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punish

punish

punish Sentence Examples

  • I can neither punish him if he does wrong nor reward him if he does right.

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  • We must punish the villain who has caused the ruin of Moscow.

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  • God will punish you, she said admonishingly, turning to Pierre.

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  • I'm not asking you to punish the men.

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  • I'm asking that you don't punish Felipa.

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  • From Antioch Hadrian set out for Dacia to punish the Roxolani, who, incensed by a reduction of the tribute hitherto paid them, had invaded the Danubian provinces.

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  • It was unfair to punish him, but his rebuke still stung.

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  • Leovigild himself was an Arian, being the last of the Visigothic kings to hold that creed; but he was not a bitter foe of the orthodox Christians, although he was obliged to punish them when they conspired against him with his external enemies.

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  • that he was anxious to reform the order and punish the knights who had adopted Lutheran doctrines.

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  • You've never given us cause to punish you.

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  • They talked about how to punish me and then sat me down and told me their decision.

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  • They were afraid that King Frost would come and punish them.

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  • In addition to their functions as guardians of the poor, the parish members have to investigate crimes and punish misdemeanours, settle litigations and divide inheritances.

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  • The " Savage Diet " which assembled on the 18th of October the same year, to punish the rebels and restore order, well deserved its name.

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  • to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

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  • to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

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  • No one you love will ever die again, and you can punish men like your father, who cast you out.

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  • No one you love will ever die again, and you can punish men like your father, who cast you out.

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  • I just hope God doesn't punish me by...taking my mother.

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  • I just hope God doesn't punish me by...taking my mother.

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  • The latter, to whose jurisdiction the men of Dover were subject, refused to punish them.

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  • The quartermaster frowned, looking at the soldiers as if threatening to punish them.

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  • Dirck Coornhert argued, in private conferences and public disputations, that it was wrong to punish heretics, and his great opponents were, as a rule, the ministers, who maintained that there was no room for more than one religion in a state.

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  • Bayezid determined to punish this insubordination: Constantinople was besieged and an army marched into Macedonia, capturing Salonica and Larissa (r395).

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  • His son, of the same name, was appointed (490), together with Datis, to take command of the expedition sent by Darius to punish Athens and Eretria for their share in the Ionian revolt.

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  • Bayezid determined to punish this insubordination: Constantinople was besieged and an army marched into Macedonia, capturing Salonica and Larissa (r395).

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  • It was very beautiful; but the idle fairies were too much frightened at the mischief their disobedience had caused, to admire the beauty of the forest, and at once tried to hide themselves among the bushes, lest King Frost should come and punish them.

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  • But did they love her enough to really punish her like parents did—real parents, with kids of their own?

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  • He rode in angry agitation toward him, firmly grasping his whip and fully prepared to take the most resolute and desperate steps to punish his enemy.

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  • In Geneva under Calvin, while the Consistoire, or ecclesiastical court, could inflict only spiritual penalties, yet the medieval idea of the duty of the state to co-operate with the church to maintain the religious purity of the community in matters of belief as well as of conduct so far survived that the civil authority was sure to punish those whom the ecclesiastical had censured.

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  • Hale, as quoted by Phillimore (Ecc. Law), says that before the time of Richard II., that is, before any acts of Parliament were made about heretics, it is without question that in a convocation of the clergy or provincial synod" they might and frequently did here in England proceed to the sentencing of heretics."But later writers, while adhering to the statement that Convocation might declare opinions to be heretical, doubted whether it could proceed to punish the offender, even when he was a clerk in orders.

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  • When one of his sons had rebelled about 550 and was taken prisoner, he did not execute him; nor did he punish the Christians who had supported him.

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  • And having the god thus at hand and imprisoned in matter, the simple-minded worshipper can punish him if his prayers are left unanswered.

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  • Nominally the sultan of Tidore is still the suzerain of western New Guinea, but his authority is scarcely recognized, except on some few shores and adjacent islands, and practically Dutch New Guinea used to be administered partly from Ternate and partly from Timor, upon more peaceful lines than was the case when the rule of the Dutch in New Guinea largely consisted of the sending of a warship now and again to some distant island or bay to burn a kampong, to punish rebellious villagers, and thus assert or reassert Dutch authority, or that of the sultan, who is their vassal.

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  • The news of that battle of Tarutino, unexpectedly received by Napoleon at a review, evoked in him a desire to punish the Russians (Thiers says), and he issued the order for departure which the whole army was demanding.

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  • Much as she was tempted to punish him, Bordeaux wasn't guilty of what Davis thought.

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  • punire, to punish, from poena, punishment, Gr.

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  • He induced them to delay the outbreak and informed the king, requesting him, however, not to punish anyone.

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  • Instead, she wondered if those people she lived with would punish her if they knew what she was doing.

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  • But Charles's determination promptly to punish the treachery of Augustus prevailed over every other consideration.

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  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.

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  • 1, 1831), nominally in order to punish his enemy Abdullah, pasha of Acre, really in order to take by force of arms the pashaliks of Syria and Damascus promised as a reward for his services in Greece.

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  • Popular pressure forced him to bring the murderers to justice, to punish them and dismiss them his service.

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  • (3) They were judged and condemned by Pliny (with Trajan's full approval) by virtue of the imperiu y n delegated to him, and in accordance with the instructions issued to governors of provinces to search out and punish sacrilegious persons.

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  • In 1543 he quitted Frankfort for a similar position at Leipzig, his contention that it was the duty of the civil magistrate to punish fornication, and his sudden departure, having given offence to the authorities of the former university.

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  • The parlement appointed a commission to discover and punish heretics; the preachers of Meaux fled to Strassburg, and Lefebvre's translation of the Bible was publicly burned.

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  • Next he thought that his enemy would send the squadron on a desperate attack just to punish him--Rostov.

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  • "Stop those wretches!" gasped Kutuzov to the regimental commander, pointing to the flying soldiers; but at that instant, as if to punish him for those words, bullets flew hissing across the regiment and across Kutuzov's suite like a flock of little birds.

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  • Nothing in life seemed to him of much importance, and under the influence of the depression that possessed him he valued neither his liberty nor his resolution to punish his wife.

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  • When sent for by Count Ostermann, Rostov, remembering that he had charged without orders, felt sure his commander was sending for him to punish him for breach of discipline.

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  • The original object of the institution of the courts or court seems to have been to prevent or punish piracy and other crimes upon the narrow seas and to deal with questions of prize; tion.

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  • A slave prison (ergastulum) was part of such an establishment, and there were slaves whose office it was to punish the offences of their fellows.

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  • The principalities of Aidin, Menteshe, Sarukhan and Kermian were annexed to Bayezid's dominions to punish their rulers for having joined with the 'Karamanian prince in rebellion.

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  • the princes, or by the council, and these are also to have the power to punish, suspend or depose him.

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  • They claim to rule the Kasu'or Meroitic Ethiopians; and the fifth inscription records an expedition along the Atbara and the Nile to punish the Nuba and Kasu, and a fragment of a Greek inscription from Meroe was recognized by Sayce as commemorating a king of Axum.

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  • The hatred and contempt of the crowd punish such men for discerning the higher laws.

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  • Italian action was hastened by news that, in December 1884, an exploring party under Signor Bianchi, royal commissioner for Assab, had been massacred in the Aussa (Danakil) country, an event which aroused in Italy a desire to punish the assassins and to obtain satisfaction for the still unpunished massacre of Signor Giulietti and his companions.

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  • The lighter punish ments inflicted by masters were commonly personal chastisement or banishment from the town house to rural labour; the severer were employment in the mill (pistrinum) or relegation to the mines or quarries.

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  • The lighter punish ments inflicted by masters were commonly personal chastisement or banishment from the town house to rural labour; the severer were employment in the mill (pistrinum) or relegation to the mines or quarries.

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  • Or maybe she just wants to prove to herself someone actually loves her enough and cares about her enough to punish her.

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  • 2), the chief work of administration, and the right to fine or otherwise punish in cases, not only of violation of laws, but also of immorality (ibid.

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  • Two years later he put down a rising of the Aquitanians in Gaul, and crossed the Rhine to punish the aggressions of the Germans.

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  • In 39 he set out with an army to Gaul, nominally to punish the Germans for having invaded Roman territory, but in reality to get money by plunder and confiscation.

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  • The upright and considerate manner in which he treated the provincials won him their affection, but at the same time brought upon him the hatred of Nero, who felt specially aggrieved because Soranus had refused to punish a city which had defended the statues of its gods against the Imperial commissioners.

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  • It must, however, be noted that one class of the measures taken to punish the old governing part of the population of Poland has been very favourable to the majority.

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  • From 1785 to 1787 he was governor of Massachusetts, suppressing with much vigour Shays' Rebellion, and failing to be re-elected largely because it was believed that he would punish the insurrectionists with more severity than would his competitor, John Hancock.

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  • In 1742 Shemakha was taken and destroyed by Nadir Shah of Persia, who, to punish the inhabitants for their creed (Sunnite Mahommedanism), built a new town under the same name about 16 m.

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  • In January 1567 Eric extorted a declaration from two of his senators that they would assist him to punish all who should try to prevent his projected marriage; and, in the middle of May, a Riksdag was summoned to Upsala to judge between the king and those of the aristocracy whom he regarded as his personal enemies.

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  • in his attempts to make Isagoras tyrant in Athens and afterwards to punish Aegina for medizing.

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  • Meanwhile Haakon, who had vanquished Skuli in 1240, sent orders to Gissur to punish Snorri for his disobedience either by capturing him and sending him back to Norway or by putting him to death.

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  • Sinjar resolved to punish this crime; but his troops deserted and he himself was taken prisoner by the Ghuzz, who kept him in strict confinement during two years (1153-1155), though treating him with all outward marks of respect.

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  • He was next required to punish inroads of the Saracens on the Italian mainland, and in September 981 he marched into Apulia, where he met at first with considerable success; but an alliance between the Arabs and the Eastern Empire, whose hostility had been provoked by the invasion of Apulia, resulted in a severe defeat on Otto's troops near Stilo in July 982.

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  • In cases where the poisonous material did its deadly work, it was held at once to indicate and rightly to punish guilt; but when it was rejected by the stomach of the accused, innocence was held to be satisfactorily established.

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  • excommunicated the sectaries of Languedoc and their abettors, Alexander even sending armed missions to hunt them down and punish them.

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  • Spartan arms could punish any violation of that " sacred truce " which was indispensable if Hellenes from all cities were to have peaceable access to the Olympian festival.

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  • A bond was drawn in which Darnley pledged himself to support the confederates who undertook to punish "certain privy persons" offensive to the state, "especially a strange Italian, called Davie"; another was subscribed by Darnley and the banished lords, then biding their time in Newcastle, which engaged him to procure their pardon and restoration, while pledging them to insure to him the enjoyment of the title he coveted, with the consequent security of an undisputed succession to the crown, despite the counter claims of the house of Hamilton, in case his wife should die without issue - a result which, intentionally or not, he and his fellow-conspirators did all that brutality could have suggested to accelerate and secure.

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  • The conduct of David after the event was such as to show that he had no complicity in the act, though he could not venture to punish its perpetrators (2 Sam.

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  • So little doubt left he on the subject that his friends judged it prudent for him to leave Basel at once, as it had been resolved to punish him for the attack on the authorities of which he had been guilty.

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  • Later, he was represented as a king of that district, rich in flocks and herds, and owner of the garden of the Hesperides, who was turned into a rocky mountain when Perseus, to punish him for his inhospitality, showed him the Gorgon's head (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Alompra, however, with a more independent spirit, not only contrived to regain possession of his village, but was able to defeat a body of Peguan troops that had been sent to punish him.

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  • When he was ready he used his new troops, before turning them against their chief enemy, the Magyars, to punish refractory Slavonic tribes; and he brought under temporary subjection nearly all the Slays between the Elbe and the Oder.

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  • Ascribing his defeat to Henrys defection, Frederick returned to Germany full of anger against the Saxon duke and firmly resolved to punish him.

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  • To punish him the pope put forward his own ward, Henry VI.s son Frederick, who was living in Sicily, as a rival king.

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  • This, which is now the principal remnant of the old ascendancy of German, and the one point of unity for the whole monarchy, is a matter on which the government and the monarch allow no concession, but in the Hungarian parliament protests against it have been raised, and in 1899 and 1900 it was necessary to punish recruits from Bohemia, who answered the roll call in the Czechish zde instead of the German hier.

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  • We are told that he warned his fellow-citizens against Phalaris, whom they had chosen as their general, by relating to them the well-known fable of the horse, which, in its eagerness to punish the stag for intruding upon its pastures, became the slave of man (Aristotle, Rhetoric, ii.

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  • 194) and, the revolt having been a military one, did not punish the province; in 202 he gave a constitution to Alexandria and the nome capitals.

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  • In 1524 the burgesses were exempted from appearing at the shire and hundred courts, and in 1583 the body corporate was reconstructed under the title of mayor and commonalty, and power was granted to make by-laws and to punish offenders.

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  • A treaty was signed with the Scottish estates; but it was torn up a few months later under the influence of Beaton and the queen-dowager Mary of Guise, and Hertford was sent in 1544 to punish this breach of promise by sacking Edinburgh.

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  • Duncan left sons, Malcolm, called Canmore (great head), and Donald Ban; and in 1054 Siward, earl of Northumbria, defeated Macbeth, whether acting under the order of Edward the Confessor in favour of the claims of Malcolm Canmore, or merely to punish Macbeth for sheltering Norman fugitives from the Confessor's court.

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  • In June Angus had prepared forces to punish the Border raiders, and James, rightly or wrongly, seems to have suspected that he was to be handed over bodily to his royal uncle.

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  • As constable of Dundee he secured the commutation of the death penalty on minor offenders under his jurisdiction, and his expressed maxim was " in the greatest crimes it is thought wisest to pardon the multitude and punish the ringleaders."

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  • The objects of that expedition were to punish Mataram and to redress the grievances of the Sasaks whom the Balinese held in cruel subjection.

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  • I); or (c) to punish them for their marriage with the heathen and their apostasy (D in ii.

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  • The duke came with some soldiers and ships, but failed to effect anything; and after the recall of d'Arcos the new viceroy, Count d'Ognate, having come to an arrangement with Annese and got Guise out of the city, proceeded to punish all who had taken part in the disturbances, and had Annese and a number of others beheaded.

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  • Nor did age lessen his energy, for in 1550, when eighty-four years old, he again put to sea to punish the raids of his old enemies the Barbary pirates, but with.

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  • Hisham, however, would not again punish his old servant; on the contrary, he seems to have regarded his indignation as a proof of innocence.

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  • In order to punish him, the latter gave permission to the Arab tribes in Egypt to cross the Nile, and granted them possession of all the lands they should conquer.

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  • God would not deliver Israel because it was his people, descended from Abraham, his chosen, but he would punish it even more severely than the other nations because it denied him by its sins (Amos iii.

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  • After having entrusted him with several missions, the Convention sent him, on the 30th of October 1793, to Lyons to punish the revolt of that city.

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  • In May of that year it was seized by Napoleon, who, to punish it for an insurrection, condemned it to three days' pillage.

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  • If they refused to listen he could punish them in any manner he thought fit; in the last resort he could release their subjects from allegiance and head a crusade of Catholic powers against them.

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  • It is eminently characteristic of his methods that, just at the same time as he was turning loose dragoons on his Protestant subjects after the revocation of the edict of Nantes (1685), he was employing other dragoons to invade the papal territory at Avignon, to punish Innocent XI.

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  • Its real object is to attack such professedly Catholic governments as have fallen in with modern ideas - as for instance, by allowing freedom of worship to their Protestant subjects, or by refusing to punish brawling in Catholic churches more severely than other breaches of the peace.

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  • In 1527 he had been declared a rebel by the Signoria on account of his well-known Medicean prejudices; and in 1530, deputed by Clement to punish the citizens after their revolt, he revenged himself with a cruelty and an avarice that were long and bitterly remembered.

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  • In 476 he led an army to Thessaly to punish the Aleuadae of Larisa for the aid they had rendered to the Persians and to strengthen Spartan influence in northern Greece.

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  • On the one hand, since that which is tabooed is held to punish the taboo-breaker by a sort of mystic infection, taboo comes to stand for uncleanness and sin.

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  • They punish all offences against the laws of human society, such as perjury, violation of the rites of hospitality, and, above all, the murder of relations.

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  • Alarmed, however, by the strength of his enemies, and by their evident determination to punish him as a bigamist, he in June 1541 made a treaty with Charles V.

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  • But the acquisition of Norway might make up for the loss of Finland; and Bernadotte, now known as the crown prince Charles John, argued that it might be an easy matter to persuade the antiNapoleonic powers to punish Denmark for her loyalty to France by wresting Norway from her.

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  • To wield a peaceful authority over all the subjects of the empire, to reward merit, and to punish transgressionsuch is the highest task of king and officials.

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  • SERGIUS II., pope from 844 to 847, a Roman of noble birth, elected by the clergy and people to succeed Gregory IV., was forthwith consecrated without waiting for the sanction of the emperor Lothair, who accordingly sent his son Louis with do army to punish the breach of faith.

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  • And if such Hottentots should escape, the owner shall be entitled to follow them up and to punish them, according to their merits in his discretion.

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  • Orestes, after the deed, goes mad, and is pursued by the Erinyes, whose duty it is to punish any violation of the ties of family piety.

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  • Juries would not punish homicide with severity.

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  • So obnoxious did he become as a critic of the government, that Walpole thought fit to punish him by procuring his dismissal from the army.

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  • All attempts to punish the offenders were futile.

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  • The court leet was a court of record, and its duty was not only to view the pledges but to present by jury all crimes that might happen within the jurisdiction, and punish the same.

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  • "had at the bottom of his heart a deep and unextinguishable desire to humble and punish England," and that war with France was a contingency to be provided against.

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  • Gordon, governor-general of the Sudan, was now ordered to go and make peace with John, but the king had moved south with his army, intending to punish Menelek for having raided Gondar whilst he, John, was engaged with the Egyptians.

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  • In consequence of the credence which the story obtained, Archbishop Bancroft was commissioned by the privy council to discover and punish the impostors.

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  • In 491 he went to Aegina to punish the island for its submission to Darius, but the intrigues of his colleague once again rendered his mission abortive.

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  • Richards one ruling passion was now to punish Philip of France for his unfriendly conduct during his absence.

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  • After this there was nothing remaining save to punish the leaders of the revolt; a good many scores of them were hanged, though the vengeance exacted does not seem to have been greater than was justified by the numerous murders and burnings of which they had been guilty; the fanatic Ball was, of course, among the first to suffer.

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  • When summoned to punish the offenders, and to make monetary compensation, Suffolk and Somerset shuffled and prevaricated, but gave no satisfaction.

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  • To clear out the government, and punish those responsible for the late disasters, the commons of Kent rose in insurrection under a captain who called himself John Mortimer, though his real name seems to have been John Cade.

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  • The sentence passed by the Lords vindicated the right of parliament to punish officials who had enjoyed the favor of the crown, which had fallen into disuse since the accession of the house of York.

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  • Besides the ordinary judges there were the extraordinary tribunals, the court of high commission nominated by the crown to punish ecclesiastical offenders, and the court of star chamber, composed of the privy councillors and the chief justices, and therefore also nominated by the crown, to inflict fine, imprisonment, and even corporal mutilation.

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  • Again, Western theology, very roughly summarized, while accepting the earlier doctrinal tradition, has broken new ground for itself, in affirming as rational necessity that God must punish sin (this is at least latent in Aquinas's - doctrine of natural law), but as contingent fact of revelation that God has in Christ combined the punishment of sin with the salvation of sinners; this is the Reformation or postReformation thought.

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  • For, if He merely may redeem but must punish, then His greatest deeds on our behalf wear an aspect of caprice, or suggest unknown if not unknowable motives.

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  • Laying more stress upon independence than upon loyalty, Hugh appears to have acted in a haughty manner toward Lothair, and also towards his son and successor Louis V.; but neither king was strong enough to punish this powerful vassal, whose clerical supporters already harboured the thought of securing for him the Frankish crown.

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  • The unsophisticated moral consciousness will still consider it unjust to punish a man for deeds of which he could not avoid the performance, and regard the alleged desire to produce in his future life consequences favourable to himself or society as beside the mark and irrelevant to the question at issue.

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  • The object of this sympathetic resentment, impelling us to punish, is what we call injustice; and thus the remarkable stringency of the obligation to act justly is explained, since the recognition of any action as unjust involves the admission that it may be forcibly obstructed or punished.

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  • Even in the second sense it hardly seems that the freedom of a man's will can be an element to be considered in examining what it is right or best for him to do (though of course the clearest convictions of duty will be fruitless if a man has not sufficient self-control to enable him to act on them); it is rather when we ask whether it is just to punish him for wrong-doing that it seems important to know whether he could have done otherwise.

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  • His political enemies ascribed it to the determination of the Greek people to " regain their liberties " and to punish his " tyranny."

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  • The hieromnemones were required periodically to inspect the lands belonging to this god, to punish those who encroached, and to see that the tenants rendered their quota of produce; and the council held the states responsible for the right performance of such duties by their respective deputies (CIA.

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  • 545) A law of great interest, dating from the beginning of the institution, imposed an oath upon the members of the league not to destroy an amphictyonic city or to cut it off from running water in war or peace; but to wage war upon those who transgressed this ordinance, to destroy their cities, and to punish any others who by theft or plotting sought to injure the god (Aeschin.

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  • Speaking at Ennis on the 19th of September, Buy P arnell told the people to punish a man for taking P P P g a farm from which another had been evicted " by isolating him from his kind as if he was a leper of old."

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  • Holders of judicial offices and permanent civil servants had the option of retiring with pensions, but the constabulary, whom the Home Rulers had openly threatened to punish when their time came, were to come after an interval under the power of the Irish Parliament.

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  • To punish Mr Smith-Barry (afterwards Tipperary.

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  • After the failure of the Kuo Min-tang's " war to punish Yuan," Sun wandered again in a wilderness of conspiracies.

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  • had leisure to punish his brother kings for deserting tion of the him, and to look to the organization of his kingdom.

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  • Great Britain seized the opportunity to punish Spain for its conduct in the American War by encouraging discontent ~n the Spanish colonies, and in the Peninsula itself both nobles and people were bitterly hostile to the queen and her favorite.

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  • Neither the war minister nor the commanders of the garrison chose to punish the offenders, and sooner than endorse such want of discipline, Sagasta and the Liberal party once more made way for Canovas.

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  • In the hook of Enoch Satan is represented as the ruler of a rival kingdom of evil, but here are also mentioned Satans, who are distinguished from the fallen angels and who have a threefold function, to tempt, to accuse and to punish.

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  • Then in 1579 the council decided to arrest Claud and his brother John (afterwards 1st marquess of Hamilton) and to punish them for their past misdeeds; but the brothers escaped to England, where Elizabeth used them as pawns in the diplomatic game, and later Claud lived for a short time in France.

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  • 63); they were chosen to punish the treachery of Philip of Macedon (xv.

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  • The relations between capital and labour are the subject of a series of statutes, which prohibit the employment of children under fourteen years of age in any mechanical, mercantile or manufacturing establishment, punish with fine or imprisonment any attempt by an employer to influence his employee's vote or to prevent him from joining a labour union, and in cases of insolvency give preference over general liabilities to debts of $100 or less for labour.

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  • Then I will punish the men also.

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  • I'm not asking you to punish the men.

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  • I'm asking that you don't punish Felipa.

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  • I will tell her you ask that I not punish her.

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  • God does not use innocent children to punish the sins of parents.

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  • Much as she was tempted to punish him, Bordeaux wasn't guilty of what Davis thought.

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  • Instead, she wondered if those people she lived with would punish her if they knew what she was doing.

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  • But did they love her enough to really punish her like parents did—real parents, with kids of their own?

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  • You've never given us cause to punish you.

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  • Or maybe she just wants to prove to herself someone actually loves her enough and cares about her enough to punish her.

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  • They talked about how to punish me and then sat me down and told me their decision.

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  • It was unfair to punish him, but his rebuke still stung.

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  • The ceasefire agreement does not allow any state to punish Iraq's non compliance with force.

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  • He will also punish all liars, the lustful, adulterers, idolaters, and blasphemers, (Revelation 21:8 ).

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  • These avenging angels are used by God to punish men for their sins.

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  • Others regarded the whole of the material world as wicked and practiced a rigorous asceticism to punish the flesh.

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  • avengee avenging angels are used by God to punish men for their sins.

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  • close relationship to the power of a court to punish for contempt.

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  • Second, we have to strengthen the forces of law and order, to reduce the fear of crime and to punish criminals effectively.

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  • Russian President Vladimir Putin blames terrorists for the bombing, and vows to punish the culprits.

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  • That's pretty disgraceful behavior from Materazzi so I think FIFA should punish him as well.

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  • And they will be ready to punish all disobedience, when your obedience is fulfilled.

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  • Put auto car cheap insuran insurance the expertise up with a fortunately two ideas punish bad driving.

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  • His desire for revenge seems not so much selfish as motivated by an urge to punish the evildoer.

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  • It is society or the system society puts in place that should make, enforce, and punish infractions of the law.

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  • It was from here that he led an attack on Hereford, to punish the inhabitants for the support they had given Stephen.

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  • This was part of a series of measures undertaken by Iraq to punish Kurdish insurgents for allying with Iran during the war.

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  • It is time to let democracy back into Northern Ireland and to punish the lawbreaker not the lawmaker.

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  • leftyrt among the liberal lefties says vote against Tony Blair to punish him for the war.

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  • Following Uthman's murder Ali did not attempt to punish the murderers.

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  • How else could Fifers bring themselves to punish Labor by rewarding its Scottish coalition partners with a victory?

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  • All poultry producers must take extra care to combat raiders who are quick to punish poor farmyard security, says the CLA.

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  • punish the perpetrator can be safely directed through the art materials.

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  • punish wrongdoers.

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  • punish offenders.

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  • punish either individual sinners or members of a sinner's family.

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  • Brian Barwick's hopes of using video evidence to retrospectively punish the divers are rejected by FIFA.

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  • punish according to the damage.

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  • punish for contempt.

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  • The section clearly has a close relationship to the power of a court to punish for contempt.

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  • Disillusioned that the local mating ritual is designed to punish everyone involved he is now hiding in his flatmate's cupboard.

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  • Do you ask Wisdom to be merciful and not punish sin?

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  • In the past leprosy was said to be sent by the ancestors to punish either individual sinners or members of a sinner's family.

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  • Mr Teague believed that the Sussex League were introducing a code of varying penalties to punish transgressions by players.

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  • One religious entity espoused the idea that God had sent the tsunami to punish the unrighteous - absolute rubbish!

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  • But the purpose of the law of contract is not to punish wrongdoing but to satisfy the expectations of the party entitled to performance.

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  • To punish is to inflict penalty for violation of law, disobedience to authority, or intentional wrongdoing.

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  • Thus he resisted all Metternich's efforts to draw him into his "system"; stoutly maintained the doctrine of non-intervention against the majority of the Powers of the continental alliance; protested at the congress of Troppau against the suggested application of the principle of intervention to the States of the Church; and at Verona joined with Tuscany in procuring the rejection of Metternich's proposal for a central committee, on the model of the Mainz Commission, to discover and punish political offences in Italy.

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  • punire, to punish, from poena, punishment, Gr.

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  • A delator of infamous character, one Peter, had accused the authorities of the city to the tsar of conspiracy; Ivan, without even confronting the Novgorodians with their accuser, proceeded at the end of 1569 to punish them.

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  • A further casus belli was provided by a decree forbidding the importation of Megarian goods into the Athenian Empire,' presumably in order to punish Megara for her alliance with Corinth (spring 432).

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  • But his position had become untenable, partly owing to an ill-considered telegram which he addressed to the tsar on his return; partly in consequence of the attitude of Prince Bismarck, who, in conjunction with the Russian and Austrian governments, forbade him to punish the leaders of the military conspiracy.

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  • From the Conquest or even earlier they had, besides various lesser rights - (1) exemption from tax and tallage; (2) soc and sac, or full cognizance of all criminal and civil cases within their liberties; (3) tol and team, or the right of receiving toll and the right of compelling the person in whose hands stolen property was found to name the person from whom he received it; (4) blodwit and fledwit, or the right to punish shedders of blood and those who were seized in an attempt to escape from justice; (5) pillory and tumbrel; (6) infangentheof and r L outfangentheof, or power to imprison and execute felons; (7) mundbryce (the breaking into or violation of a man's mund or property in order to erect banks or dikes as a defence against the sea); (8) waives and strays, or the right to appropriate lost property or cattle not claimed within a year and a day; (9) the right to seize all flotsam, jetsam, or ligan, or, in other words, whatever of value was cast ashore by the sea; (10) the privilege of being a gild with power to impose taxes for the common weal; and (11) the right of assembling in portmote or parliament at Shepway or Shepway Cross, a few miles west of Hythe (but afterwards at Dover), the parliament being empowered to make by-laws for the Cinque Ports, to regulate the Yarmouth fishery, to hear appeals from the local courts, and to give decision in all cases of treason, sedition, illegal coining or concealment of treasure trove.

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  • Athens at once appealed to Sparta to punish this act of medism, and Cleomenes I., one of the Spartan kings, crossed over to the island, to arrest those who were responsible for it.

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  • Italian action was hastened by news that, in December 1884, an exploring party under Signor Bianchi, royal commissioner for Assab, had been massacred in the Aussa (Danakil) country, an event which aroused in Italy a desire to punish the assassins and to obtain satisfaction for the still unpunished massacre of Signor Giulietti and his companions.

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  • In Raymond of Sabunde's form of moral argument - there must be a God to reward and punish, if human life is not to be " vain " - we see the kinship of that argument to the argument from design.

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  • Butler fears profoundly that there must be a just God who will punish us.

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  • In the second case, the bishop may require the superior to punish within a certain time and to certify the punishment to him; in default he himself may punish (Conc. Trid.

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  • In other words the governors were ordered merely to punish sacrilege, and, under Aurelius, Christianity was regarded as such.

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  • They promised an easy expiation for crimes to both living and dead on payment of a fee, undertook to punish the enemies of their clients, and held out to them the prospect of perpetual banqueting and drinking-bouts in Paradise.

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  • The God of Nature, whom deists confess, does punish in time, if they will but look at the facts; why not in eternity ?

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  • In 1773 a Don Cossack called Pugachev, who was so uneducated that he could not even sign the manifestoes written for him, declared himself to be Peter III., and announced that he was going to St Petersburg to punish his faithless wife and place his son Paul on the throne.

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  • Hoping to punish Moore for his boldness, Napoleon struck quickly north at Astorga, but found that he was too late to catch his foe.

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  • But Charles's determination promptly to punish the treachery of Augustus prevailed over every other consideration.

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  • From Antioch Hadrian set out for Dacia to punish the Roxolani, who, incensed by a reduction of the tribute hitherto paid them, had invaded the Danubian provinces.

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  • He threw the responsibility for the executions upon the prefect of the praetorian guard, and swore that he would never punish a senator without the assent of the entire body, to which he expressed the utmost deference and consideration.

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  • The original object of the institution of the courts or court seems to have been to prevent or punish piracy and other crimes upon the narrow seas and to deal with questions of prize; tion.

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  • ought to be enquired after, and to mulct, arrest, punish, chastise and reform"; also "to preserve the public streams of our admiralty as well for the preservation of our royal navy, and of the fleets and vessels of our kingdom.

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  • In 1874 the island was invaded by the Japanese for the purpose of obtaining satisfaction for the murder of a shipwrecked crew who had been put to death by one of the semi-savage tribes on the southern coast, the Chinese government being either unable or unwilling to punish the culprits.

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  • The latter, to whose jurisdiction the men of Dover were subject, refused to punish them.

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  • Leovigild himself was an Arian, being the last of the Visigothic kings to hold that creed; but he was not a bitter foe of the orthodox Christians, although he was obliged to punish them when they conspired against him with his external enemies.

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  • A slave prison (ergastulum) was part of such an establishment, and there were slaves whose office it was to punish the offences of their fellows.

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  • Thereupon Ormazd will hold a judicium universale, in the form of a general ordeal, a great test of all mankind by fire and molten metal, and will judge strictly according to justice, punish the wicked, and assign to the good the hoped-for reward.

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  • The principalities of Aidin, Menteshe, Sarukhan and Kermian were annexed to Bayezid's dominions to punish their rulers for having joined with the 'Karamanian prince in rebellion.

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  • 1, 1831), nominally in order to punish his enemy Abdullah, pasha of Acre, really in order to take by force of arms the pashaliks of Syria and Damascus promised as a reward for his services in Greece.

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  • In addition to their functions as guardians of the poor, the parish members have to investigate crimes and punish misdemeanours, settle litigations and divide inheritances.

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  • the princes, or by the council, and these are also to have the power to punish, suspend or depose him.

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  • Having crossed the Po to punish the Insubrians, he at first met with a severe check and was forced to capitulate.

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  • This famous charter, which was amplified, under the influence of the clergy, in 1231, when its articles were placed under the guardianship of the archbishop of Esztergom (who was authorized to punish their violation by the king with excommunication), is generally regarded as the foundation of Hungarian constitutional liberty, though like Magna Carta it purported only to confirm immemorial rights; and as such it was expressly ratified as a whole in the coronation oaths of all the Habsburg kings from Ferdinand to Leopold I.

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  • The " Savage Diet " which assembled on the 18th of October the same year, to punish the rebels and restore order, well deserved its name.

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  • that he was anxious to reform the order and punish the knights who had adopted Lutheran doctrines.

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  • His son, of the same name, was appointed (490), together with Datis, to take command of the expedition sent by Darius to punish Athens and Eretria for their share in the Ionian revolt.

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  • They claim to rule the Kasu'or Meroitic Ethiopians; and the fifth inscription records an expedition along the Atbara and the Nile to punish the Nuba and Kasu, and a fragment of a Greek inscription from Meroe was recognized by Sayce as commemorating a king of Axum.

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  • Dirck Coornhert argued, in private conferences and public disputations, that it was wrong to punish heretics, and his great opponents were, as a rule, the ministers, who maintained that there was no room for more than one religion in a state.

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  • When one of his sons had rebelled about 550 and was taken prisoner, he did not execute him; nor did he punish the Christians who had supported him.

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  • In Geneva under Calvin, while the Consistoire, or ecclesiastical court, could inflict only spiritual penalties, yet the medieval idea of the duty of the state to co-operate with the church to maintain the religious purity of the community in matters of belief as well as of conduct so far survived that the civil authority was sure to punish those whom the ecclesiastical had censured.

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  • Hale, as quoted by Phillimore (Ecc. Law), says that before the time of Richard II., that is, before any acts of Parliament were made about heretics, it is without question that in a convocation of the clergy or provincial synod" they might and frequently did here in England proceed to the sentencing of heretics."But later writers, while adhering to the statement that Convocation might declare opinions to be heretical, doubted whether it could proceed to punish the offender, even when he was a clerk in orders.

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  • Popular pressure forced him to bring the murderers to justice, to punish them and dismiss them his service.

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  • According to the medieval canon law, based on the decretals, and codified in the 13th century in the Corpus juris canonici, by which the earlier powers of metropolitans had been greatly curtailed, the powers of the archbishop consisted in the right (i) to confirm and consecrate suffragan bishops; (2) to summon and preside over provincial synods; (3) to superintend the suffragans and visit their dioceses, as well as to censure and punish bishops in the interests of discipline, the right of deprivation, however, being reserved to the pope; (4) to act as a court of appeal from the diocesan courts; (5) to exercise the jus devolutionis, i.e.

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  • (3) They were judged and condemned by Pliny (with Trajan's full approval) by virtue of the imperiu y n delegated to him, and in accordance with the instructions issued to governors of provinces to search out and punish sacrilegious persons.

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  • In 1543 he quitted Frankfort for a similar position at Leipzig, his contention that it was the duty of the civil magistrate to punish fornication, and his sudden departure, having given offence to the authorities of the former university.

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  • And having the god thus at hand and imprisoned in matter, the simple-minded worshipper can punish him if his prayers are left unanswered.

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  • He induced them to delay the outbreak and informed the king, requesting him, however, not to punish anyone.

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  • Nominally the sultan of Tidore is still the suzerain of western New Guinea, but his authority is scarcely recognized, except on some few shores and adjacent islands, and practically Dutch New Guinea used to be administered partly from Ternate and partly from Timor, upon more peaceful lines than was the case when the rule of the Dutch in New Guinea largely consisted of the sending of a warship now and again to some distant island or bay to burn a kampong, to punish rebellious villagers, and thus assert or reassert Dutch authority, or that of the sultan, who is their vassal.

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  • The parlement appointed a commission to discover and punish heretics; the preachers of Meaux fled to Strassburg, and Lefebvre's translation of the Bible was publicly burned.

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  • The charter gave the company control over the admission of " freemen " (co-partners in the enterprise, and voters), " full and absolute power and authority to correct, punish and rule " subjects settling in the territory comprised in their grant, and power to " resist.

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  • The state debt was large, taxation was heavy, and industry was unsettled; worthless paper money was in circulation, yet some men demanded more; debtors were made desperate by prosecution; the state government seemed weak, the Federal government contemptibly so; the local courts would not, or from intimidation feared to, punish the turbulent, and demagogues encouraged ideas of popular power.

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  • 2), the chief work of administration, and the right to fine or otherwise punish in cases, not only of violation of laws, but also of immorality (ibid.

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  • Two years later he put down a rising of the Aquitanians in Gaul, and crossed the Rhine to punish the aggressions of the Germans.

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  • In 39 he set out with an army to Gaul, nominally to punish the Germans for having invaded Roman territory, but in reality to get money by plunder and confiscation.

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  • It marks the difference between 1513 and 1669 that, in a reprint of the Julius Exclusus published in 1669 at Oxford, it was thought necessary to leave out a sentence in which the writer of that dialogue, supposed by the editor to be Erasmus, asserts the right of states to deprive and punish bad kings.

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  • The upright and considerate manner in which he treated the provincials won him their affection, but at the same time brought upon him the hatred of Nero, who felt specially aggrieved because Soranus had refused to punish a city which had defended the statues of its gods against the Imperial commissioners.

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  • It must, however, be noted that one class of the measures taken to punish the old governing part of the population of Poland has been very favourable to the majority.

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