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punishment

punishment

punishment Sentence Examples

  • "What will the punishment be, Mr. Johnson?" asked a bold, bad boy.

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  • No other punishment fell on the man.

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  • I think that punishment by depriving children of sweets only develops their greediness.

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  • The punishment inflicted by him upon the Getae, however, induced the Triballi to sue for peace (Arrian, Anabasis, i.

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  • Assuming this violation occurred, what is the punishment for breaking this law?

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  • Burning was an English punishment for some secular offences.

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  • In the English criminal law, where corporal punishment is ordered by the court for certain criminal offences, the "cat" is used only where the prisoner is over sixteen years of age.

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  • In the case of a crime we most urgently demand the punishment for such an act; in the case of a virtuous act we rate its merit most highly.

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  • At the same time the cabinet, as a whole, brought in a Clerical Abuses Bill, threatening with severe punishment priests guilty of disturbing the peace of families, of opposing the laws of the state, or of fomenting disorder.

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  • In the second case, the bishop may require the superior to punish within a certain time and to certify the punishment to him; in default he himself may punish (Conc. Trid.

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  • He knew Fred would be waiting up for him, but decided to let the old man cool his heels, punishment enough for setting up the evening's activity on the sly.

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  • He was in a state of physical suffering as if from corporal punishment, and could not avoid expressing it by cries of anger and distress.

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  • The " capital " punishment was generally (always in England) by burning.

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  • "I thought you didn't believe in capital punishment," he said, trying to lighten the situation.

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  • In the 13th century it was recognized that a " clerk " for felony was subject only to ecclesiastical trial and punishment; punishment which might involve lifelong imprisonment.

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  • Consequently corporal and even capital punishment occupy a far less prominent position, and tend everywhere to disappear.

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  • It is to be distinguished from Tartarus, the place of punishment for the wicked.

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  • The chitchat roamed from details of Friday's luncheon to views on crime and punishment, which, as the booze went down, became more and more general.

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  • Maybe he feared his punishment would be worse when she told Mr. Tim what he did, for Mr. Tim would surely crush Brady's PMF militia once he found out his friend was a traitor.

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  • I cannot.  My Sight has been stunted, no doubt as punishment for my tampering in Fate's court.

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  • I guess that's the punishment for our roles in the Schism – being pushed aside and forced to watch, Eden said, referring to the war that severed the two realms completely from one another.

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  • A sort of symbolic retaliation was the punishment of the offending member, seen in the cutting off the hand that struck a father or stole a trust; in cutting off the breast of a wet-nurse who substituted a changeling for the child entrusted to her; in the loss of the tongue that denied father or mother (in the Elamite contracts the same penalty was inflicted for perjury); in the loss of the eye that pried into forbidden secrets.

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  • The Italian foreign minister, Brin, began by demanding the punishment of the persons guilty of the massacre, but has~ned to accept as satisfactory the anodyne measures adopted by the French government.

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  • Minos, instead of sacrificing' it, spared its life, and Poseidon, as a punishment, inspired Pasiphae with an unnatural passion for it.

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  • The former tribe had crossed the boundaries of the other two, and was ordered to withdraw immediately under pain of punishment (Corp. inscr.

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  • Among other objects also known by the name of "cat" is the small piece of wood pointed at either end used in the game of tip-cat, and the instrument of punishment, generally known as the "cat o' nine tails."

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  • Seeing his bishop, Sixtus, being led to punishment, he cried: "Father!

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  • Capital punishment was abolished in 1877, penal servitude for life being substituted.

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  • The former tribe had crossed the boundaries of the other two, and was ordered to withdraw immediately under pain of punishment (Corp. inscr.

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  • Capital punishment was abolished in 1877, penal servitude for life being substituted.

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  • Cromwell therefore did not hesitate to join the army in its opposition to the parliament, and supported the Remonstrance of the troops (loth of November 1648), which included the demand for the king's punishment as "the grand author of all our troubles," and justified the use of force by the army if other means failed.

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  • To avoid punishment he is said to have taken poison.

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  • The whole apparatus of "forensic" ideas (law, punishment, satisfaction, &c.) is summarily rejected as foreign to God's purpose of love.

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  • Simeon of Durham makes his death occur about the same time, after he had been expelled from his country and had lost his reason as a punishment for his misdeeds.

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  • The jobars superintend the execution of the laws, collect fines and administer capital punishment; they are in contact with the buluk-bashi, or resident representative of the tribe at Scutari, who forms the only link between the mountaineers and the Turkish government.

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  • He had aristocratic privileges and responsibilities, the right to exact retaliation for corporal injuries, and liability to heavier punishment for crimes and misdemeanours, higher fees and fines to pay.

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  • Scourging (although it had been a well-known punishment of the synagogue) was at first forbidden.

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  • In the cases of heresy, apostasy and sorcery, the spiritual courts sought the aid of the secular jurisdiction to superadd the punishment of death.

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  • punire, to punish, from poena, punishment, Gr.

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  • In fact, it only approves the punishment as ordered by the Visigothic laws.

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  • Punishment and fear were not; nor were threatening words read On suspended brass; nor did the suppliant crowd fear The words of their judge; but were safe without an avenger.

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  • The existence of the soul in the body was its punishment for sins in a previous condition; and the doom of its sins in the body was its descent into other bodies, and the postponement of its deliverance " (Salmond's Christian Doctrine of Immortality, p. 109).

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  • The existence of the soul in the body was its punishment for sins in a previous condition; and the doom of its sins in the body was its descent into other bodies, and the postponement of its deliverance " (Salmond's Christian Doctrine of Immortality, p. 109).

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  • The contest and punishment of Marsyas were favourite subjects in Greek art, both painting and sculpture.

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  • Sulla made him a present of land at Beneventum, and secured him against punishment for embezzlement.

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  • Gradually there would arise the idea of proportionate punishment, of which the characteristic type is the lex talionis, 1 " an eye for an eye."

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  • A future life for him is important, because our happiness in it may depend on our present conduct; and therefore our action here should take into account the reward or punishment that it may bring on us hereafter.

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  • The great blot on his memory is his cruelty, which at times was frightful, and showed itself in its full fierceness in the punishment of persons accused of witchcraft, soothsaying or magical practices.

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  • He wished to escape the punishment, and so he called out, "Lucy Martin!" and went proudly to his seat.

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  • Punishment may take forms varying from capital punishment, flogging and mutilation of the body to imprisonment, fines, and even deferred sentences which come into operation only if an offence is repeated within a specified time.

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  • Being detected, he fled in order to escape punishment, but returned when Athenion (or Aristion), a bitter opponent of the Romans, had made himself tyrant of the city with the aid of Mithradates.

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  • Margaret of Parma meanwhile, with the aid of a considerable body of German mercenaries, had inflicted exemplary punishment upon the iconoclasts and Calvinist sectaries.

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  • Even at this stage the vindictive or retributive character of punishment remains, but gradually, and specially after the humanist movement under thinkers like Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham, new theories begin to emerge.

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  • No. I'd be disappointed and I'd come up with some form of punishment.

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  • In other countries, children are commonly treated in a harsh, strict manner, using shame or corporal punishment for discipline.

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  • There are empty threats of punishment without setting limits.

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  • Children obey rules because they are told to do so by an authority figure (parent or teacher), and they fear punishment if they do not follow rules.

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  • Unconditional Parenting: Moving from Rewards and Punishment to Reason and Love.

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  • I imagine an eternity of punishment as only the Dark One can devise.

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  • But that doesn't mean I believe in it as punishment.

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  • I just don't believe in hitting as a form of punishment.

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  • He would stay in this holding cell on the outskirts of Hell until Sasha figured out some new grueling punishment.

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  • He was sick of Hell, yet Kris's crime deserved punishment.

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  • A broken nose was fitting punishment.

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  • The progress of civilization has resulted in a vast change in the method of punishment.

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  • 4 ff.) gives the duration of the national punishment in loose chronological reckoning: 40 years (a round number) for Judah, and 150 more (according to the corrected text) for Israel, the starting-point, probably, being the year 722, the date of the capture of Samaria; the procedure described in v.

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  • Police.Broadly, the police of France may be divided into two great branchesadministrative police (la police administrative) and judicial police (la police judic-iaire), the former having for its object the maintenance of order, and the latter charged with tracing out offenders, collecting the proofs, and delivering the presumed offenders to the tribunals charged by law with their trial and punishment.

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  • On the 14th of February 1540 he entered Ghent at the head of a large army and visited the city with severe punishment.

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  • The book gives (1) evidences of witchcraft; (2) rules for discovering it; (3) proceedings for punishment.

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  • If the prosecutor have first brought him before the civil judge, the evidence is to be sent to the bishop, and the latter, if he thinks the crime has been committed, may deprive him of his office and order, and the judge shall apply to him the proper legal punishment.

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  • The 6th council of Toledo (in 693) has been cited as if it visited certain very great sinners with scourging as an ecclesiastical punishment.

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  • At some indeterminate later period, the " clerk " was tried for felony by a jury in the king's court and then "pleaded his clergy," after conviction there, and was remitted to the ordinary for ecclesiastical punishment.

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  • (d) Fustigation, as in former period, was hardly an ecclesiastical punishment.

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  • In 105, Caepio suffered a crushing defeat from the Cimbri at Arausio (Orange) on the Rhone, which was looked upon as a punishment for his sacrilege; hence the proverb Aurum Tolosanum habet, of an act involving disastrous consequences.

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  • The dead even were not free from the Holy Office; but processes could be instituted against them and their remains subjected to punishment.

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  • Here the close and solitary confinement, and the dreary and hopeless inactivity to which he was condemned, proved a terrible punishment for the full-blooded, energetic and masterful Bothwell.

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  • After his release Wakefield seemed disposed for a while to turn his attention to social questions at home, and produced a tract on the Punishment of Death, with a terribly graphic picture of the condemned sermon in Newgate, and another on incendiarism in the rural districts, with an equally powerful exhibition of the degraded condition of the agricultural labourer.

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  • As a punishment, on the 18th, of October 1775, the town was bombarded and burned by a British fleet.

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  • And he gives as a crowning instance that he exposed himself to the hatred of the informer Cyprianus by preventing the punishment of Albinus, a man of consular rank.

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  • By the aid of Apollo, who served him as a slave - either as a punishment for having slain the Cyclopes, or out of affection for his mortal master - he won the hand of Alcestis, the most beautiful of the daughters of Pelias, king of Iolcus.

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  • In the Christian church flagellation was originally a punishment, and was practised not only by parents and schoolmasters, but also by bishops, who thus corrected offending priests and monks (St Augustine, Ep. 1 59 ad Marcell.; cf.

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  • This different treatment shows the feeling of the poet - the feeling for which he seeks to evoke our inmost sympathy - to oscillate between the belief that an awful crime brings with it its awful punishment (and it is sickening to observe how the argument by which the Friar persuades Annabella to forsake her evil courses mainly appeals to the physical terrors of retribution), and the notion that there is something fatal, something irresistible, and therefore in a sense self-justified, in so dominant a passion.

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  • It was only as late as 1904, however, that the landed proprietors were forbidden by law to inflict corporal punishment upon the peasants.

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  • When the results proved unsatisfactory, remedies were sought in increased administrative supervision, draconian legislation and severe punishment, and no attempt was made to get out of the vicious circle.

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  • The address in reply to the speech from the throne, voted after a debate in which abstract theories had triumphed over common sense, demanded universal suffrage, the establishment of pure parliamentary government, the abolition of capital punishment, the expropriation of the landlords, a political amnesty, and the suppression of the Imperial Council.

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  • apart from the punishment which afterwards fell on its authors,4 was to show how little the majority of the dissolved Duma had represented the Russian people.

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  • It is possible for every sinner to turn to God and escape punishment, and conversely for a righteous man to backslide and fall.

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  • Corresponding to heaven, the abode of the righteous, we have Ge-henna (originally Ge-Hinnom, the scene of the Moloch rites of human sacrifice), the place of punishment after death for apostate Jews.

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  • As a punishment she was sentenced to be buried alive in a vault, where she hanged herself, and Haemon killed himself in despair.

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  • By the Mosaic law death by stoning was the punishment for blasphemy (Lev.

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  • All blasphemies against God, as denying His being, or providence, all contumelious reproaches of Jesus Christ, all profane scoffing at the Holy Scriptures, or exposing any part thereof to contempt or ridicule, are punishable by the temporal courts with fine, imprisonment and also infamous corporal punishment.

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  • By the law of Scotland, as it originally stood, the punishment of blasphemy was death, but by an act of 1825, amended in 1837, blasphemy was made punishable by fine or imprisonment or both.

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  • In Germany, the punishment for blasphemy is imprisonment varying from one day to three years, according to the gravity of the offence.

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  • In the approaching disruption writers saw the punishment for the king's apostasy, and they condemn the sanctuaries in Jerusalem which he erected to the gods of his heathen wives.

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  • Next, the Judaean compiler regularly finds in Israel's troubles the punishment for its schismatic idolatry; nor does he spare Judah, but judges its kings by a standard which agrees with the standpoint of Deuteronomy and is scarcely earlier than the end of the 7th century B.C. (§§ 16, 20).

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  • The suppression of the Pharisaic ordinances and the punishment of those who observed them led to some disturbance.

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  • As one of those who fear the Lord in truth and in patience, he looks forward to the punishment of all sinners who oppress the righteous and profane the sanctuary.

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  • The people petitioned for the punishment of those who were responsible for the execution of Matthias and his associates and for the removal of the high priest.

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  • The Jewish embassy was headed by Philo, who has described its fortunes in a tract dealing with the divine punishment of the persecutors.

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  • The famine was perhaps interpreted by the Zealots as a punishment for their acquiescence in the rule of an apostate.

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  • The wild excesses of his youth and their terrible punishment had weakened his strong constitution, and his parliamentary labours completed the work.

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  • It is to be observed that, before the punishment was inflicted, evidence was forthcoming which brought home the outrage of Nivose to the royalists; but this was all one to Bonaparte; his aim was to destroy the Jacobin party, and it never recovered from the blow.

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  • The punishment of Tantalus in the lower world was famous.

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  • The punishment of the overhanging rock refers to the dangerous position of the town of Tantalis below the summit of Mount Sipylus.

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  • He was willing that the accused should be tried in the courts Christian provided that the punishment of the guilty were left to the lay power.

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  • The spirited reliefs of the frieze represent the punishment of the Tyrrhenian pirates by Dionysus and their transformation into dolphins.

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  • The conqueror allowed his soldiers to loot, but inflicted no permanent punishment upon the people.

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  • Even when the slave had killed his master, the relatives of the house could not themselves inflict punishment; they were obliged to hand him over to the magistrate to be dealt with by legal process.

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  • Antony, Octavius, and Sextus Pompeius employed them in the Second Civil War; and it is recorded by Augustus on the Monumentum Ancyranum that he gave back to their masters for punishment about 30,000 slaves who had absconded and borne arms against the state.

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  • The slaves were bound to work for their masters during this period for three-fourths of the day, and were to be liable to corporal punishment if they did not give the due amount of labour.

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  • Now if He did not remove them thus and take them upon Himself, no man could endure the sufferings of Israel, due as their punishment for transgressing the law; as it is written (Isa.

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  • Whatever punishment Sulla may have inflicted, Nola, though it lost much of its importance, remained a municipium with its own institutions and the use of the Oscan language.

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  • A brief description of how the Egyptians were punished through the very things with which they sinned (though the punishment was not fatal, for God loves all things that exist), and how judgments on the Canaanites were executed gradually (so as to give them time to repent), is followed by a dissertation on the origin, various forms, absurdity and results of polytheism and idolatry (xiii.-xv.): the worship of natural objects is said to be less blameworthy than the worship of images - this latter, arising from the desire to honour dead children and living kings (the Euhemeristic theory), is inherently absurd, and led to all sorts of moral depravity.

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  • towards Buttelstedt, almost unmolested by the French, who this day had put forth all that was in them, and withstood victoriously the highest average punishment any troops of the new age of warfare had as yet endured.

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  • Now the Russians uncovered their entrenchments, and in the absence of artillery preparation Soult's leading troops received most severe punishment.

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  • These disasters compelled the retreat of the whole Silesian army, and Napoleon, leaving Mortier and Marmont to deal with them, hurried back to Troyes with his main body to strike the flank of Schwarzenberg's army, which had meanwhile begun its leisurely advance, and again at Mormant on the 17th of February, Montereau the 38th and Mery the he inflicted such heavy punishment upon his adversaries that they fell back precipitately to Bar-sur-Aube.

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  • The boys have a government of their own, elect their officials from among themselves, and inflict such punishment on any of their number as the boys deem merited.

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  • They can impose fines for small offences not worth sending bef ore the inspector, and, in cases of high misdemeanour, have the power of inflicting corporal punishment.

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  • In Florence he entered the Society of Jesus, taking the habit in Rome in 1655; it was calumniously rumoured that he adopted this course in order to escape punishment for having poisoned his wife.

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  • The judicial department comprises a supreme court consisting of a chief justice and (since 1881) four associate justices elected for terms of six years, and lower courts consisting of district courts with original jurisdiction in civil cases in law and equity, and in criminal cases upon indictments by grand juries; justices' courts, in which the amount in litigation cannot exceed $ioo, or the punishment cannot exceed three months' imprisonment or a fine of $loo; and of municipal and probate courts with the usual jurisdictions.

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  • The severity with which Henry treated the last rebels was regarded as a blot upon his fame; but the only case of merely vindictive punishment was that of the poet Luke de la Barre, who was sentenced to lose his eyes for a lampoon upon the king, and only escaped the sentence by committing suicide.

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  • 20 sqq.), they do not appear to have suffered punishment at that period, perhaps on account of a timely submission.

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  • His system declared that holiness and sin are free voluntary exercises; that men act freely under the divine agency; that the slightest transgression deserves eternal punishment; that it is through God's mere grace that the penitent believer is pardoned and justified; that, in spite of total depravity, sinners ought to repent; and that regeneration is active, not passive, with the believer.

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  • Her connexion with the trial of Orestes, the introduction of a milder form of punishment for justifiable homicide, and the institution of the court TO HaXXa54, show the important part played by her in the development of legal ideas.

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  • Her punishment is the subject of the famous group called "The Farnese Bull," by Apollonius and Tauriscus of Tralles, in the Naples museum (see Greek Art, Plate I.

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  • The act is cumulative only, and does not take away or restrain any punishment prescribed by ecclesiastical law.

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  • As a punishment, Apollo slew her sons and Artemis her daughters.

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  • The church of St Helen is a fine Perpendicular building, restored and enlarged (1880); it contains monuments of the Huntingdon family, and an old finger-pillory for the punishment of misbehaviour in church.

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  • During the session of 1830 the chambers adopted a criminal code in which punishment by death for political offences was abolished.

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  • The rebels were defeated by Lanfranc in the king's absence; but William returned to settle the difficult question of their punishment, and to stamp out the last sparks of disaffection.

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  • A clause also guarantees all nobles against arbitrary arrest and punishment at the instance of any powerful person.

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  • But the remaining 93 stood firm and were condemned to death, a punishment commuted to slavery in the Neapolitan galleys.

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  • - After the collapse of the Hungarian revolution in 1849, the Croats, in the words of Pulszky, received as reward the same absolutist regime which had been imposed upon the Magyars as punishment.

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  • Worse even than this was the system of wholesale expatriation adopted as a punishment for those who had shown a friendly attitude to the invading Serbian army.

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  • From the Reformation to the French occupation in the beginning of the 19th century, Hamburg was a purely Lutheran state; according to the "Recess" of 1529, re-enacted in 1603, nonLutherans were subject to legal punishment and expulsion from the country.

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  • He is probably identical with the Bestia who encouraged the Italians in their revolt, and went into exile (90) to avoid punishment under the law of Q.

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  • 19); (7) the everlasting punishment of the wicked (lxvi.

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  • But the source even of these - the passions of ambition and avarice - he finds in the fear of death; and that fear he resolves into the fear of eternal punishment after death.

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  • One of the most important provisions was that the punishment for different offences was definitely fixed, instead of being left to the discretion of the judge before whom a case was tried.

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  • nd in general the application of the lex talionis was enjoined as the punishment for personal injuries.

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  • Of the criminal law clauses, as many as 238 are taken up with tariffs of fines, while 80 treat of capital and corporal punishment, outlawry and confiscation, and to' include rules of procedure.

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  • 1) and treat of the sin of the angels that led to the flood, and of their temporal and eternal punishment.

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  • The punishment of the wicked especially occupies his thoughts.

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  • 70 sqq.) contains a description of the future state, the general resurrection and judgment, with an account of the punishment of the wicked, as well as the bliss of the righteous.

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  • The latter portion of the sentence was carried out on the 7th of May, and the rest of his punishment inflicted except the exaction of the fine.

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  • There is no reason to suppose that his punishment was unpopular.

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  • About the same time he published a pamphlet advocating the reform of the Prayer Book, while a tract issued on the 15th of July, Sundry reasons against the new intended Bill for governing and reforming Corporations, was declared illegal, false, scandalous and seditious; Prynne being censured, and only escaping punishment by submission.

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  • According to Ulpian the punishment for sacrilegium varied according to the position and standing of the culprit and the circumstances under which the crime was committed.

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  • The jurisdiction was something jointly shared with the temporal power in case corporal punishment were involved.

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to punishment.

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  • During the 17th century the indulgence in tobacco spread with marvellous rapidity throughout all nations, and that in the face of the most resolute opposition of statesmen and priests, the " counterblaste " of a great monarch, penal enactments of the most severe description, the knout, excommunication and capital punishment.

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  • Rejecting the retributive view of punishment, he describes the sufferings of Christ as those of the perfect "Penitent," and finds their expiatory value to lie in the Person of the Sufferer, the God-Man.

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  • Tradition tells that a few years before his death he did actually send letters to the emperor Heraclius, to the negus of Abyssinia, the king of Persia, and Cyrus, patriarch of Alexandria, the " Mukaukis " of Egypt, summoning them to accept Islam and threatening them with punishment in case of refusal.

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  • In 745 Thomas of Kana brought a new 1 "In punishment by the cross (was) the suffering of this One; He who is the true Christ, and God alone, and Guide ever pure."

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  • Constructive pardon is obtained by endurance of the punishment.

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  • c. 32, § 3, the endurance of a punishment on conviction of a felony not capital has the same effect as a pardon under the great seal.

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  • A conditional pardon most commonly occurs where an offender sentenced to death has his sentence commuted to penal servitude or any less punishment.

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  • The condition of his pardon is the endurance by him of the substituted punishment.

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  • 16 sqq.) regarded this as a punishment for a ritual fault of which the king was guilty; whilst Josephus (Ant.

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  • Eventually, after having threatened to bring an action for wrongful imprisonment, Legate was tried before a full Consistory Court in February 1612, was found guilty of heresy, and was delivered to the secular authorities for punishment.

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  • Gladstone, in defending the government against Roebuck, rebuked in dignified and significant terms the conduct of men who, " hoping to escape from punishment, ran away from duty."

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  • The sympathies of the people, and even, it is said, of the clergy, throughout Scotland, were so unmistakably on the side of the rioters that the original stringency of the bill introduced into parliament for the punishment of the city of Edinburgh had to be reduced to the levying of a fine of 2000 for Porteous's widow, and the disqualification of the provost for holding any public office.

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  • The canonists define the degrees of suspicion as "light" calling for vigilance, "vehement" demanding denunciation, and "violent" requiring punishment.

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  • During the course of the 19th century in Scottish Presbyterianism the affirmation of Christ's atoning death for all men, the denial of eternal punishment, the modification of the doctrine of the inspiration of the Scriptures by acceptance of the results of the Higher Criticism, were all censured as perilous errors.

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  • It was maintained at the bar that the denial of the most fundamental doctrines of Christianity would not be a lawful cause for such rejection, but the judgment only queries whether a denial of the personality of the devil or eternal punishment is consistent with membership of the church.

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  • The act it will be observed applies only to clergymen, and the punishment is strictly limited to deprivation of benefice.

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  • The gross selfishness of the Spartans, herein exemplified, was emphasized by their capture of the Theban citadel, and, after their expulsion, by the raid upon Attica in time of peace by the Spartan Sphodrias, and his immunity from punishment at Sparta (summer of 378 B.C.).

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  • Its preaching is practical and direct, asseverating the reality of Sin, "the everlasting punishment of the wicked," and Redemption.

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  • Jelf, and to the council, of unsound theology in regard to eternal punishment.

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  • It describes his entering Rome on foot, amid the rejoicings of the citizens; his liberality towards his soldiers and to the citizens of Rome, a liberality that was extended even to persons under eleven years of age; his charities for the maintenance of the children of the poor; his remission of succession-duties in cases where the property was small or the heirs members of the testator's family; his establishment of free trade in corn between the various parts of the empire; his abandonment of vexatious and petty prosecutions for "high treason"; his punishment of informers; his abolition of pantomimes; his repairs of public buildings and his extension and embellishment of the Circus Maximus.

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  • and as to the degree of punishment.

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  • From these results we see that Shaftesbury, opposed to Hobbes and Locke, is in close agreement with Hutcheson, and that he is ultimately a deeply religious thinker, inasmuch as he discards the moral sanction of public opinion, the terrors of future punishment, the authority' of the civil authority, as the main incentives to goodness, and substitutes the voice of conscience and the love of God.

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  • But the legend cannot be justified when the facts are compared with the slaughter of the Seven Years' War, of Napoleon's battles, the Crimea, and the American Civil War, or with the horrible punishment of von Wedell's brigade (38th) only two days before.

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  • In punishment for their offences they were bound back to back with snakes to a pillar in the lower world (Hyginus, Fab.

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  • One cannot avoid the suspicion that in this instance the Hebrew chronicler purposely phrased his account to convey the impression that Sennacherib's tragic end was but the slightly delayed culmination of the punishment inflicted for his attack upon the "chosen people."

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  • He also wrote Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1856), in which he applied to history the doctrine of organic evolution; Discourses and Essays (1856); A Manual of Church History (2 vols., 1857), a translation of Guericke; A History of Christian Doctrine (2 vols., 1863); Theological Essays (1877); Literary Essays (1878); Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (1879); The Doctrine of Endless Punishment (1885); and he edited Coleridge's Complete Works (7 vols., New York, 1894).

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  • One of the objects of the expedition sent by Governor Thomas Gage to Lexington and Concord on April 18-19, 1775, was the capture of Adams and John Hancock, temporarily staying in Lexington, and when Gage issued his proclamation of pardon on June 12 he excepted these two, whose offences, he said, were "of too flagitious a Nature to admit of any other Consideration than that of condign Punishment."

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  • Legislative divorces are forbidden by the constitution, and a statute of 1901 subjects wife-beaters to corporal punishment.

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  • Although punishment by whipping and by standing in the pillory was prohibited by an act of Congress in 1839, in so far as the Federal government had jurisdiction, both these forms of punishment were retained in Delaware, and standing in the pillory was prescribed by statute as a punishment for a number of offences, including various kinds of larceny and forgery, highway robbery, and even pretending " to exercise the art of witchcraft, fortune-telling or dealing with spirits," at least until 1893.

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  • The whipping-post was in 1908 still maintained in Delaware, and whipping continued to be prescribed as a punishment for a variety of offences, although in 1889 a law was passed which prescribed that " hereafter no female convicted of any crime in this state shall be whipped or made to stand in the pillory," and a law passed in 1883 prescribed that " in case of conviction of larceny, when the prisoner is of tender years, or is charged for the first time (being shown to have before had a good character), the court may in its discretion omit from the sentence the infliction of lashes."

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  • An old law still on the statute-books when the edition of the revised statutes was issued in 1893, prescribes that " the punishment of whipping shall be inflicted publicly by strokes on the bare back, well laid on."

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  • The Swiss churches, while agreeing to condemn Servetus, say nothing of capital punishment in their letters of advice.

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  • He was an ardent social reformer; he secured the abolition of corporal punishment in the schools, the suppression of lotteries, of houses of ill-fame and of obscene literature; he instituted reforms in the hospitals, and insisted on the honours of public burial for the poor.

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  • This by no means provided for his immunity from punishment.

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  • Its object is rather the protection of the church than the punishment of the sinner.

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  • A process which is intended to produce penitence and ultimate restoration cannot at the same time contemplate handing the offender over to eternal punishment.

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  • The former, which involved exclusion from participation in the eucharistic service and from the eucharist itself, though not from the so-called "service of the catechumens," was the usual punishment of comparatively light offences; the latter, which was the penalty for graver scandals, involved "exclusion from all church privileges," - a vague expression which has sometimes been interpreted as meaning total exclusion from the very precincts of the church building (inter hiemantes orare) and from the favour of God (Bingham, Antiquities of Christian Church, xvi.

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  • He points out the equivocal character of the word poenitentia, which meant both " penance " and " penitence "; he declared that " true contrition seeks punishment, while the ampleness of pardons relaxes it and causes men to hate it."

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  • The Consistory was thus a sort of committee of the councils, and it had no power to inflict civil punishment on offenders.

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  • The legislation against Baptists (about 1644-1678) and the persecution of the Quakers (especially 1656-1662) partook of the brutality of the time, including scourging, boring of tongues, cutting of ears and in rare cases capital punishment.

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  • Phoc. 16), exercising during a crisis a disciplinary power extending to life and death over all the Athenians " in conformity with ancestral law," procuring the banishment of one, the racking of another, and the infliction of capital punishment on several of the citizens.

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  • 50); but this represents the perversion of the original idea of the cleruchy to a system of reward and punishment.

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  • Ferrar's marriage accounts for the loss of his bishopric in March 1554, and his opinions for his further punishment.

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  • The feature of his school which attracted most attention, perhaps, was his scheme for the teacher's receiving punishment, in certain circumstances, at the hands of an offending pupil, whereby the sense of shame might be quickened in the mind of the errant child.

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  • in 1089, the rebellion against Roger in 1133 and the subsequent punishment, the plunder of the town by Barbarossa in 1167, the attack by Richard, count of Acerra in 1190, and the parliament of 1223, in which Frederick II.

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  • The first class hold (1) that oaths are forbidden by the gospel, (2) that capital punishment is not allowed to the civil power, (3) that any layman may consecrate the sacrament of the altar, and (4) that the Roman Church is not the Church of Christ.

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  • This account sufficiently shows the difference of the Waldenses from the Cathari: they were opposed to asceticism, and had no official priesthood; at the same time their objection to oaths and to capital punishment are closely related to the principles of the Cathari.

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  • They have jurisdiction of various civil actions in which the amount in controversy is less than $100, and concurrent jurisdiction with the superior courts in all cases of misdemeanours, but punishment by a justice of the peace is limited in cities of the first class to a fine of $500, or imprisonment for six months, and elsewhere to a fine of $100 or imprisonment for thirty days.

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  • With the approval of the majority of a board of pardons (composed of the secretary of state, attorney-general and auditor), he may pardon offences or commute punishment, and remit fines and forfeitures.

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  • xii.); the illness of Asa is preceded by a denunciation for relying upon Syria, and the chronology is changed to bring the fault near the punishment (2 Chron.

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  • The Aramaean invasion in the time of Joash of Judah was a punishment for the murder of Jehoiada's son (2 Chron.

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  • According to Jastrow, this attempted ascension was an offence against the gods, and his fall was his punishment.

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  • Among the definitions of sovereignty may be quoted these: "That which decides in questions of war and peace, and of making or dissolving alliances, and about laws and capital punishment, and exiles and fines, and audit of accounts and examinations of administrators after their term of office" (Aristotle, Politics, 4.4.

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  • 7 of this last statute excludes from submission to arbitration criminal cases, so far as prosecution and punishment are concerned, and, without the special leave of the court, matters relating to status, matrimonial causes, and matters affecting minors or other perons under legal disability; Trinidad and Tobago, No.

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  • On hearing that the sentence was commuted to life-long imprisonment, he declared that the pardon was harder than the punishment, and vainly petitioned for leave to serve his king for the rest of his life as a common soldier.

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  • Gautsch, who was a convinced upholder of the principle of State authority, had recourse to severe measures of punishment and discipline, which had as their result a revolver attack on the Minister of Justice from the gallery of Parliament.

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  • The famous expedition sent by General Thomas Gage of Massachusetts to Lexington and Concord on the 18th-19th of April 1775 had for its object, besides the destruction of materials of war at Concord, the capture of Hancock and Adams, who were temporarily staying at Lexington, and these two leaders were expressly excepted in the proclamation of pardon issued on the 12th of June by Gage, their offences, it was said, being "of too flagitious a nature to admit of any other consideration than that of condign punishment."

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  • After the attempt of Bean - who was a hunchback, really insane - parliament passed a bill empowering judges to order whipping as a punishment for those who molested the queen; but somehow this salutary act was never enforced.

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  • In 1869 an Irish lad, O'Connor, was sentenced to eighteen months' imprisonment and a whipping for presenting a pistol at the queen, with a petition, in St James's Park; but this time it was the queen herself who privately remitted the corporal punishment, and she even pushed clemency to the length of sending her aggressor to Australia at her own expense.

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  • (b) This relation has been disturbed so that God regards man's character and conduct with disapproval, and inflicts suffering upon him by way of punishment.

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  • 3 Some passages refer exclusively to the endurance of punishment as a condition of pardon; 4 others to the penitence and amendment of the sinner.'

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  • 2 The leading reformers emphasized the idea that Christ bore the punishment of sin, sufferings equivalent to the punishments deserved by men, a view maintained later on by Jonathan Edwards junior.

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  • He may be impeached in one case only - namely, for high treason, on the motion of the Chamber of Deputies; and his only punishment, if found guilty, is the loss of his office and disability ever to hold it again.

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  • " gallows " was translated by furia and patibulum, both words applied in classical Latin to a fork-shaped instrument of punishment fastened on the neck of slaves and criminals.

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  • Tradition regarded it as the punishment of his transference of the cult of Hercules from the Potitii.

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  • This criminal neglect of national education brought along with it its own punishment.

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  • This was rejected, and it was with some difficulty that his petition to be executed with the axe, instead of undergoing the ordinary brutal punishment for high treason, was granted.

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  • indulgentia, indulgere, to grant, concede), in theology, a term defined by the official catechism of the Roman Catholic Church in England as " the remission of the temporal punishment which often remains due to sin after its guilt has been forgiven."

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  • But, speaking of mere satisfaction for punishment due, there cannot be a doubt that some of the Saints have done more than was needed in justice to expiate the punishment due to their own sins.

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  • He is said to have been struck dead by lightning as the punishment of his pride.

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  • The dominant theory at the time when Job was written was that all suffering was a punishment of sin; and the aim of the book is to controvert this theory.

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  • After the destruction of Thebes by the Epigoni, Alcmaeon carried out his father's injunctions by killing his mother, as a punishment for which he was driven mad and pursued by the Erinyes from place to place.

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  • The reason for this punishment is not mentioned in Homer, and is obscure; according to some, he had revealed the designs of the gods to mortals, according to others, he was in the habit of attacking and murdering travellers.

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  • When a distinction was made between the souls in the under world, Sisyphus was supposed to be rolling up the stone perpetually as a punishment for some offence committed on earth; and various reasons were invented to account for it.

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  • Punishment was also inflicted on the Hindostani Fanatics of Palosi.

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  • According to Vitruvius (vii., preface) he lived during the age of Ptolemy Philadelphus (285-247 B.C.), by whom he was crucified as the punishment of his criticisms on the king.

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  • Every part of the material universe - man, woman, insect, tree, stone, or whatever it be - is the dwelling of an eternal spirit that is working out its destiny, and while receiving reward and punishment for the past is laying up reward and punishment for the future.

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  • Every act of every person has not only a moral value producing merit or demerit, but also an inherent power which works out its fitting reward or punishment.

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  • As a punishment for their treachery, Caesar put to death the senate of the Veneti and sold their people into slavery.

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  • Below the freemen were the slaves, who were war-captives, persons enslaved for punishment, or children sold by their parents.

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  • How closely related some of the Central-American nations were in institutions to the Mexicans appears, not only in their using the same peculiar weapons, but in the similarity of their religious rites; the connexion is evident in such points as the ceremony of marriage by tying together the garments of the couple, or in holding an offender's face over burning chillies as a punishment; the native legends of Central America make mention of the royal ball-play, which was the same as the Mexican game of tlachtli already mentioned.

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  • The court of a justice of the peace has jurisdiction in criminal cases only where the punishment is by fine not exceeding twenty dollars, or by imprisonment not exceeding six months, or by both, and in civil cases only where the title to real estate is not involved and the damage demanded does not exceed thirteen dollars and thirty-three cents.

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  • Capital punishment for murder in the first degree is inflicted only upon the request of a jury.

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  • But give heed lest ye also suffer the same things as they: for the evil doers among men receive their reward not among the living only, but also await punishment and much torment.

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  • The death penalty was commuted into a punishment worse because more shameful than death.

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  • This series of calamities was accepted by the Doukhobors as a punishment from God, and a spiritual awakening of a most energetic character ensued.

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  • Gervaise of Tilbury, writing early in the 13th century, has in his Otia Imperialia a chapter, De lamiis et nocturnis larvis, where he gives it out, as proved by individuals beyond all exception, that men have been lovers of beings of this kind whom they call Fadas, and who did in case of infidelity or infringement of secrecy inflict terrible punishment - the loss of goods and even of life.

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  • decreed banishment against its adherents, Justinian the punishment of death.

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  • This crime aroused intense excitement throughout the country, and the Orange body, particularly, to which Scott belonged, demanded the immediate punishment of his murderer and the suppression of the rebellion.

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  • In the end 25 out of 53 French members voted in justification of Riel's punishment.

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  • In the 1907 state legislature a county local option bill was passed in February, and immediately afterward the Sherrod anti-shipping bill was enacted forbidding the acceptance of liquors for shipment, transportation or delivery to prohibition districts, and penalising the soliciting of orders for liquor in "dry" districts with a punishment of $500 fine and six months' imprisonment with hard labour.

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  • Under its provisions it is a punishable offence " to break or injure a submarine cable wilfully or by culpable negligence in such manner as might interrupt or obstruct telegraphic communication either wholly or partially, such punishment being without prejudice to any civil action for damages.

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  • In addition to the franchise, immunity from corporal punishment (even in the field) was promised the Latins.

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  • Feckenham used all his influence with Mary "to procure pardon of the faults or mitigation of the punishment for poor Protestants" (Fuller), and he was sent by the queen to prepare Lady Jane Grey for death.

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  • It is admitted by himself that he inflicted punishment for religious opinion.

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  • 45) it appears that he was sent with Carneades and Diogenes to Rome in 156-155 B.C. to protest against the fine of 500 talents imposed on Athens in punishment for the sack of Oropus.

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  • This punishment, originally inflicted on those who neglected certain mystic rites, was transferred to those who, like the Danaides, despised the mystic rite of marriage; cf.

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  • These Cluniac obedientiae differed from the ordinary Benedictine cells in being also places of punishment, to which monks who had been guilty of any grave infringement of the rules were relegated as to a kind of penitentiary.

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  • Esarhaddon, on his way to Egypt for the second time, determined to deal out punishment; he blockaded Tyre, and raised earthworks on the shore and cut off the water-supply; but he did not capture the city itself.

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  • Stocks (Punishment) >>

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  • 19), but the belief in its existence and in the punishment of wrong-doing was salutary (ii.

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  • See also the articles Annuity; Capital Punishment; Cremation; Insurance; Medical, Jurisprudence, &C.

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  • It may also be thought of as retributive, as a reversal of present conditions so that the miserable are comforted, and the prosperous laid low, or as a reward or punishment for good or evil desert here.

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  • The retribution of the wicked is described as death, outer darkness, weeping and wailing and gnashing of teeth, the undying worm, the quenchless fire, exclusion from the kingdom, eternal punishment and the like" (S.

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  • The doctrines of the Resurrection, the Last Judgment, the Reward of the Righteous and the Punishment of the Wicked are not less distinctly expressed than in the other apostolic writings.

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  • Clement of Alexandria taught that justice is not merely retributive, that punishment is remedial, that probation continues after death till the final judgment, that Christ and the apostles preached the Gospel in Hades to those who lacked knowledge, but whose heart was right, that a spiritual body will be raised.

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  • He held fast to eternal punishment, but allowed the possibility of mitigations.

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  • The doctrine of eternal punishment has been opposed on many grounds, such as the disproportion between the offence and the penalty, the moral world should prepare itself for the descent of the and religious immaturity of the majority of men at death, the diminution of the happiness of heaven involved in the knowledge of the endless suffering of others (Schleiermacher), the defeat of the divine purpose of righteousness and grace that the continued antagonism of any of God's creatures would imply, the dissatisfaction God as Father must feel until His whole family is restored.

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  • Shedd, Doctrine of Endless Punishment (New York, 1886); F.

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  • It pointed out distinctly and temperately the grounds of the right of punishment, and from these principles deduced certain propositions as to the nature and amount of punishment which should be inflicted for any crime.

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  • On the 28th of May 1572 a demand from both houses of parliament for her execution as well as Norfolk's was generously rejected by Elizabeth; but after the punishment of the traitorous pretender to her hand, on whom she had lavished many eloquent letters of affectionate protestation, !she fell into "a passion of sickness" which convinced her honest keeper of her genuine grief for the ducal caitiff.

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  • This combination of eternal punishment with restless wandering has attracted the imagination of innumerable writers in almost all European tongues.

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  • On the scaffold, "by the clemency of the empress," his punishment was mitigated to the severing of his right hand followed by decapitation.

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  • Measures were taken for the defence of the territory and the punishment of the assailants, which culminated in the despatch of Sir Garnet (afterwards Viscount) Wolseley as British administrator, 800,000 being voted by parliament for the expenses of the expedition.

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  • Matters came to a climax at the council of Vienne in 1311 under Pope Clement V., where the "sect of Beguines and Beghards" were accused of being the main instruments of the spread of heresy, and decrees were passed suppressing their organization and demanding their severe punishment.

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  • Capital punishment is retained on the statute, but is never enforced, the prisoner on whom sentence of death is passed in due form in open court being relegated to imprisonment for life in solitary confinement and perpetual silence.

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  • The book of Chronicles enumerates several Judaean cities fortified by Rehoboam (not necessarily connected with Sheshonk's campaign), and characteristically regards the invasion as a punishment (2 Chron.

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  • The punishment for the offence is penal servitude for life or not less than three years, or imprisonment for not more than two years.

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  • during the first half of the 9th century B.C. He is introduced as predicting the drought 2 God was to send upon Israel as a punishment for the apostasy into which Ahab had been led by his heathen wife Jezebel.

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  • Such an inference is, however, clearly at variance with the whole doctrine of sin, repentance and the atonement, as also with that of eternal reward and punishment, which postulates a real measure of human responsibility.

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  • His strength lay in his intense conviction of an intimate connexion between sin and punishment and in his power of dramatic presentation.

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  • Congress now acted promptly: on the 31st of January 1865, that body by joint resolution proposed to the states the 13th amendment of the Federal Constitution, providing that "neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States or any place subject to their jurisdiction."

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  • Again he joined the emperor, but his punishment was swift and sure, as Turenne and Wrangel again marched into the electorate and defeated the Bavarians at Zusmarshausen, near Augsburg, in May 1648.

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  • Of these, one forbade ministers of religion from abusing ecclesiastical punishment; the second, which was the most important, introduced a law already adopted in Baden, that no one should be appointed to any office in the Church except a German, who must have received his education in a German gymnasium, have studied for three years in a German university, and have passed a state examination in philosophy, history, German literature and classics; all ecclesiastical seminaries were placed under the control of the state, and all seminaries for boys were forbidden.

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  • The epithet is applied to Zeus and the Erinyes as the deities of revenge and punishment.

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  • He spoke against capital punishment, against church-rates, against flogging in the army, and against the Irish Established Church.

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  • The lukewarm are rebuked, the enemies threatened with terrible punishment, both temporal and eternal.

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  • Mehmet Au banished them to Esna, in Upper Egypt; and the few that remained in Cairo called themselves Awalim, to avoid punishment.

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  • 8olaim~n after very slight resistance, at the beginning of 905, and after the infliction of severe punishment on the inhabitants Egypt was once more put under a deputy, Isa al-Naushari, appointed directly by the caliph.

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  • One of his first acts, after preventing the application of capital punishment to the ringleaders of the revolt, was to veto the project of protecting the khedive and his government by means of a Praetorian guard recruited from Asia Minor, Epirus, Austria and Switzerland, and to insist on the principle that Egypt must be governed in a truly liberal spirit.

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  • The punishment of the people is briefly recorded in v.

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  • But there are canons for the punishment of such as might induce the sovereign so to erect any town into a city, solely with the view of becoming bishop thereof.

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  • From a remission of penance it was extended, in the 13th century, to a release from the temporal punishment exacted by God, whether in this life or in purgatory, from the repentant sinner.

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  • For most offences there was some generally recognized punishment - such as death for murder or adultery; but often vengeance would fall upon another person instead of the wrongdoer.

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  • The idea that the Jews would believe in Antichrist, as punishment for not having believed in the true Christ, seems to be expressed by the author of the fourth gospel (v.

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  • But of all doctrines that of eternal punishment is most contrary, Reimarus thinks, to true ideas of God, and it was this point which first caused him to stumble" (History of Modern Phil., Eng.

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  • This roused the emperor to visit him with a severer punishment, though Innocent I.

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  • In regard to punishment for the violation of a husband's rights Proverbs shows a marked advance on the old usage.

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  • 10) prescribes death as the punishment for adultery; Proverbs (v., vi.

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  • 27 sqq., vii.) treats the offence as a sin against the offender himself, an act of suicidal folly, the punishment coming sometimes from the jealous husband, but chiefly in the way of the physical depravation and social ignominy that befall the adulterer.

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  • This change of punishment imports not a falling off in the moral standard but rather the conviction that a crime of this sort is best dealt with by public opinion; in airy case it means a change in the constitution of society.

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  • Jesus appeared as revealing the unity with God in which the Greeks in their best days unwittingly rejoiced, and as lifting the eyes of the Jews from a lawgiver who metes out punishment on the transgressor, to the destiny which in the Greek conception falls on the just no less than on the unjust.

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  • On the one hand, the suppression is denounced as a base surrender to the forces of tyranny and irreligion, an act of treason to conscience, which reaped its just punishment of remorse; on the other hand, it is as ardently maintained that Clement acted in full accord with his conscience, and that the order merited its fate by its own mischievous activities which made it an offence to religion and authority alike.

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  • God always appeared to him as an implacable judge, threatening punishment for breaking a law which it was impossible to keep. He confessed to himself that he often hated this arbitrary Will which Scotist theology called God.

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  • It was held that Absolution removed guilt and freed from eternal punishment, but that something had to be done to free the penitent from temporal punishment whether in this life or in purgatory.

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  • It cannot remit the divine punishment for sin; that also is in the hands of God alone.

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  • Corporal punishment is kept within limits (xxv.

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  • 37); and the by-word was soon justified in fact, for he plundered a temple of Bel at Elymais to replenish his exhausted treasury and met the fitting punishment from the gods at the hands of the inhabitants (Diodorus xxix.

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  • He had, however, incurred punishment for refusing to obey a command of his master, Mahommed Bey.

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  • 16, 24 seq.) describe the punishment of Benjamin by the religious assembly and the massacre of Jabesh-Gilead for its refusal to join Israel, four hundred virgins of the Gileadites being saved for Benjamin.

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  • Capital punishment was confined to treason and murder; the former was not to be attended by corruption of blood, drawing, or quartering; all other felonies were made punishable by confinement and hard labour, save a few to which was applied, against Jefferson's desire, the principle of retaliation.

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  • an observation of this truth should render honest republican governors so mild in their punishment of rebellions as not to discourage them too much.

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  • This mysterious Western, offshoot of Gnosticism had no single feature about it which could soften the hostility of a character such as Martin's, but he resisted the introduction of secular punishment for evil doctrine, and withdrew from communion with those bishops in Gaul, a large majority, who invoked the aid of Maximus against their erring brethren.

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  • Nowhere is crime committed on such trifling grounds, or with such general impunity, though when it is punished the punishment is atrocious.

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  • This was quelled by Major (afterwards Sir Hector) Munro, who ordered twenty-four of the ringleaders to be blown from guns, an old Mogul punishment.

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  • He had the satisfaction of carrying out the decree which ordered that all the statues of Antony should be demolished, and thus " the divine justice reserved the completion of Antony's punishment for the house of Cicero" (Plutarch).

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  • Pelagius insisted that sin was an act, not a state, an abuse of the freedom of the will, and that each man was responsible and liable to punishment only for his own acts.

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  • The earliest object sought in imprisonment was to secure the person of the accused to ensure his appearance before his judges for trial, and after conviction to produce him Early to take his punishment.

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  • At this time prisons were primarily places of detention, not of punishment, peopled by accused persons, still innocent in the eyes of the law, and debtors guilty only of breaches of the financial rules of a commercial country, framed chiefly in the interest of the creditor.

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  • In 18 3 a select committee of the House of Commons went into the whole subject of secondary punishment and reported that, as the difficulties in the way of an effective classification of prisoners were insurmountable, they were strongly in favour of the confinement of prisoners in separate cells, recommending that the whole of the prisons should be altered accordingly and the expense borne by the public exchequer.

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  • Primary or capital punishment still existed, but to a greatly modified extent.

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  • A slow death may be defended indeed on moral grounds if regeneration has been compassed, ' but it is only another form of capital punishment.

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  • A new committee sat in 1863, and in its report again remarked in no measured terms upon the many and wide differences that still existed in the gaols of Great Britain as regards construction, diet, labour and general discipline, "leading to an inequality, uncertainty and inefficiency of punishment productive of the most prejudicial results."

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  • As for penal servitude, the punishment reserved for the gravest offences, great changes had been introduced.

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  • Penal servitude, to use the words of the lord chief justice Sir Alexander Cockburn, one of the members of the committee, "was hardly calculated to produce on the mind of the criminal that salutary dread of the recurrence of the punishment which may be the means of deterring him and, through his example, others from the commission of crime."

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  • This plan had originated with Captain Maconochie, at one time superintendent in Norfolk Island, who had recommended that the punishment inflicted upon criminals should be measured, not by time, but by the amount of labour actually performed.

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  • The committee last quoted gave it as their opinion that "penal servitude as at present administered is on the whole satisfactory; it is effective as a punishment and free from serious abuses.

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  • Having earned his remission the convict enters upon the third stage of his punishment.

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  • One was the strict limitation of corporal punishment to offences of mutiny and gross personal violence to officers, where previously it might be inflicted for many forms of misconduct, and it can only now be adjudged under great restrictions.

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  • In it he suggested that the following reforms should be carried out, some by administrative order and some by future legislation: (1) time for the payment of fines inflicted for minor offences; (2) disciplinary treatment outside prison for all offenders under 21 years of age; (3) punishment of those guilty of offences not involving moral turpitude to be relieved of all degrading features; (4) the reduction of the period of solitary confinement to a maximum of one month; (5) and the abolition of the ticket-of-leave system.

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  • Du Cane, Punishment and Prevention of Crime (1885); Braco, Estudos penitenciarios e criminaes (Lisbon, 1888); Garofalo, Studio sul delitto, sulle sui cause e sui mezzi di repressione (1890); Adolphe Guillot, Les Prisons de Paris (1890); Tallack, Preventive and Penological Principles (1896); Salillas, Vida penal en Espana (Madrid).

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  • Moawiya, disregarding his son Yazid's advice that he should exact condign punishment for Zobair's disrespect, replied in flattering terms, regretting the trespass and resigning both slaves and estate to Zobair.

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  • The chief punishment, however, the burning of the fleet, was a very impolitic measure, as it strengthened the hands of the Byzantines.

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  • As a punishment for supplying the Titans with water in their contest with Zeus, he was turned into a river of Hades, over which departed souls were ferried by Charon.

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  • As the object of punishment is not the will or the individual himself, but the misdirection of the will, so the result of punishment is the final purification and redemption of all.

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  • The success of the Italian resistance was primarily due to the power of the Italian soldier, when properly handled, to take hard punishment.

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  • On the 16th of January 1793 the vote began to be taken in the Convention upon the punishment of the king.

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  • Periodical markets, weekly or annual, had preceded them, which already enjoyed the special protection of the king's ban, acts of violence against traders visiting them or on their way towards them being subject to special punishment.

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  • Justices of the peace, one of whom is elected biennially in each precinct, have jurisdiction in civil actions in which the amount in controversy does not exceed $200 and the title to or boundary of real estate is not involved, and in criminal actions less than a felony and in which the punishment prescribed by law does not exceed a fine of $100 and imprisonment for six months.

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  • The narrator considered that Israel had to be a prophet to the "nations" at large, that Israel had, like Jonah, neglected its duty and for its punishment was "swallowed up" in foreign lands.

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  • As a punishment for the treacherous murder of some Roman merchants and one of Caesar's commissariat officers at Cenabum, the town was burnt and the inhabitants put to the sword or sold as slaves.

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  • purgatorium, from purgare, to purge), according to Roman Catholic faith, a state of suffering after death in which the souls of those who die in venial sin, and of those who still owe some debt of temporal punishment for mortal sin, are rendered fit to enter heaven.

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  • He took part in the punishment of Cade's supporters, and discountenanced a proposal in parliament that he should be declared heir to the crown.

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  • In 76 he was tried for his malpractices, but escaped punishment; six years later he was removed from the senate by the censors, but soon afterwards reinstated.

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  • in 1649 (perhaps as a special measure of punishment) an " Act for the better Propagation and Preaching of the Gospel in Wales," by the terms of which a packed body of seventy commissioners was presented with powers that were practically unlimited to deal with all matters ecclesiastical in Wales.

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  • The famous decretal of Siricius (385) not only enjoined strict celibacy on bishops, priests and deacons, but insisted on the instant separation of those who had already married, and prescribed the punishment of expulsion for disobedience (Siric. Ep. i.

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  • It contained a vigorous and severe attack upon the royal policy, and did not shrink from warning Henry with temporal punishment at the hands of the emperor and the king of France if he did not repent of his cruelties and return to the Church.

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  • If a person in fetters took refuge in his house he was immediately loosed from his bonds; and if a criminal on his way to the scene of his punishment met him and threw himself at his feet he was respited for that day.

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  • Only the worst offences, however, at first draw down post-mortem punishment.

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  • But though Philip appeared for a time to give way, he had made up his mind to visit the opponents of his policy with ruthless punishment.

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  • He used his great influence to bring the suspected persons to trial and punishment.

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  • suggests neither hope nor consolation, until the end, where we have an assurance that Zion's punishment is complete, and she will not again be exiled (iv.

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  • As a punishment, Ixion was seized with madness, until Zeus purified him of his crime and admitted him as a guest to Olympus.

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  • In the Riksdag of 1884 a new patent law was adopted, the age at which women should be held to attain their majority was fixed at twenty-one years and the barbarous prison punishment of " bread and water " abolished.

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  • If found guilty they were to be degraded and sent back to the king's court for punishment.

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  • The greatest punishment to an untrustworthy slave is tc give him his liberty and let him earn his living.

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  • In criminal cases the dispensation of justice is always summary, and, when the offence is small, the whole procedure, including the examination of witnesses and criminal, as well as the decision and the punishment, a bastinado, is a matter of some minutes.

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  • A foreign subject implicated in a criminal suit cannot be pursued or molested in any way unless there exist full proofs of his having taken part in the crime imputed to him, and should he be duly convicted of the crime, he is handed over to his legation, which either sends him back to his own country to undergo the punishment established by law, or, according to more recent usage, punishes him in Persia by fine, imprisonment, &c. In this respect the powers of the foreign representatives in Persia, now numbering ten (Great Britain, Russia, France, Turkey, Austria-Hungary, Germany, United States of America, Italy, Belgium and the Netherlands) vary considerably, some having the power of condemning a criminal to death, while others cannot do more than fine and imprison for short periods.

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  • Charged with the murder of a holy saiyid, his hands were cut off and his tongue was plucked out, as part of the horrible punishment inflicted on him.

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  • The punishment for the offence is fine and imprisonment, with or without hard labour, if the party rescued has not been convicted of the offence for which he was in custody.

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  • The punishment for a felonious rescue may be penal servitude for not more than seven or less than three years, or imprisonment for not more than two years, with or without hard labour.

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  • In later writers Tartarus is the place of punishment of the wicked after death, and is used for the underworld generally.

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  • Sulla, after his victory over Mithradates, brushed away their pretexts, and inflicting a very heavy fine told them that the punishment fell far short of their deserts.

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  • An act passed in 1836 (the Cape of Good Hope Punishment Act) empowered the colonial courts to deal with offences committed by British subjects in any part of South Africa up to the 25th degree of south latitude.

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  • Jameson and the other raiders were handed over to the British government for punishment.

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  • His argument, that the punishment of an imprudent act often follows after a long interval may be admitted, but does not advance a single step towards the conclusion that imprudent acts will be punished hereafter.

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  • So, too, with the attempt to show that from the analogy of the present life we may not unreasonably infer that virtue and vice will receive their respective rewards and punishments hereafter; it may be admitted that virtuous and vicious acts are naturally looked upon as objects of reward or punishment, and treated accordingly, but we may refuse to allow the argument to go further, and to infer a perfect distribution of justice dependent upon our conduct here.

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  • The chief motive for these accusations was no doubt the desire of amassing wealth,' since by the law of majestas one-fourth of the goods of the accused, even if he committed suicide in order to avoid confiscation (which was always carried out in the case of those condemned to capital punishment), was assured to the accuser (who was hence called quadruplator).

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  • The abuse naturally reappeared under a man like Domitian; the delators, with whom Vespasian had not interfered, although he had abolished trials for majestas, were again banished by Trajan, and threatened with capital punishment in an edict of Constantine; but, as has been said, the evil, which was an almost necessary accompaniment of autocracy, lasted till the end of the 4th century.

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  • With Aeschylus the punishment ends here, but, according to Euripides, in order to escape the persecutions of the Erinyes, he was ordered by Apollo to go to Tauris, carry off the statue of Artemis which had fallen from heaven, and bring it to Athens.

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  • When the city was taken, on the 9th of October 1793, although the Convention ordered its destruction, Couthon did not carry out the decree, and showed moderation in the punishment of the rebels.

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  • He remained in power during five years of unbroken peace (1851-1856), and carried many useful reforms. The most important of these was the so-called Additional Act of the 5th of July 1852, which amended the charter of 1826 by providing for the direct election of deputies, the decentralization of the executive, the creation of representative municipal councils, and the abolition of capital punishment for political offences.

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  • Apart from a few redactional glosses the chapter as a whole belongs to P. The punishment of Nadab and Abihu by death for offering " strange fire " (x.

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  • 7 ff., and the offence is clearly one against property, the omission of the punishment being possibly due to the redactor who added vv.

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  • The handing over of impenitent persons, and those who had relapsed, to the secular power, and their punishment, did not usually take place on the occasion of an auto-da-fe, properly so called.

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  • Little else is known of him except that he declared in favour of the death punishment for the Catilinarian conspirators.

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  • He began by repealing Catherine's law which exempted the free classes of the population of Russia from corporal punishment and mutilation.

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  • But it must be remembered that in consequence of many scandals which had taken place in the previous war the Articles of War had been deliberately revised so as to leave no punishment save death for the officer of any rank who did not do his utmost against the enemy either in battle or pursuit.

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  • This savage punishment was approved by the higher officers of the navy, who showed great lenity to men of their own rank.

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  • The new birth when lost may be restored through repentance, which is not merely (I) sincere sorrow, but also (2) confession of each individual sin to the priest, and (3) the discharge of penances imposed by the priest for the removal of the temporal punishment which may have been imposed by God and the Church.

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  • The general taste having been considerably refined since, Rabelais has in parts become nearly unreadable - the worst and most appropriate punishment for his faults.

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  • Mercy to the Gentiles and the punishment of "the sons of the kingdom" is foretold viii.

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  • The doctrine of Augustine was revived in the 9th century by Gottschalk, who taught that God's passing over the lost meant their predestination to punishment.

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  • The Elizabethan administration had successfully defended its own existence and the Protestant faith against able and powerful antagonists, but this had not been accomplished without enforcing severe measures of repression and punishment upon those of the opposite faith.

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  • Their punishment was terrible.

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  • Capital punishment is by electrocution.

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  • COURT LEET, an English petty criminal court for the punishment of small offences.

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  • The contest, which raged from the 23rd to the morning of the 26th of June, was without doubt the bloodiest and most resolute the streets of Paris have ever seen, and the general did not hesitate to inflict the severest punishment on the rebels.

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  • There were powers of all sorts, powers of help and salvation and also powers of punishment (Philo i.

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  • Mumford, who had torn down a United States flag placed by Farragut on the United States mint; and for this execution he was denounced (Dec. 1862) by President Davis as "a felon deserving capital punishment," who if captured should be reserved for execution.

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  • The two schools are not places of punishment, but reformatory schools for delinquent boys (from 8 to 16 years of age) and girls (from 6 to 16 years), who have been committed by the courts for violations of law, and, in the case of girls, who, by force of circumstances or associations, are " in manifest danger of becoming outcasts of society."

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  • As a religious man, he wrote and strove in favour of tolerance, being decidedly against capital punishment for heretics.

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  • The idea is that the dead man shall enter the spirit world in a manner befitting his earthly rank, or he would be despised by the other spirits, and also that if proper respect were not shown to his remains, he might bring supernatural punishment on his relations.

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  • He signalized his vigour by the punishment of a great officer and in negotiations with the state of Ts`i.

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  • and opposed the punishment of the authors of the September massacres.

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  • His place in the Edwardean theology is principally due to his defence against the Universalists of his father's doctrine of the atonement, namely, that Christ's death, being the equivalent of the eternal punishment of sinners, upheld the authority of the divine law, but did not pay any debt, and made the pardon of all men a possibility with God, but not a necessity.

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  • The defaulting regiment was, marched down to Barrackpur for punishment.

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  • Two days later the 19th were publicly disbanded, but no further punishment was attempted.

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  • Should the lords infringe the well-established rights of their subjects, the latter had no court to appeal to and only God could inflict punishment on the oppressors.

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  • One of his pamphlets against the latter (The Public Spirit of the Whigs set forth in their Generous Encouragement of the Author of the Crisis, 1714) was near involving him in a prosecution, some invectives against the Scottish peers having proved so exasperating to Argyll and others that they repaired to the queen to demand the punishment of the author, of whose identity there could be no doubt, although, like all Swift's writings, except the Proposal for the Extension of Religion, the pamphlet had been published anonymously.

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  • The third heaven: Paradise and place of punishment.

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  • Capital punishment was re-established, and the press was made responsible for matter published.

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  • She is said to have loved a young man named Dardanus, of Abydos, and, enraged at his neglect of her, to have put out his eyes while he was asleep. The gods, as a punishment for this, ordered her, by an oracle, to take the famous but rather mythical lover's leap from the Leucadian promontory (Photius, Cod.

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  • A virgin martyr who is threatened with loss of honour as a bitterer punishment than loss of life offers points as powerful as they are perilous.

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  • Tarpeia herself is a local divinity, the manner of whose death was suggested by the tumulus or shields on the spot devoted to her cult, a crime being invented to account for the supposed punishment.

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  • In June, Mr Schreiner, whose recent support of Sir Alfred Milner had incensed many of his Bond followers, resigned in consequence of the refusal of some of his colleagues to support the disfranchisement bill which he was prepared, in accordance with the views of the home government, to introduce for the punishment of Cape rebels.

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  • The savage punishment of the Neapolitan Republicans is dealt with in more detail under Naples, Nelson and Caracciolo, but it is necessary to say here that the king, and above all the queen, were particularly anxious that no mercy should be shown to the rebels, and Maria Carolina made use of Lady Hamilton, Nelson's mistress, to induce him to execute her own spiteful vengeance.

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  • The spirit of Livingston's code was remedial rather than vindictive; it provided for the abolition of capital punishment and the making of penitentiary labour not a punishment forced on the prisoner, but a matter of his choice and a reward for good behaviour, bringing with it better accommodations.

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  • So despotic did the tyranny become in the West, that in the time of Charlemagne it was necessary to restrain abbots by legal enactments from mutilating their monks and putting out their eyes; while the rule of St Columban ordained loo lashes as the punishment for very slight offences.

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  • In spite of occasional secessions which brought severe punishment upon the island (1 453, 1 479), the rule of the Giustiniani was not abolished till 1566.

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  • In this court all offences against the forest laws may be tried, but no judgment or punishment follows.

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  • Although we find in the poems of Dubhthach, written in the 5th century and prefixed to the Senchus Mor, the sentences, "Let every one die who kills a human being," and "Every living person that inflicts death shall suffer death," capital punishment did not prevail in Ireland before or after.

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  • The laws uniformly discountenanced revenge, retaliation, the punishment of one crime by another, and permitted capital punishment only in the last resort and in ultimate default of every other form of redress.

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  • There is good reason to believe that the system was as effectual in the prevention and punishment of crime and in the redress of wrongs as any other human contrivance has ever been.

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  • By the commission of crime, breach of contract, or other disgraceful or injurious conduct, Einechlan was diminished or destroyed, a capitis diminutio occurred, apart from any other punishment.

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  • Punishment will fall upon an oppressive court, upon those who wear foreign apparel, and who " leap over the threshold " (v.

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  • After a period of punishment (cf.

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  • cotnmunicated unless he approved of such punishment being inflicted on them.

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  • Hence we find Gloucester insisting that the remnant of the vanquished party should not be subjected to over heavy~ punishment, and even making an armed demonstration, in the spring of 1267, to demand the re-enactment of the Provisions of Oxford.

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  • Naturally he expected the same accuracy from other men, and when he did not meet it he could be harsh and unrelenting in the punishment that he inflicted.

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  • Later additions to the statute were devised to terrorize the laborer, by adding stripes and branding to his punishment, if he still remained recalcitrant or absconded.

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  • Hence there arose, both in and out of parliament, a violent agitation for the removal of Lancaster from power, and the punishment of the favorites, who were believed, with complete justification, to be misusing the royal name for their own private profit.

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  • Such violence, however, speedily brought its own punishment.

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  • Scrope he had been smitten with a painful disorder, Faction in which his enemies declared to be the punishment the court.

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  • The regent handed her over for punishment as a sorceress to the French clergy of his own party.

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  • It was a righteous punishment for her interference in the unnatural strife of Orleanists and Burgundians that the struggle between York and Lancaster was to be as bitter and as bloody as that between the two French factions.

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  • The contention began ~fl 1515 with the fierce assault by the Commons on the old abuse of benefit of clergy, and the immunity of clerical criminals from due punishment for secular crimesa question as old as the times of Henry II.

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  • The meeting at Edinburgh of a convention of delegates of the associated friends of the people, at which some foolish and exaggerated language was used, was followed by the trial of Thomas Muir, a talented young advocate whose brilliant defence did not save him from a sentence of fourteen years transportation (August 30, 1793), while seven years transportation was the punishment of the Rev. T.

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  • After receiving the opinion of the law officers the cabinet decided to introduce a bill into parliament increasing in England the punishment for a conspiracy to commit a felony either within or without the United Kingdom.

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  • The story of Claude Gueux, published five years later (1834), another fervent protest against the infliction of capital punishment, was followed by many other eloquent and passionate appeals to the same effect, written or spoken on various occasions which excited the pity or the indignation of the orator or the poet.

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  • Along with this great doctrine there pass on into Christianity the slowly attained hope of resurrection and the dreadful doctrine of future punishment for the wicked.

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  • Christian teachers during the 19th century grew more reticent in regard to future punishment.

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  • Again, Western theology, very roughly summarized, while accepting the earlier doctrinal tradition, has broken new ground for itself, in affirming as rational necessity that God must punish sin (this is at least latent in Aquinas's - doctrine of natural law), but as contingent fact of revelation that God has in Christ combined the punishment of sin with the salvation of sinners; this is the Reformation or postReformation thought.

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  • Also that Mordecai offered a gross affront to Haman, for which no slighter punishment would satisfy Haman than the destruction of the whole Jewish race (iii.

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  • That he remained satisfied with them himself is doubtful, unless for their foresight, their tremendous effect as instruments of punishment, and as they swept him to so much distinction.

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  • The posts were generally filled by eminent and capable men who had to keep the peace, enforce punishment for breach of the law, and take care that neither country encroached on the boundary of the other.

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  • Like him, armed with bow and arrows, she deals death to mortals, sometimes gently and suddenly, especially to women, but also as a punishment for offences against herself or morality.

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  • His articles on corporal punishment, which appeared in Russkaya Starina in 1881, brought about its abolition.

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  • He summed up their doctrines under eleven heads: they condemn the having and using images in the churches, the going on pilgrimages to the memorial or "mynde places" of the saints, the holding of landed possessions by the clergy, the various ranks of the hierarchy, the framing of ecclesiastical laws and ordinances by papal and episcopal authority, the institution of religious orders, the costliness of ecclesiastical decorations, the ceremonies of the mass and the sacraments, the taking of oaths and the maintaining that war and capital punishment are lawful.

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  • All the articles of Pecock's list, save that on capital punishment, are to be found in the Conclusions; and, although many writers have held that Wycliffe's own views differed greatly from what have been called the "exaggerations of the later and more violent Lollards," all these views may be traced to Wycliffe himself.

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  • On the 8th Thermidor (26th of July) Robespierre addressed the Convention, deploring the invectives against himself and the Revolutionary Tribunal and demanding the purification of the committees and the punishment of traitors.

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  • Inherited incapacity for the choice of good is the punishment for Adam's misuse of freedom.

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  • And because Adam's choice necessitates punishment it follows that in some instances Divine Grace can never be bestowed.

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  • Neither the deterrent nor the reformatory theories of punishment (q.v.) necessarily depend upon or carry with them a belief in the freedom of the will.

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  • Humanitarian moralists, who hesitate to believe in the retributive theory of punishment because, as they think, its aim is not the criminal's future well-being but merely the vindication through pain of an outrage upon the moral law which the criminal need never have committed, might welcome a theory which urges that the sole aim of punishment should be the exercise of an influence determining the criminal's future conduct for his own or the social good.

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  • Moreover, the belief that the justice of punishment depends upon the responsibility of the criminal for his past offences and the admission of the moral consciousness that his previous wrong-doing was freely chosen carries with it, so it is argued, consequences which the libertarian moralist might be willing to accept with reluctance.

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  • While if the deterrent and reformatory theories alone provide a rational end for punishment to aim at then the libertarian hypothesis pushed to its extreme conclusion must make all punishments equally useless.

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  • It might, however, be thought that whatever be the compatibility of theories of punishment or of the activity of the state as a moralizing agency with determinism, to reconcile the R denial of freedom with a belief in the reality of remorse or penitence will be plainly impossible.

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  • ness and consequent punishment, unless they are elected by God's unmerited grace to share the benefits of Christ's redemption.

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  • In answer to this argument some necessarians have admitted that punishment can be legitimate only if it be beneficial to the person punished; others, again, have held that the lawful use of force is to restrain lawless force; but most of those who reject free-will defend punishment on the ground of its utility in deterring others from crime, as well as in correcting or restraining the criminal on whom it falls.

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  • It is true that Hegel regards the conscious effort to realize one's own conception of good as a higher stage of moral development than the mere conformity to the jural rules establishing property, maintaining contract and allotting punishment to crime, in which the universal will is first expressed; since in such conformity this will is only accomplished accidentally by the outward concurrence of individual wills, and is not essentially realized in any of them.

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  • From him, however, not only has punishment overtaken us, but a pestilence instilled from him resides in us, to which punishment is justly due.

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  • As compared with the earlier assize it prescribes greater severity of punishment for criminal offences; arson and forgery were henceforth to be crimes about which the jurors are to enquire; and those who failed at the ordeal were to lose a hand as well as a foot.

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  • It allowed the chief to call for the labour of any district, and to employ it in planting, house or canoe-building,supplying food on the occasion of another chief's visit, &c. This power was often used with much discernment; thus an unpopular chief would redeem his character by calling for some customary service and rewarding it liberally, or a district would be called on to supply labour or produce as a punishment.

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  • The punishment is penal servitude for not more than seven nor less than five years, or imprisonment with or without hard labour, not exceeding two years.

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  • Now this God-man, as sinless, is exempt from the punishment of sin; His passion is therefore voluntary, not given as due.

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  • Indeed the country people would look on the destruction of the high places with their Asheras and Mazzebas as sacrilege and would consider Josiah's death in battle as a divine punishment for his sacrilegious deeds.

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  • On the other hand, the destruction of Jerusalem and the exile of the people would appear to those who had obeyed D's instructions as a well-merited punishment for national apostasy.

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  • Very frequently he is the judge of souls, and sends the good and bad to their own places of reward and punishment.

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  • The subjects are: (1) Years past no;longer ours; (2) Man a sojourner on earth; (3) Advantage of frequent contemplation of eternity; (4) Preparation for judgment by such contemplation; (5) The good man not desirous of talking; (6) Abstinence, and its distinction from the prohibition to take life; (7) Selfexamination and self-reproof inconsistent with inaction; (8) Future reward and punishment; (9) Prying into futurity hastens calamity; (ro) Wealth with covetousness more wretched than poverty with contentment.

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  • They were about to obey, when the old herdsman, who had brought them up, revealed his secret, and they carried out the punishment on Dirce instead (Hyginus, Fab.

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  • He reorganized taxation on a basis of equality for all citizens, thereby abolishing one of the most vexatious privileges of the nobility, reformed the administration of justice and local government, suppressed torture and capital punishment, and substituted a citizen militia for the standing army.

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  • In the Gorham controversy of 1850, in the question of Oxford reform in 18J4, in the prosecution of some of the writers of Essays and Reviews, especially of Benjamin Jowett, in 1863, in the question as to the reform of the marriage laws from 1849 to the end of his life, in the Farrar controversy as to the meaning of everlasting punishment in 1877, he was always busy with articles, letters, treatises and sermons.

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  • He fully confirmed the right of the nobles to trial by law and security against arbitrary punishment; he left the franchises of the city untouched, and respected the independence of the justiza.

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  • Both men and angels will be judged at the end of the world, when the good will receive again the immortality which was lost through sin, and the wicked will receive death through punishment with.

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  • He escaped severe punishment only by the hasty retirement of the army from the town.

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  • An additional motive for his punishment consisted in his having warned the Trojans against the wooden horse left by the Greeks.

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  • "The dominion of evil over men is also represented as a slavery to Satan, and this as punishment.

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  • But it is only at the Last Judgment that his power is wholly annihilated; he is himself delivered up to eternal punishment."

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  • 1 (note drought as the punishment for not Unsystematic additions appear to have been made from time to time on a considerable scale, and we not seldom find two accounts of the same events which not only differ in detail but are certainly of very different date.

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  • tlon of It is connected by the prophecy of the punishment the mon- of the house of Eli (iii.

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  • The punishment of Eli and his sons (iv.) becomes a passing interest, and the fate of the ark is by no means so central an idea as its wonder-working in the Philistine territory.

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  • The punishment for exceeding the prices fixed was death or deportation.

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  • At Vercelli Dolcino suffered a horrible punishment.

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  • The state almost entirely supports the Connecticut school for imbeciles, at Lakeville; the American school for the deaf, in Hartford; the oral school for the deaf, 1 The constitution prescribes that " the privileges of an elector shall be forfeited by a conviction of bribery, forgery, perjury, duelling, fraudulent bankruptcy, theft or other offense for which an infamous punishment is inflicted," but this disability may in any case be removed by a two-thirds vote of each house of the general assembly.

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  • Many of those who could not hold out were able to secure certificates which gave them immunity from punishment without actually renouncing the faith, just as "parliamentary certificates" of conformity used to be given in England without any pretext of fact.

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  • declared them deposed in perpetuity in punishment of Pandolfaccio's misdeeds.

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  • 2 He once sentenced an unhappy Jew to run the gauntlet of 10,000 strokes, exclaiming as he signed the warrant, " Thank God, we have no capital punishment in Russia !

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  • He didn't think the memory was enough of a punishment for taking the life of an innocent human, but he was constrained again by the primary mission of the Guardians to protect humanity against evil, deserving or not.

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  • I imagine an eternity of punishment as only the Dark One can devise.

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  • No. I'd be disappointed and I'd come up with some form of punishment.

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  • But that doesn't mean I believe in it as punishment.

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  • I just don't believe in hitting as a form of punishment.

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  • The chitchat roamed from details of Friday's luncheon to views on crime and punishment, which, as the booze went down, became more and more general.

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  • He would stay in this holding cell on the outskirts of Hell until Sasha figured out some new grueling punishment.

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  • He was sick of Hell, yet Kris's crime deserved punishment.

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  • "I thought you didn't believe in capital punishment," he said, trying to lighten the situation.

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  • They walked to the music room with Jackson grumbling "glutton for punishment" and "own worst enemy," under his breath.

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  • Maybe he feared his punishment would be worse when she told Mr. Tim what he did, for Mr. Tim would surely crush Brady's PMF militia once he found out his friend was a traitor.

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  • I cannot.  My Sight has been stunted, no doubt as punishment for my tampering in Fate's court.

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  • He knew Fred would be waiting up for him, but decided to let the old man cool his heels, punishment enough for setting up the evening's activity on the sly.

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  • Assuming this violation occurred, what is the punishment for breaking this law?

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  • A broken nose was fitting punishment.

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  • I guess that's the punishment for our roles in the Schism – being pushed aside and forced to watch, Eden said, referring to the war that severed the two realms completely from one another.

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  • Punishment ensued as a result of disobedience.

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  • There was exemplary punishment of the printers who dared defy the Soviet government.

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  • abolition of capital punishment.

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  • I have been a passionate advocate of unpaid work, community punishment, community service over the years.

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  • For collecting alms by falsely claiming to suffer from epilepsy, Jennings is put into the stocks, which Harman calls " condign punishment.

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  • Others say that women should suffer in childbirth as a divine punishment and not use anesthesia.

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  • annoying to hear of people who regard a court-martial as a punishment in itself.

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  • arriviste neo-cons got the point, public punishment was exacted, from exile to demotion to banishment.

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  • backless latex dress that exposes her most sensitive area, is brought in to receive her punishment.

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  • barbaric punishment.

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  • There he receives a punishment beating which keeps him in hospital for weeks.

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  • blackmail plot, but the threat of the punishment was very real.

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  • capital punishment.

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  • Under EU criteria countries are required to abolish capital punishment for any crime.

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  • By then, Aileen's case had been taken up by a lawyer who opposes capital punishment.

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  • It was the head of a barony held by the Earls of Dunbar, who had the power of inflicting capital punishment.

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