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Puritan sentence examples

puritan
  • As a political adviser of the king Williams consistently counselled moderation and compromise between the unqualified assertion of the royal prerogative and the puritan views of popular liberties which were.

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  • John Penry, the Puritan martyr, was born at Cefn-brith in this parish.

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  • Later the place was abandoned, and in 1634 a Puritan settlement was made here.

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  • While he maintained the puritan doctrines as a whole, the special point of his attack was the Episcopacy.

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  • His family seems to have been strongly Puritan and was related to many of those Buckinghamshire families who were prominent in the parliamentary party.

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  • His writings show sound scholarship and high literary power, while they helped to shape the thought of the Puritan party in England.

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  • "A Forgotten Puritan Colony," in No.

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  • Elizabeth required Grindal to suppress the "prophesyings" or meetings for discussion which had come into vogue among the Puritan clergy, and she even wanted him to discourage preaching; she would have no doctrine that was not inspired by her authority.

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  • Nine of these Puritan Presbyterian churches were established on Long Island between 1640 and 1670 - one at Southampton and one at Southold (originally of the Congregational type) in 1640, one at Hempstead about 1644, one at Jamaica in 1662, and churches at Newtown and Setauket in the next half century; and three Puritan Presbyterian churches were established in Westchester county, New York, between 1677 and 1685.

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  • Clear and forcible in style and arrangement, they are models of Puritan exposition and of appeal through the emotions to the individual conscience, illuminated by frequent flashes of spontaneous and often highly unconventional humour.

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  • In the 16th century we find faith cures recorded of Luther and other reformers, in the next century of the Baptists, Quakers and other Puritan sects, and in the 18th century the faith healing of the Methodists in this country was paralleled by Pietism in Germany, which drew into its ranks so distinguished a man of science as Stahl (1660-1734) In the 19th century Prince Hohenlohe-WaldenburgSchillingsfiirst, canon of Grosswardein, was a famous healer on the continent; the Mormons and Irvingites were prominent among English-speaking peoples; in the last quarter of the 19th century faith healing became popular in London, and Bethshan homes were opened in 1881, and since then it has found many adherents in England.

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  • Meanwhile, in America the Puritan tradition, adapted to the new conditions, is represented by Cotton Mather, and later by Jonathan Edwards, the greatest preacher of his time and country.

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  • He was Puritan to the core, with a tenacious memory, a strength of will bordering upon obstinacy, and a want of sympathy with human nature.

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  • The remarkable junction or fusion of the Independents or " Separatists " who emigrated from Leiden to Plymouth, Massachusetts, with the Puritan Nonconformists of Massachusetts Bay, modified Independency by the introduction of positive fraternal relations among the churches.

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  • The pamphlets were printed at a secret press established by John Penry, a Welsh puritan, with the help of the printer Robert Waldegrave, about midsummer 1588, for the issue of puritan literature forbidden by the authorities.

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  • CHADERTON, LAURENCE (?1536-1640), Puritan divine, was born at Lees Hall, in the parish of Oldham, Lancashire, probably in September 1536, being t41e second son of Edmund Chaderton, Scale, 1:3,350,000 o lo Miles 50 to ...mostly a gentleman of an ancient and wealthy family, and a zealous Catholic. Under the tuition of Laurence Vaux, a priest, he became an able scholar.

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  • His last days were harassed by the diatribes of the Puritan preacher, Francis Cheynell.

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  • John Hales (1584-1656); Edmund Calamy (1600-1666); the Cambridge Platonist, Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1685); Richard Baxter (1615-1691); the puritan John Owen (1616-1683); the philosophical Ralph Cudworth (1617-1688); Archbishop Leighton (1611-1684) - each of these holds an eminent position in the records of pulpit eloquence, but all were outshone by the gorgeous oratory and art of Jeremy Taylor (1613-1667), who is the most illustrious writer of sermons whom the British race has produced.

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  • Both sexes dressed with Puritan plainness; husbands and wives quitted their homes for convents; marriage became an awful and scarcely permitted rite; mothers suckled their own babes; and persons of all ranks - nobles, scholars and artists - renounced the world to assume the Dominican robe.

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  • He was a man happy in his ancestry; he inherited the dignity, the reserve, the keen and vivid intellect, and the picturesque imagination of the French Huguenot, though they came to him chastened and purified by generations of Puritan discipline exercised under the gravest ecclesiastical disabilities, and of culture maintained in the face of exclusion from academic privileges.

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  • Oliver was born on the 25th of April 1599, was educated under Dr Thomas Beard, a fervent puritan, at the free school at Huntingdon, and on the 23rd of April 1616 matriculated as a fellow-commoner at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, then a hotbed of puritanism, subsequently studying law in London.

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  • For the promulgation of these views, which were confessedly at variance with the doctrines of the standards of the national church of Scotland, he was summoned (1726) before his presbytery, where in the course of the investigations which followed he affirmed still more explicitly his belief that "every national church established by the laws of earthly kingdoms is antichristian in its constitution and persecuting in its spirit," and further declared opinions upon the subject of church government which amounted to a repudiation of Presbyterianism and an acceptance of the puritan type of Independency.

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  • With all the Puritan eagerness to push a clear, uncompromising, Scripture-based distinction of right and wrong into the affairs of every-day life, he has a thoroughly English horror of casuistry, and his clumsy canons consequently make wild work with the infinite intricacies of human nature.

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  • There had been various minor expeditions during the few years since Smith was on the coast before this company, in the Puritan interests, had sent over John Endecott with a party in 1628 to what is now Salem.

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  • As a churchman he is typically Anglican, equally removed from the Puritan and the Roman positions.

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  • This comes out in the writings both of Robinson and of Henry Jacob, both of whom passed gradually from Puritanism to Separatism at a time when the silencing of some 300 Puritan clergy by the Canons of 1604, and the exercise of the royal supremacy under Archbishop Bancroft, brought these " brethren of the Second Separation " into closer relations with the earlier Separatists.

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  • It has been calculated that in the period 1620-1640 upwards of 22,000 Puritan emigrants (the figures have been placed as high as 50,000) sailed from British and Dutch ports.

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  • The fact seems to be that intellectual speculation was as strong in America as in Puritan England; the assumption that the inhibition of its expression was good seems wholly gratuitous, and contrary to general convictions underlying modern freedom of speech.

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  • Far otherwise was it with the church which was formed originally at Gainsborough (?1602), by " professors " trained under zealous Puritan clergy in the district where Nottinghamshire, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire meet, but which about 1606 reorganized itself for reasons of convenience into two distinct churches, meeting at Gainsborough and in Scrooby Manor House.

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  • A puritan may go to his brown-bread crust with as gross an appetite as ever an alderman to his turtle.

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  • Locke went far to unite in a higher principle elements in the broad Anglican and the Puritan theories, while he recognized the individual liberty of thought which distinguishes the national church of England.

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  • The bishops' Interpretations and Further Considerations, issued in 1560, tolerated a lower vestiarian standard than was prescribed by the rubric of 1559; the Advertisements, which Parker published in 1566, to check the Puritan descent, had to appear without specific royal sanction; and the Reformatio legum ecclesiasticarum, which Foxe published with Parker's approval, received neither royal, parliamentary nor synodical authorization.

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  • The Federal Street theatre-the first regular theatrewas established in 1794, the old Puritan feeling having had its natural influence in keeping Boston behind New York and Philadelphia in this respect.

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  • Impressed by the formalism and deadness of contemporary Christianity (of which there is much evidence in the confessions of the Puritan writers themselves) he emphasized the importance of repentance and personal striving after the truth.

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  • 1618), Puritan author, and of William Erbury, sometime vicar of St Mary's in the town, who, with his curate, Walter Cradock,were among the founders of Welsh nonconformity.

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  • of the Cochecho Falls; the present name was adopted in 1639, and with the development of manufacturing and trading interests the population gradually removed nearer the falls; Hilton and his followers were Anglicans, but in 1633 they were joined by several Puritan families under Captain Thomas Wiggin, who settled on Dover Neck (1 m.

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  • Though indeed we might look nearer home than the Talmud for similar absurdities; most Puritan communities could furnish strange freaks of Sabbatarian casuistry.

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  • He was also deprived of his prebend, probably as being a married man, before May 1554, and sought refuge at Strassburg and Frankfort, where he developed puritan and almost presbyterian views.

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  • Thenceforth 4 The opposite of this external Independency, admission of civil oversight even for churches enjoying internal ecclesiastical selfgovernment, was also common, being the outcome of the traditional Puritan attitude to the state.

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  • It is in answer to A Defence of the Government established in the Church of Englande, by Dr. John Bridges, dean of Salisbury, itself a reply to earlier puritan works, and besides attacking the episcopal office in general assails certain prelates with much personal abuse.

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  • The more important tracts have been reprinted by Petheram in his series of Puritan Discipline Tracts (1842-1860), in Arber's English Scholar's Library (1879-1880), in R.

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  • From New England, as has been seen, Puritan settlers established Presbyterian churches (or churches which immediately became Presbyterian) in Long Island, on New Jersey, and in South Carolina; but the Puritans who remained in New England usually established Congregational churches.

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  • Its immediate occasion was the disputation at Heidelberg (1568) for the doctorate of theology by George Wither or Withers, an English Puritan (subsequently archdeacon of Colchester), silenced (1565) at Bury St Edmunds by Archbishop Parker.

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  • Mecca itself was taken; plundering was forbidden, but the tombs of the saints and all objects of veneration were ruthlessly destroyed, and all ceremonies which seemed in the eye of the stern puritan conqueror to suggest the taint of idolatry were forbidden.

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  • Reared in a Puritan atmosphere, he has graphically described the mystical experience which, coming to him in his early youth, changed his whole conception of theology and determined his choice of the ministry.

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  • Puritan's Pride Vitamins has excellent consumer reviews on most major websites.

