This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

purim

purim

purim Sentence Examples

  • if, as seems probable, the earlier Greek version of the Book of Esther was made about 179 B.C. (Swete, Introduction of the Old Testament in Greek, p. 25), this suggestion of the connexion of Purim with the Maccabean period made by Haupt and, before him, by Willrich, falls to the ground.

    1
    0
  • That one of the earlier dates is correct seems probable from the fact that the Falashas know nothing of either the Babylonian or Jerusalem Talmud, make no use of phylacteries (tefillin), and observe neither the feast of Purim nor the dedication of the temple.

    0
    0
  • i.: if " the feast " is read, a choice remains between Passover and Tabernacles (the definite article would not be very definite after all); if the more probable " a feast," the greater feasts are presumably excluded, but a choice remains between, at any rate, Pentecost (May), Trumpets (September), Dedication (December) and Purim (February).

    0
    0
  • Adar 13, 2 Fast of Esther, 8 In embolismic „ 14, Purim, years.

    0
    0
  • PURIM, a Jewish festival held on the 14th and 15th of Adar, the last month of the Jewish calendar.

    0
    0
  • According to Jewish tradition it is held in celebration of the deliverance of the Jews from the massacre plotted against them by their enemy Haman in the time of Artaxerxes, who fixed upon the former date by casting "lots" (= Hebrew loan-word Purim) .

    0
    0
  • Purim is the carnival of the Jewish year.

    0
    0
  • From the 17th century onward Purim plays were performed mostly by the children, who improvised a dramatic version of the story of Esther.

    0
    0
  • Scarcely more is to be said in favour of the suggestion made by Von Hammer; but better known in connexion with the name of Lagarde, who connects the name Purim with the old Zoroastrian festival of the dead, entitled Farwardigan.

    0
    0
  • variant of the Hebrew (4 poupal); but there is absolutely nothing about Purim which suggests any relation with a festival of the dead.

    0
    0
  • 157 seq.) connects Purim with the puchru or assembly of the gods, which forms part of the Babylonian New Year festival Zagmuku, but the inserted guttural is against the identification.

    0
    0
  • This etymological connexion, suggested by Jensen (Kosmologie, 84), brings the festival of Purim into close relation with the Babylonian New Year festival known as Zagmuku, in which one of the most prominent ceremonials was the celebration of the assembly of the gods under the presidency of Marduk (Merodach) for the purpose of determining the fates of the New Year.

    0
    0
  • 296 seq.) and others have suggested that the drunkenness and masquerading current at the period of Purim are directly derived from the general period of licence allowed at the Sacaea festival of the Babylonian New Year.

    0
    0
  • Even the fact that this latter was celebrated on the first of Nisan, or a fortnight after the Jewish date for Purim, is confirmed by the Book of Esther itself, which states that "In the first month, which is the month Nisan, they cast Pur, that is, the lot, before Haman" (Esther iii.

    0
    0
  • Frazer connects Purim with the whole series of spring festivals current in western Asia, in which the old god of vegetation was put to death and a new human representative of him elected and allowed to have royal and divine rights, so as to promote the coming harvest (Golden Bough, 2nd.

    0
    0
  • The death of the god, he suggests, is represented by the Fast of Esther on the 13th of Adar, the day before Purim, while the rejoicing on Purim itself, and the licence accompanying it, recall the union of the god and goddess of vegetation, of which he sees traces in the relations of Mordecai and Esther.

    0
    0
  • There may possibly be "survivals" of the influence of some such celebrations both on the Book of Esther and on the ceremonies of Purim, but there is absolutely no evidence that the Jews took over the interpretation of these festivals with their celebration.

    0
    0
  • Nor is there any record of royal privileges attaching to any person at the period of Purim such as occurs in the festivals with which it is supposed to be connected by Frazer.

    0
    0
  • His further suggestion, therefore, that the ironical crowning of Jesus with the crown of thorns and the inscription over the Cross, together with the selection of Barabbas, had anything to do with the feast of Purim, must be rejected.

    0
    0
  • The connexion of the Passion with the Passover rather than Purim would alone be sufficient to nullify the suggestion.

    0
    0
  • However, it is practically certain, both from the etymology of the word Purim and from the resemblance of the festivals, that the feast, as represented in the Book of Esther, was borrowed from the Persians, who themselves appeared to have adapted it from the Babylonians.

    0
    0
  • This renders it impossible to accept Haupt's suggestion that Purim is connected with the celebration of Nicanor's Day, to celebrate the triumph of Judas Maccabaeus over the Syrian general Nicanor at Adasa (161 B.C.) on the 13th of Adar, since this is the date of the Fast of Esther, and, besides, the Second Book of Maccabees, which refers to Nicanor's Day, speaks of it as the day before Mordecai's Day (2 Macc. xvi.

    0
    0
  • The date at which the feast of Purim was first adopted by the Jews from their Persian neighbours would be definitely determined if we knew the date of the Book of Esther.

    0
    0
  • vii.) that, in 416 A.D., the Jews of Inmester, a town in Syria, illtreated a Christian child during some Purim pranks and caused his death.

    0
    0
  • It has even been suggested that this gave rise to the myth of the blood accusation in which Jews are alleged to sacrifice a Christian child at Passover; but this is unlikely, since it has never been suggested that this crime was committed in connexion with Purim.

    0
    0
  • In connexion with Purim many quaint customs were introduced by the Jews of later times.

    0
    0
  • Besides gifts to friends, parents made Purim gifts to their children, especially in the form of Purim cakes.

    0
    0
  • In later days the same function was performed by the Purim Rabbi, who often indulged in parodies of the ritual.

    0
    0
  • With Purim is connected the only trace of a true folk-drama among Jews.

    0
    0
  • Thus the Jews of Cairo celebrated Purim on the 28th of Adar in memory of their being miraculously saved from the persecution of Ahmed Pasha in 1524.

    0
    0
  • The Jews of Frankfort celebrate their special Purim on the 10th of Adar because of their deliverance from persecution by Fettmilch in 1616.

    0
    0
  • Rabbi Enoch Altschul of Prague recorded his own escape on the 22nd of Tebet 1623 in a special roll or megillah, which was to be read by his family on that date with rejoicing similar to the general Purim.

    0
    0
  • David Brandeis of Jung-Bunzlau in Bohemia was saved from an accusation of poisoning on the 10th of Adar 1731, and instituted a similar family Purim celebration in consequence.

    0
    0
  • " Purim"; "Purim Plays," "Purims, Special"; W.

    0
    0
  • Erbt, Die Purimsage (Berlin, 1900); Abrahams, Jewish Life in the Middle Ages; Lagarde, Purim, ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Religion (Gottingen, 885); Steinschneider, Purim and Parodie (Berlin, 1902); P. Haupt, Purim (Leipzig, 1906); I.

    0
    0
  • (io) Megillah, " roll " (of Esther), the reading of it at Purim, &c. (11) Mo`ed gaton (" the small M," to distinguish it from the name of this order), or Mashkin (the first word), regulations for the intermediate festivals at Passover and Tabernacles.

    0
    0
  • Even the name of God is not once mentioned, perhaps from a dread of its profanation during the Saturnalia of Purim.

    0
    0
  • Following the real or fancied light of these names, Prof. Jensen holds that the Esther-legend is based on a mythological account of the victory of the Babylonian deities over those of Elam, which in plain prose means the deliverance of ancient Babylonia from its Elamite oppressors, and that such an account was closely connected with the Babylonian New Year's festival, called Zagmuk, just as the Esther-legend is connected with the festival of Purim.

    0
    0
  • (I) The Babylonian festival corresponding to Purim was not the spring festival of Zagmuk, but the summer festival of Ishtar, which is probably the Sacaea of Berossus, an orgiastic festival analogous to Purim.

    0
    0
  • " Purim, § 7), while agreeing with Winckler that the book is based on an earlier narrative, holds that that earlier text differed more widely from the present in its geographical and historical setting than Winckler seems to suppose.

    0
    0
  • The problem of the origin of the name Purim, however, can hardly be said to have received a final solution.

    0
    0
  • (1875), 14$-153; Lagarde, Purim (1887); Zimmern in Stade's Zeitschrift, xi.

    0
    0
  • Biblica, articles " Esther " and " Purim " (a composite article).

    0
    0
  • The last, which closes the book, tells of the institution of the feast of Purim.

    0
    0
  • Zimmern indeed connects the Akitu festival with 'that of Purim on the 15th Adar (March); see K.A.T.

    0
    0
  • That one of the earlier dates is correct seems probable from the fact that the Falashas know nothing of either the Babylonian or Jerusalem Talmud, make no use of phylacteries (tefillin), and observe neither the feast of Purim nor the dedication of the temple.

    0
    0
  • i.: if " the feast " is read, a choice remains between Passover and Tabernacles (the definite article would not be very definite after all); if the more probable " a feast," the greater feasts are presumably excluded, but a choice remains between, at any rate, Pentecost (May), Trumpets (September), Dedication (December) and Purim (February).

    0
    0
  • Adar 13, 2 Fast of Esther, 8 In embolismic „ 14, Purim, years.

    0
    0
  • PURIM, a Jewish festival held on the 14th and 15th of Adar, the last month of the Jewish calendar.

    0
    0
  • According to Jewish tradition it is held in celebration of the deliverance of the Jews from the massacre plotted against them by their enemy Haman in the time of Artaxerxes, who fixed upon the former date by casting "lots" (= Hebrew loan-word Purim) .

    0
    0
  • Purim is the carnival of the Jewish year.

    0
    0
  • From the 17th century onward Purim plays were performed mostly by the children, who improvised a dramatic version of the story of Esther.

    0
    0
  • Scarcely more is to be said in favour of the suggestion made by Von Hammer; but better known in connexion with the name of Lagarde, who connects the name Purim with the old Zoroastrian festival of the dead, entitled Farwardigan.

    0
    0
  • variant of the Hebrew (4 poupal); but there is absolutely nothing about Purim which suggests any relation with a festival of the dead.

    0
    0
  • 157 seq.) connects Purim with the puchru or assembly of the gods, which forms part of the Babylonian New Year festival Zagmuku, but the inserted guttural is against the identification.

    0
    0
  • This etymological connexion, suggested by Jensen (Kosmologie, 84), brings the festival of Purim into close relation with the Babylonian New Year festival known as Zagmuku, in which one of the most prominent ceremonials was the celebration of the assembly of the gods under the presidency of Marduk (Merodach) for the purpose of determining the fates of the New Year.

    0
    0
  • 296 seq.) and others have suggested that the drunkenness and masquerading current at the period of Purim are directly derived from the general period of licence allowed at the Sacaea festival of the Babylonian New Year.

    0
    0
  • Even the fact that this latter was celebrated on the first of Nisan, or a fortnight after the Jewish date for Purim, is confirmed by the Book of Esther itself, which states that "In the first month, which is the month Nisan, they cast Pur, that is, the lot, before Haman" (Esther iii.

    0
    0
  • Frazer connects Purim with the whole series of spring festivals current in western Asia, in which the old god of vegetation was put to death and a new human representative of him elected and allowed to have royal and divine rights, so as to promote the coming harvest (Golden Bough, 2nd.

    0
    0
  • The death of the god, he suggests, is represented by the Fast of Esther on the 13th of Adar, the day before Purim, while the rejoicing on Purim itself, and the licence accompanying it, recall the union of the god and goddess of vegetation, of which he sees traces in the relations of Mordecai and Esther.

    0
    0
  • There may possibly be "survivals" of the influence of some such celebrations both on the Book of Esther and on the ceremonies of Purim, but there is absolutely no evidence that the Jews took over the interpretation of these festivals with their celebration.

    0
    0
  • Nor is there any record of royal privileges attaching to any person at the period of Purim such as occurs in the festivals with which it is supposed to be connected by Frazer.

    0
    0
  • His further suggestion, therefore, that the ironical crowning of Jesus with the crown of thorns and the inscription over the Cross, together with the selection of Barabbas, had anything to do with the feast of Purim, must be rejected.

    0
    0
  • The connexion of the Passion with the Passover rather than Purim would alone be sufficient to nullify the suggestion.

    0
    0
  • However, it is practically certain, both from the etymology of the word Purim and from the resemblance of the festivals, that the feast, as represented in the Book of Esther, was borrowed from the Persians, who themselves appeared to have adapted it from the Babylonians.

    0
    0
  • This renders it impossible to accept Haupt's suggestion that Purim is connected with the celebration of Nicanor's Day, to celebrate the triumph of Judas Maccabaeus over the Syrian general Nicanor at Adasa (161 B.C.) on the 13th of Adar, since this is the date of the Fast of Esther, and, besides, the Second Book of Maccabees, which refers to Nicanor's Day, speaks of it as the day before Mordecai's Day (2 Macc. xvi.

    0
    0
  • if, as seems probable, the earlier Greek version of the Book of Esther was made about 179 B.C. (Swete, Introduction of the Old Testament in Greek, p. 25), this suggestion of the connexion of Purim with the Maccabean period made by Haupt and, before him, by Willrich, falls to the ground.

    0
    0
  • The date at which the feast of Purim was first adopted by the Jews from their Persian neighbours would be definitely determined if we knew the date of the Book of Esther.

    0
    0
  • vii.) that, in 416 A.D., the Jews of Inmester, a town in Syria, illtreated a Christian child during some Purim pranks and caused his death.

    0
    0
  • It has even been suggested that this gave rise to the myth of the blood accusation in which Jews are alleged to sacrifice a Christian child at Passover; but this is unlikely, since it has never been suggested that this crime was committed in connexion with Purim.

