1859); Miscellanies (1859); Limits of Exact Science applied to History (Inaugural Lectures, 1860); Town and Country Sermons 0860; Sermons on the Pentateuch (1863); Water-babies (1863); The Roman and the Teuton (1864); David and other Sermons (1866); Hereward the Wake, a novel (1866); The Ancient Regime (Lectures at the Royal Institution, 1867); Water of Life and other Sermons (1867); The Hermits (1869); Madam How and Lady Why (1869); At last (1871); Town Geology (1872); Discipline and other Sermons 1872); Prose Idylls (1873); Plays and Puritans (1873); Health and Education (1874); Westminster Sermons (1874); Lectures delivered in America (1875).

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  • The pieces which followed are: The Man of Destiny (written in 1895, played at Croydon in 1897 by Mr Murray Carson), a Napoleonic drama, which was revived at New York by Arnold Daly in 1904; You Never Can Tell (written in 1896, produced at the Strand Theatre in 1900), a farcical comedy; The Devil's Disciple (produced at New York by Richard Mansfield in 1897, and in London in 1899), the scene of which is laid in the War of American Independence, Caesar and Cleopatra (1898) and Captain Brassbound's Conversion (1898) - printed as Three Plays for Puritans (1900); The Admirable Bashville (Stage Society,' Imperial Theatre, 1903), a dramatization of Cashel Byron's Profession.

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  • Though Aberdaron rectory does not belong to the isle, the farm "Cwrt" (Court), where the abbot held his court, still goes with Bardsey, which was granted to John Wynn of Bodvel, Carnarvonshire, after the battle and partial sack of Norwich by the Puritans in the Civil War; passing through Mary Bodvel to her husband, the earl of Radnor, who sold it to Dr Wilson of York.

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  • Archbishop Sandys' views on the Eucharist horrified him; but on the other hand he maintained friendly relations with Bishop Pilkington and Thomas Lever, and the Puritans had some hope of his support.

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  • Neal, History of the Puritans (ed.Toulmin, 5 vols., 1822); E.

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  • He was fond of music and of art, and kept statues in Hampton Court Gardens which scandalized good puritans.

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  • Ostentatious avoidance of a fish-diet became, indeed, one of the outward symbols of militant Protestantism among the Puritans.

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  • During the i 7th century the inhabitants of Banbury seem to have been zealous Puritans, and are frequently satirized by contemporary dramatists.

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  • This History of the Puritans deals with the time between the Reformation and 1689; the first volume appearing in 1732, and the fourth and last in 1738.

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  • The first volume was attacked in 1733 for unfairness and inaccuracy by Isaac Maddox, afterwards bishop of St Asaph and of Worcester, to whom Neal replied in a pamphlet, A Review of the principal facts objected to in the first volume of the History of the Puritans; and the remaining volumes by Zachary Grey (1688-1766), to whom the author made no reply.

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  • The History of the Puritans was edited, in five volumes, by Dr Joshua Toulmin (1740-1815), who added a life of Neal in 1797.

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  • But they realized that " the Lord had more truth and light yet to break forth of his Holy Word "; and this gave them an open-minded and tolerant spirit, which continued to mark the church in Plymouth Colony, as distinct from the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay.

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  • Because of the union of the towns of the New Haven Jurisdiction with Connecticut, in 1664, and the consequent admission of others than church members to civil rights, these Puritans resolved to remove and found a new town, in which, as originally in the New Haven towns, only church members should have a voice in the government.

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  • 1, the substance of which was a passionate attack on the Puritans.

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  • By the king's desire he undertook the vindication of the practices of confirmation, absolution, private baptism and lay excommunication; he urged, but in vain, the reinforcement of an ancient canon, "that schismatics are not to be heard against bishops"; and in opposition to the Puritans' demand for certain alterations in doctrine and discipline, he besought the king that care might be taken for a praying clergy; and that, till men of learning and sufficiency could be found, godly homilies might be read and their number increased.

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  • A list of the clergy was immediately prepared by him for the king, in which each name was labelled with an 0 or a P, distinguishing the Orthodox to be promoted from the Puritans to be suppressed.

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  • in 1617 on the recommendation of Thomas Morton, bishop of Chester, for use in Lancashire, where the king on his return from Scotland found a conflict on the subject of Sunday amusements between the Puritans and the gentry, many of whom were Roman Catholics.

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  • That period was one of gradual transition to the conditions of Stuart times; during it practically every claim was put forward that was made under the first two Stuarts either on behalf of parliament or the prerogative, and Elizabeth's attitude towards the Puritans was hardly distinguishable from James I.'s.

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  • Like this earlier publication, it had the division of the chapters into verses, and a marginal commentary which proved a great attraction to the Puritans.

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  • (3) The Kharijites, who, in spite of the heavy losses they sustained at the hands of Ali, maintained their power by gaining new adherents from among those austere Moslems, who held both Omayyads and Alids as usurpers, and have often been called, not unjustly, the Puritans of Islam.

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  • While thus resident in comparative privacy he was sent for to the Hague by Sir Horatio Vere, the English governor of Brill, who appointed him a minister in the army of the states-general, and of the English soldiers in their service, a post held by some�of the greatest of England's exiled Puritans.

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  • This feeling explains his detestation of foreign manners and superstitions, his loathing not only of inhuman crimes and cruelties but even of the lesser derelictions from selfrespect, his scorn of luxury and of art as ministering to luxury, his mockery of the poetry and of the stale and dilettante culture of his time, and perhaps, too, his indifference to the schools of philosophy and his readiness to identify all the professors of stoicism with the reserved and close-cropped puritans, who concealed the worst vices under an outward appearance of austerity.

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  • The leniency shown by Archbishop Grindal to puritans encouraged him to return to England, and he became curate of Cranbrook in 1583.

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  • But as the passions of 1660 cooled, as the hatred with which the Puritans had been regarded while their reign was recent gave place to pity, he was less and less harshly treated.

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  • She undoubtedly nerved the French at a critical time, and inspired an army of laggards and pillagers with a fanatical enthusiasm, comparable with that of Cromwell's Puritans.

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  • He shared to the full his fathers dislikc and distrust of the Puritans, and he supported with the whole weight of the crown the attempt of William Laud (q.v.), since 1633 archbishop of Canterbury, to enforce conformity to the ritual prescribed by the Prayer Book.

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  • time offence was given to the Puritans by an order that every clergyman should read the Declaration of Sports, in which the king directed that no one should be prevented from dancing or shooting at the butts on Sunday afternoon.

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  • The Puritans themselves were but a minority, and of that STRAFFORD; HAMPDEN; PYM; GREAT REBELLION: CROMWELL, &c.

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  • The over-haste of the Puritans to drill England into ways of morality and virtue had thrown at least the upper classes into a slough of revelry and baseness.

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  • The violence of the Restoration had been directed primarily against Puritanism, and only against certain forms of government so far as they allowed Puritans to gain the upper hand.

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  • His first term as governor, during which he seems to have been extremely popular with the majority of the colonists, was notable principally for his Berkeley religious intolerance and his expulson of the Puritans, who were in a great minority.

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  • But Locke's hereditary sympathy with the Puritans was gradually lessened by the intolerance of the Presbyterians and the fanaticism of the Independents.

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  • Puritans like Owen and Goodwin, whose idea of ecclesiastical comprehension was dogmatic and narrow, were ready to accept sectarian variety, because it was their duty to allow many religions in the nation, but only one form of theology within their own sect.

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  • Yet he did not, like many Puritans, mean Scripture as interpreted by himself or by his sect.

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  • This book, together with his insistence on points of ritual in his cathedral church and his friendship with Laud, exposed him to the suspicions and hostility of the Puritans; and the book was rudely handled by William Prynne and Henry Burton.

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  • After his death the Novatians spread rapidly over the empire; they called themselves Ka6apoi, or Puritans, and rebaptized their converts from the Catholic view.

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  • In England, in the 17th century, the square flat top began to be enlarged, forming a rim of thick stuff projecting beyond the close-fitting cap. This was the "square cap" so virulently denounced by the Puritans as a symbol of High Church Erastianism.

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  • In the meantime another migration to the Connecticut country had begun in 1638, when a party of Puritans who had arrived in Massachusetts the preceding year sailed from Boston for the Connecticut coast and there founded New Haven.

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  • Each successive move against the puritans by Laud appeared to have provoked an equally fervent response.

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  • The latter was an issue that caused acrimony between Royalists and Puritans.

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  • Now, this is heavily circumscribed, either in the 16th century by Anglicans or the 17th century by Puritans.

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  • One Response to " The new Puritans " romy Says: February 23rd, 2005 at 12:22 am the funny (?

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  • Once, the windows were full of stained glass images of Saints, but they were all destroyed, probably by 17th century Puritans.

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  • This is to emphasize their status as the allies and patrons of local cadres of godly Protestant fundamentalists; in common parlance radical Puritans.

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  • How the 18th century Puritans who furnished this place would be appalled!

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  • Puritans of a century later.

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  • Radical Puritans separated themselves from the Church of England and were called separatists.

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  • Originally, the spaces between the columns were filled with delicate Gothic tracery, destroyed by the Puritans.

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  • For me there were echoes of Arthur Miller's The Crucible - it's strange how Puritans never seem to get a good write-up.

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  • The pressure upon the Puritans increasing, Eaton, who had been one of the original patentees of the Massachusetts Bay colony in 1629, determined to use his influence and fortune to establish an independent colony of which his pastor should be the head.

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  • Meanwhile, like Bunyan and many other puritans, Cromwell had been passing through a trying period of mental and religious change and struggle, beginning with deep melancholy and religious doubt and depression, and ending with "seeing light" and with enthusiastic and convinced faith, which remained henceforth the chief characteristic and impulse in his career.

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  • In 1570 Grindal was translated to the archbishopric of York, where Puritans were few and coercion would be required mainly for Roman Catholics.

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  • For a hundred years after the Elizabethan settlement the battle raged round the compulsory use of the surplice and square cap, both being objected to by the extreme Calvinists or Puritans.

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  • It cannot be denied that men like Roger Williams and some of the persecuted Quakers, though undeniably contentious and aggressive in their conscientious dissent, showed a spirit which to-day seems sweeter in tolerance and humanity than that of the Puritans.

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  • Whitgift) and by the Puritans, who maintained the paramount duty of remaining within the queen's church and there working for the further reformation which they recognized as sadly needed by English religion.

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  • " Reformation without tarrying for Anie " was the burden laid on the heart of the Congregational pioneers in 1567-1571; and it continued to press heavily on many, both " Separatists " and conforming " Puritans " (to use the nicknames used by foes), before it became written theory in Robert Browne's work under that title, published at Middelburg in Holland in 1582 (see Browne, Robert).

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  • The greed and tyranny of several of the commissioners, and the bigotry and mismanagement of well-meaning fanatics such as Cradock and Powell, soon wrought dire confusion throughout the whole Principality, so that a monster petition, signed alike by moderate Puritans and by High Churchmen, was prepared for presentation to parliament in 1652 by Colonel Edward Freeman, attorney-general for South Wales.

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  • While thus resident in comparative privacy he was sent for to the Hague by Sir Horatio Vere, the English governor of Brill, who appointed him a minister in the army of the states-general, and of the English soldiers in their service, a post held by some�of the greatest of England's exiled Puritans.

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  • PP. 34 6 -347; Neal's Puritans, i.

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  • One Response to " The new puritans " romy Says: February 23rd, 2005 at 12:22 am the funny (?

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  • Once, the windows were full of stained glass images of Saints, but they were all destroyed, probably by 17th century puritans.

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  • This is to emphasize their status as the allies and patrons of local cadres of godly Protestant fundamentalists; in common parlance radical puritans.

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  • How the 18th century puritans who furnished this place would be appalled !

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  • Much evidence of it survives in Suffolk, and it is almost always blamed on the puritans of a century later.

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  • Radical Puritans separated themselves from the Church of England and were called Separatists.

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  • For me there were echoes of Arthur Miller 's The Crucible - it 's strange how Puritans never seem to get a good write-up.

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  • In America, the Puritans objected to Christmas trees and Christmas celebrations in general.

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  • When the Puritans had come to power in the mid-seventeenth century, they abolished all joyous celebrations of Christmas, insisting that it was a somber occasion and should be marked as such.

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  • If you find expensive brand name labels affordable, don't let the Puritans push aside your need to dress your baby like a billboard!

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  • The ministers were mostly Puritans; by their ordination, &c., Episcopalian; and for the most part strongly impressed with the desirability of nearer agreement with the Church of Scotland, and other branches of the Reformed Church on the Continent.

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  • English Puritans emigrated under the auspices of the Virginia Company to the Bermudas in 1612; and in 1617 a Presbyterian Church, governed by ministers and four elders, was established there by Lewis Hughes, who used the liturgy of the isles of Guernsey and Jersey.

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