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  • Puritan's Pride does indeed offer low prices.

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  • Theword "prelacy," meaning no more originally than the office and dignity of a prelate, came to be applied in Presbyterian Scotland and Puritan England - especially during the 17th century - to the episcopal form of church government, being used in a..

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  • Contrary to the Puritan teaching of the time, they insisted on the possibility, in this life, of complete victory over sin.

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  • In New York City, Francis Doughty preached to Puritan Presbyterians in 1643; in 1650 he was succeeded by Richard Denton (1586-1662).

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  • Bishop Williams, a kinsman of Cromwell's, relates at this time that he was "a common spokesman for sectaries, and maintained their part with great stubbornness"; and his earliest extant letter (in 1635) is an appeal for subscriptions for a puritan lecturer.

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  • revolt against some of its fundamental principles which was led by the Puritan reaction.5 Now that the smoke of these controversies has passed away, it is possible to form a clearer judgment upon the merits of the patristic writings.

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  • Parker was therefore left to stem the rising tide of Puritan feeling with little support from parliament, convocation or the Crown.

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  • The government of the Jurisdiction was of the strictest Puritan type, and although the forty-five "blue laws" which the Rev. Samuel Peters, in his General History of Connecticut, ascribed to New Haven were much confused with the laws of the other New England colonies and some were mere inventions, yet many of them, and others equally "blue," were actually in operation as enactments or as court decisions in New Haven.

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  • Disputes about vestments had expanded into a controversy over the whole field of Church government and authority, and Parker died on the 17th of May, 1575, lamenting that Puritan ideas of "governance" would "in conclusion undo the queen and all others that depended upon her."

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  • Population.-Up to the War of Independence the population was not only American, but it was in its ideas and standards essentially Puritan; modern liberalism, however, has introduced new standards of social life.

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  • In England the rivalry was not between Catholic and Reformer, but between Anglican and Nonconformist, or, if we may use the wide but less correct term, Puritan.

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  • Dowden, Puritan and Anglican (1901); J.

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  • WILLIAM COLLINS WHITNEY (1841-1904), American political leader and financier, was born at Conway, Massachusetts, on the 15th of July 1841, of Puritan stock.

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  • The town was governed largely after the Mosaic law and continued essentially Puritan for fifty years or more; about 1730 Presbyterianism superseded Congregationalism, and in 1734 Colonel Josiah Ogden, having caused a schism in the preceding year, by saving his wheat one dry Sunday in a wet season, founded with several followers the first Episcopal or Church of England Society in Newark - Trinity Church.

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  • He was deeply read in Puritan divinity, and adopted Sabellian doctrines on the Trinity.

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  • Harsnett was no favourite with the Puritan community, and Charles I.

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  • The Puritan lecturers were suppressed.

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  • He showed great hostility to the Puritan sabbath and supported the reissue of the Book of Sports, especially odious to that party, and severely reprimanded Chief Justice Richardson for his interference with the Somerset wakes.

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  • This was the source of his intense dislike of the Puritan and Nonconformist conception of the church, which afforded no tangible or definite form.

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  • Finally, the lord proprietor was deprived of his government from 1654 to 1658 in obedience to instructions from parliament which were originally intended to affect only Virginia, but were so modified, through the influence of Claiborne and some Puritan exiles from Virginia who had settled in Maryland, as to apply also to " the plantations within Chesapeake Bay."

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  • She hardly rivalled Lady Jane Grey as the ideal Puritan maiden, but she swam with the stream, and was regarded as a foil to her stubborn Catholic sister.

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  • and next year received a place at court, where he had a reputation for Puritan austerity.

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  • It is observable also that they were chosen without reference to party, at least as many of the Puritan clergy as of the opposite party being placed on the committees.

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  • Serious dissensions had already arisen between Puritan and Anglican factions in Dover, and Captain John Underhill, another Antinomian, became for a time a leader of the Puritan faction.

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  • Puritan Massachusetts was naturally hostile to the Antinomians at Exeter as well as to the Anglicans at Strawberry Banke.

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  • The heirs of Mason protested, but little was done about the matter during the period of Puritan ascendancy in the mother country.

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  • In his professional capacity, his attitude was correct enough; and, indeed, his anxiety for the French alliance and for the marriage between Elizabeth and Anjou led him to suggest concessions to Anjou's Catholic susceptibilities which came strangely from so staunch a Puritan.

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  • Paulding; and The Puritan and his Daughter (1849).

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  • So also the immigration of French Canadians and of Irish explains the fact that in every state of one-time Puritan New England the Roman Catholics were a majority over Protestants and all other churches.

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  • strong, stern, able, devoted woman of the old Puritan school, Calvinist in religion, unsparing of herself and others, rigid in her ideas of duty, proud, reserved and ungracious.

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  • BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WADE (1800-1878), American statesman, was born near Springfield, Massachusetts, on the 27th of October 1800, of Puritan ancestry.

