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pupils

pupils Sentence Examples

  • Your pupils are different sizes.

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  • Your pupils are different sizes.

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  • Her large eyes were pinned to his, her pupils dilated and breathing quick.

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  • His pupils were contracted by the bright sunlight and his light green eyes contrasted sharply with his bronze tan.

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  • Black pupils swallowed the color of her eyes.

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  • Her pupils were large, making her eyes look dark.

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  • Her pupils dilated as he neared, her breath quickening.

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  • Every evening extracts from his great works, the Canon and the Sanatio, were dictated and explained to his pupils; among whom, when the lesson was over, he spent the rest of the night in festive enjoyment with a band of singers and players.

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  • Your pupils are dilated.

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  • She met his gaze and held it, her pupils dilating and a faint flush spreading across her features.

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  • His eyes were glazed, his pupils large enough to swallow the color of his irises.

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  • He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.

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  • The teachers at the Wright-Humason School were always planning how they might give the pupils every advantage that those who hear enjoy--how they might make much of few tendencies and passive memories in the cases of the little ones--and lead them out of the cramping circumstances in which their lives were set.

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  • The pupils contracted in the sunlight, leaving large pools of blue iris.

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  • "My dear count, you were one of my best pupils--you must dance," said little Iogel coming up to Nicholas.

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  • According to Suidas, Plato, on his departure for Sicily, left his pupils in charge of Heraclides.

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  • Those eyes were dark now, mostly because the pupils were large.

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  • They were a soft, sable brown with specs of black that seemed to swirl in motion around her pupils like two tiny solar systems.

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  • The pupils in his eyes were dilated so large that his eyes looked black in a face that had gone strangely pale.

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  • My friends thought we might have one or two pupils in our own home, thereby securing to me the advantage of being helpful to others without any of the disadvantages of a large school.

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  • There are collegiate institutes for more advanced education at Winnipeg, Brandon and Portage la Prairie, with a total of 1094 pupils enrolled.

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  • The head of the college, the abbe Antoine Faure, who was from the same part of the country as himself, befriended the lad, and continued to do so for many years after he had finished his course, finding him pupils and ultimately obtaining for him the post of tutor to the young duke of Chartres, afterwards the regent duke of Orleans.

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  • It is to these two investigators and their pupils that most of our exact thermochemical data are due.

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  • Poisonous serpents, such as the cottonmouth and copperhead, will have slit pupils.

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  • What gave him his power, and secured for him so deeply the respect and veneration of his pupils and acquaintances, was the intensely religious character of his whole life.

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  • This was not only in itself an important contribution to plant anatomy, but served as the starting-point of a series of researches by Van Tieghem and his pupils, which has considerably advanced our knowledge of the details of histology, and also culminated in the foundation of the doctrine of the stele (Van Tieghem and Douliot, Sur la polystlie, Ann.

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  • His pupils became his friends for life.

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  • Of course my instructors had had no experience in teaching any but normal pupils, and my only means of conversing with them was reading their lips.

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  • The six or seven weeks of the long vacation, during which he had pupils with him, were mainly employed in writing.

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  • His pupils became his friends for life.

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  • The most important free institution in this class is the cole des Sciences Politiques, which prepares pupils for the civil services and teaches a great number of political subjects, connected with France and foreign countries, not included in the state programmes.

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  • A large number of other works by members and pupils of the same family, but unsigned, exist in Rome.

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  • According to the returns for 1905 there were 7292 state schools, with 15,628 teachers and 648,927 pupils, and the average attendance of scholars was 446,000.

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  • On the 17th of March 1528 he married Ottilie Beham, a gifted lady, whose brothers, pupils of Albrecht Durer, had got into trouble through Anabaptist leanings.

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  • The pupils of the secondary schools reach a maximum of 6~6o per 1000 in Liguria and 5~92 in Latium, and a minimum of 2.30 in the Abruzzi, 227 in Calabria and 1.65 in Basilicata.

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  • The female secondary schools in 1881-1882 numbered 77, of which 7 were government institutions, with 3569 pupils; in 1901f 902 there were 233 schools (9 governmental) with 9347 pupils.

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  • Despite the prevailing poverty, it has also a real-school with good buildings, founded in 1865, and attended by about 300 pupils in 1900.

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  • Each of these schools impresses its pupils, in the case of the birds, with its own stamp, but there are many combinations, since in the course of phyletic development many a group of birds has exchanged one school for another.

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  • He left Oxford in 1819 and settled at Laleham, near Staines, where he took pupils for the university.

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  • Their pupils form the starting-point of the next series, the Tannaim (from Aram.

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  • Owing to the fact that the material collected by Mordecai was left to his pupils to arrange, the work was current in two recensions, an Eastern (in Austria) and a Western (in Germany, France, &c.).

