Pupils sentence example

pupils
  • Your pupils are different sizes.

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  • Your pupils are dilated.

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  • Black pupils swallowed the color of her eyes.

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  • Her large eyes were pinned to his, her pupils dilated and breathing quick.

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  • His pupils were contracted by the bright sunlight and his light green eyes contrasted sharply with his bronze tan.

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  • Every evening extracts from his great works, the Canon and the Sanatio, were dictated and explained to his pupils; among whom, when the lesson was over, he spent the rest of the night in festive enjoyment with a band of singers and players.

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  • Lalande were among his pupils.

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  • Her pupils dilated as he neared, her breath quickening.

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  • The pupils contracted in the sunlight, leaving large pools of blue iris.

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  • His eyes were glazed, his pupils large enough to swallow the color of his irises.

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  • He lifted Selyn's eyelids and shone a light to watch her pupils.

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  • As a teacher in the Persian school of Edessa he had translated, probably with the help of his pupils, certain works of " the Interpreter," i.e.

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  • All primary and some secondary public schools are controlled by provincial education boards elected by school committees of the parents of pupils.

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  • He corresponded with some of the most eminent scholars of his time on mathematical subjects; and his house was generally full of pupils from all quarters.

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  • The school revenues are derived from the sale and rental of public lands granted by Congress, and of the salt and swamp lands devoted by the state to such purposes, from a uniform levy of one mill on each dollar of taxable property in the state, from local levies (averaging 7.2 mills in township districts and 10.07 mills in separate districts in 1908), from certain fines and licences, and from tuition fees paid by non-resident pupils.

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  • He was one of the favourite pupils of Aedesius, and devoted himself mainly to the mystical side of Neoplatonism.

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  • He took paternal pride in the achievements of his pupils, and delighted to see, through them, his influence spreading in every university.

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  • Appointed superintendent of the cathedral school of his native city, he taught with such success as to attract pupils from all parts of France, and powerfully contributed to diffuse an interest in the study of logic and metaphysics, and to introduce that dialectic development of theology which is designated the scholastic. The earliest of his writings of which we have any record is an Exhortatory Discourse to the hermits of his district, written at their own request and for their spiritual edification.

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  • As early as 1831 an unsuccessful attempt was made to form an adequate public school fund; the first real effort to establish a common school system for the territory was made after 1835; in 1840 there were altogether 18 academies and 51 common schools, and in 1849 the state legislature made an appropriation in the interest of the public instruction of white pupils, and this was supplemented by the proceeds of land granted by the United States government for the same purpose.

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  • In 1852 Tallahassee established a public school; and in 1860 there were, according to a report of the United States census, 2032 pupils in the public schools of the state, and 4486 in " academies and other schools."

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  • His pupils were drawn not only from France and Normandy, but also from Gascony, Flanders, Germany and Italy.

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  • Among the more illustrious of his pupils may be mentioned South, Dryden, Locke, Prior and Bishop Atterbury.

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  • With Thomas Hill Green he founded in England a school of orthodox neo-Hegelianism, and through his pupils he exerted a farreaching influence on English philosophy and theology.

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  • The teachers numbered in 1920 2,015 in 133 grade schools and 494 in high schools, and the enrolment of pupils in grades was 74,654 and in high schools 12,169.

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  • There were in evening grades 198 teachers and 6,245 pupils, and in evening high schools 148 teachers and 5,090 pupils.

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  • The public-school system was supplemented by parochial schools which had in 1920 650 teachers and 33,000 pupils.

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  • In 1909 the number of missionaries (including wives) was 113; organized churches, 194; members and adherents, 21,085; schools, 135; pupils, 7042; hospitals and dispensaries, 17; patients treated, 6865; subscriptions raised from Friends in Great Britain and Ireland, £26,689, besides £3245 received in the fields of work.

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  • He died in 277 B.C. at the age of fifty-three, seven years before his master, who adopted his children and in his will commended them to the care of his pupils.

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  • As a little boy he would take his place among the pupils of the monastic school, though he would soon pass to the ranks of the teachers, and the fact that he was ordained deacon at nineteen, below the canonical age, shows that he was regarded as remarkable both for learning and goodness.

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  • The convent was suppressed by Duke Maurice in 1543, and was by him converted into a school (the Fiirsten Schule), one of the most renowned classical schools in Germany, which counts Lessing and Gellert among its former pupils.

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  • The average attendance of enrolled black and white pupils is practically identical, but the enrolment of whites (about 52% in 1902) is somewhat higher and that of the blacks about a third lower than their ratio in the population.

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  • Private schools, some of very high grade, draw many pupils.

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  • Promising pupils are frequently sent to Vienna University, with scholarships, which may be forfeited if the holders engage in political agitation.

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  • In this field Bechamp, Cohnheim, Albrecht Kossel, and, especially, Emil Fischer and his pupils have been extremely active.

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  • Casuistry came to the aid of average human nature - that is to say, pupils began to confront the master with hard cases taken from daily life.

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  • This, and allied alkaloids, have formed the subject of many investigations by Wyndham Dunstan and his pupils in England, and by Martin Freund and Paul Beck in Berlin.

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  • In 1912 in the corresponding area there were 98 secondary schools with 22,600 pupils, one per 26,000 inhabitants (in Germany one per 54,000).

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  • Appointed, in 1754, professor of geometry in the royal school of artillery, he formed with some of his pupils - for the most part his seniors - friendships based on community of scientific ardour.

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  • In expounding the principles of the differential calculus, he started, as it were, from the level of his pupils, and ascended with them by almost insensible gradations from elementary to abstruse conceptions.

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  • One of his pupils at Florence was the famous John Reuchlin.

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  • An incomplete return in 1891 gave 8 793 schools and 376,399 pupils.

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  • In 1759, after completing with his pupils a tour of two years' duration through Gottingen, Utrecht, Paris, Marseilles and Turin, he resigned his tutorship and settled at Augsburg.

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  • In 1902 there were in Hungary 18,729 elementary schools with 32,020 teachers, attended by 2,573,377 pupils, figures which compare favourably with those of 1877, when there were 15,486 schools with 20,717 teachers, attended by 1,559,636 pupils.

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  • The number of middle schools in 1902 was 243 with 4705 teachers, attended by 71,788 pupils; in 1880 their number was 185, attended by 40,747 pupils.

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  • The Polytechnicum in Budapest, founded in 1844, which contains four faculties and was attended in 1900 by 1772 pupils, is also considered a high school.

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  • Specially significant were the Memorandum addressed to the throne by 55 deputies of the Croat party of Right, in the Croatian, Bosnian, Dalmatian and Istrian Diets, and the political strike organized by the pupils of both sexes in almost all the middle schools of the Slavonic South.

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  • His true greatness can only be estimated by a consideration of the fact that he was a great teacher not only of human and comparative anatomy and zoology but also of physiology, and that nearly all the most distinguished German zoologists and physiologists of the period 1850 to 1870 were his pupils and acknowledged his leadership. The most striking feature about Johann Miller's work, apart from the comprehensiveness of his point of view, in which he added to the anatomical and morphological ideas of Cuvier a consideration of physiology, embryology and microscopic structure, was the extraordinary accuracy, facility and completeness of his recorded observations.

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  • At Reims he seems to have studied and lectured for many years, having amongst his pupils Hugh Capet's son Robert, afterwards king of France, and Richer, to whose history we owe almost every detail of his master's early life.

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  • Otric, suspecting that Gerbert erred in his classification of the sciences, sent one of his own pupils to Reims to take notes of his lectures, and, finding his suspicions correct, accused him of his error before Otto II.

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  • His Latin Grammar and Glossary 2 were written for his pupils after the two books of homilies.

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  • The primary school, in which the pupils learn only Chinese writing and the precepts of Confucius, stands at the base of this system.

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  • This law has been in force since about 1870, but on the 30th of June 1908 there were only 1150 public schools in the republic with a total enrolment of 35,777 pupils.

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  • In that year, however, Angelo Mai discovered in the Ambrosian library at Milan a palimpsest manuscript (and, later, some additional sheets of it in the Vatican), on which had been originally written some of Fronto's letters to his royal pupils and their replies.

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  • The letters consist of correspondence with Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, in which the character of Fronto's pupils appears in a very favourable light, especially in the affection they both seem to have retained for their old master; and letters to friends, chiefly letters of recommendation.

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  • Asclepiades had many pupils who adhered more or less closely to his doctrines, but it was especially one of them, Themison, who gave permanence to the teachings of his master by framing out of them, with some modifications, a new system of medical doctrine, and founding on this basis a school which lasted for some centuries in successful rivalry with the Hippocratic tradition, which, as we have seen, was up to that time the prevailing influence in medicine.

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  • Pupils flocked to him from all European countries; Germans are especially mentioned; a Polish student reported and published some of his lectures; and the Englishman Kaye was a zealous disciple, who does not, however, seem to have done anything towards transplanting this method of instruction to his own country.

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  • The Westminster Column, outside the entrance to Dean's Yard, was erected to the memory of the old pupils of Westminster School who died in the Russian and Indian wars of 1854-1859.

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  • Other institutions include higher elementary schools for pupils certified to be able to profit by higher instruction; and schools for blind, deaf and defective children.

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  • His co-professors were Louis Cappel and Josue de la Place, who also were Cameron's pupils.

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  • He was educated at the Malmesbury grammar school under Robert Latimer, who had numbered Thomas Hobbes among his earlier pupils, and at his schoolmaster's house Aubrey first met the philosopher about whom he was to leave so many curious and interesting details.

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  • It was then ascertained that there were 684 public schools with 14,133 pupils, and 1664 private schools with 8685 pupils.

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  • It is worthy of remark that of these schools 29 were Mahommedan, and that there were 176 schools for girls in which upwards of 2000 pupils were taught.

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  • There are 22 public elementary schools for boys and 18 for girls (education being compulsory and gratuitous), with about 20,000 pupils, and 56 private schools with 5700 pupils.

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  • Secondary education is provided by one higher and four lower technical schools with 1375 pupils, three ginnasii or lower classical schools, and three licei or higher classical schools, with moo pupils, and three training colleges with over 700 pupils.

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  • He soon gained recognition as a learned and successful teacher, and the younger Adalhard, St Anskar the apostle of Sweden, Odo bishop of Beauvais and Warinus abbot of Corvei in Saxony may be mentioned among the more distinguished of his pupils.

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  • See Robert Nisbet Bain, Pupils of Peter the Great (London, 1895), chaps.

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  • Soon men began to assist memory by making notes, and pupils sought to take written jottings of what they had heard from their teachers.

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  • Meanwhile one of his pupils, Barsumas, had settled at Nisibis in Persian territory where he became bishop in 435 and established a Nestorian school.

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  • According to Plato (Prot., 318 E), he endeavoured to communicate "prudence" (6130vXia) to his pupils, "which should fit them to manage their households, and to take part by word and deed in civic affairs."

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  • His formal lectures were supplemented by discussions amongst his pupils.

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  • As a teacher he had a remarkable power of kindling enthusiasm; and he sent out many distinguished pupils, among whom may be mentioned Hitzig, Schrader, Noldeke, Diestel and Dillma nn.

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  • Respect for his character and abilities attracted pupils irrespective of religious connexion, among them Newton Ogle, afterwards dean of Westminster.

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  • At these schools were 22,000 pupils (13,000 boys), all save 3500 Mussulmans being Europeans or Jews.

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  • There are, besides these, a large number of private schools, which in 1906 carried about 22,000 pupils on their rolls, or three times the number in the public primary schools.

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  • In these the majority of pupils were under the direction of Belgian and German instructors.

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  • After his death his lectures were written out from his own notes, supplemented by those of some of his pupils, and published with a biographical preface by his friend and colleague, Professor John Robison (1739-1805), in 1803, as Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry, delivered in the University of Edinburgh.

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  • These prisms may be combined with concave lenses, which correct the myopia, or, since a concave lens may be considered as composed of two prisms united at their apices, the same effect may be obtained by making the distance between the centres of the concave lenses greater than that between the centres of the pupils.

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  • Where, on the other hand, there is no tendency to squinting, care must be taken in selecting spectacles that the distances between the centres of the glasses and the centres of the pupils are quite equal, otherwise squinting, or at any rate great fatigue, of the eyes may be induced.

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  • The interior of the Church is decorated with sculptures by pupils of Desiderio da Settignano.

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  • He tried to find pupils to board with him, but only one pupil came, and he was soon sent away for lack of companions.

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  • This seems to be sufficiently attested by the fact that he was greatly liked and esteemed, not only in the pulpit but in private intercourse, by cultivated women like the countess of Biickeburg, the duchess of Weimar and Frau von Stein, and, what perhaps is more, was exceedingly popular among the gymnasium pupils, in whose education he took so lively an interest.

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  • For Pisanello's pupils and other painters of subsequent date, see Painting.

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  • His Works were published in 1587-89, and a more complete edition by his son and two of his pupils, Pareus and Reuterus, in 1612.

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  • The Japanese then recognized a lofty civilization and placed themselves as pupils at its feet, learning its script and deciphering its hooks.

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  • As illustrating the rapid development of familiarity with foreign authors, a Japanese retrospect of the Meiji era notes that whereas Macaulays Esfays were ii the curriculum of the Imperial University in 1881-1882, they were studied, five or six years later, in secondary schools, and pupils of the latter were able to read with understanding the works of Goldsmith, Tennyson and Thackeray.

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  • Later there came abundant aid to the cause of popular art, partly from pupils of the Kano aiid Tosa schools, but mainly from the artisan class.

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  • OkyO rose into notice about 1775, and a number of pupils flocked to his studio in ShijO Street, KiOto (whence ShijO school).

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  • Pupils, the chief of whom were Kiyomasa, Kiyotsume, Kiyomitsu, Kiyonaga and Kiyomine, carried on his tradition until the end of the 18th century, the three earlier using but few colors, while the works of the two last named show a technical mastery of all the capabilities of the process.

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century the process was technically at its greatest height, and in the hands of the great landscape artist, Hiroshige I., as well as the pupils of Toyokuni I.Kunisada and Kuniyoshiand those of Hokusai, it at first kept up an excellent level.

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  • Of his pupils, Hokkei (1780f 856) and Kyosai were the greatest.

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  • Thus Arakawa Reiun, one of Kouns most brilliant pupils, has exhibited a figure of a swordsman in the act of driving home a furious thrust.

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  • Ebisei, who moved from Awata to GojO-zaka in 1688; Eisen and Rokubei, pupils of Ebisei; Mokubei, a pupil of Eisen, but more celebrated than his master; Shuhei (1790-1810), Kentei (1782-1820), and Zengoro Hozen, generally known as Eiraku (1790-1850).

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  • Then followed Hanzan, the two Shiome, Yamamoto ShunshU and his pupils, Yamada Joka and KwanshOsai Toyo (late I8th century).

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  • There has been nothing like them in any other country, and they stand at an immeasurable distance above the works of the early Owari school represented by Kaji Tsunekichi and his pupils and colleagues.

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  • He taught rhetoric at Rome (one of his pupils being Jerome), and in his old age became a convert to Christianity.

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  • There is reason to believe, on the evidence of two pay-bills, that for a short time in 1755 and 1756 Hutton worked in Old Long Benton colliery; at any rate, on Ivison's promotion to a living, Hutton succeeded to the Jesmond school, whence, in consequence of increasing pupils, he removed to Stote's Hall.

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  • In 1760 he married, and began tuition on a larger scale in Newcastle, where he had among his pupils John Scott, afterwards Lord Eldon, chancellor of England.

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  • The eyes are small, with vertical pupils.

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  • In 1561 he went to teach theology in Rome, reckoning among his pupils Robert Bellarmine, afterwards cardinal; then passed into Sicily; and in 1569 he was sent to Paris, where his expositions of the writings of Thomas Aquinas attracted large audiences.

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  • In his Socratic power of convincing his pupils of their ignorance he did more than perhaps any other man of his time to awaken in those who came under his sway the desire for knowledge and the process of independent thought.

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  • The pupils enumerated in 1906 were 707,843.

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  • Pupils found him a somewhat choleric and exacting master and academic society a great recluse.

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  • Bain resigned his professorship in 1880 and was succeeded by William Minto, one of his most brilliant pupils.

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  • For cities of above 8000 inhabitants (for which alone comparative statistics are annually available), in 1902-1903 the ratio of average attendance to school enrolment, the average number of days' attendance of each pupil enrolled, and the value of school property per capita of pupils in average attendance were higher than in any other state; the average length of the school term was slightly exceeded in eight states; and the total cost of the schools per capita of pupils in average attendance ($39.05) was exceeded in six other states.

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  • There are several hundred private schools, whose pupils constituted in1905-190615.7% of the total school-enrolment of the state.

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  • Nearly 10,000 pupils are said to receive their education in its 140 madrasas or theological colleges; primary schools are kept at most mosques.

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  • The word 6 uXia from iatXEiv (buou, Eau)), meaning communion, intercourse, and especially interchange of thought and feeling by means of words (conversation), was early employed in classical Greek to denote the instruction which a philosopher gave to his pupils in familiar talk (Xenophon, Memorabilia, I.

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  • He obeyed the summons, and the pope himself became his first and apparently one of his most proficient pupils.

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  • The school was denounced in the press, was not pecuniarily successful, and in 1839 was given up, although Alcott had won the affection of his pupils, and his educational experiments had challenged the attention of students of pedagogy.

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  • This school was founded by Euclides of Megara, one of the pupils of Socrates.

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  • He was himself a diligent investigator and experimenter, and he did much to encourage original research among his pupils, one of whom was Dr Joseph Black.

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  • His clearness of statement and power of imparting interest to the most abstruse topics were the conspicuous features of his teaching, and in his various capacities as a scientific lecturer, a physiologist, and a practical physician, he was ever surrounded with large and increasing classes of intelligent pupils, to whom his eminently suggestive mode of instruction was specially attractive.

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  • The college to which Hofmann devoted nearly twenty of the best years of his life was starved; the coaltar industry, which was really brought into existence by his work and that of his pupils under his direction at that college, and which with a little intelligent forethought might have been retained in England, was allowed to slip into the hands of Germany, where it is now worth millions of pounds annually; and Hofmann himself was compelled to return to his native land to find due appreciation as one of the foremost chemists of his time.

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  • But in addition to these and numberless other investigations for which he was responsible the influence he exercised through his pupils must also be taken into account.

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  • Each denomination attends to the religious instruction of its own adherents, chiefly by means of Sunday schools, which count 108,000 pupils.

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  • In 1851 he established his fame as a philologist by The Study of Words, originally delivered as lectures to the pupils of the Diocesan Training School, Winchester.

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  • Provision is made for secondary education in all the leading town schools, which prepare pupils for matriculation.

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  • A county board of education examines applicants for teachers' positions and pupils applying to enter high schools.

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  • The schools are open to all pupils between the ages of six and twenty-one, and attendance for twelve weeks each year, eight of which must be consecutive, is compulsory for those between the ages of eight and fourteen.

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  • But a new system of musical notation which he thought he had discovered was unfavourably received by the Academie des sciences, where it was read in August 1742, and he was unable to obtain pupils.

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  • Pupils are sent to the best foreign agricultural, forestry and mining schools, and, after going through the prescribed course, often with distinction, return to Siam to apply their knowledge with more or less success.

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  • They now contain not far short of 100,000 pupils.

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  • In the metropolitan monton there are primary, secondary and special schools for boys and girls, affording instruction to some 10,000 pupils.

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  • Most of the special schools also give scholarships to enable the best of their pupils to complete their studies abroad.

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  • Among his pupils was Abelard.

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  • On the other hand, the pupils trained by him circulated his principles throughout France, recognizing him as the founder of national archaeology.

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  • In 1878 he gave up his duties as professor, which then fell to the most conspicuous of his pupils, Robert de Lasteyrie.

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  • After a year or two he left Montaigu and eked out his money from the bishop by taking pupils.

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  • The next few years were spent still in preparation, supported by pupils' fees and the dedications of books; the Collectanea adagiorum in June 1500 to Mountjoy, and some devotional and moral compositions to Batt's patroness and her son.

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  • For a year he remained with his pupils at Bologna, and then, his engagement completed, negotiated with Aldus Manutius for a new edition of his Adagia upon a very different scale.

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  • They are a series of dialogues, written first for pupils in the early Paris days as formulae of polite address, but afterwards expanded into lively conversations, in which many of the topics of the day are discussed.

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  • Complications with the Turk were avoided by the adroit diplomacy of the king, while the superior discipline and efficiency of the Polish armies under the great Tarnowski (q.v.) and his pupils overawed the Tatars and extruded the Muscovites, neither of whom were so troublesome as they had been during the last reign.

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  • Among the pupils of Callimachus was Eratosthenes who, in 234, succeeded Zenodotus as librarian.

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  • One of the distinguished pupils of Photius, Arethas, bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia (c. 907-932), devoted himself with remarkable energy to collecting and expounding the Greek classics.

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  • Among the most distinguished pupils of the latter was Leonardo Bruni, who, about 1405, wrote " the earliest humanistic tract on education expressly addressed to a lady."

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  • During the brief existence of their schools their most celebrated pupils were Tillemont and Racine.

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  • By the scheme of 1901 the pupils of the Realgymnasium, the Oberrealschule and the Gymnasium were admitted to the university on equal terms in virtue of their leaving-certificates, but Greek and Latin were still required for students of classics or divinity.

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  • Bennett of Cornell in 1901, a year in which it was estimated that this pronunciation was in use by more than 96% of the Latin pupils in the secondary schools.

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  • Harris, the U.S. commissioner of education, and they were able to report that, in all the five groups into which they had divided the states, the number of pupils pursuing the study of Latin and Greek showed a remarkable advance, especially in the most progressive states of the middle west.

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  • By a law of 1904 all teachers who taught an average of 15 pupils were to receive at least $300.

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  • In Rome he lectured on rhetoric and philosophy, and collected around him many eminent pupils, amongst whom Cicero was the most famous and the most enthusiastic. None of his works is extant; our knowledge of his views is derived from Numenius, Sextus Empiricus and Cicero.

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  • The state grants scholarships tenable at European universities to promising pupils, and there are three important public libraries.

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  • Though he was not a good teacher, his influence both on his pupils and on those few intimate friends for whom alone he relaxed the gravity of his manner was profound, and, little as he-was known to the white inhabitants of Lexington, he was revered by the slaves, to whom he showed uniform kindness, and for whose moral instruction he worked unceasingly.

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  • Amongst his pupils, Amelius and Porphyry are the most eminent.

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  • He received his early education in the school of Kirkcaldy under David Miller, amongst whose pupils were many who were afterwards distinguished men.

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  • For secondary instruction the national and state schools numbered 36 with 4642 pupils, and for professional instruction 65 with 9018 students, of whom 3790 were women.

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  • Like the Lyceum of Galata Serai in Constantinople, it has two sets of professors, Turkish and French, and a full course of education in each language, the pupils following both courses.

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  • All taxes on savings banks are distributed to the towns in which the depositors reside, the tax on non-resident depositors constituting a Literary Fund which is distributed to the towns on the basis of the number of pupils in each.

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  • Fittig and his pupils (Annalen, 1883, 216, pp. loo, 115; 1885, 227, pp. 55, 119), in which it was shown that the aldehyde forms an addition compound with the sodium salt of the fatty acid, and that the acetic anhydride plays the part of a dehydrating agent.

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  • He had already assisted Nathaniel Bowditch in his translation of the Mecanique celeste, and now produced a series of mathematical textbooks characterized by the brevity and terseness which made his teaching unattractive to inapt pupils.

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  • The gymnasium, however, was deserted; the nobles of Styria began to murmur at subsidizing a teacher without pupils; and he found it prudent to look elsewhere for employment.

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  • In 1781 he was imprisoned for a short time in the Bicetre on an accusation of corrupting the morals of his pupils, his real offence being the writing of satirical verse.

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  • The patient is quite unconscious, the eyes are motionless, the pupils dilated, the skin cold and moist, the limbs relaxed, the pulse is slow and barely perceptible, the respirations very slow and convulsive.

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  • One of his pupils was John Whitgift.

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  • Higher instruction is given in two national institutes at the capital, one for men with Soo pupils and one for women with 300.

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  • Other educational establishments are a school of art, a national conservatory of music, a commercial college, four trades' schools with more than 600 pupils and a national library.

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  • The technical college, founded in 1814 by the archduke John Baptist, had in 1901 about 400 pupils.

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  • He also attacked Isocrates, according to Cicero, and perhaps even set up a rival school of rhetoric. At any rate he had pupils of his own, such as Eudemus of Cyprus, Theodectes and Hermias, books of his own, especially dialogues, and even to some extent his own philosophy, while he was still a pupil of Plato.

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  • Indeed, according to Ammonius, Plato too had talked as he walked in the Academy; and all his followers were called Peripatetics, until, while the pupils of Xenocrates took the name " Academics," those of Aristotle retained the general name.

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  • But Aristotle was an author as well as a lecturer; for the hypothesis that the Aristotelian writings are notes of his lectures taken down by his pupils is contradicted by the tradition of their learning while walking, and disproved by the impossibility of taking down such complicated discourses from dictation.

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  • There is a further hypothesis that the Aristotelian works were not originally treatises, but notes of lectures either for or by his pupils.

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  • With one of his pupils in particular, Theophrastus, who was born about 370 and therefore was some fifteen years younger than himself, he had a long and intimate connexion; and the work of the pupil bears so close a resemblance to that of his master, that, even when he questions Aristotle's opinions (as he often does), he seems to be writing in an Aristotelian atmosphere; while he shows the same acuteness in raising difficulties, and has caught something of the same encyclopaedic genius.

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  • It is probable that this extraordinary resemblance is due to the pupils having actually assisted their master; and this supposition enables us to surmount a diffi culty we feel in reading Aristotle's works.

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  • Such then was the method of composition by which Aristotle began in early manhood to write his philosophical works, continued them gradually and simultaneously, combined shorter discourses into longer treatises, compared and connected them, kept them together in his library without publishing them, communicated them to his school, used the co-operation of his best pupils, and finally succeeded in combining many mature writings into one harmonious system.

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  • He says that Aristotle (I) divided his commentationes and arts taught to his pupils into i wrspuch and IcKpoarcKa; (2) taught the latter in the morning walk (iwOcvov 7rEpi-rraTov), the former in the evening walk (SaXcvew 71Epi-zrarov); (3) divided his books in the same manner; (4) defended himself against Alexander's letter, complaining that it was not right to his pupils to have published his acroamatic works, by replying in a letter that they were published and not published, because they are intelligible only to those who heard them.

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  • Before his death he voluntarily resigned his position to his pupils, Euander and Telecles.

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  • He himself said that his pupils were his best books; he intended to teach them not so much new facts as the way to study, endeavouring to develop in them an idea of criticism and truth.

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  • Two other works, containing accounts of the work of himself and his pupils, are Philosophische Studien (1883-1902) and Psychologische Studien (1905 foil.).

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  • At Oxford he set his pupils to work on making roads to improve the country.

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  • Two years after, lack of pupils compelled him to move to Rudolstadt and later to Dresden, where he gave lessons in music. In 1805 his ideal of a universal world-society led him to join the Freemasons, whose principles seemed to tend in the direction he desired.

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  • His philosophical views, which were identical with those of Crates (q.v.), he expounded by precept and example with great success, and had among his pupils 00 of the weight of a litre of Menippus of Sinope.

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  • In its prime the settlement must have afforded accommodation for several hundreds, teachers and pupils combined.

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  • Saxon architecture owes nearly everything to his initiative, and Bede was one of his pupils.