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  • A smouldering and growing Puritan discontent with the Prayer Book, suppressed with a firm hand under Queen Elizabeth, burst out into a flame on the accession of King James I.

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  • As a result the king summoned a conference of leading Puritan divines, and of bishops and other leading Anglican divines, which met under his presidency at Hampton Court in January 1604.

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  • The objections raised from the Nonconformist point of view were numerous and varied, but they were thoroughly discussed between the first meeting on the 15th of April and the last on the 24th of July 1661; the bishops agreeing to meet the Puritan wishes on a few minor points but on none of fundamental importance.

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  • Their general tendency was distinctly in a Catholic as opposed to a Puritan direction, and the two thousand Puritan incumbents who vacated their benefices on St Bartholomew's Day rather than accept the altered Prayer Book bear eloquent testimony to that fact.

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  • He was consulted a good deal by the government on such questions as England's attitude towards the council of Trent, and political considerations made him more and more hostile to Puritan demands with which he had previously sympathized.

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  • RICHARD ALLEINE (1611-1681), English Puritan divine, was born at Ditcheat, Somerset, where his father was rector.

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  • Amongst the most eminent of its missionaries was the celebrated John Eliot, the Puritan minister of Roxbury, Massachusetts, who, encouraged and financially assisted by Boyle, brought out the Bible in the Indian language in 1661-1664.

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  • Coaxdon House, the birthplace in 1602 of Sir Symonds d'Ewes, the Puritan historian, is about 2 m.

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  • He showed also great severity in the prosecution of the Roman Catholic priests, and favoured the Anabaptists and the extreme Puritan sects to the disadvantage of the moderate Presbyterians, exciting great and general discontent, a petition being finally sent in for his recall.

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  • RICHARD BAXTER (1615-1691), English puritan divine, called by Dean Stanley "the chief of English Protestant Schoolmen," was born at Rowton, in Shropshire, at the house of his maternal grandfather, in November (probably the 12th) 1615.

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  • Gardiner's Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution (Oxford, 1899).

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  • JOHN TILLOTSON (1630-1694), English archbishop, was the son of a Puritan clothier in Sowerby, Yorkshire, where he was born in October 1630.

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  • Thus early was he brought into contact with the aggressive Puritan spirit.

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  • No Puritan nonconformist name is so affectionately cherished as is that of Joseph Alleine.

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  • Although not strictly Puritan the character of Salem was not essentially different from that of the other Massachusetts towns.

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  • WILLIAM FULKE (1538-1589), Puritan divine, was born in London and educated at Cambridge.

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  • As a Puritan controversialist he was remarkably active; in 1580 the bishop of Ely appointed him to defend puritanism against the Roman Catholics, Thomas Watson, ex-bishop of Lincoln (1513-1584), and John Feckenham, formerly abbot of Westminster, and in 1581 he was one of the disputants with the Jesuit, Edmund Campion, while in 1582 he was among the clergy selected by the privy council to argue against any papist.

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  • The great Puritan hero was a man after his own heart, and the portrait drawn by so sympathetic a writer is not only intensely vivid, but a very effective rehabilitation of misrepresented character.

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  • JOHN PENRY (1559-1593), Welsh Puritan, was born in Brecknockshire in 1559; tradition points to Cefn Brith, a farm near Llangammarch, as his birthplace.

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  • He matriculated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, in December 1580, being then almost certainly a Roman Catholic; but soon became a convinced Protestant, with strong Puritan leanings.

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  • JOHN WINTHROP (1588-1649), a Puritan leader and governor of Massachusetts, was born in Edwardston, Suffolk, on the 12th of January (O.S.) 1588, the son of Adam Winthrop of Groton Manor, and Anne (Browne) Winthrop. In December 1602 he matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge, but he did not graduate.

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  • Meanwhile he passed through the deep spiritual experiences characteristic of Puritanism, and made wide acquaintance among the leaders of the Puritan party.

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  • On the 10th of October following he was chosen governor of the "Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England," and sailed in the "Arbella" in March 1630, reaching Salem (Mass.) on the 12th of June (O.S.), accompanied by a large party of Puritan immigrants.

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  • In 1617 Virginia fell into the hands of a rigid Puritan, Captain Samuel Argall.

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  • Richard Bennett, a Puritan from Maryland, now ruled the province.

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  • Bennett and his Puritan successors, Edward Digges and Samuel Mathews, made no serious change in the administration of the colony except to extend greatly the elective franchise.

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  • HENRY AIRAY (1560?-1616), English Puritan divine, was born at Kentmere, Westmorland, but no record remains of the date of either birth or baptism.

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  • Upon the downfall of the Puritan Commonwealth in the mother country (1660) numerous grievances were presented to King Charles II.

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  • against the Puritan governments of New England, among them Massachusetts' extension of its jurisdiction over the towns of Maine and New Hampshire, the persecution of the Quakers, and the denial of the right of appeal to the crown, and in 1664 a royal commission, consisting of Richard Nicolls, Samuel Maverick, Robert Carr and George Cartwright, was sent over to settle disputes and secure some measure of imperial control, but Massachusetts, the chief offender; successfully baffled all attempts at interference, and the mission was almost a complete failure.

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  • Doyle, The Puritan Colonies (2 vols., New York, 1889); B.

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  • Osgood, The American Colonies in the Seventeenth Century (3 vols., New York, 1904-1907); John Fiske, The Beginnings of New England, or the Puritan Theocracy in its Relation to Civil and Religious Liberty (Boston, 1896); S.

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  • She was a woman of considerable culture, well skilled in the classical studies of the period, and a warm adherent of the Reformed or Puritan Church.

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  • Of these two Puritan divines, Vicar Prichard, who was essentially orthodox in his behaviour, forms an interesting connecting link between the learned Elizabethan translators of the Bible and the great revivalists of the 18th century, and his moral rhymes in the vernacular, collected and printed after his death under the title of The Welshman's Candle (Canwyll y Cymry), still retain some degree of popularity amongst his countrymen.

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  • At the Restoration all the ejected clergy who survived were reinstated in their old benefices under the Act of Uniformity of 1662, whilst certain Puritan incumbents were in their turn dismissed for refusing to comply with various requirements of that act.

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  • (Cambridge, 1885); Barrett Wendell, Cotton Mather, the Puritan Priest (New York, 1891), a remarkably sympathetic study and particularly valuable for its insight into (and its defence of) Mather's attitude toward witchcraft; Abijah P. Marvin, The Life and Times of Cotton Mather (Boston, 1892); 1VI.

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  • And looking back upon that course afterwards, he records with much complacency how his earliest St Andrews sermon built up a whole fabric of aggressive Protestantism upon Puritan theory, so that his startled hearers muttered, "Others sned (snipped) the branches; this man strikes at the root."

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  • Christopher Goodman (c. 1520-1603) and he, with other exiles, began there the Puritan tradition, and prepared the earlier English version of the Bible, "the household book of the English-speaking nations" during the great age of Elizabeth.

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  • The use of " wax lights and tapers " formed one of the indictments brought by P. Smart, a Puritan prebendary of Durham, against Dr Burgoyne, Cosin and others for setting up " superstitious ceremonies " in the cathedral " contrary to the Act of Uniformity."

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  • One of Ames's sermons became historical in the Puritan controversies.

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  • It ably sums up the issues between the Puritan school and that of Hooker.

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  • DUDLEY FENNER (c. 1558-1587), English puritan divine, was born in Kent and educated at Cambridge University.

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  • ROBERT ABBOT (1588?-1662?), English Puritan divine.

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  • Yet, Puritan though he was, he was extremely and often unfairly antagonistic to Nonconformists.

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  • He had assistance from two clerics of widely differing opinions - from Edmund Grindal, who was later, as archbishop of Canterbury, to maintain his Puritan convictions in opposition to Elizabeth; and from John Aylmer, afterwards one of the bitterest opponents of the Puritan party.

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  • His work had rendered great service to the government, and he might have had high preferment in the Church but for the Puritan views which he consistently maintained.

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  • EDWARD LEIGH (1602-1671), English Puritan and theologian, was born at Shawell, Leicestershire.

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  • Moreover, Puritan Massachusetts, which was naturally hostile to the Anglicanism of Gorges and his followers, interpreted her charter so as to make her northern boundary run east and west from a point 3 m.

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  • Among them were some of those men of mark who made the backbone of the American character: the sturdy Puritan, Peter Bulkeley, sometime rector of Odell in Bedfordshire, and afterward pastor of the church in the wilderness at Concord, New Hampshire; the zealous evangelist, Father Samuel Moody of Agamenticus in Maine, who pursued graceless sinners even into the alehouse; Joseph Emerson of Malden, "a heroic scholar," who prayed every night that no descendant of his might ever be rich; and William Emerson of Concord, Mass., the patriot preacher, who died while serving in the army of the Revolution.

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  • But the spirit in which Emerson conceived the laws of life, reverenced them and lived them out, was the Puritan spirit, elevated, enlarged and beautified by the poetic temperament.

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  • He is the historian of the Puritan revolution, and has written its history in a series of volumes, originally published under different titles, beginning with the accession of James I.; the seventeenth (the third volume of the History of the Commonwealth and Protectorate) appeared in Igor.

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  • He was perhaps drawn to the Puritan period by the fact of his descent from Cromwell and Ireton, but he has certainly written of it with no other purpose than to set forth the truth.

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  • Among the more noteworthy of Gardiner's separate works are: Prince Charles and the Spanish Marriage (2 vols., London, 1869); Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution, 1625-1660 (1st ed., Oxford, 1889; 2nd ed., Oxford, 1899); Oliver Cromwell (London, 1901); What Gunpowder Plot was (London, 1897); Outline of English History (1st ed., London, 1887; 2nd ed., London, 1896); and Student's History of England (2 vols., 1st ed., London, 1890-1891; 2nd ed., London, 1891-1892).

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  • These " bodily effects," he insisted, were not " distinguishing marks " of the work of the'Spirit of God; but so bitter was the feeling against the revival in the more strictly Puritan churches that in 1742 he was forced to write a second apology, Thoughts on the Revival in New England, his main argument being the great moral improvement of the country.

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  • His father was Stephen Longfellow, a lawyer and United States congressman, and his mother, Zilpha Wadsworth, a descendant of John Alden and of "Priscilla, the Puritan maiden."

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  • The Faraizis or Puritan sect of Mahommedans are exceedingly numerous in the district.

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  • The years of John's boyhood were those during which the Puritan spirit was in the highest vigour all over England; and nowhere had that spirit more influence than in Bedfordshire.

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  • He probably did more than any other man in America to lead the Puritan churches from a faith which regarded God as a moral governor, the Bible as a book of laws, and religion as obedience to a conscience to a faith which regards God as a father, the Bible as a book of counsels, and religion as a life of liberty in love.

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  • Incidentally, the fact becomes plain that this section is composed from the standpoint of Asia Minor and Syria, that it dates from soon after the time of Maximin (235-38) and Decius (249-51), and that it springs from a Christian community of a strictly puritan type.

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  • Left an orphan when five years old, he was placed by his guardian under the care of the Puritan vicar of Wotton-under-Edge, with whom he remained till he attained his sixteenth year, when he entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford.

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  • Speaking broadly the development was from rigour to indulgence, and the three schisms referred to voiced the protests of the puritan minority.

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  • But the church was thereby involved in a double conflict; for while on the one hand the Novatianist schism represents the puritan outcry against such laxity, on the other the martyrs (not indeed for the first time) claimed a position above church law, and gave trouble by issuing libelli pacis, i.e.

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  • Men were ready to shout applause in honor of Puritan martyrs like Prynne, Burton and Bastwick, whose ears were cutoff in 1637, or in honor of the lawyers who argued such a case as that of Hampden.

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  • The other side, which had the majority by a few votes, wished to see the Puritan creed prevail in all its strictness, and were favorable to the establishment of the Presbyterian discipline.

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  • The Long Parliament of the Restoration met in 1661, and the Act of Uniformity ~ntirely excludeci all idea of reform in the Puritan direction, md ordered the expulsion from their benefices of all clergymen who refused to express approval of the whole of the Book of Common Prayer (1662).

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  • After the Puritan army had been disbanded, the king resolved to keep on foot a petty force of 5000 men, and he had much difficulty in providing for it out of a revenue which had not been intended by those who voted it to be used for such a purpose.

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  • In 1680 twenty years had passed since the Puritan army had been disbanded.

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  • But the memory of the high-handed proceedings of Puritan rulers was still too recent to allow Englishmen to run the risk of a reimposition of their yoke, and this feeling, fanciful as it was, was sufficient to keep the Test Act in force for years to come.

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  • having been brought up in firm belief that she would succeed to the crown," as limited in means, of the Puritan persuasion, and very proud, insisting on a precedence over the princesses, though ordered back by the master of the ceremonies and in consequence being expelled from the court.

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  • Goodwin, John Goodwin (an early Arminian); for learning, John Lightfoot; for genius, John Milton; for literary and devotional power, John Bunyanalways admirable except when he talks Puritan dogma.

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  • A Puritan settlement was made here in 1634.

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  • The elder Locke, a strict but genial Puritan, by whom the son was carefully educated at home, was engaged in the military service of the parliamentary party.

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  • In 1652 he entered Christ Church, Oxford, then under John Owen, the Puritan dean and vice-chancellor of the university.

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  • He had a more modest estimate of human resources for forming true judgments in religion, and a less pronounced opinion of the immorality of religious error, than either the Catholic or the Puritan.

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  • But Locke accepted Holy Scripture as infallible with the reverence of a Puritan.

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  • Its effects are most clearly seen in Scotland, in Puritan England and in the New England states, but its influence was and is felt among peoples that have little desire or claim to be called Calvinist.

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  • In Merrick Park, adjoining the City Library, there is St Gaudens's famous statue of "The Puritan," commemorative of Deacon Samuel Chapin, one of the early settlers of the city.

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  • (154 dward 7- Sir Edward Bellingham, a Puritan soldier whose 155.3).

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  • From 1639 to 1655 the show disappeared owing to Puritan opposition.

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  • Lord Willoughby of Parham was a prominent Parliamentary leader, and the Isle of Axholme and the Puritan yeomanry of Holland declared for the parliament.

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  • FRANCIS ROUS (1579-1659), English Puritan, was born at Dittisham in Devon in 1579, and educated at Oxford (Broadgates Hall, afterwards Pembroke College) and at Leiden, graduating at the former in January 1596-97, and at the latter thirteen months afterwards.

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  • Annapolis, at first called Providence, was settled in 1649 by Puritan exiles from Virginia.

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  • 1 A third Puritan settlement was established in 1635 at the mouth of the Connecticut river, under the auspices of an English company whose leading members were William Fiennes, Lord Say and Sele (1582-1662) and Robert Greville, Lord Brooke (1608-1643).

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  • 1657), a member of the company, arrived, and as immigration from England soon afterwards greatly declined on account of the Puritan Revolution, he sold the colony to Connecticut in 1644.

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  • Why, then, would a Puritan like Bunyan write allegory at all?

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  • An old Puritan says, ' A stick in the water looks crooked.

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  • He talked like a Puritan about the Sabbath; and then he had a crucifix in his room.

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  • eccentricitynew, of course, that St. Clare had some of the eccentricities of puritan piety.

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  • The Puritan believed only in congregational baptism and would not necessarily baptize a dying child believing in the efficacy of prevenient grace.

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  • The army called for a new Parliament of Puritan saints, who proved as inept as the Rump.

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  • inflamed by puritan passions.

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  • The hero visits this church, which he finds " plain enough and bare enough to please a Puritan " .

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  • On religious matters between the founder of the Friends and the great Puritan there was a deep division.

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  • The old Puritan said: ' Crosses and losses are to be expected ' .

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  • To be considered thriller and feels that rigid Puritan.

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  • Puritan ethics.

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  • Puritan community.

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  • Puritan disgust with whole new legs trigger the most.

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  • Puritan preacher in Wales.

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  • Puritan divine and educational writer, was educated at Christ's College, Cambridge.

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  • Puritan ministers visited both Savage and Butler in the condemned cells in the run up to their hangings.

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  • In 1577, the year that prophesyings were suppressed by the Privy Council, the strongly Puritan William Jennings was appointed vicar.

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  • Yet David Hillman also bequeathed his sons an almost Puritan sense of duty.

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  • Labor makes the Tories 18 years in government look positively Puritan.

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  • A man like that might personally be rather puritanical; but he would never call it being a Puritan.

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  • Object to weekday and holy day services (because the puritan was a strict Sabbatarian ).

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  • He joined the separatists, a Puritan religious group who were highly critical of the Church of England.

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  • Contemporary Puritan writers in the Marprelate tracts allude to Dr John Bridges, dean of Salisbury, author of A Defence of the Government of the Church of England, as the reputed author of Gammer Gurton's Needle, but he obviously could not be properly described as "Mr S."

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  • He subsequently settled in London, where he joined the Puritan congregation of the Rev. John Davenport, whom he had known since boyhood.

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  • The fight lasted in all some ten years; but Collier had right on his side, and triumphed; his position was, moreover, strengthened by the fact that he was known as a Troy and high churchman, and that his attack could not, therefore, be assigned to Puritan rancour against the stage.

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  • In 1628 he was returned to parliament as member for the borough, and on the 11th of February 1629 he spoke in support of puritan doctrine, complaining of the attempt by the king to silence Dr Beard, who had raised his voice against the "flat popery" inculcated by Dr Alabaster at Paul's Cross.

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  • It is true that Puritan austerity and the lack of any strong central authority after Oliver's death produced a reaction which temporarily restored Charles's dynasty to the throne; but it is not less true that the execution of the king, at a later time when all over Europe absolute monarchies "by divine right" were being established on the ruins of the ancient popular constitutions, was an object lesson to all the world; and it produced a profound effect, not only in establishing constitutional monarchy in Great Britain after James II., with the dread of his father's fate before him, had abdicated by flight, but in giving the impulse to that revolt against the idea of "the divinity that doth hedge a king" which culminated in the Revolution of 1789, and of which the mighty effects are still evident in Europe and beyond.

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  • Most of these ordinances were subsequently confirmed by parliament, and, "on the whole, this body of dictatorial legislation, abnormal in form as it is, in substance was a real, wise and moderate set of reforms."' His ordinances for the "Reformation of Manners," the product of the puritan spirit, had but a transitory effect.

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  • The volumes have not appeared in chronological order of subject, but form a nearly complete colonial history, as follows: The Discovery of America, with some Account of Ancient America, and the Spanish Conquest (1892, 2 vols.); Old Virginia and her Neighbours (1897, 2 vols.); The Beginnings of New England; or, The Puritan Theocracy in its Relations to Civil and Religious Liberty (1889); Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America (1899); The American Revolution (1891, 2 vols.); and The Critical Period of American History, 1783-1789 (1888).

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  • From his New England Puritan mother, from his Scottish grandmother, from his Jersey-American grandfather and from his remoter French ancestry Thoreau inherited distinctive traits: the Saxon element perhaps predominated, but the " hauntings of Celtism " were prevalent and potent.

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  • His principal work is The English Colonies in America, in five volumes, as follows: Virginia, Maryland and the Carolinas (1 vol., 1882), The Puritan Colonies (2 vols., 1886), The Middle Colonies (1 vol., 1907), and The Colonies under the House of Hanover (i vol., 1907), the whole work dealing with the history of the colonies from 1607 to 1759.

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  • Byington, The Puritan in England and America (Bc,ston, 1896) and The Puritan as Colonist and Reformer (Boston, :899)..

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  • The northern or New England element began by endeavouring to establish a Puritan theocracy which broke down.

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  • But of organized churches we can trace none in England, until we come in 1586 to Greenwood and Barrow, the men whose devotion to a cause in which they felt the imperative call of God seems to have rallied into church-fellowship the Separatists in London, whether those of Fytz's day or those later convinced by the failure of the Puritan efforts at reform and by the writings of Browne.

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  • MARPRELATE CONTROVERSY, a war of pamphlets waged in 1588 and 1589 between a puritan writer who employed the pseudonym "Martin Marprelate" and defenders of the Established Church.

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  • At the same time the circumstances of the period, the fact that various schemes of union with Rome were abroad, that the missions of Panzani and later of Conn were gathering into the Church of Rome numbers of members of the Church of England who, like Laud himself, were dissatisfied with the Puritan bias which then characterized it, the incident mentioned by Laud himself of his being twice offered the cardinalate, the movement carried on at the court in favour of Romanism, and the fact that Laud's changes in ritual, however clearly defined and restricted in his own intention, all tended towards Roman practice, fully warranted the suspicions and fears of his contemporaries.

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  • In the orchard stands a tomb, that of the puritan Sir Robert Hutton (d.

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  • It is not in the Puritan direction, but intended to emphasize and to make more clear church doctrine and discipline, which in recent years had become obscured or decayed.

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  • He shut himself up in his study to wrestle with the Prussian Dryasdusts, whom he discovered to be as wearisome as their Puritan predecessors and more voluminous.

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  • The indictments were dismissed in 1628 by Sir James Whitelocke, chief justice of Chester and a judge of the King's Bench, and in 1629 by Sir Henry Yelverton, a judge of Common Pleas and himself a strong Puritan (see Hierurgia Anglicana, ii.

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  • WILLIAM AMES (1576-1633), English Puritan divine, better known, especially in Europe, as Amesius, was born of an ancient family at Ipswich, Suffolk, in 1576, and was educated at the local grammar school and at Christ's College, Cambridge, where, as throughout his life, he was an omnivorous student.

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  • It was formed by men who were fierce Puritan enthusiasts, and who for the very reason that the intensity of their religion separated them from the mass of their countrymen, had learnt to uphold with all the energy of zeal the doctrine that neither church nor state had a right to interfere with the forms of worship which each congregation might select for itself (see CONGREGATIONAL1SM and CROMWElL, OT.lvER).

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  • These early colonists had come to Massachusetts in the Puritan migration of 1630; their removal to Connecticut, in which they were led principally by Thomas Hooker, Roger Ludlow (c. 1590-1665) and John Haynes (d.

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  • Epiphanius tells of Audaeus of Mesopotamia and his followers, Puritan sectaries in the 4th century, who were orthodox except for this belief and for Quartodecimanism (see Easter).

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  • The hero visits this church, which he finds " plain enough and bare enough to please a puritan ".

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  • The old puritan said: ' Crosses and losses are to be expected '.

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  • To be considered thriller and feels that rigid puritan.

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  • The repression of sexuality leads to a puritan ethics.

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  • However, any association with Rome was totally unacceptable to the growing puritan community.

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  • He was probably, however, the first puritan preacher in Wales.

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  • John Brinsley, a puritan divine and educational writer, was educated at Christ 's College, Cambridge.

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  • In 1577, the year that prophesyings were suppressed by the Privy Council, the strongly puritan William Jennings was appointed vicar.

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  • Thomas Fuller (Church History) traces the earliest use of the term "Puritan" to 1564.

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  • The terms "Precisian," "Puritan," "Presbyterian," were all used by Archbishop Parker in his letters about this time as nicknames for the same party, and ten years later the name was in common use.

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  • Labor makes the Tories 18 years in government look positively puritan.

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  • A man like that might personally be rather Puritanical; but he would never call it being a Puritan.

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  • Object to weekday and holy day services (because the puritan was a strict Sabbatarian).

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  • He was a staunch puritan, and a member of the Suffolk committee for the prosecution of scandalous ministers under the Earl of Manchester.

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  • He joined the Separatists, a Puritan religious group who were highly critical of the Church of England.

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  • The larger bathing suits favored in the U.S. probably harken back to the Puritan founders of the country.

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  • Puritan's Pride Vitamins is a nutritional supplement company based in Oakdale, New York.

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  • Puritan's Pride has been in business over 50 years and today sells vitamins, supplements, herbs and more through mail order catalogs and a robust website.

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  • Puritan's Pride offers an astonishing array of vitamins, supplements, herbs, natural health products and more.

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  • From A to Zinc, Puritan's Pride has it all.

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  • Puritan's Pride also sells nutritional supplements, capitalizing on their role in health and their growing popularity.

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  • New research points to the benefit of foods, herbs and spices for health and wellness, and Puritan's Pride has been quick to offer consumers natural health products derived from herbs and food sources.

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  • Puritan's Pride sells various formulations for colon cleansing, detoxification, adrenal support, and more.

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