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  • He was a diligent seeker after the truth, and was perfectly sincere when he informed a critic of the exact number of "truths" he had discovered, and when he remarked to one of his pupils a few days before his death, "Rest assured that what I have written in my book is the truth."

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  • Their pupils form the starting-point of the next series, the Tannaim (from Aram.

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  • When her friend added that some of the pupils he had seen in Budapest had more than one hundred tunes in their heads, she said, laughing, "I think their heads must be very noisy."

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  • Any teacher of composition knows that he can bring his pupils to the point of writing without errors in syntax or in the choice of words.

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  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.

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  • His black, agate pupils with saffron- yellow whites moved restlessly near the lower eyelids.

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  • He retained this position until 1517, wrote a Latin grammar, and other manuals for the use of his pupils, and in 1515 travelled in Italy with Ernest.

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  • The opposing minority were now powerless, and the younger fellows who had been his pupils were more inclined to follow him than others would have been.

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  • The chief naval school is the Ecole navale at Brest, which is devoted to the training of officers; the age of admission is from fifteen to eighteen years, and pupils after completing their course pass a year on a frigate school.

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  • Public primary schools include (1) icoles maternellesinfant schools for children from two to six years old; (2) elementary primary schoolsthese are the ordinary schools for children from six to thirteen; (3) higher primary schools (coles primaires suprieures) and supplementary courses; these admit pupils who have gained the certificate of primary elementary studies (cerlificat diludes primaires), offer a more advanced course and prepare for technical instruction; (4) primary technical schools (coles manuelles dapprenlissage, coles primaires suprleures professionnelles) kept by the communes or departments.

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  • He lifted Selyn's eyelids and shone a light to watch her pupils.

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  • The man in her bedroom was kind of creepy: tall and lean with blond hair and eyes so dark, she couldn't see his pupils.

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  • The pall-bearers were seven heads of colleges and the provost of Eton, all old pupils.

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  • The total number of such schools was, in 1896, 742 with 33,813 pupils.

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  • Menahem's system of bi-literal and uni-literal roots was violently attacked by Dunash ibn Labrat, and as violently defended by the author's pupils.

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  • The theological seminary, founded in 1744 and transformed in 1814 into an academy, reckoned Platon and Philarete among its pupils.

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  • Precepts such as these could hardly fail to effect some modification of the reckless zeal of the Galileans in the pupils of the synagogue.

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  • Among his famous pupils were F.

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  • On his deathbed he turned to the devoted pupils who watched over their master's last hours.

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  • Lalande were among his pupils.

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  • He was able to gather around him a group of congenial friends and pupils, such as the Mills, the Austins and Bowring, with whom he could discuss the problems upon which he was engaged, and by whom several of his books were practically rewritten from the mass of rough though orderly memoranda which the master had himself prepared.

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  • He succeeded in abolishing the old-fashioned medieval textbooks and methods of instruction, and led his pupils to the study of the classical authors themselves.

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  • Crecelius, "Alexander Hegius and seine Schuler," from the works of Johannes Butzbach, one of Hegius's pupils, in Zeitschrift des bergischen Geschichtsvereins, vii.

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  • As the attendance at his classes continually increased - pagans thronging; to him as well as Christians - he handed over the beginners to his friend Heracles, and took charge of the more advanced pupils himself.

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  • The pupils at Brienne, far from receiving a military education, were grounded in ordinary subjects, and in no very efficient manner, by brethren of the order, or society, of Minims. The moral tone of the school was low; and Napoleon afterwards spoke with contempt of the training of the "monks" and the manner of life of the scholars.

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  • The former of these were designed for the completion of the training of the most promising pupils in the communal elementary schools, and were left to local control or even to management by private individuals.

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  • Of those travellers then the first to be here especially named is Marsigli, the fifth volume of whose Danubius Pannonico-Mysicus is devoted to the birds he met with in the valley of the Danube, and appeared at the Hague in 1725, followed by a French translation in 1744.8 Most of the many pupils whom Linnaeus sent to foreign countries submitted their discoveries to him, but Kalm, Hasselqvist and Osbeck published separately their respective travels in North America, the Levant and China.

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  • The greatest benefit conferred by this memoir is probably that it stimulated the efforts, presently to be mentioned, of one of his pupils, and that it brought more distinctly into sight that other factor, originally discovered by Merrem, of which it now clearly became the duty of systematizers to take cognizance.

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  • He corresponded with some of the most eminent scholars of his time on mathematical subjects; and his house was generally full of pupils from all quarters.

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  • The school revenues are derived from the sale and rental of public lands granted by Congress, and of the salt and swamp lands devoted by the state to such purposes, from a uniform levy of one mill on each dollar of taxable property in the state, from local levies (averaging 7.2 mills in township districts and 10.07 mills in separate districts in 1908), from certain fines and licences, and from tuition fees paid by non-resident pupils.

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  • He was one of the favourite pupils of Aedesius, and devoted himself mainly to the mystical side of Neoplatonism.

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  • He took paternal pride in the achievements of his pupils, and delighted to see, through them, his influence spreading in every university.

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  • Appointed superintendent of the cathedral school of his native city, he taught with such success as to attract pupils from all parts of France, and powerfully contributed to diffuse an interest in the study of logic and metaphysics, and to introduce that dialectic development of theology which is designated the scholastic. The earliest of his writings of which we have any record is an Exhortatory Discourse to the hermits of his district, written at their own request and for their spiritual edification.

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  • As early as 1831 an unsuccessful attempt was made to form an adequate public school fund; the first real effort to establish a common school system for the territory was made after 1835; in 1840 there were altogether 18 academies and 51 common schools, and in 1849 the state legislature made an appropriation in the interest of the public instruction of white pupils, and this was supplemented by the proceeds of land granted by the United States government for the same purpose.

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  • In 1852 Tallahassee established a public school; and in 1860 there were, according to a report of the United States census, 2032 pupils in the public schools of the state, and 4486 in " academies and other schools."

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  • His pupils were drawn not only from France and Normandy, but also from Gascony, Flanders, Germany and Italy.

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  • Among the more illustrious of his pupils may be mentioned South, Dryden, Locke, Prior and Bishop Atterbury.

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  • With Thomas Hill Green he founded in England a school of orthodox neo-Hegelianism, and through his pupils he exerted a farreaching influence on English philosophy and theology.

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  • The teachers numbered in 1920 2,015 in 133 grade schools and 494 in high schools, and the enrolment of pupils in grades was 74,654 and in high schools 12,169.

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  • There were in evening grades 198 teachers and 6,245 pupils, and in evening high schools 148 teachers and 5,090 pupils.

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  • The public-school system was supplemented by parochial schools which had in 1920 650 teachers and 33,000 pupils.

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  • Indian astrono mers found apt pupils there among the Arabs; the works of 1 R.

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  • In 1909 the number of missionaries (including wives) was 113; organized churches, 194; members and adherents, 21,085; schools, 135; pupils, 7042; hospitals and dispensaries, 17; patients treated, 6865; subscriptions raised from Friends in Great Britain and Ireland, £26,689, besides £3245 received in the fields of work.

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  • He died in 277 B.C. at the age of fifty-three, seven years before his master, who adopted his children and in his will commended them to the care of his pupils.

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  • As a little boy he would take his place among the pupils of the monastic school, though he would soon pass to the ranks of the teachers, and the fact that he was ordained deacon at nineteen, below the canonical age, shows that he was regarded as remarkable both for learning and goodness.

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  • After the death of De Rossi, one of his pupils, H.

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  • The convent was suppressed by Duke Maurice in 1543, and was by him converted into a school (the Fiirsten Schule), one of the most renowned classical schools in Germany, which counts Lessing and Gellert among its former pupils.

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  • The average attendance of enrolled black and white pupils is practically identical, but the enrolment of whites (about 52% in 1902) is somewhat higher and that of the blacks about a third lower than their ratio in the population.

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  • In the last days of Spanish rule (1894), there were 904 public and 704 private schools, and not more than 60,000 pupils enrolled; in 1900 there were 3550 public schools with an enrolment of 172,273 and an average attendance of 123,362.

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  • Private schools, some of very high grade, draw many pupils.

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  • Promising pupils are frequently sent to Vienna University, with scholarships, which may be forfeited if the holders engage in political agitation.

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  • Among his pupils were Origen (Eus.

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  • " the man the pupils of whose eyes are prominent") (d.

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  • In this field Bechamp, Cohnheim, Albrecht Kossel, and, especially, Emil Fischer and his pupils have been extremely active.

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  • He was the greatest of the pupils of G.

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  • Camillus, it is said, had him whipped back into the town by his pupils, and the Faliscans were so affected by this generosity that they at once surrendered.

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  • Casuistry came to the aid of average human nature - that is to say, pupils began to confront the master with hard cases taken from daily life.

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  • This, and allied alkaloids, have formed the subject of many investigations by Wyndham Dunstan and his pupils in England, and by Martin Freund and Paul Beck in Berlin.

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  • In 1912 in the corresponding area there were 98 secondary schools with 22,600 pupils, one per 26,000 inhabitants (in Germany one per 54,000).

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  • Appointed, in 1754, professor of geometry in the royal school of artillery, he formed with some of his pupils - for the most part his seniors - friendships based on community of scientific ardour.

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  • In expounding the principles of the differential calculus, he started, as it were, from the level of his pupils, and ascended with them by almost insensible gradations from elementary to abstruse conceptions.

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  • One of his pupils at Florence was the famous John Reuchlin.

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  • An incomplete return in 1891 gave 8 793 schools and 376,399 pupils.

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  • In 1759, after completing with his pupils a tour of two years' duration through Gottingen, Utrecht, Paris, Marseilles and Turin, he resigned his tutorship and settled at Augsburg.

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  • In 1902 there were in Hungary 18,729 elementary schools with 32,020 teachers, attended by 2,573,377 pupils, figures which compare favourably with those of 1877, when there were 15,486 schools with 20,717 teachers, attended by 1,559,636 pupils.

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  • The number of middle schools in 1902 was 243 with 4705 teachers, attended by 71,788 pupils; in 1880 their number was 185, attended by 40,747 pupils.

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  • (The university at Zagrab is without a faculty of medicine.) There are besides ten high schools of law, called academies, which in 1900 were attended by 1569 pupils.

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  • The Polytechnicum in Budapest, founded in 1844, which contains four faculties and was attended in 1900 by 1772 pupils, is also considered a high school.

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  • 1007), whose fame rests on a dissertation on amicable numbers, and on the schools which were founded by his pupils at Cordova, Dania and Granada.

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  • Historical research and literary criticism flourished under Racki, the first president of the Academy, and his pupils: while Strassmayer did much to revive the Glagolitic, or ancient Slavonic liturgy, and to win for it the favour of Pope Leo XIII.

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  • Specially significant were the Memorandum addressed to the throne by 55 deputies of the Croat party of Right, in the Croatian, Bosnian, Dalmatian and Istrian Diets, and the political strike organized by the pupils of both sexes in almost all the middle schools of the Slavonic South.

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  • His true greatness can only be estimated by a consideration of the fact that he was a great teacher not only of human and comparative anatomy and zoology but also of physiology, and that nearly all the most distinguished German zoologists and physiologists of the period 1850 to 1870 were his pupils and acknowledged his leadership. The most striking feature about Johann Miller's work, apart from the comprehensiveness of his point of view, in which he added to the anatomical and morphological ideas of Cuvier a consideration of physiology, embryology and microscopic structure, was the extraordinary accuracy, facility and completeness of his recorded observations.

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  • See Robert Nisbet Bain, The Pupils of Peter the Great (London, 1897); Christoph Hermann von Manstein, Memoirs (Eng.

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  • At Reims he seems to have studied and lectured for many years, having amongst his pupils Hugh Capet's son Robert, afterwards king of France, and Richer, to whose history we owe almost every detail of his master's early life.

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  • Otric, suspecting that Gerbert erred in his classification of the sciences, sent one of his own pupils to Reims to take notes of his lectures, and, finding his suspicions correct, accused him of his error before Otto II.

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  • Fittig and his pupils (Ann., vols.

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  • school " in the city had done much to inculcate on his pupils the doctrines of Theodore of Mopsuestia.

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  • As a teacher in the Persian school of Edessa he had translated, probably with the help of his pupils, certain works of " the Interpreter," i.e.

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  • His Latin Grammar and Glossary 2 were written for his pupils after the two books of homilies.

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  • The primary school, in which the pupils learn only Chinese writing and the precepts of Confucius, stands at the base of this system.

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  • This law has been in force since about 1870, but on the 30th of June 1908 there were only 1150 public schools in the republic with a total enrolment of 35,777 pupils.

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  • In that year, however, Angelo Mai discovered in the Ambrosian library at Milan a palimpsest manuscript (and, later, some additional sheets of it in the Vatican), on which had been originally written some of Fronto's letters to his royal pupils and their replies.

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  • The letters consist of correspondence with Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, in which the character of Fronto's pupils appears in a very favourable light, especially in the affection they both seem to have retained for their old master; and letters to friends, chiefly letters of recommendation.

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  • Asclepiades had many pupils who adhered more or less closely to his doctrines, but it was especially one of them, Themison, who gave permanence to the teachings of his master by framing out of them, with some modifications, a new system of medical doctrine, and founding on this basis a school which lasted for some centuries in successful rivalry with the Hippocratic tradition, which, as we have seen, was up to that time the prevailing influence in medicine.

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  • Pupils flocked to him from all European countries; Germans are especially mentioned; a Polish student reported and published some of his lectures; and the Englishman Kaye was a zealous disciple, who does not, however, seem to have done anything towards transplanting this method of instruction to his own country.

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  • Haller occupied in the new university of Gottingen (founded 1737) a position corresponding to that of Boerhaave at Leiden, and in like manner influenced a very large circle of pupils, The appreciation of his work in physiology belongs to the history of that science; we are only concerned here with its influence on medicine.

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  • They are sufficiently evidenced by the fact that Edward Jenner and Matthew Baillie were his pupils.

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  • The method of auscultation was soon introduced into England by pupils of Laennec. John Forbes (1787-1861) in 1824, and William Stokes (1804-1878) of Dublin in 1825, published treatises on the use of the stethoscope.

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  • Most of the ardent cultivators of this science in Germany in the next generation were his pupils.

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  • Marey, 1863) attention was drawn to the physical features of the circulation, to the signs of degeneration of the arterial tree, and less definitely to the fluctuations of blood pressure; but as we have said under the consideration of diseases of the heart, the kymographs of Ludwig and his pupils brought out these fluctuations far more accurately and completely.

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  • Of this series his pupils produced in his lifetime Les Derniers Carolingiens (by F.

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  • and Hugh Capet and the history of the kingdom of Provence were not published until after his death, and his own unfinished history of Charles the Bald was left to be completed by his pupils.

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  • The Westminster Column, outside the entrance to Dean's Yard, was erected to the memory of the old pupils of Westminster School who died in the Russian and Indian wars of 1854-1859.

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  • Other institutions include higher elementary schools for pupils certified to be able to profit by higher instruction; and schools for blind, deaf and defective children.

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  • His co-professors were Louis Cappel and Josue de la Place, who also were Cameron's pupils.

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  • He was educated at the Malmesbury grammar school under Robert Latimer, who had numbered Thomas Hobbes among his earlier pupils, and at his schoolmaster's house Aubrey first met the philosopher about whom he was to leave so many curious and interesting details.

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  • It was then ascertained that there were 684 public schools with 14,133 pupils, and 1664 private schools with 8685 pupils.

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  • It is worthy of remark that of these schools 29 were Mahommedan, and that there were 176 schools for girls in which upwards of 2000 pupils were taught.

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  • There are 22 public elementary schools for boys and 18 for girls (education being compulsory and gratuitous), with about 20,000 pupils, and 56 private schools with 5700 pupils.

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  • Secondary education is provided by one higher and four lower technical schools with 1375 pupils, three ginnasii or lower classical schools, and three licei or higher classical schools, with moo pupils, and three training colleges with over 700 pupils.

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  • He soon gained recognition as a learned and successful teacher, and the younger Adalhard, St Anskar the apostle of Sweden, Odo bishop of Beauvais and Warinus abbot of Corvei in Saxony may be mentioned among the more distinguished of his pupils.

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  • Among his pupils the most eminent were Peter von Bohlen (1796-1840), A.

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  • See Robert Nisbet Bain, Pupils of Peter the Great (London, 1895), chaps.

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  • The Pupils of Peter the Great, ch.

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  • At that period there was at Rome a demand for copies of, or variations on, noted works of Greek sculpture: the demand was met by the workshops of Pasiteles and his pupils Stephanus and Menelaus and others, several of whose statues are extant.

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  • Soon men began to assist memory by making notes, and pupils sought to take written jottings of what they had heard from their teachers.

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  • Meanwhile one of his pupils, Barsumas, had settled at Nisibis in Persian territory where he became bishop in 435 and established a Nestorian school.

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  • According to Plato (Prot., 318 E), he endeavoured to communicate "prudence" (6130vXia) to his pupils, "which should fit them to manage their households, and to take part by word and deed in civic affairs."

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  • His formal lectures were supplemented by discussions amongst his pupils.

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  • As a teacher he had a remarkable power of kindling enthusiasm; and he sent out many distinguished pupils, among whom may be mentioned Hitzig, Schrader, Noldeke, Diestel and Dillma nn.

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  • Respect for his character and abilities attracted pupils irrespective of religious connexion, among them Newton Ogle, afterwards dean of Westminster.

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  • At these schools were 22,000 pupils (13,000 boys), all save 3500 Mussulmans being Europeans or Jews.

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  • There are, besides these, a large number of private schools, which in 1906 carried about 22,000 pupils on their rolls, or three times the number in the public primary schools.

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  • In these the majority of pupils were under the direction of Belgian and German instructors.

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  • After his death his lectures were written out from his own notes, supplemented by those of some of his pupils, and published with a biographical preface by his friend and colleague, Professor John Robison (1739-1805), in 1803, as Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry, delivered in the University of Edinburgh.

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  • These prisms may be combined with concave lenses, which correct the myopia, or, since a concave lens may be considered as composed of two prisms united at their apices, the same effect may be obtained by making the distance between the centres of the concave lenses greater than that between the centres of the pupils.

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  • Where, on the other hand, there is no tendency to squinting, care must be taken in selecting spectacles that the distances between the centres of the glasses and the centres of the pupils are quite equal, otherwise squinting, or at any rate great fatigue, of the eyes may be induced.

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  • of Freetown), and opened in 1828 with six pupils, one of whom was Bishop Crowther, was affiliated in 1876 to Durham University and has a high-class curriculum.

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  • The interior of the Church is decorated with sculptures by pupils of Desiderio da Settignano.

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  • He tried to find pupils to board with him, but only one pupil came, and he was soon sent away for lack of companions.

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  • This seems to be sufficiently attested by the fact that he was greatly liked and esteemed, not only in the pulpit but in private intercourse, by cultivated women like the countess of Biickeburg, the duchess of Weimar and Frau von Stein, and, what perhaps is more, was exceedingly popular among the gymnasium pupils, in whose education he took so lively an interest.

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  • For Pisanello's pupils and other painters of subsequent date, see Painting.

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  • His Works were published in 1587-89, and a more complete edition by his son and two of his pupils, Pareus and Reuterus, in 1612.

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  • The Japanese then recognized a lofty civilization and placed themselves as pupils at its feet, learning its script and deciphering its hooks.

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  • As illustrating the rapid development of familiarity with foreign authors, a Japanese retrospect of the Meiji era notes that whereas Macaulays Esfays were ii the curriculum of the Imperial University in 1881-1882, they were studied, five or six years later, in secondary schools, and pupils of the latter were able to read with understanding the works of Goldsmith, Tennyson and Thackeray.

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  • Later there came abundant aid to the cause of popular art, partly from pupils of the Kano aiid Tosa schools, but mainly from the artisan class.

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  • OkyO rose into notice about 1775, and a number of pupils flocked to his studio in ShijO Street, KiOto (whence ShijO school).

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  • Pupils, the chief of whom were Kiyomasa, Kiyotsume, Kiyomitsu, Kiyonaga and Kiyomine, carried on his tradition until the end of the 18th century, the three earlier using but few colors, while the works of the two last named show a technical mastery of all the capabilities of the process.

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century the process was technically at its greatest height, and in the hands of the great landscape artist, Hiroshige I., as well as the pupils of Toyokuni I.Kunisada and Kuniyoshiand those of Hokusai, it at first kept up an excellent level.

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  • Of his pupils, Hokkei (1780f 856) and Kyosai were the greatest.

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  • Thus Arakawa Reiun, one of Kouns most brilliant pupils, has exhibited a figure of a swordsman in the act of driving home a furious thrust.

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  • Ebisei, who moved from Awata to GojO-zaka in 1688; Eisen and Rokubei, pupils of Ebisei; Mokubei, a pupil of Eisen, but more celebrated than his master; Shuhei (1790-1810), Kentei (1782-1820), and Zengoro Hozen, generally known as Eiraku (1790-1850).

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  • 1715), whose pupils and descendants maintained his traditions for a period of equal length.

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  • Then followed Hanzan, the two Shiome, Yamamoto ShunshU and his pupils, Yamada Joka and KwanshOsai Toyo (late I8th century).

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  • There has been nothing like them in any other country, and they stand at an immeasurable distance above the works of the early Owari school represented by Kaji Tsunekichi and his pupils and colleagues.

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  • He taught rhetoric at Rome (one of his pupils being Jerome), and in his old age became a convert to Christianity.

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  • There is reason to believe, on the evidence of two pay-bills, that for a short time in 1755 and 1756 Hutton worked in Old Long Benton colliery; at any rate, on Ivison's promotion to a living, Hutton succeeded to the Jesmond school, whence, in consequence of increasing pupils, he removed to Stote's Hall.

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  • In 1760 he married, and began tuition on a larger scale in Newcastle, where he had among his pupils John Scott, afterwards Lord Eldon, chancellor of England.

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  • The eyes are small, with vertical pupils.

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  • In 1561 he went to teach theology in Rome, reckoning among his pupils Robert Bellarmine, afterwards cardinal; then passed into Sicily; and in 1569 he was sent to Paris, where his expositions of the writings of Thomas Aquinas attracted large audiences.

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  • In his Socratic power of convincing his pupils of their ignorance he did more than perhaps any other man of his time to awaken in those who came under his sway the desire for knowledge and the process of independent thought.

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  • In Germany the credit of the French successes was due to Crequi, who was no longer the defeated general of Conzer Briicke, but the most successful of Turenne's pupils.

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  • The pupils enumerated in 1906 were 707,843.

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  • Pupils found him a somewhat choleric and exacting master and academic society a great recluse.

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  • Nisbet Bain, The Pupils of Peter the Great (London, 1897); M.

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  • Bain resigned his professorship in 1880 and was succeeded by William Minto, one of his most brilliant pupils.

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  • For cities of above 8000 inhabitants (for which alone comparative statistics are annually available), in 1902-1903 the ratio of average attendance to school enrolment, the average number of days' attendance of each pupil enrolled, and the value of school property per capita of pupils in average attendance were higher than in any other state; the average length of the school term was slightly exceeded in eight states; and the total cost of the schools per capita of pupils in average attendance ($39.05) was exceeded in six other states.

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  • There are several hundred private schools, whose pupils constituted in1905-190615.7% of the total school-enrolment of the state.

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  • Nearly 10,000 pupils are said to receive their education in its 140 madrasas or theological colleges; primary schools are kept at most mosques.

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  • The word 6 uXia from iatXEiv (buou, Eau)), meaning communion, intercourse, and especially interchange of thought and feeling by means of words (conversation), was early employed in classical Greek to denote the instruction which a philosopher gave to his pupils in familiar talk (Xenophon, Memorabilia, I.

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  • He obeyed the summons, and the pope himself became his first and apparently one of his most proficient pupils.

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  • The school was denounced in the press, was not pecuniarily successful, and in 1839 was given up, although Alcott had won the affection of his pupils, and his educational experiments had challenged the attention of students of pedagogy.

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  • This school was founded by Euclides of Megara, one of the pupils of Socrates.

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  • He was himself a diligent investigator and experimenter, and he did much to encourage original research among his pupils, one of whom was Dr Joseph Black.

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  • His clearness of statement and power of imparting interest to the most abstruse topics were the conspicuous features of his teaching, and in his various capacities as a scientific lecturer, a physiologist, and a practical physician, he was ever surrounded with large and increasing classes of intelligent pupils, to whom his eminently suggestive mode of instruction was specially attractive.

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  • The college to which Hofmann devoted nearly twenty of the best years of his life was starved; the coaltar industry, which was really brought into existence by his work and that of his pupils under his direction at that college, and which with a little intelligent forethought might have been retained in England, was allowed to slip into the hands of Germany, where it is now worth millions of pounds annually; and Hofmann himself was compelled to return to his native land to find due appreciation as one of the foremost chemists of his time.

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  • But in addition to these and numberless other investigations for which he was responsible the influence he exercised through his pupils must also be taken into account.

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  • All primary and some secondary public schools are controlled by provincial education boards elected by school committees of the parents of pupils.

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  • Each denomination attends to the religious instruction of its own adherents, chiefly by means of Sunday schools, which count 108,000 pupils.

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  • Sylvester, was discovered and exhibited to him by one of his pupils, named Lipkin, who, however, it was afterwards found, had been anticipated by A.

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  • In 1851 he established his fame as a philologist by The Study of Words, originally delivered as lectures to the pupils of the Diocesan Training School, Winchester.

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  • Provision is made for secondary education in all the leading town schools, which prepare pupils for matriculation.

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  • A county board of education examines applicants for teachers' positions and pupils applying to enter high schools.

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  • The schools are open to all pupils between the ages of six and twenty-one, and attendance for twelve weeks each year, eight of which must be consecutive, is compulsory for those between the ages of eight and fourteen.

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  • But a new system of musical notation which he thought he had discovered was unfavourably received by the Academie des sciences, where it was read in August 1742, and he was unable to obtain pupils.

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  • months, and the schools are open to all pupils between the ages of six and twenty-one years.

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  • Pupils are sent to the best foreign agricultural, forestry and mining schools, and, after going through the prescribed course, often with distinction, return to Siam to apply their knowledge with more or less success.

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  • They now contain not far short of 100,000 pupils.

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  • In the metropolitan monton there are primary, secondary and special schools for boys and girls, affording instruction to some 10,000 pupils.

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  • Most of the special schools also give scholarships to enable the best of their pupils to complete their studies abroad.

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  • Among his pupils was Abelard.

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  • By the work of Julius Sachs and his pupils plant physiology was established on a scientific basis, and became an important part of the study of plants, for the development of which reference may be made to the article Plants: Physiology.

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  • On the other hand, the pupils trained by him circulated his principles throughout France, recognizing him as the founder of national archaeology.

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  • In 1878 he gave up his duties as professor, which then fell to the most conspicuous of his pupils, Robert de Lasteyrie.

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  • BIBLIOGRAPHY.-TWO of Quicherat's best pupils published excellent obituar y notices of him: Robert de Lasteyrie, in Jules Quicherat, sa vie et ses travaux (from Bulletin du Comite des travaux historiques, 1883, n.

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  • After a year or two he left Montaigu and eked out his money from the bishop by taking pupils.

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  • The next few years were spent still in preparation, supported by pupils' fees and the dedications of books; the Collectanea adagiorum in June 1500 to Mountjoy, and some devotional and moral compositions to Batt's patroness and her son.

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  • For a year he remained with his pupils at Bologna, and then, his engagement completed, negotiated with Aldus Manutius for a new edition of his Adagia upon a very different scale.

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  • They are a series of dialogues, written first for pupils in the early Paris days as formulae of polite address, but afterwards expanded into lively conversations, in which many of the topics of the day are discussed.

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  • He entered the university of Tubingen in 1836, and was one of the earliest pupils of F.

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  • Complications with the Turk were avoided by the adroit diplomacy of the king, while the superior discipline and efficiency of the Polish armies under the great Tarnowski (q.v.) and his pupils overawed the Tatars and extruded the Muscovites, neither of whom were so troublesome as they had been during the last reign.

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  • Although teaching was uncongenial to him he took pupils in mathematics, and held for a time the position of mathematical coach for Woolwich and Sandhurst.

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  • Among the pupils of Callimachus was Eratosthenes who, in 234, succeeded Zenodotus as librarian.

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  • 512), a transcript of whose great work on Latin grammar was completed at Constantinople by one of that grammarian's pupils in 527, to be reproduced in a thousand MSS.

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  • One of the distinguished pupils of Photius, Arethas, bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia (c. 907-932), devoted himself with remarkable energy to collecting and expounding the Greek classics.

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  • At Ramsey he wrote for his pupils a scholarly work dealing with points of prosody and pronunciation, and exhibiting an accurate knowledge of Virgil and Horace.

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  • 1120), was still perpetuated by his pupils.

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  • Among the most distinguished pupils of the latter was Leonardo Bruni, who, about 1405, wrote " the earliest humanistic tract on education expressly addressed to a lady."

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  • Among his occasional pupils.

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  • During the brief existence of their schools their most celebrated pupils were Tillemont and Racine.

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  • Daunou (October 1795), which divided the pupils of the " central schools " into three groups, according to age, with corresponding subjects of study: (r) twelve to fourteen, = drawing, natural history, Greek and Latin, and a choice of modern languages; (2) fourteen to sixteen, - mathematics, physics, chemistry; (3) over sixteen, - general grammar, literature, history and constitutional law.

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  • pupils in a thousand graduated phrases distributed over a hundred instructive chapters, while the Latin authors were banished because of their difficulty and their " paganism" (1631).

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  • By the scheme of 1901 the pupils of the Realgymnasium, the Oberrealschule and the Gymnasium were admitted to the university on equal terms in virtue of their leaving-certificates, but Greek and Latin were still required for students of classics or divinity.

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  • Bennett of Cornell in 1901, a year in which it was estimated that this pronunciation was in use by more than 96% of the Latin pupils in the secondary schools.

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  • Harris, the U.S. commissioner of education, and they were able to report that, in all the five groups into which they had divided the states, the number of pupils pursuing the study of Latin and Greek showed a remarkable advance, especially in the most progressive states of the middle west.

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  • By a law of 1904 all teachers who taught an average of 15 pupils were to receive at least $300.

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  • In Rome he lectured on rhetoric and philosophy, and collected around him many eminent pupils, amongst whom Cicero was the most famous and the most enthusiastic. None of his works is extant; our knowledge of his views is derived from Numenius, Sextus Empiricus and Cicero.

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  • The state grants scholarships tenable at European universities to promising pupils, and there are three important public libraries.

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  • Though he was not a good teacher, his influence both on his pupils and on those few intimate friends for whom alone he relaxed the gravity of his manner was profound, and, little as he-was known to the white inhabitants of Lexington, he was revered by the slaves, to whom he showed uniform kindness, and for whose moral instruction he worked unceasingly.

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  • From 1830 to 1833 he had as pupils a number of men (including W.

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  • Amongst his pupils, Amelius and Porphyry are the most eminent.

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  • He received his early education in the school of Kirkcaldy under David Miller, amongst whose pupils were many who were afterwards distinguished men.

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  • to be found in the development of the primary schools, of which there were 8226 in 1874, with an attendance of 360,000 pupils.

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  • The private, religious and association schools numbered 2281, with 135,838 pupils.

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  • For secondary instruction the national and state schools numbered 36 with 4642 pupils, and for professional instruction 65 with 9018 students, of whom 3790 were women.

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  • Like the Lyceum of Galata Serai in Constantinople, it has two sets of professors, Turkish and French, and a full course of education in each language, the pupils following both courses.

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  • To this is added a " Literary Fund " (designed originally for founding a college) which is derived from the proceeds of a state tax on the deposits, stock, &c. of savings banks, trust companies, loan and trust companies, building and loan associations and other similar corporations not residing in the state, and a portion of the proceeds of a dog tax, both of which are distributed among the several districts in proportion to the number of pupils not less than five years of age who have attended school at least two weeks.

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  • All taxes on savings banks are distributed to the towns in which the depositors reside, the tax on non-resident depositors constituting a Literary Fund which is distributed to the towns on the basis of the number of pupils in each.

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  • Fittig and his pupils (Annalen, 1883, 216, pp. loo, 115; 1885, 227, pp. 55, 119), in which it was shown that the aldehyde forms an addition compound with the sodium salt of the fatty acid, and that the acetic anhydride plays the part of a dehydrating agent.

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