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  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the state capitol, the executive mansion (1909), the Federal building (in front of which is a monument to Kit Carson), the county court house, a National Guard armoury, a Federal industrial boarding school for Indians (with 300 pupils in 1908) and Saint Catherine's Industrial School for Indians (Roman Catholic).

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  • In 1908 there were 154 public schools with 18,564 pupils (27.06% of whom were Japanese, 20.89% Hawaiian, 1 3.54% part Hawaiian, 18.72% Portuguese and 10.63% Chinese) and 51 private schools with 4881 pupils.

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  • He took also an active part in the teaching of the academy, and executed for the instruction of his pupils the celebrated Ecorche still in use.

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  • A Synodikon from the year 1210 adds the names of his pupils or "apostles," Mihail, Todur, Dobri, Stefan, Vasilie and Peter, all thoroughly Slavonic names.

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  • He gathered them together and read with them as he had done with his pupils at Oxford; he urged them to spend at least five hours a day in reading the best books.

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  • In memory of the victory several monuments have been erected in the town and its vicinity, of which the most noticeable are the bronze statue of the Danish Land Soldier by Bissen (one of Thorvaldsen's pupils), and the great barrow over 50o Danes in the cemetery of the Holy Trinity Church, with a bas-relief by the same sculptor.

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  • Wenzel, one of his pupils, edited in 1883 from his MS. a Simplified Tibetan Grammar.

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  • It was rebuilt in 1819 on an eminence overlooking one of the main entrances into the town, and is capable of accommodating loo resident pupils.

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  • Among Reuchlin's own pupils were Melanchthon, Oecolampadius and Cellarius, while Sebastian Munster in Heidelberg (afterwards professor at Basel), and Buchlein (Fagius) at Isny, Strasburg and Cambridge, were pupils of the liberal Jewish scholar Elias Levita.

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  • Gratuitous instruction of a very high order is afforded by the Board of Trade to upwards of 2000 pupils.

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  • According to some accounts, Philolaus, obliged to flee, took refuge first in Lucania and then at Thebes, where he had as pupils Simmias and Cebes, who subsequently, being still young men (vcavifKoL), were present at the death of Socrates.

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  • Not only did pupils flock to Tosa from many quarters, attracted alike by the novelty of Itagaki's doctrines, by his eloquence and by his transparent sincerity, but also similar schools sprang up among the former vassals of other fiefs, who saw themselves excluded from the government.

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  • Early in the 29th century the missionaries had not been able to do much by way of education, but the new openings were seized with such power as was possible, and while in 1876 there were 289 mission schools with 4909 pupils, in 1910 there were 312 9 schools with 79,823 scholars.

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  • There were, in 1907, 76 buildings for schools and 47,968 pupils, while in the evening and holiday classes there were 10,724 older pupils; 2,109,920 free rations and 215,135 paid rations were distributed to 16,526 pupils, and douches were supplied.

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  • Pizzoli's Tavolo Psicoscopico for examining the mental qualities of the pupils is of interest.

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  • Continuation schools (herhalingsscholen) must be organized wherever required, and are generally open for six months in winter, pupils of twelve to fourteen or sixteen attending.

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  • Pupils from the higher-burgher schools are only eligible for the first.

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  • In 1904 there were 7092 primary schools with 859,436 pupils of both sexes.

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  • In 1907 there were 554 primary schools with 41,000 pupils.

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  • Her most famous pupils were Erinna of Telos and Damophyla of Pamphylia.

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  • The distinction of his career there was rewarded with a free choice amongst the departments of the public service open to pupils of the school.

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  • Though a man of profligate and arrogant character, he enjoyed a great reputation as a teacher; Quintilian and Persius are said to have been his pupils.

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  • He then taught physics in Cyzicus and the Propontis, and subsequently, accompanied by a number of pupils, went to Athens.

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  • Alytes obstetricans is a small toad-like Batrachian, two inches in length, of dull greyish coloration, plump form with warty skin and large eyes with vertical pupils.

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  • He took a house at Edial near Lichfield and advertised for pupils.

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  • But eighteen months passed away, and only three pupils came to his academy.

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  • The total number of primary schools was 60,584 in 1906 1907; teachers, 166,597; pupils, 9.737,262an average of about one Volksschule to every 900 inhabitants.

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  • There were also in Germany in the same year 643 private schools, giving instruction similar to that of the elementary schools, with 41,000 pupils.

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  • These schools are in close touch with the sovereigns and the governments, and the more promising pupils are thus from the first assured of a career, especially in connection with the decoration of public buildings and monuments.

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  • Meanwhile he had published several small historical works; but his college and university duties left little time for writing, and in 1875 he accepted the vicarage of Embleton, a parish on the coast of Northumberland, near Dunstanburgh, with an ancient and beautiful church and a fortified parsonage house, and within reach of the fine library in Bamburgh Keep. Here he remained for nearly ten years, acquiring that experience of parochial work which afterwards stood him in good stead, taking private pupils, studying and writing, as well as taking an active part in diocesan business.

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  • His lectures and conversation classes were extraordinarily good, possessing as he did the rare gift of kindling the enthusiasm without curbing the individuality of his pupils.

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  • The pupils of the secondary schools in Sicily number 3'94 per moo, the maximum being 6.60 in Liguria and the minimum 1.65 in Basilicata.

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  • Ray's reputation was high also as a tutor; and he communicated his own passion for natural history to several pupils, of whom Francis Willughby is by far the most famous.

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  • In the spring of 1663 Ray started together with Willughby and two other pupils on a tour through Europe, from which he returned in March 1666, parting from Willughby at Montpellier, whence the latter continued his journey into Spain.

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  • The last was written for the use of Willughby's sons, his pupils; it passed through many editions, and is still useful for its careful identifications of plants and animals mentioned by Greek and Latin writers.

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  • Ibn 'Abbas, a cousin of Mahomet, and the chief source of the traditional exegesis of the Koran, has, on theological and other grounds, given currency to a number of falsehoods; and at least some of his pupils have emulated his example.

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  • All pupils were taught to recite portions of the Koran, and a proportion of the scholars learnt to read and write Arabic and a little simple arithmetic. Those pupils who succeeded in committing to memory the whole of the Koran were regarded as fiki (learned in Mahommedan law), and as such escaped liability to military conscription.

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  • The number of pupils in 1905 was over 12,000 boys and 2000 girls.

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  • The number of pupils in private schools under government inspection was in 1898, the first year of the grant-in-aid system, 7536; in 1900, 12,315; in 1905, 145,691.

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  • Symptoms attendant on the hypnotic state are closure of the eyelids by the hypnotizer without subsequent attempt to open them by the hypnotized subject; the pupils, instead of being constricted, as for near vision, dilate, and there sets in a condition superficially resembling sleep. But in natural sleep the action of all parts of the nervous system is subdued, whereas in the hypnotic the reactions of the lower, and some even of the higher, parts are exalted.

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  • It follows from the above that a patient who is definitely under the influence of atropine will display rapid pulse, dilated pupils, a dry skin and a sense of discomfort, due to dryness of the mouth and throat.

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  • The Irish Christian Brothers have some hundred houses in Ireland with 300 attached schools and over 30,000 pupils.

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  • The deposition of `Abd ul-Aziz is an example of the tremendous power that can be wielded by the ulema at the head of their thousands of pupils, 3 when they choose to stir up the masses; nor would Malhmud II.

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  • In some devotional pictures of the time Diirer seems to have been much helped by pupils, as in the two different compositions of the Marks weeping over the body of Christ preserved respectively at Munich and Nuremberg.

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  • The variability of structures which are repeated in the body of the same individual (serial homologues) has been studied by Pearson and his pupils with important results.

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  • Such measurements of fraternal correlation in the lower animal as Pearson and his pupils have at present made give values very close to 2.

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  • His personal relations with his pupils were of a singularly close and affectionate nature, and the charm of his social gifts and genial character won him friends on all sides.

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  • The master was addressed by his pupils with the word rabbi (" my teacher"), or rabbenu (" our teacher").

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  • Oral examinations are much more used abroad than in England, where the pupils during their school years receive but little exercise in the art of consecutive speaking.

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  • Karl Sand, the murderer of Kotzebue, was one of his pupils; and a letter of his, found on another student, warning the lad against participation in secret societies, was twisted by the suspicious authorities into evidence of his guilt.

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  • Amongst his pupils at St John's were Lord Burghley, who married Cheke's sister Mary, and Roger Ascham, who in The Schoolmaster gives Cheke the highest praise for scholarship and character.

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  • As a teacher and master Hegel inspired confidence in his pupils, and maintained discipline without pedantic interference in their associations and sports.

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  • But his influence upon his pupils, and his solidarity with the Prussian government, gave him a position such as few professors have held.

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  • The flock included intelligent pupils, empty-headed imitators, and romantic natures who turned philosophy into lyric measures.

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  • Along with Gozzoli already mentioned, Zanobi Strozzi and Gentile da Fabriano are named as pupils of the Beato.

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  • Valuable work in exploration is annually done by the directors of these schools and by their pupils.

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  • In metal-work, as in other arts, the Romans were pupils and imitators of the Greeks.

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  • The post was unpaid, and Bahrdt, who had now married, lived by taking pupils and keeping an inn.

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  • There was also a tradition that Demosthenes was one of his pupils.

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  • Their school of bronze sculpture, whose first famous exponent was Ageladas (Hagelaidas), the reputed master of Pheidias, reached its climax towards the end of the 5th century in the atelier of Polyclitus and his pupils.

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  • Wherever he went, his lecture-room was crowded with admiring pupils, whose homage filled his purse and enhanced his reputation.

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  • Secondly, for the sake of novelty they extended their range, including scientific and technical subjects, but handling them, and teaching their pupils to handle them, in a popular way.

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  • Now skill in disputation is plainly a valuable accomplishment; and, as the Aristotelian logic grew out of the regulated discussions of the eristics and their pupils, the disputant sophistry of the 4th century deserves more attention and.

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  • When Protagoras included in his course grammar, style, interpretation of the poets, and oratory, supplementing his own continuous expositions by disputations in which he and his pupils took part, he showed a not inadequate appreciation of the requisites of a literary education; and it may be conjectured that his comprehensive programme, which Prodicus and others extended, had something to do with the development of that versatility which was the most notable element in the Athenian character.

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  • Indeed, we have evidence of sound, if conventional, principle in Prodicus's apologue of the " Choice of Heracles," and of honourable, though eccentric, practice in the story of Protagoras's treatment of defaulting pupils.

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  • Now it is true that before 447 B.C., besides the teachers of writing, gymnastics and music, to whom the young Greek resorted for elementary instruction, there were artists and artisans who not only practised their crafts, but also communicated them to apprentices and pupils, and that accordingly the Platonic Protagoras recognizes in the gymnast Iccus, the physician Herodicus, and the musicians Agathocles and Pythoclides, forerunners of the sophists.

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  • In the primary schools, however, which provide vernacular teaching for the masses, there were only 4 million pupils to the 300 millions of India.

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  • His power lay in the interpretation of literature rather than in linguistic study, and his influence over his pupils was exercised by his own fireside as well as in the relation, always friendly and familiar, which he held to them in the classroom.

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  • In 1910 there were more than 6000 Filipino teachers who were teaching English to more than 500,000 pupils.

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  • Among his pupils were Sir Walter Scott, Jeffrey, Cockburn, Francis Horner, Sydney Smith, Lord Brougham, Dr Thomas Brown, James Mill, Sir James Mackintosh and Sir Archibald Alison.

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  • The story that in 882 he was invited to Oxford by Alfred the Great, that he laboured there for many years, became abbot at Malmesbury, and was stabbed to death by his pupils with their "styles," is apparently without any satisfactory foundation, and doubtless refers to some other Johannes.

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  • Her great eloquence and rare modesty and beauty, combined with her remarkable intellectual gifts, attracted to her class-room a large number of pupils.

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  • From 1869 onwards Abbe Liszt divided his time between Rome and Weimar, where during the summer months he received pupils - gratis as formerly - and, from 1876 up to his death at Bayreuth on the 31st of July 1886, he also taught for several months every year at the Hungarian Conservatoire of Budapest.

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  • Giotto and others, the most famous of which are those over the high altar by Giotto, illustrating the vows of the Franciscan order; while the upper church has frescoes representing scenes from the life of St Francis (probably by Giotto and his contemporaries) on the lower portion of the walls of the nave, and scenes from Old and New Testament history by pupils of Cimabue on the upper.

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  • They worship Siva in his form of Bhairava, the" terrible."A sub-section of this order are the Dandi Dasnamis, or Dandi of ten names, so called from their assuming one of the names of Sankara's four disciples, and six of their pupils.

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  • He had made a quiet but deep impression on all who came within his influence in Oxford, and during his five years of college tutorship had won the affection of his pupils.

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  • The academy established by Vittorino da Feltre at Mantua under the protection of Gian Francesco Gonzaga for the training of pupils of both sexes, might be chosen as the type of this Italian method.

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  • He entered the lists boldly against the materialism of " Stoff and Kraft," and avowed himself a Christian believer, whereupon he lost the countenance of a number of his old friends and pupils, and was unfeelingly told that he was suffering from an " atrophy of the brain."

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  • Like Protagoras, he professed to train his pupils for domestic and civic affairs; but it would appear that, while Protagoras's chief instruments of education were rhetoric and style, Prodicus made ethics prominent in his curriculum.

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  • Theramenes, Euripides and Isocrates are said to have been pupils or hearers of Prodicus.

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  • The Lexicon (AEewv Euvaywyi), published later than the Bib iotheca, was probably in the main the work of some of his pupils.

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  • His principal pupils were Herennius, the two Origens, Cassius Longinus and Plotinus.

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  • As he designedly wrote nothing, and, with the aid of his pupils, kept his views secret, after the manner of the Pythagoreans, his philosophy must be inferred mainly from the writings of Plotinus.

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  • After his release he kept a small school in Lambeth, one of his pupils being James Stephen (1758-1832), who became master in Chancery.

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  • See Robert Nisbet Bain, The Pupils of Peter the Great, chs.

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  • Latin, still the universal language of learning, formed no part of Jewish education; and Spinoza, after learning the elements from a German master, resorted for further instruction to a physician named Franz van den Ende, who eked out an income by taking pupils.

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  • His enthusiasm for the natural sciences may have been the only ground for the reputation he had acquired of instilling atheistic notions into the minds of his pupils along with the Latin which he taught them.

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  • The physician had an only daughter, Clara Maria by name, who, besides being proficient in music, understood Latin, it is said, so perfectly that she was able to teach her father's pupils in his absence.

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  • She cannot, therefore, have been more than eleven, or twelve in 1656, the year in which Spinoza left Amsterdam; and as Kerckkrink was seven years younger than Spinoza, they cannot well have been simultaneous pupils of Van den Ende's and simultaneous suitors for his daughter's hand.

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  • As a teacher, Laetus, who has been called the first head of a philological school, was extraordinarily successful; in his own words, like Socrates and Christ, he expected to live on in the person of his pupils, amongst whom were many of the most famous scholars of the period.

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  • He awakened curiosity and roused a public sympathy with letters; nor was it without significance that two of the greatest Swedes of the century, Gustavus Adolphus and the poet Stjernhjelm, were his pupils.

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  • As personal friends and pupils of the former, the brothers Columbus deserve special attention.

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  • In the normal schools, where the pupils are trained to enter the public service as primary teachers, not only is the tuition free, but also books, board, lodging and everything needed in their school work.

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  • The School of Mechanic Arts and Trades (Escuela de Artes y Oficios) of Santiago has a high reputation for the practical character of its instruction, in which it is admirably seconded bya normal handicraft school (Sloyd system) and a night school of industrial drawing in the same city, and professional schools for girls in Santiago and Valparaiso, where the pupils are taught millinery, dress-making, knitting, embroidery and fancy needlework.

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  • The public primary schools numbered 1961 in 1903, with 3608 teachers, 166,928 pupils enrolled, and an average attendance of 108,582.

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  • She herself drew up the rules of the institution; she examined every minute detail; she befriended her pupils in every way; and her heart often turned from the weariness of Versailles or of Marly to her "little girls" at St Cyr.

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  • The later years of her power were marked by the promotion of her old pupils, the children of the king and Mme de Montespan, to high dignity between the blood royal and the peers of the realm, and it was doubtless under the influence of her dislike for the duke of Orleans that the king drew up his will, leaving the personal care of his successor to the duke of Maine, and hampering the duke of Orleans by a council of regency.

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  • It requires the middle of the aperture stop to be reproduced in the centres of the entrance and exit pupils without spherical aberration.

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  • In thirty years, of some 700 pupils who passed through his hands 500 became wranglers; and for twenty-two successive years, from 1861 to 1882, the senior wrangler was trained by him.

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  • The tuition is gratuitous, and the pupils are clothed and partly fed at government expense.

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  • The average number of pupils was about 250, and until the beginning of 1899 these two schools were the only establishments under the supervision.

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  • The new schools at Teheran have from 1000 to 1400 pupils.

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  • Much has been and is being done for education by the Armenians and the Protestant and Roman Catholic missions in Persia, and a large percentage of the pupils is composed of Mussulmans.

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  • In 1907 the American Protestant mission had 129 schools with 3423 pupils, the English Protestant missions had 5 schools with 425 pupils, the Roman Catholic mission (Lazaristes) had 3 schools with 400 pupils, and the Armenians had 4 schools and 646 pupils.

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  • The farm was assiduously, if not very skilfully, cultivated, and other industries were established - most of the members paying by labour for their board - but nearly all of the income, and sometimes all of it, was derived from the school, which deservedly took high rank and attracted many pupils.

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  • He was known for his great scholarship, simplicity of character, and affectionate interest in the pupils of the grammar school, of which he was appointed master a few months before becoming vicar of the parish (1760), reigning in both capacities till his death.

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  • He was one of the earliest of Peter's pupils.

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  • Aristo of Chios and Herillus of Carthage, Zeno's heterodox pupils, Persaeus, his favourite disciple and housemate, the poet Aratus, and Sphaerus, the adviser of the Spartan king Cleomenes, are noteworthy minor names; but the chief interest centres about Zeno, Cleanthes, Chrysippus, who in succession built up the wondrous system.

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  • Diogenes of Seleucia is said to have wavered in his belief at last; Boethus, one of his pupils, flatly denied it.

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  • Doubtless, at the first founding of the school Zeno himself and Zeno's pupils were inspired with this hope; they emulated the Cynics Antisthenes and Diogenes, who never shrank out of modesty from the name and its responsibilities.

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  • Soon the influence of the pupils reacted upon the doctrines taught.

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  • To attract his Roman pupils Panaetius would naturally choose simple topics susceptible Panaetius.

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  • Epictetus testifies to the powerful hold he acquired upon his pupils, each of whom felt that Musonius spoke to his heart.

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  • The benevolent institutions include the general hospital, founded in 1817, removed to the present site in 1867, extended by the addition of two wings in 1878 and of an eye department in 1890; a convalescent home for twenty patients from the hospital only (1903); the Royal Cambrian Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, established in 1847 at Aberystwyth, removed to Swansea in 1850, and several times enlarged, so as to have at present accommodation for ninety-eight pupils; the Swansea and South Wales Institution for the Blind, established in 1865 and now under the Board of Education; the Swansea and South Wales Nursing Institute (1873), providing a home for nurses in the intervals of their employment; a nursing institution (1902) for nursing the sick poor in their own homes, affiliated with the Queen's Jubilee Institute of London; the Sailors' Home (1864); a Sailors' Rest (1885); and a Mission to Seamen's Institute (1904).

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  • This greatly enhanced his reputation and brought him a large number of pupils.

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  • C. Baur, who infused into their pupils above all a deep love of the ancient classics.

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  • The comatose patient has a cold and clammy skin, livid lips and ear-tips - a grave sign - and " pin-point pupils."

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  • Travelling in Italy with one of his pupils, he made an exhaustive study of the antiquities of Rome.

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  • The 24th of April 1872, the fiftieth anniversary of his election to his professorship, was observed in Princeton as his jubilee by between 400 and 500 representatives of his 2700 pupils, and $50,000 was raised for the endowment of his chair.

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  • The income from the state school fund is divided among the counties on the basis of the total number of days of attendance of the public school pupils; the legislative appropriation, however, is apportioned among the counties according to their assessed property values.

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  • The total number of pupils is about 600.

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  • The Roman Catholic Church has 361 schools, with 1835 teachers and an attendance of 33,000 pupils.

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  • The fees from pupils 1,150 2,000 570 5,000 130 4,800 amounted to £82,000, making the actual cost of primary instruction £75 8, 000.

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  • St Andrew's College, also for boys, is a more recent establishment, and has about the same number of pupils.

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  • There are three large collegiate institutes, having some 300 to 600 pupils each, and in addition a number of schools for girls, such as Havergal College and Westminster College.

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  • In 1522 he removed to St Andrew's University, where in 1525 George Buchanan was one of his pupils.

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  • It is generally held that he taught Bonaventura, Duns Scotus and Thomas Aquinas, but a comparison of dates makes it clear that the two latter could nothave been his pupils and that the statement about Bonaventura is open to doubt.

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  • Since 1889 each town and city has been required to furnish textbooks, apparatus and supplies, without cost to the pupils.

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  • In 1892-1893 text-books and supplies were first furnished free to pupils in the grades; and in the same year supervisory work was introduced.

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  • In 1909 there were 685 public schools in the state; the total number of pupils of school age (six to eighteen years) was 102,050, the number enrolled in the public schools was 84,804, and the average daily attendance was 66,774; the total number of teachers was 2255 (1645 women), and the average monthly salary of men teachers was 888.13 and of women $57.44; and the total expenditure for public education was $2,762,581 for the year, being more than twice as much as was expended by the state ten years before.

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  • He built and endowed a grammar-school at a cost of upwards of X500, educated and maintained a large number of poor children at his own charge, and provided the more promising pupils with means of studying at the universities.

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  • Enriched by the offerings of his pupils, and feasted with universal admiration, he came, as he says, to think himself the only philosopher standing in the world.

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  • Pietro a Majella has existed in one form or other since 1760, and has had many famous pupils.

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  • In his studio Leonardo worked for several years (about 1470-1477) in the company of Lorenzo di Credi and other less celebrated pupils.

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  • It may have been joint studio-work of Verrocchio and his pupils including Leonardo, who certainly was concerned in it, since a study for the sleeve of the angel, preserved at Christ Church, Oxford, is unquestionably by his hand.

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  • The National Gallery "Virgin of the Rocks" certainly, with help from Ambrogio de Predis; in this the Florentine character of the original is modified by an admixture of Milanese elements, the tendency to harshness and over-elaboration of detail softened, the strained action of the angel's pointing hand altogether dropped, while in many places pupils' work seems recognizable beside that of the master.

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  • The painters especially recorded as Leonardo's immediate pupils during this part of his life at Milan are the two before mentioned, Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio and Ambrogio Preda or de Predis, with Marco d'Oggionno and Andrea Salai, the last apparently less a fully-trained painter than a studio assistant and personal attendant, devotedly attached and faithful in both capacities.

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  • Leonardo's own native Florentine manner had at first been not a little modified by that of the Milanese school as he found it represented in the works of such men as Bramantino, Borgognone and Zenale; but his genius had in its turn reacted far more strongly upon the younger members of the school, and exercised, now or later, a transforming and dominating influence not only upon his immediate pupils, but upon men like Luini, Giampetrino, Bazzi, Cesare da Sesto and indeed the whole Lombard school in the early 15th century.

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  • Within a few months the ageing master uprooted himself from Milan, and moved with his chattels and retinue of pupils to Rome, into the service of the house that first befriended him, the Medici.

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  • Of things communicable he was at the same time, as we have said, communicative - a genial companion, a generous and loyal friend, ready and eloquent of discourse, impressing all with whom he was brought in contact by the power and the charm of genius, and inspiring fervent devotion and attachment in friends and pupils.

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  • In matters of the heart, if any consoling or any disturbing passion played a great part in his life, we do not know it; we know only (apart from a few passing shadows cast by calumny and envy) of affectionate and dignified relations with friends, patrons and pupils, of public and private regard mixed in the days of his youth with dazzled admiration, and in those of his age with something of reverential awe.

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  • In silverpoint there are many beautiful drawings of his earlier time, and some of his later; but of the charming heads of women and young men in this material attributed to him in various collections, comparatively few are his own work, the majority being drawings in his spirit by his pupils Ambrogio Preda or Boltraffio.

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  • Menander was among his pupils.

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  • The old ducal palace - one of the largest buildings of its kind in Europe - was begun in 1302 for Guido Bonaccolsi, and probably completed in 1328 for Ludovico Gonzaga; but many of the accessory apartments are of much later date, and the internal decorations are for the most part the work of Giulio Romano and his pupils.

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  • But his austere life and commanding personality made him an effective teacher, and his influence, kept alive by his pupils Polemon and Crates, ceased only when Arcesilaus, the founder of the so-called Second Academy, gave a new direction to the studies of the school.

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  • He soon attracted a large number of pupils, the most distinguished of whom were Amelius, Eustochius and Porphyry.

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  • Great improvements were effected between 1900 and 1907, the number of schools increasing from 3643 to 4463, and the pupils from 298,000 to 515,000.

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  • Up to the fourth class all pupils are taught alike in the lyceums; in the fifth, however, they are divided into a literary or " humanist " section, and a scientific or " realist " section.

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  • The high school, built in 1806, for many years a familiar object on the west margin of the Links, gave way to the academy, a handsome and commodious structure, to which are drafted senior pupils from the numerous board schools for free education in the higher branches.

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  • In 1905 the total number of educational institutions was 10,194 with 593,431 pupils.

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  • The city also has a Polytechnic Institute, as well as high schools for white and for coloured pupils.

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  • On the 7th of October 1868 the Cornell University opened with some confusion due to the condition of the campus, and to the presence of 412 would-be pupils, many of whom expected to " work their way through."

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  • Equally great as antiquary, jurist, political and social historian, he lived to see the time when among students of Roman history he had pupils, followers, critics, but no rivals.

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  • Cardinal de Zabarella and Paulus Castrensis were also amongst his pupils.

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  • In1906-1907the state school tax was increased from 11 6 cents per $100 to 13.6 cents per $100; an educational standard was provided, coming into effect in August 1908, for public school teachers, in addition to the previous requirement of a written test; a regular system of normal training was authorized; uniform courses were provided for the public high schools; and small township schools with twelve pupils or less were discontinued, and transportation supplied for pupils in such abandoned schools to central school houses.

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  • Patrick Hamilton, the Scottish martyr, was one of his pupils; and it was at Lambert's instigation that Hamilton composed his Loci communes, or Patrick's Pleas as they were popularly called in Scotland.

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  • He mentally constructed a system of universal law; and, when, at the end of his captivity, he accompanied his pupils, the sons of Coyet, to the university, of Leiden, he was enabled to publish, in 1661, the fruits of his reflections under the title of Elementa jurisprudentiae universalis, libri duo.

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  • He was distinguished for his mathematical knowledge, and became eminently successful as a private tutor, many of his pupils attaining high distinction.

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  • But primary instruction has been greatly improved; there is a school of arts and trades at the capital, in which there are endowed scholarships for pupils from different provinces; a normal school has been established to train teachers for the Indians; high schools and training schools have been opened; and the government pays the expenses of several students in Europe.

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  • Sheer necessity drove him, in addition, to take many private pupils; but having been ordained in 1675, he was presented by Lord North in 1684 to the living of Burstow in Surrey; and his financial position was further improved by a small inheritance on his father's death in 1688.

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