    0
    0
  • In connexion with Purim many quaint customs were introduced by the Jews of later times.

    0
    0
  • Besides gifts to friends, parents made Purim gifts to their children, especially in the form of Purim cakes.

    0
    0
  • In later days the same function was performed by the Purim Rabbi, who often indulged in parodies of the ritual.

    0
    0
  • With Purim is connected the only trace of a true folk-drama among Jews.

    0
    0
  • Davidson, Parody, pp. 2 7, 5 o, 199 Besides the general festival of Purim, various communities of Jews have instituted special local Purims to commemorate occasions when they have been saved from disaster.

    0
    0
  • Thus the Jews of Cairo celebrated Purim on the 28th of Adar in memory of their being miraculously saved from the persecution of Ahmed Pasha in 1524.

    0
    0
  • The Jews of Frankfort celebrate their special Purim on the 10th of Adar because of their deliverance from persecution by Fettmilch in 1616.

    0
    0
  • Rabbi Enoch Altschul of Prague recorded his own escape on the 22nd of Tebet 1623 in a special roll or megillah, which was to be read by his family on that date with rejoicing similar to the general Purim.

    0
    0
  • David Brandeis of Jung-Bunzlau in Bohemia was saved from an accusation of poisoning on the 10th of Adar 1731, and instituted a similar family Purim celebration in consequence.

    0
    0
  • " Purim"; "Purim Plays," "Purims, Special"; W.

    0
    0
  • Erbt, Die Purimsage (Berlin, 1900); Abrahams, Jewish Life in the Middle Ages; Lagarde, Purim, ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Religion (Gottingen, 885); Steinschneider, Purim and Parodie (Berlin, 1902); P. Haupt, Purim (Leipzig, 1906); I.

    0
    0
  • (io) Megillah, " roll " (of Esther), the reading of it at Purim, &c. (11) Mo`ed gaton (" the small M," to distinguish it from the name of this order), or Mashkin (the first word), regulations for the intermediate festivals at Passover and Tabernacles.

    0
    0
  • The Book of Esther, in the Bible, relates how a Jewish maiden, Esther, cousin and foster-daughter of Mordecai, was made his queen by the Persian king Ahasuerus (Xerxes) after he had divorced Vashti; next, how Esther and Mordecai frustrated Haman's endeavour to extirpate the Jews; how Haman, the grand-vizier, fell, and Mordecai succeeded him; how Esther obtained the king's permission for the Jews to destroy all who might attack them on the day which Haman had appointed by lot for their destruction; and lastly, how the feast of Purim (Lots ?) was instituted to commemorate their deliverance.

    0
    0
  • Even the name of God is not once mentioned, perhaps from a dread of its profanation during the Saturnalia of Purim.

    0
    0
  • His thesis (seldom defended now) was that Purim corresponds to Furdigan, the name of the old Persian New Year's and All Souls' festival held in spring, on which the Persians were wont to exchange presents (cf.

    0
    0
  • Following the real or fancied light of these names, Prof. Jensen holds that the Esther-legend is based on a mythological account of the victory of the Babylonian deities over those of Elam, which in plain prose means the deliverance of ancient Babylonia from its Elamite oppressors, and that such an account was closely connected with the Babylonian New Year's festival, called Zagmuk, just as the Esther-legend is connected with the festival of Purim.

    0
    0
  • (I) The Babylonian festival corresponding to Purim was not the spring festival of Zagmuk, but the summer festival of Ishtar, which is probably the Sacaea of Berossus, an orgiastic festival analogous to Purim.

    0
    0
  • " Purim, § 7), while agreeing with Winckler that the book is based on an earlier narrative, holds that that earlier text differed more widely from the present in its geographical and historical setting than Winckler seems to suppose.

    0
    0
  • The problem of the origin of the name Purim, however, can hardly be said to have received a final solution.

    0
    0
  • (1875), 14$-153; Lagarde, Purim (1887); Zimmern in Stade's Zeitschrift, xi.

    0
    0
  • Biblica, articles " Esther " and " Purim " (a composite article).

    0
    0
  • The last, which closes the book, tells of the institution of the feast of Purim.

    0
    0
  • Zimmern indeed connects the Akitu festival with 'that of Purim on the 15th Adar (March); see K.A.T.

    0
    0
  • On the left of the web page is a list of categories that include Purim, Shavuot, Chanukah and even cards with Jewish jokes.

    0
    0
  • Other fun days for dressing up include: Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter, Purim, Valentines, and St. Patrick's Day.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →