This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

pupil

pupil

pupil Sentence Examples

  • Please tell your little pupil many things when you have much time.

    135
    72
  • by two naturalists, Sir Joseph Banks and Dr Solander, a pupil of Linnaeus, as well as by two astronomers.

    129
    43
  • But the pupil soon found his teacher to be a charlatan, and taught himself, aided by commentaries, to master logic, geometry and astronomy.

    111
    47
  • My little pupil continues to manifest the same eagerness to learn as at first.

    55
    54
  • The next day, every pupil except one had written a composition.

    41
    35
  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.

    35
    24
  • In his youth he was a pupil of Thomas A.

    34
    36
  • He afterwards became a pupil of the Sorbonne, and received the degree of B.D.

    32
    28
  • The names of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller will always be linked together, and it is necessary to understand what Dr. Howe did for his pupil before one comes to an account of Miss Sullivan's work.

    23
    15
  • Another suggestion, which rests, however, merely on its own internal probability, is that Squarcione had at the outset used his pupil Andrea as the unavowed executant of certain commissions, but that after a while Andrea began painting on his own account, thus injuring the professional interests of his chief.

    18
    20
  • Your loving little pupil, HELEN A. KELLER.

    15
    13
  • His pupil Joseph Albo in his `Iggarim had the same two objects.

    14
    12
  • In 1881 and 1884 he printed some notes on the elements of vector analysis for the use of his students; these were never formally published, but they formed the basis of a text-book on Vector Analysis which was published by his pupil, E.

    13
    14
  • Helen Keller became so rapidly a distinctive personality that she kept her teacher in a breathless race to meet the needs of her pupil, with no time or strength to make a scientific study.

    12
    13
  • The subsequent development of rack railways is especially associated with a Swiss engineer, Nicholas Riggenbach, and his pupil Roman Abt, and the forms of rack introduced by them are those most commonly used.

    11
    18
  • CALLISTHENES (c. 360-328 B.C.), of Olynthus, Greek historian, a relative and pupil of Aristotle, through whose recommendation he was appointed to attend Alexander the Great in his Asiatic expedition.

    10
    10
  • In a year after she first went to Helen Keller, Miss Sullivan found herself and her pupil the centre of a stupendous fiction.

    8
    9
  • "Look how many charming young ladies-" He turned with the same request to Denisov who was also a former pupil of his.

    8
    10
  • The only time she had to prepare herself for the work with her pupil was from August, 1886, when Captain Keller wrote, to February, 1887.

    7
    9
  • Denisov sat down by the old ladies and, leaning on his saber and beating time with his foot, told them something funny and kept them amused, while he watched the young people dancing, Iogel with Natasha, his pride and his best pupil, were the first couple.

    7
    9
  • It seems to be certain that the portion usually attributed to Septchenes was, in part at least, the work of his distinguished pupil, Louis XVI.

    7
    10
  • "I expect you have guessed that Prince Vasili has not come and brought his pupil with him" (for some reason Prince Bolkonski referred to Anatole as a "pupil") "for the sake of my beautiful eyes.

    6
    10
  • Willughby, the younger of the two, and at first the other's pupil, seems to have gradually become the master; but, he dying before the promise of his life was fulfilled, his writings were given to the world by his friend Ray, who, adding to them from his own stores, published the Ornithologia in Latin in 1676, and in English with many emendations in 1678.

    5
    6
  • In this account of the picnic we get an illuminating glimpse of Miss Sullivan's skill in teaching her pupil during play hours.

    5
    7
  • Stevenson, whom Miss Sullivan likes and used to read to her pupil, is another marked influence.

    5
    7
  • Rashi was a pupil of Jacob ben Yaqar, and studied at Worms and Mainz.

    5
    8
  • Jeremy Taylor was a pupil of Thomas Lovering, at the newly founded Perse grammar school.

    5
    8
  • by bringing about the marriage of his pupil with Mademoiselle de Blois, a natural but legitimated daughter of the king; and for this service he was rewarded with the gift of the abbey of St Just in Picardy.

    5
    12
  • In grammar he followed Hayyuj, whose pupil he was.

    5
    12
  • But, when increased knowledge of Aristotle's texts (and of the commentaries) led to the victory of a supposed Aristotelianism over a supposed Platonism, Albertus Magnus, and his still more distinguished pupil Thomas Aquinas, mark certain doctrines as belonging to faith but not to reason.

    5
    12
  • The new tsar, Alexander III., was an apt pupil of his tutor Pobedonostsev (q.v.), the celebrated procurator of the Holy Synod, for whom the representative system was a modern lie," and his reign covered a period of frank reaction, during which there was not only no question of affected even the stolid and apparently immovable masses of the peasantry.

    5
    12
  • It ends with the destruction of Jerusalem by the armies of the Roman Empire, which was, like Alexander, at once the masterful pupil and the docile patron of Hellenism.

    5
    14
  • His favourite pupil was known as Carlo del Mantegna; Caroto of Verona was another pupil, Bonsignori an imitator.

    4
    7
  • In the course of his wanderings he settled for a time at Wurzburg, where he had as a pupil Me'ir of Rothenburg !d.

    4
    7
  • Asher ben Jehiel, a pupil of Me'ir of Rothenburg, was the author of the popular Talmudic compendium, generally quoted as Rabbenu Asher, on the lines of Alfasi, besides other halakhic works.

    4
    7
  • By watching them, she learned to treat her pupil as nearly as possible like an ordinary child.

    4
    8
  • Bernhard Walther, a rich patrician, became his pupil and patron; and they together equipped the first European observatory, for which Regiomontanus himself constructed instruments of an improved type (described in his posthumous Scripta, Nuremberg, 1544).

    3
    5
  • His writings, consisting of short poems, philosophical essays, grammatical notes and letters, were published after his death by his pupil Jacob Faber.

    3
    5
  • From your affectionate little pupil, HELEN A. KELLER.

    3
    5
  • The reason why she read to her pupil so many good books is due, in some measure, to the fact that she had so recently recovered her eyesight.

    3
    5
  • The Romanesque cathedral contains some interesting examples of native art (by Giovanni Martini da Udine, a pupil of Raphael, and others).

    3
    6
  • In October of that year the district was ceded to the East India Company in absolute sovereignty by Raja Sharabhoji, pupil of the missionary Schwarz.

    3
    6
  • EUTYCHIDES, of Sicyon in Achaea, Greek sculptor of the latter part of the 4th century B.C., was a pupil of Lysippus.

    2
    4
  • I regard my pupil as a free and active being, whose own spontaneous impulses must be my surest guide.

    2
    4
  • After the first year or so of elementary work she met her pupil on equal terms, and they read and enjoyed good books together.

    2
    4
  • It was at his house, full of all the wondrous, half-forbidden novelties of the west, that Alexius, after the death of his first consort, Martha, met Matvyeev's favourite pupil, the beautiful Natalia Naruishkina, whom he married on the 21st of January 1672.

    2
    5
  • During the second period the pupil has a choice of four courses: (1) Latin and Greek; (2) Latin and sciences; (3) Latin and modern languages; (4) sciences and modern languages.

    2
    5
  • Antisthenes was a pupil of Socrates, from whom he imbibed the fundamental ethical precept that virtue, not pleasure, is the end of existence.

    2
    5
  • in 1040 at Mainz), a famous Talmudist and com mentator, his pupil Jacob ben Yaqar, and Moses of Narbonne, called ha-Darshan, the "Exegete," were the forerunners of the greatest of all Jewish commentators, Solomon ben Isaac (Rashi), who died at Troyes in 1105.

    2
    6
  • The first lasts four years, and at the end of this the pupil may obtain (after examination) the certificate of secondary studies.

    2
    8
  • Remember, I'm a stupid pupil.

    1
    0
  • He purchased from the family of Neleus of Skepsis in the Troad manuscripts of the works of Aristotle and Theophrastus (including their libraries), which had been given to Neleus by Theophrastus himself, whose pupil Neleus had been.

    1
    0
  • Mantegna was, as he deserved to be, Squarcione's favourite pupil.

    1
    0
  • From the testimony of his pupil, and the still more conclusive evidence of his own correspondence with the father, Pavilliard seems to have been a man of singular good sense, temper and tact.

    1
    3
  • Nevertheless, even after the second marriage of Paul Panin maintained all his old influence over his pupil, who, like himself, was now a warm admirer of the king of Prussia.

    1
    3
  • Hugh's pupil, Richard of St Victor, declares, in opposition to dialectic scholasticism, that the objects of mystic contemplation are partly above reason, and partly, as in the intuition of the Trinity, contrary to reason.

    1
    3
  • At Vienna, from 1452, he was the pupil and associate of George Purbach (1423-1461), and they jointly undertook a reform of astronomy rendered necessary by the errors they detected in the Alphonsine Tables.

    1
    3
  • But neither temperament nor training allowed her to make her pupil the object of any experiment or observation which did not help in the child's development.

    1
    3
  • I had an idea that I could win the love and confidence of my little pupil by the same means that I should use if she could see and hear.

    1
    3
  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.

    1
    3
  • When Miss Sullivan went out in the barnyard and picked up a little chicken and talked to Helen about it, she was giving a kind of instruction impossible inside four walls, and impossible with more than one pupil at a time.

    1
    3
  • And finally all the conditions were good for that first nature school, in which the teacher and pupil played together, exploring together and educating themselves, pupil and teacher inseparable.

    1
    3
  • He was present with his pupil at the battle of Steinkirk, and "faced fire," says Marshal Luxembourg, "like a grenadier."

    1
    4
  • His chief pupil, Johann Salomo Semler, is sometimes called the father of German rationalism.

    1
    4
  • When fully dilated, the pupil is round in all birds; when contracted it is usually round, rarely oval as in the fowl.

    1
    4
  • Zeno was a pupil of Crates, from whom he learned the moral worth of self-control and indifference to sensual indulgence.

    1
    4
  • The progress of primary education is illustrated by the fact that, while in 1885 there was one school for every 2665 inhabitants and one pupil for every 48 inhabitants, in 1898 the figures were 1643 and 31 inhabitants.

    1
    4
  • GUARINO [GUARINUS] DA VERONA (1370-1460), one of the Italian restorers of classical learning, was born in 1370 at Verona, and studied Greek at Constantinople, where for five years he was the pupil of Manuel Chrysoloras.

    1
    4
  • TIMON (c. 320-230), of Phlius, Greek sceptic philosopher and satirical poet, a pupil of Stilpo the Megarian and Pyrrho of Elis.

    1
    4
  • At the outset, indeed, there was one considerable obstacle to the free intercourse of tutor and pupil: M.

    1
    4
  • He assures us that his tutor did not complain of any inaptitude on the pupil's part, and that the pupil was as happily unconscious of any on his own; but here he broke off.

    1
    4
  • He was a pupil of Azo, and the master of Odofredus, of Hostiensis, and of Jacobus de Ravanis, the last of whom has the reputation of having first applied dialectical forms to legal science.

    1
    5
  • McENTEE, Jervis (1828-1891), American artist, was born at Rondout, New York, on the 14th of July 1828, and was a pupil of Frederick E.

    1
    5
  • When nineteen he became the pupil of a doctor in Shrewsbury, also acting as dresser in the infirmary there.

    1
    5
  • However this may be, he came under the influence of Socrates, and became a devoted pupil.

    0
    0
  • But this difficulty was soon removed by the pupil's diligence; the very exigencies of his situation were of service to him in calling forth all his powers, and he studied the language with such success that at the close of his five years' exile he declares that he " spontaneously thought " in French rather than in English, and that it had become more familiar to " ear, tongue and pen."

    0
    0
  • Under the judicious regulations of his new tutor a methodical course of reading was marked out, and most ardently prosecuted; the pupil's progress was proportionably rapid.

    0
    0
  • The latter's name seems not to be even mentioned by him, but Nitzsch was in Paris in the summer of 1827, and it is almost impossible that he should not have heard of L'Herminier's labours, unless the relations between the followers of Cuvier to whom Nitzsch attached himself, and those of De Blainville, whose pupil L'Herminier was, were such as to forbid anv communication between the rival schools.

    0
    0
  • The republic entrusted the work to the Florentine Verrocchio, who dying before the statue was completed begged the government to allow his pupil Lorenzo di Credi to carry it to a conclusion.

    0
    0
  • Neander found in him the very impulse which he needed, while Schleiermacher found a pupil of thoroughly congenial feeling, and one destined to carry out his views in a higher and more effective Christian form than he himself was capable of imparting to them.

    0
    0
  • He is described as the eighth leader of the Pythagorean school, and was a pupil (not the teacher, as some have maintained) of Philolaus.

    0
    0
  • In the book as we have it there is no orderly exposition of a theory; it rather has the appearance of a collection of remarks jotted down by a pupil (somewhat after the manner of Xenophon's Memorabilia), or of extracts from a sage's notebook.

    0
    0
  • Its concluding words suggest that its production was due to Khalid ben Yezid (died in 708), who was a pupil of the Syrian monk Marianus, and according to the Kitab-al-Fihrist was the first Mussulman writer on alchemy.

    0
    0
  • de la Boe Sylvius (1614-1672), though not by his pupil Otto Tachenius, and by J.

    0
    0
  • It was Alexander II., the former pupil of Lanfranc, who gave the Norman Conquest the papal benediction - a notable advantage to William at the moment, but subsequently the cause of serious embarrassments.

    0
    0
  • He was subsequently a pupil first of Stilpo and then of Phaedo of Elis, whose school he transferred to Eretria, by which name it was afterwards known.

    0
    0
  • Arfvedson, a pupil of Berzelius, detected a new element, which he named lithium, in various minerals - notably petalite.

    0
    0
  • The influence of Schleiermacher, whose pupil Leonhard Usteri in his Entwickelung der paulinischen Lehrbegriffs (1824) expressed strong doubts as to Ephesians, carried weight.

    0
    0
  • One of the most distinguished among them was Thales of Miletus (6 4 o -543 B.C.), the founder of the Ionian school of philosophy, whose pupil, Anaximander (611-546 B.C.) is credited by Eratosthenes with having designed the first map of the world.

    0
    0
  • Dicaearcus of Messana in Sicily, a pupil of Aristotle (326-296 B.C.), is the author of a topographical account of Hellas, with maps, of which only fragments are preserved; he is credited with having estimated the size of the earth, and, as far as known he was the first to draw a parallel across a map. 4 This parallel, or dividing line, called diaphragm (partition) by a commentator, extended due east from the Pillars of Hercules, through the Mediterranean, and along the Taurus and Imaus (Himalaya) to the eastern ocean.

    0
    0
  • Phison +barya L op felice Other Catalans are, Jahuda Cresques, a Jew of Barcelona, the supposed author of the famous Catalan map of the world (1375), Guglielmo Solerio (1384), Mecia de Viladestes (1413-1433) Gabriel de Valleseche (1439-1447) and Pietro Roselli, a pupil of Beccario of Genoa (1462).

    0
    0
  • Stabius (1502) and his pupil J.

    0
    0
  • There is one circumstance, however, which seems to mark a difference between the two animals: the eye of the dog of every country and species has a circular pupil, but the position or form of the pupil is oblique in the wolf.

    0
    0
  • His Son, Alexandre Edmond Becquerel (1820-1891), was born in Paris on the 24th of March 1820, and was in turn his pupil, assistant and successor at the Musee d'Histoire Naturelle; he was also appointed professor at the short-lived Agronomic Institute at Versailles in 1849, and in 1853 received the chair of physics at the Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers.

    0
    0
  • A pupil of Nessus, or, as some accounts prefer, of Democritus himself, he was a complete sceptic. He accepted the Democritean theory of atoms and void and the plurality of worlds, but held a theory of his own that the stars are formed from day to day by the moisture in the air under the heat of the sun.

    0
    0
  • Another METRODORUS1 of Lampsacus was a pupil of Anaxagoras, and one of the earliest to attempt' to interpret Homer allegorically.

    0
    0
  • Metrodorus of Stratonice was a pupil, first of Apollodorus, and later of Carneades.

    0
    0
  • He was taught first by his father Spintharus, a pupil of Socrates, and later by the Pythagoreans, Lamprus of Erythrae and Xenophilus, from whom he learned the theory of music. Finally he studied under Aristotle at Athens, and was deeply annoyed, it is said, when Theophrastus was appointed head of the school on Aristotle's death.

    0
    0
  • On the duke of Buckingham's nomination, Wesley was for six years a pupil at Charterhouse.

    0
    0
  • And not for them only; for in the school of York, founded by his pupil Archbishop Ecgberht, was trained Alcuin (Ealhwine) the initiator under Charles the Great of the Frankish schools, which did so much for learning on the continent.

    0
    0
  • In the year 1459 John Argyropoulos was lecturing on the Greek language and literature at Florence, and Marsilio became his pupil.

    0
    0
  • In 1811 Morse, whose tastes during his early years led him more strongly towards art than towards science, became the pupil of Washington Allston, and accompanied his master to England, where he remained four years.

    0
    0
  • In the same year he accompanied his pupil to Cambridge, and resided with him as governor, in term time, for the next four years.

    0
    0
  • His pupil then went abroad, but Law was left at Putney, where he remained in Gibbon's house for more than ten years, acting as a religious guide not only to the family but to a number of earnest-minded folk who came to consult him.

    0
    0
  • There he was presently joined by two ladies: Mrs Hutcheson, the rich widow of his old friend, who recommended her on his death-bed to place herself under Law's spiritual guidance, and Miss Hester Gibbon, sister to his late pupil.

    0
    0
  • This prolific author copied, and so imported into Ottoman literature, a didactic style of ghazel-writing which was then being introduced in Persia by the poet Sa'ib; but so closely did the pupil follow in the footsteps of his master that it is not always easy to know that his lines are intended to be Turkish.

    0
    0
  • The little that is known of him is to be found in his letters and the encomium by his pupil and successor Choricius.

    0
    0
  • It is conjectured that he went to his old pupil Alexander, who was at that time bishop of Flaviada in Cappadocia, and that when his pupil was raised to the see of Jerusalem Clement followed him there.

    0
    0
  • The death of Toledo in 1567 threatened a fatal blow at the satisfactory completion of the enterprise, but a worthy successor was found in Juan Herrera, Toledo's favourite pupil, who adhered in the main to his master's designs.

    0
    0
  • The "Cleveland plan," in force in the public schools, minimizes school routine, red tape and frequent examinations, puts great stress on domestic and manual training courses, and makes promotion in the grammar schools depend on the general knowledge and development of the pupil, as estimated by a teacher who is supposed to make a careful study of the individual.

    0
    0
  • There are a technical school, an intermediate school for boys and another for girls, a "higher-grade" and a pupil teachers' school.

    0
    0
  • The Dantzig painter named in Italy Pandolfo Reschi was his pupil.

    0
    0
  • As his health improved it was hoped that he would be able to adopt the family profession of civil engineering, and in 1868 he went to Anstruther and then to Wick as a pupil engineer.

    0
    0
  • He also trained Georgians in the art of printing, and cut the type with which under his pupil Mihail Ishtvanovitch they printed the first Georgian Gospels (Tiflis, 170 9).

    0
    0
  • His pupil, Gentile da Fabriano (1370-1428), was a painter of considerably greater skill and wider knowledge; but there are no important works of his at Fabriano.

    0
    0
  • In the July following he moved into a little house, built for him by his pupil and friend, the Assyriologist Francois Thureau Dangin, within the latter's park at Garnay, by Dreux.

    0
    0
  • At an early age he came to Athens, and was induced to remain by the fame of Socrates, whose pupil he became.

    0
    0
  • His daughter Arete, and her son Aristippus (µr)Tp03LSaKTos, " pupil of his mother"), carried on the school after his death.

    0
    0
  • The pupil is at first contracted, and afterwards dilated.

    0
    0
  • Previously to this, Lankester's pupil Gulland had shown (1885) that in the embryo the coxal gland is a comparatively simple tube, which opens to the exterior in this position and by its other extremity into a coelomic space.

    0
    0
  • Then again, the ears are large in proportion to the head, the pupil of the eye is elliptical and vertical when in a strong light, and the female has six pairs of teats, in place of the three to five pairs found in dogs, wolves and jackals.

    0
    0
  • in the Campo Santo of Pisa; Agostino and Agnolo, who in 1330 carved the fine tomb of Bishop Guido Tarlati in the cathedral of Arezzo; Lando di Pietro (14th century), architect, entrusted by the Sienese commune with the proposed enlargement of the cathedral (1339), and perhaps author of the famous Gothic reliquary containing the head of S Galgano in the Chiesa del Santuccio, which, however, is more usually attributed to Ugolino di Vieri, author of the tabernacle in the cathedral at Orvieto; Giacopo (or Jacopo) della Quercia, whose lovely fountain, the Fonte Gaia, in the Piazza del Campo has been recently restored; Lorenzo di Pietro (Il Vecchietta), a pupil of Della Quercia and an excellent artist in marble and bronze; Francesco d'Antonio, a skilful goldsmith of the 1 6th century; Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1502), painter, sculptor, military engineer and writer on art; Giacomo Cozzarelli (15th century); and Lorenzo Mariano, surnamed 11 Marrina (16th century).

    0
    0
  • To encourage the instruction of children who by reason of distance cannot attend a government or government-aided school, grants-in-aid are made for each pupil attending farm schools.

    0
    0
  • But in the school of Fulda, presided over by his pupil Hrabanus Maurus (776-856), there are to be found some fresh contributions to the discussion.

    0
    0
  • Since then, says their regretful pupil, " less time and less care have been bestowed on grammar, and persons who profess all arts, liberal and mechanical, are ignorant of the primary art, without which a man proceeds in vain to the rest.

    0
    0
  • i Remigius of Auxerre, pupil of Eric, became the most celebrated professor of dialectic in the Parisian schools of the lcth century..

    0
    0
  • From these sources it appears that he professed successively two opinions on the nature of the universals, having been dislodged from his first position by the criticism of Abelard, his quondam pupil.

    0
    0
  • William of Conches, a pupil of Bernard's, devoting himself to psychological and physiological questions, was of less importance for the specific logico-metaphysical problem.

    0
    0
  • The book was undoubtedly the precursor of the famous Books of Sentences of Abelard's own pupil Peter Lombard and others, and of all the Summae theologiae with which the church was presently to abound.

    0
    0
  • Peter of Poitiers, the pupil of Peter the Lombard, flourished about 1160-1170.

    0
    0
  • Alexander of Hales was succeeded in his chair of instruction by his pupil John of Rochelle, who died in 1271 but taught only till 1253.

    0
    0
  • 12 John of Rochelle was succeeded in 1253 by John Fidanza, better known as Bonaventura (q.v.), who also had been a pupil of Alexander of Hales.

    0
    0
  • The limits of his long life include that of his still greater pupil, Thomas Aquinas (1227-1274).

    0
    0
  • The pupil, entering into his master's labours, was able from the first to take a more comprehensive survey of the whole field; and in addition he was doubtless endowed with an intellect which was finer, though it might not be more powerful, than his master's.

    0
    0
  • A pupil of The Scotus, he carried his master's criticism farther, and Twofold denied that any theological doctrines were rationally Truth.

    0
    0
  • After studying at Leipzig and Bonn, where he was a pupil of Dahlmann, he established himself as a privatdozent at Leipzig, lecturing on history and politics.

    0
    0
  • Of his discovery we know nothing except that he declared it to his pupil Antonio Marie Floridas.

    0
    0
  • Haeckel himself, with his pupil MikluchoMaclay, had in the meantime made studies on the growth from the egg of Sponges - studies which resulted in the complete separation of the unicellular or equicellular Protozoa from the Sponges, hitherto confounded with them.

    0
    0
  • To get an idea of the magnitudes of the quantities involved, let us take the case of an aperture of 1 in., about that of the pupil of the eye.

    0
    0
  • The latter element must eventually be decreased until less than the diameter of the pupil of the eye.

    0
    0
  • It is necessary that the aperture of the pupil be accommodated to the angular extent of the spectrum, or reciprocally.

    0
    0
  • Black bands will be too fine to be well seen unless the aperture (2h) of the pupil be somewhat contracted.

    0
    0
  • The point at issue was, that neither in the polyphonic school, in which Zarlino was educated, nor in the later monodic school, of which his recalcitrant pupil, Vincenzo Galilei, was the most redoubtable champion, could those proportions be tolerated in practice, however attractive they might be to the theorist in their mathematical aspect.

    0
    0
  • His pupil Richer has left us a detailed account of his system of teaching at Reims. So far as the trivium is concerned, his text-books were Victorinus's translation of Porphyry's Isagoge, Aristotle's Categories, and Cicero's Topics with Manlius's Commentaries.

    0
    0
  • Ample facilities were given for the teaching of Dutch, but it was provided that no pupil should be promoted to a higher standard unless he (or she) was making satisfactory progress in the knowledge of English.

    0
    0
  • The more important, besides Jacob of Edessa and Barhebraeus, are `Ananisho` of Hedhaiyabh, Uonain ibn Ishak, his pupil Bar 'Ali, Bar Saroshwai (early 10th century), Bar Bahlul (middle of 10th century), Elias of Tirhan (t1049), Elias bar Shinaya (above), John Bar Zo'bi (beginning of 13th century) and Jacob bar Shakko.

    0
    0
  • It is safe to assume that the original draft of this, afterwards enlarged by his pupil, Alfric Bata, was by Alfric, and represents what his own scholar days were like.

    0
    0
  • Several of its churches are architecturally interesting, especially the Madonna delle Lacrime (1487) outside the town, the elegant early Renaissance architecture of which resembles that of the Madonna del Calcinaio at Cortona, and most of them (and also the municipal picture gallery) contain paintings by artists of the Umbrian school - notably Lo Spagna, a pupil of Perugino.

    0
    0
  • A pupil of his father, Thomas Thornycroft, and of the Royal Academy schools, he was still a student when he was called upon to assist his father in carrying out the important fountain in Park Lane, London.

    0
    0
  • professor of mathematics in the school in which he had been a pupil.

    0
    0
  • Herophilus (335-280 B.C.) was a Greek of Chalcedon, a pupil of the schools both of Cos and of Cnidus.

    0
    0
  • The Erasistrateans paved the way for what was in some respects the most important school which Alexandria produced, that known as the empiric, which, though it recognized no master by name, may be considered to have been founded by Philinus of Cos (280 B.C.), a pupil of Herophilus; but Serapion, a great name in antiquity, and Glaucias of Tarentum, who traced the empirical doctrine back to the writings of Hippocrates, are also named among its founders.

    0
    0
  • His friend and pupil AvERROES of Cordova (q.v.), so well known for his philosophical writings, was also an author in medical subjects, and as such widely read in Latin.

    0
    0
  • His countryman and pupil, George Cheyne (1671-1743), who lived some years at Bath, published a new theory of fevers on the mechanical system, which had a great reputation.

    0
    0
  • Mead was the pupil of the equally popular and successful John Radcliffe (1650-1714), who had acquired from Sydenham a contempt for book-learning, and belonged to no school in medicine but the school of common sense.

    0
    0
  • Many of the leading English physicians of the 18th century studied there; Gerard Van Swieten (1700-1772), a pupil of Boerhaave, transplanted the latter's method of teaching to Vienna, and founded the noted Vienna school of medicine.

    0
    0
  • In Germany the only important school of practical medicine was that of Vienna, as revived by Gerard van Swieten (1700-1772), a pupil of Boerhaave, under the patronage of Maria Theresa.

    0
    0
  • William Hunter (1718-1783) was known in London as a brilliant teacher of anatomy and successful obstetric physician; his younger brother and pupil, John Hunter (1728-1793), was also a teacher of anatomy, and practised as a surgeon.

    0
    0
  • A condition of this reform was the need of a preliminary training of the mind of the pupil in pure science, even in physics and chemistry; that is to say, before introduction into his professional studies.

    0
    0
  • In collaboration with his pupil Andre Reville, he wrote the chapters on "L'Emancipation des villes, les communes et les bourgeoisies" and "Le Commerce et l'industrie au moyen age" for the Histoire generate of Lavisse and Rambaud.

    0
    0
  • At last, in September 1740, master and pupil met for the first time at Cleves, an interview followed three months later by a longer visit.

    0
    0
  • Before he was sixteen he attended lectures at Owens College, and at eighteen he gained a mathematical scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1871 as senior wrangler and first Smith's prizeman, having previously taken the degree of D.Sc. at London University and won a Whitworth scholarship. Although elected a fellow and tutor of his college, he stayed up at Cambridge only for a very short time, preferring to learn practical engineering as a pupil in the works in which his father was a partner.

    0
    0
  • ZALEUCUS, of Locri Epizephyrii in Magna Graecia, Greek lawgiver, is supposed to have flourished about 660 B.C. The statement that he was a pupil of Pythagoras is an anachronism.

    0
    0
  • Instruction for teachers is provided in pupil teachers' centres (preparatory), and in residential and day training colleges.

    0
    0
  • This is the more modern view, in contrast to the earlier theory most generally accepted, according to which he flourished about l00 B.C. The earlier theory started from the superscription of one of his works, Ηρωνος Κτησιβίον βελοποιϊκά, from which it was inferred that Hero was a pupil of Ctesibius.

    0
    0
  • Nor can the relation of master and pupil be certainly inferred from the superscription quoted (observe the omission of any article), which really asserts no more than that Hero re-edited an earlier treatise by Ctesibius, and implies nothing about his being an immediate predecessor.

    0
    0
  • George Schwanhart, a pupil of Caspar Lehmann, started glass-cutting at Ratisbon, and about 1690 Stephen Schmidt and Hermann Schwinger introduced the crafts of cutting and engraving glass in Nuremberg.

    0
    0
  • There he received a good training in philosophy and medicine, and is said to have been a pupil of Avempace.

    0
    0
  • Assyria in this, as in other matters, the servile pupil of Babylonia, built its palaces and temples of brick, though stone was the natural building material of the country, even preserving the brick platform, so necessary in the marshy soil of Babylonia, but little needed in the north.

    0
    0
  • A native of Apamea in Syria and a pupil of Panaetius, he spent after his teacher's death many years in travel and scientific researches in Spain (particularly at Gades), Africa, Italy, Gaul, Liguria, Sicily and on the eastern shores of the Adriatic. When he settled as a teacher at Rhodes (hence his surname "the Rhodian") his fame attracted numerous scholars; next to Panaetius he did most, by writings and personal intercourse, to spread Stoicism in the Roman world, and he became well known to many leading men, such as Marius, Rutilius Rufus, Pompey and Cicero.

    0
    0
  • The first to establish a beet-sugar factory was his pupil and successor, Franz Carl Achard, at Cunern (near Breslau) in Silesia in 180r.

    0
    0
  • In 1806, shortly after graduation, he became Repetent and Privatdozent in that university; and, as he was fond of afterwards relating, had Neander for his first pupil in Hebrew.

    0
    0
  • See The Life Work of Liebig (London, 1876), by his pupil A.

    0
    0
  • De Wette was dismissed from his professorship in 1819, and Bleek, a favourite pupil, incurred the suspicion of the government as an extreme democrat.

    0
    0
  • His pupil Sibawaihi, a Persian, wrote the grammar known simply as The Book, which is generally regarded in the East as authoritative and almost above criticism.

    0
    0
  • It is said that he received nearly £400 from a single pupil.

    0
    0
  • He learned philosophy in the Ionian school, and was perhaps a pupil of Democritus, though this is doubtful on chronological grounds.

    0
    0
  • He was, however, restored to his monastery in 842, and died on the 18th of August 849, on an embassy to his former pupil.

    0
    0
  • His pupil, Rainer Gemma-Frisius, used it for the observation of the solar eclipse of January 1544 at Louvain, and fully described the methods he adopted for making measurements and drawings of the eclipsed sun, in his De Radio Astronomico et Geometrico (1545).

    0
    0
  • Moestlin and his pupil Kepler - the latter applying it in 1607 to the observation of a transit of Mercury - also by Johann Fabricius, in 1611, for the first observations of sun-spots.

    0
    0
  • Various writers on optics in the 17th century discussed the principle of the simple dark chamber alone and with single or compound lenses, among them Jean Tarde (Les Astres de Borbon, 1623); Descartes, the pupil of Kepler (Dioptrique, 1637); Bettinus (Apiaria, 1645); A.

    0
    0
  • Miss Sullivan, whose ability as a teacher must be considered almost as marvellous as the talent of her pupil, was throughout her devoted companion.

    0
    0
  • He was born of heathen parents in Africa about 260, and became a pupil of Arnobius, whom he far excelled in style though his knowledge of the Scriptures was equally slight.

    0
    0
  • He exhorts a former pupil, Demetrianus, not to be led astray by wealth from virtue; and he demonstrates the providence of God from the adaptability and beauty of the human body.

    0
    0
  • There he had William Cullen bor his instructor in chemistry, and the relation between the two soon became that of professor and assistant rather than of master and pupil.

    0
    0
  • DICAEARCHUS, of Messene in Sicily, Peripatetic philosopher and pupil of Aristotle, historian, and geographer, flourished about 320 B.C. He was a friend of Theophrastus, to whom he dedicated the majority of his works.

    0
    0
  • When young, Arrian was the pupil and friend of Epictetus, who had probably withdrawn to Nicopolis, when Domitian expelled all philosophers from Rome.

    0
    0
  • During the years1823-1826he went through the prescribed course at the divinity hall, then presided over by Dr Stevenson MacGill, and on leaving, accompanied a pupil as private tutor to Eton, where he stayed two years.

    0
    0
  • DISCIPLE, properly a pupil, scholar (Lat.

    0
    0
  • He tried to find pupils to board with him, but only one pupil came, and he was soon sent away for lack of companions.

    0
    0
  • Of his manner and personal appearance we have the following account from one who was his pupil: - " Daily as the clock struck eight on the horologe of the Luxembourg, while the ringing hammer on the bell was yet audible, the door of my room opened, and there entered a man, short, rather stout, almost what one might call sleek, freshly shaven, without vestige of whisker or moustache.

    0
    0
  • The arches of this period are There is every reason to doubt Vasari's statement that Pisanello was a pupil of Andrea del Castagno.

    0
    0
  • Vitruvius Cerdo, possibly a pupil and freedman of the famous writer on architecture.

    0
    0
  • tised by the Kose line, and perhaps by their prede cessors, but it did not take shape as a school until the beginning of the 11th century under Fujiwara no Motomitsu, who was a pupil of Kose no Kinmochi; it then became known as Yamato-ryu, a title which two centuries later was changed to that of Tosa, on the occasion of one of its masters, Fujiwara no Tsunetaka, assuming that appellation as a family name.

    0
    0
  • His brother and pupil.

    0
    0
  • Amongst these the most famous were Goshun (1742-1811), who is sometimes regarded as one of the founders of the school; Sosen (1757-1821), an animal painter of remarkable power, but especially celebrated for pictures of monkey life; ShhO, the younger brother of the last, also an animal painter; ROsetsu (1755-1799), the best landscape painter of his school; Keibun, a younger brother of Goshun, and some later followers of scarcely less fame, notably Hoyen, a pupil of Keibun; Tessan, an adopted son of Sosen; Ippo and YOsai (1788-1878), well known for a remarkable set of volumes, the Zenken kojitsu, containing a long series of portraits of ancient Japanese celebrities.

    0
    0
  • The first historical period of glyptic art in Japan reaches from the end of the 6th to the end of the 12th century, culminating in, the work of the great Nara sculptors, Unkei and Period, his pupil Kwaikei.

    0
    0
  • Ebisei, who moved from Awata to GojO-zaka in 1688; Eisen and Rokubei, pupils of Ebisei; Mokubei, a pupil of Eisen, but more celebrated than his master; Shuhei (1790-1810), Kentei (1782-1820), and Zengoro Hozen, generally known as Eiraku (1790-1850).

    0
    0
  • He summoned to his fief the painter Tangena pupil of the renowned Tanyu, who died in 1674and employed him to paint faience or to furnish designs for the ceramists of Tatsumonji.

    0
    0
  • His lacquer-ware is distinguished for a bold and at times almost eccentric impressionism, and his use of inlay is strongly characteristic. RitsuO (1663-1747), a pupil and contemporary of KOrin, and like him a potter and painter also, was another lacquerer of great skill.

    0
    0
  • c. 1540), a native of Dijon, and pupil of Leonardo da Vinci, but the sculpture of the portals, including "The Last Judgment" on the tympanum of the main portal, is probably from his hand.

    0
    0
  • In 1849 he studied for a few months in Paris, where he copied Titian and Correggio in the Louvre, and then returned to Frankfort, where he settled down to serious art work under Edward Steinle, whose pupil he declared he was "in the fullest sense of the term."

    0
    0
  • Not a few, however, lead a nocturnal life, and many of them have, accordingly, their pupil contracted into a vertical or more rarely a horizontal slit.

    0
    0
  • The pupil remains contracted and reacts to light.

    0
    0
  • Constitutional symptoms appear as a rule in less than fifteen minutes: prostration, staggering, cold sweats, vomiting, feeble and quick pulse, dilatation of the pupil, and slight mental disturbance.

    0
    0
  • The pupil is always dilated and insensitive to light.

    0
    0
  • The pupil is widely dilated and insensible to light.

    0
    0
  • Some of the usual characters employed for systematic purposes, for the making of convenient keys, are the following: The number of rows of scales across the body and in a longitudinal direction; shape and structure of scales, whether smooth or with a longitudinal keel; arrangement of the shields on the head; shape of the contracted pupil.

    0
    0
  • The features by which the treesnakes are distinguished are still more developed in the whip-snakes (Dryophis), whose excessively slender body has been compared to the cord of a whip. Although arboreal, like the former, they are nocturnal in their habits, having a horizontal instead of a round pupil of the eye.

    0
    0
  • The Mexican Trimorphodon much resemble viperine snakes with the flat, triangular head, narrow neck, slit-like pupil and pugnacious disposition.

    0
    0
  • The eye is small, with round pupil, which is so much contracted by the light when the snake is taken out of the water that the animal becomes blinded and is unable to hit any object it attempts to strike.

    0
    0
  • The head is thick, very distinct from the neck and the pupil is vertical, so that these harmless snakes look rather viperish.

    0
    0
  • Portions of the pediments of this temple have been found in the excavations; but no sign has been found of the pediments mentioned by Pausanias, representing on the east Apollo and the Muses, and on the west Dionysus and the Thyiades (Bacchantes), and designed by Praxias, the pupil of Calanias.

    0
    0
  • Samuel's son, Francis Parkman, a graduate of Harvard in 1807, was one of the most eminent of the Boston clergymen, a pupil and friend of Channing, and noted among Unitarians for a broadly tolerant disposition.

    0
    0
  • The average cost per pupil in these schools was 35 s.

    0
    0
  • Its elementary nature was imperfectly understood; and the impure specimens obtained by the early chemists explain, in some measure, its confusion with tin, lead, antimony, zinc and other metals; in 1595 Andreas Libavius confused it with antimony, and in 1675 Nicolas Lemery with zinc. These obscurities began to be finally cleared up with the researches of Johann Heinrich Pott (1692-1777), a pupil of Stahl, published in his Exercitationes chemicae de Wismutho (1769), and of N.

    0
    0
  • The severity of his father's manner was ill-calculated to encourage the first efforts of one so sensitive; but fortunately, at the age of eleven, he became the pupil of his brother Nicolas.

    0
    0
  • The brightness of the image is sometimes in creased by silvering the glass; and on removing a small portion of the silver the observer can Object see the image with part of the pupil while he sees the paper through the unsilvered aperture with the remaining part.

    0
    0
  • When the pupil of the eye is held half over the edge of the prism a, one sees the image of the object with one half of the pupil and the paper with the other half.

    0
    0
  • Don Juan de Zuniga, who was appointed to teach him the use of arms, was more conscientious; but he had a very poor pupil.

    0
    0
  • In the same year his pupil Volter (Die Entstehung der Apok., 1882, 1885) put forward the bold theory that the original Apocalypse consisted of 1.4-6, iv.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently he became a pupil of Lepsius and Brugsch, and devoted himself to the study of Egyptian inscriptions.

    0
    0
  • Johnson, whose chief asset was the MS. tragedy of Irene, was at first the host of his former pupil, who, however, before the end of the year took up his residence at Rochester with John Colson (afterwards Lucasian professor at Cambridge).

    0
    0
  • A large collection of such curious information is contained in the Bibliotheca of Apollodorus, a pupil of Aristarchus who flourished in the and century B.C. Eratosthenes was the first to write on mathematical and physical geography; he also first attempted to draw up a chronological table of the Egyptian kings and of the historical events of Greece.

    0
    0
  • To the same period belongs his institution of the philosophical journal Mind; the first number appeared in January 1876, under the editorship of a former pupil, G.

    0
    0
  • For cities of above 8000 inhabitants (for which alone comparative statistics are annually available), in 1902-1903 the ratio of average attendance to school enrolment, the average number of days' attendance of each pupil enrolled, and the value of school property per capita of pupils in average attendance were higher than in any other state; the average length of the school term was slightly exceeded in eight states; and the total cost of the schools per capita of pupils in average attendance ($39.05) was exceeded in six other states.

    0
    0
  • Of his life little is known, and that little is chiefly derived from the dedicatory letters prefixed to two of his treatises and addressed respectively to Bishop Theodald (not Theobald, as Burney writes the name) of Arezzo, and Michael, a monk of Pomposa and Guido's pupil and friend.

    0
    0
  • At his first appearance in history Guido was a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Pomposa, and it was there that he taught singing and invented his educational method, by means of which, according to his own statement, a pupil might learn within five months what formerly it would have taken him ten years to acquire.

    0
    0
  • The feature of his school which attracted most attention, perhaps, was his scheme for the teacher's receiving punishment, in certain circumstances, at the hands of an offending pupil, whereby the sense of shame might be quickened in the mind of the errant child.

    0
    0
  • At an advanced age he became a pupil of Diogenes the Cynic, and gained such repute as a student of philosophy that he was selected by Alexander to hold a conference with the Indian Gymnosophists.

    0
    0
  • MARCUS PACUVIUS (c. 220-130 B.C.), Roman tragic poet, was the nephew and pupil of Ennius, by whom Roman tragedy was first raised to a position of influence and dignity.

    0
    0
  • From 1737 to 1740 William Hunter was his resident pupil, and at one time they proposed to enter into partnership. In 1740 Cullen took the degree of M.D.

    0
    0
  • Sybel was educated at the gymnasium of his native town, and then at the university of Berlin, where he came under the influence of Savigny and of Ranke, whose most distinguished pupil he was to become.

    0
    0
  • He went to Paris at the age of twenty, and, as a pupil of Corot, came into close touch with the Barbizon masters.

    0
    0
  • He was succeeded at Groningen in 1643 by his pupil Samuel Maresius (1599-1673).

    0
    0
  • As a pupil of the sophist Prodicus he acquired facility in public speaking.

    0
    0
  • He devoted his leisure to the improvement of his economic treatise, which had for some time been out of print, but which the censorship did not permit him to republish; and in 1814 he availed himself (to use his own words) of the sort of liberty arising from the entrance of the allied powers into France to bring out a second edition of the work, dedicated to the emperor Alexander, who had professed himself his pupil.

    0
    0
  • In 1783 he entered the university of Freiburg, where he became a pupil in the seminary for the training of priests, and soon distinguished himself in classical and Oriental philology as well as in biblical exegesis and criticism.

    0
    0
  • In June 1792 he returned home, and, breaking his journey at Bonn, was presented with a Cantata by Beethoven, then aged two-and-twenty, whom he invited to come to Vienna as his pupil.

    0
    0
  • messianische Weissagungen) were published in 1880 after his death, along with a portrait and biographical sketch by his pupil, J.

    0
    0
  • Together with the historian Theopompus he was a pupil of Isocrates, in whose school he attended two courses of rhetoric. But he does not seem to have made much progress in the art, and it is said to have been at the suggestion of Isocrates himself that he took up literary composition and the study of history.

    0
    0
  • Alcamenes, the rival or pupil of Pheidias, was the sculptor of a berm at Athens, a copy of which, dating from Roman times, was discovered at Pergamum in 1903.

    0
    0
  • The king was struck with the lad's bright grey eyes and pleasant humorous face; and Brokman, proud of his pupil, made him translate a chapter from a Hebrew Bible first into Latin and then into Danish, for the entertainment of the scholarly monarch.

    0
    0
  • Quesnay died on the 16th of December 1774, having lived long enough to see his great pupil, Turgot, in office as minister of finance.

    0
    0
  • He was released only through the intercession of Queen Mary of Scotland and some of the principal nobility, and retired with his pupil to Bourges.

    0
    0
  • Quetelet, by his pupil and assistant E.

    0
    0
  • Francesco contains famous frescoes by Piero de' Franceschi, representing scenes from the legend of the Holy Cross, and others by Spinello Aretino, a pupil of Giotto.

    0
    0
  • The town also has some buildings by Lazzaro Buggiano, the pupil and adoptive son of Brunelleschi.

    0
    0
  • The senate did most of the current business; Peter Vasilevich Zavadovsky, a pupil of the Jesuits, was minister of education.

    0
    0
  • But though von Richthofen's general conception of the Kuen-lun system was broadly sound and in accordance with facts, the details both of his description and of that of his pupil Wegener' require now very considerable revision, and need even to be in part recast, as a consequence of explorations and investigations made since they wrote by, amongst others, the Russian explorers N.

    0
    0
  • See Phebe Mitchell Kendall, Maria Mitchell: Life, Letters and Journals (Boston, 1896); In Memoriam (Poughkeepsie, 1889), by her pupil and successor at Vassar, Mary W.

    0
    0
  • In the dull round of instruction in "grammar" he did not distinguish himself, and was surpassed by his early friend and companion, William Herman, who was Winckel's favourite pupil.

    0
    0
  • When it was finished, with an ample re-dedication to Mountjoy, a new pupil presented himself, Alexander Stewart, natural son of James IV.

    0
    0
  • When they returned to Rome, his pupil departed to Scotland, to fall a few years later by his father's side at Flodden; Erasmus also found a summons to call him northwards.

    0
    0
  • In this belief he differed from his pupil, Roger Cotes, and from most of the great mathematical astronomers of the 18th century, who worked out in detail the task sketched by the genius of Newton.

    0
    0
  • Contemporary with him were Hugh of St Victor and his pupil Richard of St Victor, both monks of the abbey of St Victor at Paris, the aim of whose teaching, based on that of the PseudoDionysius, was a mystical absorption of thought in the Godhead and the surrender of self to the Eternal Love.

    0
    0
  • The remainder of his life he spent partly in preaching throughout Bavaria and the adjoining districts, partly in retirement in the various houses of his order; in 1270 he preached the eighth Crusade in Austria; almost the last of his labours was the defence of the orthodoxy of his former pupil, Thomas Aquinas.

    0
    0
  • Dante places him with his pupil Aquinas among the great lovers of wisdom (Spiriti Sapienti) in the Heaven of the Sun.

    0
    0
  • As a pupil of the famous Pomponius Laetus, and, subsequently, as a member of the circle of Cosmo de' Medici, he received a finished education.

    0
    0
  • Two critical editions of the Iliad and Odyssey were produced by his successor, Aristarchus, who was librarian until 1 4 6 B.C. and was the founder of scientific scholarship. His distinguished pupil, Dionysius Thrax (born c. 166 B.C.), drew up a Greek grammar which continued in use for more than thirteen centuries.

    0
    0
  • His most famous pupil was Varro (116-27), the six surviving books of whose great work on the Latin language are mainly concerned with the great grammatical controversy on analogy and anomaly - a controversy which also engaged the attention of Cicero and Caesar, and of the elder Pliny and Quintilian.

    0
    0
  • His pupil, Walafrid Strabo, the abbot of Reichenau (d.

    0
    0
  • 1280), and his famous pupil, Thomas Aquinas (d.

    0
    0
  • During the, 8th century the classical scholarship of the Netherlands was under the healthy and stimulating influence of Bentley (1662-1742), who marks the beginning of the English and Dutch period, mainly represented English in Holland by Bentley's younger contemporary and correspondent, Tiberius Hemsterhuys (1685-1766), and the latter scholar's great pupil David Ruhnken (1723-1798).

    0
    0
  • When Latin grammar has been mastered, he bids the teacher lead his pupil " into the sweet fountain and spring of all Arts and Science," that is, Greek learning which is " as profitable for the understanding as the Latin tongue for speaking."

    0
    0
  • Wolf and his illustrious pupil, Wilhelm von Humboldt.

    0
    0
  • Schulze's period of prominence in Berlin closely corresponded to that of Herbart at Konigsberg (1809-1833) and Göttingen (1833-1841), who insisted that for boys of eight to twelve there was no better text-book than the Greek Odyssey, and this principle was brought into practice at Hanover by his distinguished pupil, Ahrens.

    0
    0
  • He was a pupil of Clitomachus, whom he succeeded as head of the Third or New Academy.

    0
    0
  • ALCIDAMAS, of Elaea, in Aeolis, Greek sophist and rhetorician, flourished in the 4th century B.C. He was the pupil and successor of Gorgias and taught at Athens at the same time as Isocrates, whose rival and opponent he was.

    0
    0
  • - ix.) moral exhortations addressed to an imagined " son " or pupil.

    0
    0
  • In part it may fairly be attributed to the retarding influence of the school of Ewald, but in large part also Well- to the fact that Vatke, a pupil of Hegel, had developed his theory on a priori grounds in accordance with the principles of Hegel's philosophy of history.

    0
    0
  • For that, when it came, much was due to the work of Graf (a pupil of Reuss, whose Geschichtliche Bucher des Alten Testaments appeared in 1866); to the Dutch scholar Kuenen, who, starting from the earlier criticism, came over to the new, made it the basis of his Religion of Israel (1869-1870), a masterly work and a model of sound method, and continued to support it by a long series of critical essays in the Theologisch Tijdschrift; and to Wellhausen, who displayed an unrivalled combination of grasp of details and power of historical construction: his Prolegomena zur Geschichte Israels was published in 1878 and translated into English in 1885; the history itself, Israelitische u.

    0
    0
  • It was originally a harmony of the four gospels made by Tatian, the pupil of Justin Martyr, towards the end of the 2nd century.

    0
    0
  • Griesbach, a pupil at Halle of J.

    0
    0
  • Scholz, a pupil of Hug, inspected and partially collated nearly a thousand MSS.

    0
    0
  • His philosophy, which is in most respects identical with that of his pupil, Epictetus, is marked by its strong practical tendency.

    0
    0
  • It is said also that he became a pupil of Arcesilaus and Lacydes, heads of the Middle Academy.

    0
    0
  • Nearly all geckos are nocturnal and the pupil contracts into a vertical slit, except in a few diurnal kinds, e.g.

    0
    0
  • It is also true that Neoplatonism sought to come to an understanding 1 Porphyry wrote a book, lrfpi T Aoyi a' CALAof001as, but this was before he became a pupil of Plotinus; as a philosopher he was independent of the Aoyca.

    0
    0
  • But the Enneads of his pupil Plotinus are the primary and classical document of Neoplatonism.

    0
    0
  • In the hands of Iamblichus (q.v.), the pupil of Porphyry, Neoplatonism is changed " from a philosophical theory to a theological doctrine."

    0
    0
  • He accepted, and resigned his professorship. He went abroad with his pupil in February 1764; they remained only a few days at Paris and then settled at Toulouse, at that time the seat of a parlement, where they spent eighteen months in the best society of the place, afterwards making a tour in the south of France and passing two months at Geneva.

    0
    0
  • In October 1766 tutor and pupil returned home, and they ever afterwards retained strong feelings of mutual esteem.

    0
    0
  • Zoilus appears to have been at one time a follower of Isocrates, but subsequently a pupil of Polycrates, whom he heard at Athens, where he was a teacher of rhetoric. Zoilus was chiefly known for the acerbity of his attacks on Homer (which gained him the name of Homeromastix, "scourge of Homer"), chiefly directed against the fabulous element in the Homeric poems. Zoilus also wrote against Isocrates and Plato, who had attacked the style of Lysias of which he approved.

    0
    0
  • Another reference to Byrgius occurs in a work by Benjamin Bramer, the brother-in-law and pupil of Byrgius, who, writing in 1630, says that the latter constructed his table twenty years ago or more.'

    0
    0
  • Both as regards structure and habits, the leopard may be reckoned as one of the more typical representatives of the genus Felis, belonging to that section in which the hyoid bone is loosely connected with the skull, owing to imperfect ossification of its anterior arch, and the pupil of the eye when contracted under the influence of light is circular, not linear as in the smaller cats.

    0
    0
  • in 1594 by Chastel, a pupil of theirs, revealed the danger that the whole Society was running by the intrigues of a few men.

    0
    0
  • of Portugal, and an old pupil of the Jesuits at Coimbra, dismissed the three Jesuit chaplains of the king and named three secular priests in their stead.

    0
    0
  • His pupil Cuthberht recorded this fact in a letter to a fellow-student, Cuthwine: " a capite sancti evangelii Johannis usque ad eum locum in quo dicitur, ` sed haec quid sunt inter tantos ?'

    0
    0
  • - Justin Martyr perhaps contemplated the use of water instead of wine, and Tatian his pupil used it.

    0
    0
  • An excellent way to start a pupil is on a sure-footed horse without bridle, the master governing him by a leading rein until the pupil has acquired a firm seat and can be trusted with reins.

    0
    0
  • Rufus accepted the verdict with the resignation befitting a Stoic and pupil of Panaetius.

    0
    0
  • The earliest analytical solution appears to have been given by the princess Elizabeth, a pupil of Descartes and daughter of Frederick V.

    0
    0
  • Tannoja, a pupil of Liguori's (3 vols., Naples, 1798-1802); new ed., Turin, 1857; French trans., Paris, 1842); P. v.

    0
    0
  • HERENNIUS MODESTINUS, a celebrated Roman jurist, who flourished about 250 B.C. He appears to have been a native of one of the Greek-speaking provinces, probably Dalmatia, and was a pupil of Ulpian.

    0
    0
  • SIR WILFRID LAURIER (1841-), Canadian statesman, was born on the 10th of November 1841, at St Lin in the province of Quebec. The child of French Roman Catholic parents, he attended the elementary school of his native parish and for eight or nine months was a pupil of the Protestant elementary school at New Glasgow in order to learn English; his association with the Presbyterian family with whom he lived during this period had a permanent influence on his mind.

    0
    0
  • Maildulphus, a Scottish or Irish monk, who came into England about 635, built a hermitage near the site of the modern Malmesbury (Maildulphi-urbs, Maldelmesburh, Malmesbiri) and gathered disciples round him, thus forming the nucleus of the later abbey of which Aldhelm his pupil became the first abbot.

    0
    0
  • The master is said to have called his pupil the intellect of the school and his house a reader's.

    0
    0
  • He is also said to have complained that his pupil spurned him as colts do their mothers.

    0
    0
  • He also attacked Isocrates, according to Cicero, and perhaps even set up a rival school of rhetoric. At any rate he had pupils of his own, such as Eudemus of Cyprus, Theodectes and Hermias, books of his own, especially dialogues, and even to some extent his own philosophy, while he was still a pupil of Plato.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle is said to have written on monarchy and on colonies for Alexander; and the pupil is said to have slept with his master's edition of Homer under his pillow, and to have respected him, until from hatred of Aristotle's tactless relative, Callisthenes, who was done to death in 328, he turned at last against Aristotle himself.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle also formed his Peripatetic school into a kind of college with common meals under a president (6tpxcov) changing every ten days; while the philosopher himself delivered lectures, in which his practice, as his pupil Aristoxenus tells us (Harmonics, ii.

    0
    0
  • him from Stagira a Greek and Ionic but colonial origin, a medical descent and tendency, and a matter-of-fact worldly kind of character, nevertheless on coming to Athens as pupil of Plato he must have begun with his master's philosophy.

    0
    0
  • What then in more detail was the philosophy which the pupil learnt from the master?

    0
    0
  • All these inspiring metaphysical and moral doctrines the pupil accepted from his master's dialogues, and throughout his life adhered to the general spirit of realism without materialism pervading the Platonic philosophy.

    0
    0
  • In the first place as regards style, though the Stagirite pupil Aristotle could never rival his Attic master in literary form, yet he did a signal service to philosophy in gradually passing from the vague generalities of the dialogue to the scientific precision of the didactic treatise.

    0
    0
  • Thirdly as regards doctrines, the surpassing interest of these early writings is that they show the pupil partly agreeing, partly disagreeing, with his master.

    0
    0
  • It shows how nearly the pupil could imitate his master's dialogues, and still more how exactly he at first embraced his master's doctrines.

    0
    0
  • In contending, as Aristotle's pupil, that a teacher should begin by proposing his:, subject, he tells us how Aristotle used to relate that most of Plato's.

    0
    0
  • On the one hand, there is the curious story given partly by Strabo (608-609) and partly in Plutarch's Sulla (c. 26), that Aristotle's successor Theophrastus left the books of both to their joint pupil, Neleus of Scepsis, where they were hidden in a cellar, till in Sulla's time they were sold to Apellicon, who made new copies, transferred after Apellicon's death by Sulla to Rome, and there edited and published by Tyrannio and Andronicus.

    0
    0
  • 4); and the dialogue Protrepticus was known to the Cynic Crates, pupil of Diogenes and master of Zeno (Fragm.

    0
    0
  • For example, he addressed the Theodectea to his pupil Theodectes; and even in ancient times a doubt arose whether it was a work of the master or the pupil.

    0
    0
  • With one of his pupils in particular, Theophrastus, who was born about 370 and therefore was some fifteen years younger than himself, he had a long and intimate connexion; and the work of the pupil bears so close a resemblance to that of his master, that, even when he questions Aristotle's opinions (as he often does), he seems to be writing in an Aristotelian atmosphere; while he shows the same acuteness in raising difficulties, and has caught something of the same encyclopaedic genius.

    0
    0
  • Another pupil, Eudemus of Rhodes, wrote and thought so like his master as to induce Simplicius to call him the most genuine of Aristotle's companions (i yv170 - 1.CJTaTOS TWv 'ApLUTor XovS iraipwv).

    0
    0
  • At this point, Plato and Aristotle have become very far apart: to the master beauty appears to be an independent thing, and really separate, to the pupil at his best only something beautiful, an attribute which is only mentally separable from an individual substance.

    0
    0
  • But this lapse only shows how powerful a dominion Plato exercised over Aristotle's soul to the last; for it arises out of the pupil still accepting from hiAmaster the unity of the universal though now applying it, not to classes, but to essences.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that when, after Plato's death and the accession of Speusippus in 347, Aristotle with Xenocrates left Athens to visit his former pupil Hermias, the three discussed this moderate system of Ethics in which the two philosophers nearly agreed.

    0
    0
  • by Pietro Tacca (1577-1640), a pupil of Giovanni da Bologna.

    0
    0
  • Most of them have been indifferently restored by local artists, who follow mechanically a kind of hieratic tradition, the principles of which are embodied in a work of iconography by the monk Dionysius, said to have been a pupil of Panselinos.

    0
    0
  • His pupil, Mr E.

    0
    0
  • Here he studied scholastic philosophy and theology under a pupil of Occam's, from whom he imbibed the nominalist conception of philosophy; in addition he studied canon law, medicine, astronomy and even magic, and apparently some Hebrew.

    0
    0
  • His earliest teacher (omitting the legendary Scotchman Menzies) was the dyak, or clerk of the council, Nikita Zotov, subsequently the court fool, who taught his pupil to spell out the liturgical and devotional books on which the children of the tsar were generally brought up. After Zotov's departure on a diplomatic mission, in 1680, the lad had no regular tutor.

    0
    0
  • Whether administered in the form of the official lamella or by subcutaneous injection, physostigmine causes a contraction of the pupil more marked than in the case of any other known drug.

    0
    0
  • That this action is a direct and not a nervous one is shown by the fact that if the eye be suddenly shaded the pupil will dilate a little, showing that the nerves which cause dilatation are still competent after the administration of physostigmine.

    0
    0
  • His pupil, Oswald Kiilpe (1862), who bases his Grundriss der Psychologie on the hypothesis of unitary experience, says in his Einleitung in die Philosophie (1895; 4th ed.

    0
    0
  • preceptor; Warwick took up his charge in 1428; he trained his pupil to be a good man and refined gentleman, but he could not teach him kingship. As early as 1423 the baby king was made to appear at public functions and take his place in parliament.

    0
    0
  • His chief pupil in philosophy was Posidonius of Apamea.

    0
    0
  • An authoritative record of the outlines of his life was only discovered early in the 19th century in a writing of Auxentius of Milan, his pupil and companion.

    0
    0
  • pupil Auxentius describes how, "in the name of God," he set out upon his way, hoping to prevent the teaching of these new heretics from reaching "the churches of Christ by Christ committed to his charge."

    0
    0
  • The personal qualities of the man may be inferred from his pupil's.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Dollar Academy and Edinburgh University, being at the latter first a pupil, and afterwards the assistant, of Lord Playfair, then professor of chemistry; he also studied under Kekule at Ghent.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that he was secretary to the Lombard king Desiderius, the successor of Ratchis; it is certain that this king's daughter Adelperga was his pupil.

    0
    0
  • In October 1814, when his pupil came of age, Ancillon was included by Prince Hardenberg in the ministry, as privy councillor of legation in the department of foreign affairs, with a view to utilizing his supposed gifts as a philosophical historian in the preparation of the projected Prussian constitution.

    0
    0
  • ARGYROPULUS, or [[Argyropulo, John]] (c. 1416-1486), Greek humanist, one of the earliest promoters of the revival of learning in the West, was born in Constantinople, and became a teacher there, Constantine Lascaris being his pupil.

    0
    0
  • Roger Bacon, his pupil, speaks highly of his attainments in theology and mathematics.

    0
    0
  • Vauquelin, who claimed him as his pupil, guaranteed his conduct, and saved him from expulsion from Paris.

    0
    0
  • In the 19th century the greatest name among Hebraists is that of Gesenius, at Halle, whose shorter grammar (of Biblical Hebrew) first published in 1813, is still the standard work, thanks to the ability with which his pupil E.

    0
    0
  • ABU UBAIDA [Ma`mar ibn ul-Muthanna] (728-825), Arabian scholar, was born a slave of Jewish Persian parents in Basra, and in his youth was a pupil of Abu`Amr ibn ul-`Ala.

    0
    0
  • Among the abbesses was the celebrated Elizabeth (1618-1680), eldest daughter of the elector palatine Frederick V., who was a philosophical princess, and a pupil of Descartes.

    0
    0
  • 19 a planted and used as well in the said colonies as also as much as might be among the savages bordering among them "; and the honoured names of Nicolas Ferrar, John Ferrar, John Donne and Sir John Sandys, a pupil of Hooker, are all found on the council by which the home management of the colony was conducted.

    0
    0
  • The interior was erected by Giovanni Dolcebuono, a pupil of Bramante, to whom is also due S.

    0
    0
  • In 1669 he resigned his mathematical chair to his pupil, Isaac Newton, having now determined to renounce the study of mathematics for that of divinity.

    0
    0
  • Another Aspasius, in the 3rd century A.D., was a Roman sophist and rhetorician, son or pupil of the rhetorician Demetrianus.

    0
    0
  • Although belonging to an orthodox family, he became a pupil of the great Mu`tazalite teacher al-Jubba`i, and himself remained a Mu ` tazalite until his fortieth year.

    0
    0
  • Oporinus (1507-1568), his pupil and amanuensis.

    0
    0
  • Philip - or rather the compiler who made excerpts from him - says that he was at the head of an Alexandrian school (the catechetical), that he lived in the time of Hadrian and Antoninus, to whom he addressed his Apology, and that Clement of Alexandria was his pupil; but these statements are more than doubtful.

    0
    0
  • The modelling is of a very high order, and the one eye which remains perfect is cut out of rock crystal, with the pupil and iris marked by colours applied to the lower face of the crystal.

    0
    0
  • He was a pupil of Gemistus.

    0
    0
  • Having visited Milan and Pavia, and resided for several years at Venice, he went to Rome upon the invitation of Bruni Leonardo, who had been his pupil, and was then secretary to Gregory XII.

    0
    0
  • Wickstead neglected his pupil entirely, but Baxter's eager mind found abundant nourishment in the great library at the castle.

    0
    0
  • Many other churches, and the picture gallery (Galleria Martinengo), contain fine works of the painters of the Brescian school, Alessandro Bonvicino (generally known as Moretto), Girolamo Romanino and Moretto's pupil, Giovanni Battista Moroni.

    0
    0
  • As Heeren's pupil, he laid enormous stress on the importance of original authorities.

    0
    0
  • The ancients also attributed to her a considerable power in satire, but in hexameter verse they considered her inferior to her pupil Erinna.

    0
    0
  • The engagement came to an end in 1631, when he was recalled to train the young earl of Devonshire, now thirteen years old, son of his previous pupil.

    0
    0
  • In the course of the next seven years in Derbyshire and abroad, Hobbes took his pupil over rhetoric, 2 logic, astronomy, and the principles of law, with other subjects.

    0
    0
  • 4 2 3-5 10), corresponds with a Latin version dictated to his young pupil.

    0
    0
  • During the years of its composition he remained in or near Paris, at first in attendance on his royal pupil, with whom he became a great favourite.

    0
    0
  • Two or three days after Charles's arrival in London, Hobbes drew in the street the notice of his former pupil, and was at once received into favour.

    0
    0
  • A few days after the publication of this poem, his tragedy of Irene, begun many years before, was brought on the stage by his old pupil, David Garrick, now manager of Drury Lane Theatre.

    0
    0
  • Yet the two Lichfield men had so many early recollections in common, and sympathized with each other on so many points on which they sympathized with' nobody else in the vast population of the capital, that, though the master was often provoked by the monkey-like impertinence of the pupil, and the pupil by the bearish rudeness of the master, they remained friends till they were parted by death.

    0
    0
  • ZENODOTUS, Greek grammarian and critic, pupil of Philetas of Cos, was a native of Ephesus.

    0
    0
  • According to the History of Armenia which bears his name he was a pupil of the two fathers of Armenian literature, the patriarch or catholicos Sahak the Great and the vartabed Mesrob.

    0
    0
  • If the limits within which the Geography was composed are to be more nearly defined, we may say that, from isolated traces of Arab rule (which in Armenia dates from 651), it must have been written certainly after that year, and perhaps about the year 657.9 Another extant work of Moses is a Manual of Rhetoric, in ten books, dedicated to his pupil Theodorus.

    0
    0
  • Berthelot first as pupil, then as assistant and finally as colleague.

    0
    0
  • A short time afterwards the militant party among the Protestants suffered a heavy loss by the death of their leader, John Casimir, whose policy, however, was continued by his nephew and pupil, the elector Frederick IV.

    0
    0
  • There, too, Lysias is said to have commenced his studies in rhetoric - doubtless under a master of the Sicilian school - possibly, as tradition said, under Tisias, the pupil of Corax, whose name is associated with the first attempt to formulate rhetoric as; an art.

    0
    0
  • So it came about in 1869, that on the first occasion when there was a joint sitting of the Delegations to settle a point in the von Rauscher (1797-1875), cardinal archbishop of Vienna, who had earned his red hat by the share he had taken in arranging the concordat of 1855, and now attempted to use his great personal influence with the emperor (his former pupil) to defeat the bill.

    0
    0
  • From this time onwards he seems to have depended chiefly on the bounty of his pupil Willughby, who made Ray his constant companion while he lived, and at his death left him 60 a year, with the charge of educating his two sons.

    0
    0
  • His principal works are - Instilutiones medicae (Leiden, 1708); A phorismi de cognoscendis et curandis morbis (Leiden, 1709), on which his pupil and assistant, Gerard van Swieten (1700-1772) published a commentary in 5 vols.; and Elementa chemiae (Paris, 1724).

    0
    0
  • In this wild school Ali proved an apt pupil.

    0
    0
  • He taught the young Octavian (afterwards Augustus) at Apollonia, and was a pupil of Posidonius at Rhodes.

    0
    0
  • ELIS This school was founded by Phaedo, a pupil of Socrates.

    0
    0
  • The respiratory rhythm is less frequent and the breathing less deep; the heart-beat is less frequent; the secretions are less copious; the pupil is narrow; in the brain there exists arterial anaemia with venous congestion, so that the blood-flow there is less than in the waking state.

    0
    0
  • In his early youth he went to Alexandria, where he spent twelve years partly as a pupil of Theon, a rhetorician, and partly as a professor of rhetoric. He then turned to philosophy and science, and studied under Hermeias and his sons, Ammonius and Heliodorus.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless during her lifetime the system worked fairly well; but her pupil and successor, Eric of Pomerania, was unequal to the burden of empire and embroiled himself both with his neighbours and his subjects.

    0
    0
  • The same policy was victoriously pursued by his nephew and pupil Andreas Bernstorff, an even greater man than the elder Bernstorff, who controlled the foreign policy of Denmark from 1773 to 1778, and again from 1784 till his death in 1797.

    0
    0
  • He was a pupil of Truman H.

    0
    0
  • The result of its instillation into the eye - and the same occurs when the atropine has been absorbed elsewhere - is rapidly to cause wide dilatation of the pupil.

    0
    0
  • The action of atropine in dilating the pupil is also aided by a stimulation of the fibres from the sympathetic nervous system, which innervate the remaining muscle of the iris - the dilator pupillae.

    0
    0
  • Atropine is universally and constantly used in ophthalmic practice in order to dilate the pupil for examination of the retina by the ophthalmoscope, or in cases where the inflamed iris threatens to form adhesions to neighbouring parts.

    0
    0
  • He was a pupil of the Jesuits at the college of Clermont, then studied law at Bourges.

    0
    0
  • He entered at an early age the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres, where he became first a pupil (1705), then an associate (1714) and finally a pensionnaire (1722).

    0
    0
  • ARISTO or ARISTON, of Chios (c. 250 B.C.), a Stoic philosopher and pupil of Zeno.

    0
    0
  • Having kissed the hands of the sheikh and teachers of his school, the pupil awaits the beginning of the lectures.

    0
    0
  • In 1836 Sir William Hamilton was appointed to the chair of Logic and Metaphysics, and Fraser became his pupil.

    0
    0
  • He took a pupil or two, and wrote articles for the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia under the editorship of Brewster.

    0
    0
  • In 1861 Reid took lessons from an itinerant portrait-painter, William Niddrie, who had been a pupil of James Giles, R.S.A., and afterwards entered as a student in the school of the Board of Trustees in Edinburgh.

    0
    0
  • In 1773 the duke Karl Eugen of Wurttemberg claimed young S chiller as a pupil of his military school at the "Solitude" near Ludwigsburg, where, instead of his chosen subject of study, theology, he was obliged to devote himself to law.

    0
    0
  • Morris, having passed his finals in the preceding term, was entered as a pupil at the office of George Edmund Street, the well-known architect; and on New Year's Day the first number of The Oxford and Cambridge Magazine appeared.

    0
    0
  • 4 It is not necessary to decide whether the epistle is by St Paul or by a pupil of Paul, although the former seems to the present writer to be by far the more probable, in spite of the brilliant attack on the genuineness of the epistle by Wrede in Texte and Ubersetzungen, N.F.

    0
    0
  • The same authority says he was a pupil of Parmenides and of Heraclitus, but the statement is improbable, owing to discrepancy in dates.

    0
    0
  • This step helped his studies, for he was sent to Tubingen in 1496 and became a favourite pupil of the guardian of the Minorite convent there, Paulus Scriptoris, a man of considerable general learning.

    0
    0
  • But in the case of a pupil who had passed through a good secondary school it would be as safe to rely for supplementary information under this head on the testimony of his teachers, as it is to rely on their evidence with regard to the fundamental and all-important element on which no examina- .tion supplies direct information - personal character.

    0
    0
  • He also studied at Guy's Hospital, London (1797-1801), where he was a pupil of Sir Astley Cooper.

    0
    0
  • ALEXANDER OF APHRODISIAS, pupil of Aristocles of Messene, the most celebrated of the Greek commentators on the writings of Aristotle, and styled, by way of pre-eminence, o E fl-yrl-riis (" the expositor"), was a Dative of Aphrodisias in Caria.

    0
    0
  • In January 1759 he accompanied his pupil to the university of Wittenberg, from which he was driven in 1760 by the Prussian cannon.

    0
    0
  • He was probably contemporary with Alexander the Great; he certainly wrote before Dicaearchus, a pupil of Aristotle who died about 285 B.C. His work is lost, and we are left almost wholly in the dark as to its form and character, but the various titles under which it is quoted (e.g.

    0
    0
  • Bernardo (1408-1489), son of Leonardo, was a pupil of Guarino and of George of Trebizond, and entered the Venetian senate at an early age.

    0
    0
  • A general preface exhorting the pupil to give heed to the instruction of the sages (xxii.

    0
    0
  • On the 10th of July 1554, he was chosen as tutor to Prince Edward, and after his pupil's accession to the throne he continued his instructions.

    0
    0
  • In June 1 447 he proceeded to Orvieto, to paint in the Cappella Nuova of the cathedral, with the co-operation of his pupil Benozzo Gozzoli.

    0
    0
  • and was then appointed government pupil at the Lyceum, which had recently been founded.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1690 he was released from his confinement, and after subsisting for some years largely on the charity of his friend and former pupil, Dr John Radcliffe, he died on the 21st of January 1699.

    0
    0
  • Both will be found, together with some controversial writings and his biography by his pupil Ignatius, also patriarch of Constantinople, in J.

    0
    0
  • Immediately after finishing his course at the Ecole Polytechnique he was appointed repetiteur there, an office which he had discharged as an amateur while still a pupil in the school; for it had been the custom of his comrades often to resort to his room after an unusually difficult lecture to hear him repeat and explain it.

    0
    0
  • Finding in the cultivation of " virtue " or " excellence " a substitute for the pursuit of scientific truth, and in disputation the sole means by which " virtue " or " excellence " could be attained, he resembled at once the sophists of culture and the sophists of eristic. But, inasmuch as the " virtue " or " excellence " which he sought was that of the man rather than that of the official, while the disputation which he practised had for its aim, not victory, but the elimination of error, the differences which separated him from the sophists of culture and the sophists of eristic were only less considerable than the resemblances which he bore to both; and further, though his whole time and attention were bestowed upon the education of young Athenians, his theory of the relations of teacher and pupil differed from that of the recognized professors of education, inasmuch as the taking of fees seemed to him to entail a base surrender of the teacher's independence.

    0
    0
  • that the normal pupil of the eye distends to one-fifth of an inch.

    0
    0
  • His pupil Quintilian calls him the greatest orator he had ever known; but he disgraced his talents by acting as public informer against some of the most distinguished personages in Rome.

    0
    0
  • He wrote nothing; but much of his teaching was taken down with affectionate care by his pupil Flavius Arrianus, the historian of Alexander the Great, and is preserved in two treatises, of the larger of which, called the Discourses of Epictetus ('E7rLKT)TOV Atarpcf3ai), four books are still extant.

    0
    0
  • The gymnasium is descended from the Latin school of which the celebrated Alexander Hegius was master in the third quarter of the 15th century, when the young Erasmus was sent to it, and at which Adrian Floreizoon, afterwards Pope Adrian VI., is said to have been a pupil about the same time.

    0
    0
  • The chief authorities for the biography of Malherbe are the Vie de Malherbe by his friend and pupil Racan, and the long Historiette which Tallemant des Reaux has devoted to him.

    0
    0
  • He was much impressed by the teaching of Phaedrus, the Epicurean, at a period before he assumed the toga virilis; he studied dialectic under Diodotus the Stoic, and in 88 B.C. attended the lectures of Philo, the head of the Academic school, whose devoted pupil he became.

    0
    0
  • The set harangue of teacher to pupil, in which steps in argument are slurred and the semblance of co-inquiry is rendered nugatory, must be eliminated.

    0
    0
  • If this be pressed as suggesting that the philosopher Aristotle was already in full activity at the date of writing, it is of importance to know what Platonic dialogues were later than the debut of his critical pupil.

    0
    0
  • Tait, who was Hamilton's pupil and after him the leading exponent of the subject) is a brief resume of this first, and by far the most important and most difficult, of the three stages.

    0
    0
  • 210 by a pupil of Bardesanes (Cureton, Spicilegium Syriacum, 16 ult.).

    0
    0
  • ZENO OF TARSUS, Stoic philosopher and pupil of Chrysippus, belonged to the period of the Middle Stoa.

    0
    0
  • P.) AMA`I [Abu Said `Abd ul-Malik ibn Quraib] (c. 739-831), Arabian scholar, was born of pure Arab stock in Basra and was a pupil there of Abu `Amr ibn ul- 'Ala.

    0
    0
  • Anaximenes, pupil of Anaximander, seems to have rebelled against the extreme materialism of his master.

    0
    0
  • Another pupil of Anaxagoras was Archelaus of Miletus.

    0
    0
  • Founded in 744 at the instigation of St Boniface by his pupil Sturm, who was the first abbot, it became the centre of a great missionary work.

    0
    0
  • Syrus, first bishop of Pavia (2nd century); an altar-piece (1521), the best work of Giampietino (Rizzi), a pupil of Leonardo da Vinci; and another, the masterpiece of Bernardino Gatti of Parma (1531).

    0
    0
  • In Plaza Bolivar is a statue of Liberty by Pietro Tenerani (1789-1869), a pupil of Canova, and in Plaza Santander is one of General Francisco de Paula Santander (1792-1840).

    0
    0
  • He was a pupil of Anaxagoras, and is said by Ion of Chios (ap. Diog.

    0
    0
  • About Liszt's pianoforte technique in general it may be said that it derives its efficiency from the teaching of Czerny, who brought up his pupil on Mozart, a little Bach and Beethoven, a good deal of Clementi and Hummel, and a good deal of his (Czerny's) own work.

    0
    0
  • The first name is that of Theagenes of Rhegium, contemporary of Cambyses (525 B.C.), who is said to have founded the " new grammar " (the older " grammar " being the art of reading and writing), and to have been the inventor of the allegorical interpretations by which it was sought to reconcile the Homeric mythology with the morality and speculative ideas of the 6th century B.C. The same attitude in the " ancient quarrel of poetry and philosophy " was soon afterwards taken by Anaxagoras; and after him by his pupil Metrodorus of Lampsacus, who explained away all the gods, and even the heroes, as elementary substances and forces (Agamemnon as the upper air, &c.).

    0
    0
  • According to Heraclides Ponticus (pupil of Plato), the poetry of Homer was first brought to the Peloponnesus by Lycurgus, who obtained it from the descendants of Creophylus (Polit.

    0
    0
  • The influence of English judges who knew his abilities and his circumstances enabled him to be called to the bar on the 6th of June 1866, dispensing with the usual three years as a student, and he acquired his first knowledge of the practice and methods of English courts as the pupil of Mr C. E.

    0
    0
  • Benjamin was naturally an apt and useful pupil; for instance, an opinion of Mr Pollock, which for long guided the London police in the exercise of their right to search prisoners, is mentioned by him as having been really composed by Benjamin while he was still his pupil.

    0
    0
  • Still the school was pregnant with instructions for so apt a pupil.

    0
    0
  • In 1835 Keble's father died at the age of ninety, and soon after this his son married Miss Clarke, left Fairford, and settled at Hursley vicarage in Hampshire, a living to which he had been presented by his friend and attached pupil, Sir William Heathcote, and which continued to be Keble's home and cure for the remainder of his life.

    0
    0
  • Applied to the conjunctiva it causes anaesthesia, dilatation of the pupil, diminution of the intraocular tension, and some interference with accommodation.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 there were 187,836 persons of school age (from 6 to 21) in the state, and of these 144,007 were enrolled in the schools; the annual cost of education was $4.34 per pupil.

    0
    0
  • The educational institutions include the free grammar school (founded by James Leigh in 1619 and rebuilt in 1876), the Wigan and District Mining and Technical College (built by public subscription and opened in 1903) and the mechanics' institution, also the convent of Notre Dame (1854), with a college for pupil teachers and a high school for girls, and several Roman Catholic schools.

    0
    0
  • THOMAS ADDIS EMMET (1764-1827), Irish lawyer and politician, second son of Robert Emmet, physician to the lordlieutenant of Ireland, and elder brother of Robert Emmet (q.v.), the rebel, was born at Cork on the 24th of April 1764, and was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and at Edinburgh University, where he studied medicine and was a pupil of Dugald Stewart in philosophy.

    0
    0
  • Two drawings were prepared and placed before a painter at Cherbourg named Mouchel, who at once recognized the boy's gifts, and accepted him as a pupil; but shortly after (1835) Millet's father died, and the eldest son, with heroic devotion, took his place at home, nor did he return to his work until the pressing calls from without were solemnly enforced by the wishes of his own family.

    0
    0
  • He next devised a sign alphabet for the use of one hand only, and in 1749 he brought his second pupil before the Paris Academy of Sciences, the members of which were astonished at the results he had accomplished.

    0
    0
  • Fitzgerald was the first to attempt to measure the length of electric waves; Helmholtz put the problem into the hands of his favourite pupil, Heinrich Hertz, and the latter finally gave an experimental demonstration of electromagnetic waves, the "Hertzian waves," on which wireless telegraphy depends, and the velocity of which is the same as that of light.

    0
    0
  • ANAXIMANDER, the second of the physical philosophers of Ionia, was a citizen of Miletus and a companion or pupil of Thales.

    0
    0
  • He was a man of few acquaintances, amongst the few being Bunsen, the subsequent scholar-diplomatist, and Bunsen's pupil, W.

    0
    0
  • We do not know whether his influence was brought to bear in this sense upon Spinoza; but it has been suggested that the writings of Bruno, whose spirit of enthusiastic naturalism and fervid revolt against the Church would be especially dear to a man of Van den Ende's leanings, may have been put into the pupil's hand by the master.

    0
    0
  • He had a pupil living with him at Rhijnsburg whose character seemed to him lacking in solidity and discretion.

    0
    0
  • This pupil (probably Albert Burgh, who afterwards joined the Church of Rome and penned a foolishly insolent epistle to his former teacher) was the occasion of Spinoza's first publication - the only publication indeed to which his name was attached.

    0
    0
  • He was a pupil of Ammonius Hermiae, and is supposed to have written the life of Aristotle sometimes attributed to his master.

    0
    0
  • It is said that, though he was a pupil of Ammonius, he was at first a Christian, and he has been credited with the authorship of a commentary on the Mosaic Cosmogony in eight books, dedicated to Sergius, patriarch of Constantinople, and edited by Balthasar Corderius in 1630.

    0
    0
  • Tessin's Old Man's Letters to a young Prince were addressed to his pupil, afterwards Gustavus III.

    0
    0
  • The cost of maintaining these schools was 4,146,574 pesos, or an average of £2: 17: 3 per pupil in attendance.

    0
    0
  • She became a devoted pupil of Mme.

    0
    0
  • If the system be entirely behind the aperture stop, then this is itself the entrance pupil (" front stop "); if entirely in front, it is the exit pupil (" back stop ").

    0
    0
  • the radius of the entrance pupil, is its maximum value.

    0
    0
  • from it and traversing the system is made infinitely narrow by reducing me aperture stop; such a pencil consists of the rays which can pass from the object point through the now infinitely small entrance pupil.

    0
    0
  • Naming the central ray passing through the entrance pupil the " axis of the pencil " or " principal ray," we can say: the rays of the pencil intersect, not in one point, but in two focal lines, which we can assume to be at right angles to the principal ray; of these, one lies in the plane containing the principal ray and FIG.

    0
    0
  • This ray, named by Abbe a " principal ray " (not to be confused with the " principal rays " of the Gaussian theory), passes through the centre of the entrance pupil before the first refraction, and the centre of the exit pupil after the last refraction.

    0
    0
  • 9) can be defined by the co-ordinates (E, n) of this point 0 in an object plane I, at right angles to the axis, and two other co ordinates (x, y), the point in which the ray intersects the entrance pupil, i.e.

    0
    0
  • He studied theology in Paris, but there is no proof that he was a pupil of Abelard.

    0
    0
  • Rhetorik, 1897, 8 f.); here as elsewhere the rush and flow of feeling carry with them some care for rhetorical form, in the shape of antitheses, such as a pupil of the schools might more or less unconsciously retain.'

    0
    0
  • That he changed the system of blinding his relatives from passing a hot metal over the open eye to an extraction of the whole pupil is indicative of gross brutality.

    0
    0
  • He entered the Franciscan order and subsequently went to Paris, where he was a pupil of Duns Scotus.

    0
    0
  • It is a curious commentary on the theories of Duns Scotus that one pupil, Francis, should have taken this course, while another pupil, Occam, should have used his arguments in a diametrically opposite direction and ended in extreme Nominalism.

    0
    0
  • He was the pupil and personal friend of many leaders of the higher criticism in Germany, and from the first he advocated views which, though now widely accepted, were then regarded with apprehension.

    0
    0
  • On the death of his father, a presentation to Christ's Hospital was procured for Coleridge by the judge, Sir Francis Buller, an old pupil of his father's.

    0
    0
  • A pupil of the Fcole des Beaux Arts he won the Prix de Rome in 1859; he was awarded the medal of honour at the Salon in 1868 and was appointed officer of the Legion of Honour in 1878.

    0
    0
  • He was well treated at Rome by the pope, but on the outbreak of a new conspiracy headed by his pupil, Tommaso Pignatelli, he was persuaded to go to Paris (1634),(1634), where he was received with marked favour by Cardinal Richelieu.

    0
    0
  • He set up (in 334) a school of rhetoric in his native place, which was largely attended, his most famous pupil being Paulinus,afterwards bishop of Nola.

    0
    0
  • He encouraged Grotius when only a youth of sixteen to edit Capella; the early death of the younger Douza he wept as that of a beloved son; Daniel Heinsius, from being his favourite pupil, became his most intimate friend.

    0
    0
  • In justice, however, it should be added that his health was being steadily undermined by a mysterious internal complaint, and that Fenelon's tutorship came to an end on his disgrace in 169 7, before the pupil was fifteen.

    0
    0
  • His time was much better employed in fitting his old pupil, Burgundy, for a kingship that never came.

    0
    0
  • A conical pencil of rays diverges from the pupil of the eye, so that its base covers the object seen.

    0
    0
  • had been the pupil of Matthew of Pisa and summoned Justus Balduinus to his court to write the national history in Latin, while later King John II.

    0
    0
  • According to official estimates for 1901, the total number of primary schools in the republic was 733, with 938 teachers and 41,587 pupils - the total cost of their maintenance being estimated at 585,365 bolivianos, or only 14.07 bolivianos per pupil (about £1:4:6).

    0
    0
  • There are numerous varieties of this plant in cultivation, one of the most remarkable of which is the variety pendula, with long, flexible, hanging, cord-like branches; it was discovered in Japan about 1776 by Carl Peter Thunberg, a pupil of Linnaeus, who made valuable collections at the Cape of Good Hope, in the Dutch East Indies and in Japan.

    0
    0
  • In belles lettres he showed himself throughout, both in matter and form, the pupil and admirer of Lucilius, after whom he wrote satires..

    0
    0
  • There is a charge that he was guilty of simony, having received his office through the favour of Philip, brother of Louis VII., his former pupil.

    0
    0
  • APOLLODORUS, an Athenian grammarian, pupil of Aristarchus and Panaetius the Stoic, who lived about 140 B.C. He was a prolific and versatile writer.

    0
    0
  • Many are the stories of martyrs and confessors who are believed to have lived in these troublous times, and their efforts were at last crowned with success, for in the century commencing with the reign of Bilamgur in 971 there took place " the second introduction of religion " into Tibet, more especially under the guidance of the pandit Atisha, who came to Tibet in 1041, and of his famous native pupil and follower Brom Ston.

    0
    0
  • The eye, for example, is damp and porous, and the act of seeing consists in the reflection of the image (SELKeAov) mirrored on the smooth moist surface of the pupil.

    0
    0
  • He warns Joinville against wine-bibbing, against bad language, against all manner of foibles small and great; and the pupil acknowledges that this physician at any rate had healed himself in these respects.

    0
    0
  • C. Brodrick, Memorials of Merton College, p. 194), and to Paris, where he was first the pupil, afterwards the successful rival, of Duns Scotus.

    0
    0
  • An important stage in his development was the period of three years that he spent at Oldenburg as assistant and pupil of S.

    0
    0
  • Acacius, the pupil of Eusebius and his successor in the see of Caesarea, wrote a life of him which is unfortunately lost.

    0
    0
  • In 1846, having decided to adopt the law as a profession, he left Cambridge, entered at Lincoln's Inn, and became a pupil of the conveyancer Mr Christie.

    0
    0
  • Most of what the Fathers narrate of Cerdo's tenets has probably been transferred to him from his famous pupil Marcion, like whom he is said to have rejected the Old Testament and the New, except part of Luke's Gospel and of Paul's Epistles.

    0
    0
  • At the age of sixteen he is said to have entered Brasenose College, Oxford, where he was the pupil of John Harding or Hawarden, and had for room-mate Alexander Nowell, afterwards dean of St.

    0
    0
  • He lived for some time at Aldgate, London, in the house of his former pupil, Thomas Howard, now duke of Norfolk, who retained a sincere regard for his tutor and left him a small pension in his will.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the school of Haddington, where John Knox was later a pupil.

    0
    0
  • Marconi was his pupil.

    0
    0
  • At this time Madame Kovalevsky was at Stockholm, where Gustaf Mittag Leffler, also a pupil of Weierstrass, who had been recently appointed to the chair of mathematics at the newly founded university, had procured for her a post as lecturer.

    0
    0
  • Hence in education the teacher should fully acquaint himself with the mental development of the pupil, in order that he may make full use of what the pupil already knows.

    0
    0
  • The Samaritans were evidently strong in magic. In all the accounts given us of Simon of Gitta magic is a marked feature, as also in the case of his pupil Menander.

    0
    0
  • " When I have presented," he said, " one corner of a subject, and the pupil cannot of himself make out the other three, I do not repeat my lesson."

    0
    0
  • Lynxes are found in the northern and temperate regions of both the Old and New World; they are smaller than leopards, and larger than true wild cats, with long limbs, short stumpy tail, ears tufted at the tip, and pupil of the eye linear when contracted.

    0
    0
  • He was a pupil at the Ecole des Chartes, which he left in 1873, and also at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes; and he obtained appointments in the public libraries at the Mazarine (1878), at Fontainebleau (1884), and at St Genevieve, of which he was nominated librarian in 1885.

    0
    0
  • A life of Bernard Gilpin, written by George Carleton, bishop of Chichester, who had been a pupil of Gilpin's at Houghton, will be found in Bates's Vitae selectorum aliquot virorum, &c. (London, 1681).

    0
    0
  • His triumph over the theologian was complete; the pupil was able to give lectures, without previous training or special study, which were acknowledged superior to those of the master.

    0
    0
  • His position at the time was not unpopular throughout New England, and it is needless to say that his doctrine that the Lord's Supper is not a cause of regeneration and that communicants should be professing Christians has since (very largely through the efforts of his pupil Joseph Bellamy) become a standard of New England Congre gationalism.

    0
    0
  • His pupil, Samuel Hopkins, in 1765 published two volumes from manuscript containing eighteen sermons and a memoir; the younger Jonathan Edwards with Dr Erskine published an edition in 4 volumes (1744 sqq.), and Samuel Austin in 1808 edited an edition in 8 volumes.

    0
    0
  • during the time of Augustus); Hellanicus of Mytilene; Stesimbrotus of Thasos, opponent of Pericles and reputed author of a political pamphlet on Themistocles, Thucydides and Pericles; Hippys and Glaucus, both of Rhegium, the first the author of histories of Italy and Sicily, the second of a treatise on ancient poets and musicians, used by Harpocration and Plutarch; Damastes of Sigeum, pupil of Hellanicus, author of genealogies of the combatants before Troy (an ethnographic and statistical list), of short treatises on poets, sophists, and geographical subjects.

    0
    0
  • He had soon learnt all that Verrocchio had to teach - more than all, if we are to believe the oft-told tale of the figure, or figures, executed by the pupil in the picture of Christ's Baptism designed by the master for the monks of Vallombrosa.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →