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pump

pump

pump Sentence Examples

  • In the old days there was a hand pump in the kitchen and no hot water you didn't boil yourself.

  • If they succeeded, they'd stick your guy... or girl, in a box in McLean and pump 'em dry.

  • Pump gas and sign baseball cards?

  • Without a pump or two spares, they accomplished the same thing.

  • If the air is just let out of your tires, do you think a bicycle pump might be enough to get you running?

  • You have a pump?

  • Westlake twisted around the seat once more and after a struggle pulled out an old step pump.

  • I wouldn't tell that ninny if his shoes were on fire and he was standing at a leaky gas pump.

  • He must think she was as easy as a primed pump.

  • He took the opportunity to casually pump Hunter on the Byrne disappearance.

  • One was parked beside the building with its hood up, and an old mustang sat at the pump.

  • Clarissa sat her chair like a queen on a throne, the toe of a red pump and a white plaster clad foot peeping out from under her long gown.

  • To the south and west of the city a large district is laid out as a park, where there is a statue to the memory of John Maurice of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679), who governed Cleves from 1650 to 1679, and in the western part there are mineral wells with a pump room and bathing establishment.

  • The steam is introduced into the pipes at about the pressure of the atmosphere, and is sucked through the system by means of a vacuum pump, which at the same operation frees the pipes from air and from condensation water.

  • There is usually fixed above the sucker a short iron valverod, with a device known as a rivet-catcher to prevent damage to the pump by the dropping of rivets from the pump-rods.

  • The pumps employed to force the oil through the pipes were at first of the single-cylinder or " donkey " type, but these were found to cause excessive wear - a defect remedied by the use of the Worthington pump now generally adopted.

  • These muscles act so as to pump the blood through the respiratory organs.

  • Drainage channels are provided, usually along the main haulage roads, by which the water flows to a sump excavated at the pump shaft.

  • As the larger part of the water in a mine comes from the surface, the cost of drainage may be reduced by intercepting this surface water, and collecting it at convenient points in the pump shaft from which it may be raised at less cost than if permitted to go to the bottom.

  • Tanks operated by the main hoisting engines, and of capacities up to 50o gallons or more, are applicable under several conditions: (1) When the shaft is deep, the quantity of water insufficient to keep a pump in regular operation, and the hoisting engine not constantly employed in raising mineral, the tank is worked at intervals, being attached temporarily to the hoisting rope in place of the cage.

  • All work simultaneously, each raising the water to a tank or sump above, whence it is taken by the next pump of the system, and finally discharged at the surface.

  • When mine water is acid the working parts of the pump must be lined with or made of bronze or other non-corrosive material; or the acid may be neutralized by adding lime in the sump.

  • The 'disposition of these valves divides this type of pump into suction pumps and force pumps.

  • i shows the arrangement in a suction pump. A is the cylinder within which the piston B is moved up and down by the rod C. D is the inlet pipe (the lower extremity of which is placed beneath the surface of the liquid to be G removed), and G is the outlet pipe.

  • It is seen that the action is intermittent, liquid only being discharged during a down stroke, but since the driving force is that which is supplied to the piston rod, the lift is only con ditioned by the power available and by the strength of the pump. A continuous supply can be obtained by leading the delivery pipe into the base of an air chamber H, which is fitted with a discharge pipe J of such a diameter that the liquid cannot escape from it as fast as it is pumped in during a down stroke.

  • The action is essentially that -of the common suction pump. The construction was subsequently improved by many experimenters, notably by Boyle, Hawksbee, Smeaton and others; and more recently two pump barrels were employed, so obtaining the same degree of exhaustion much more rapidly.

  • This type of pump is, however, not very efficient, for there is not only leakage about the valves and between the piston and cylinder, but at a certain degree of exhaust the air within the vessel is insufficient to raise the inlet valve; this last defect has been met in some measure by using an extension of the piston to open and close the valve.

  • The so-called oil air-pumps are much more efficient; the valve difficulty is avoided, and the risk of leakage minimized; whilst in addition there is no air clearance between the piston and the base of the cylinder as in the older mechanical forms. The Fleuss pump may be taken as an example.

  • A more complicated pump, but of much the same principle, was devised in 1784 by Joseph Baader, to be improved by C. F.

  • The pump devised by D FIG.

  • The general scheme of Geisler's pump is shown in fig.

  • Supposing the vessel to be exhausted to have already been securely connected to the pump, we now lower the reservoir B so as to reduce the pressure in A sufficiently below the tension in the gas to be sucked in, and, by turning the cock so as to connect A with the vessels to be exhausted, cause the gas to expand into and almost fill A.

  • of mercury to balance the pressure of the atmosphere, a Geisler pump necessarily is a somewhat long-legged and unwieldy instrument; in addition, the long tube is liable to breakage.

  • It can be considerably shortened, the two vessels A and B brought more closely together, and the somewhat objectionable india-rubber tube be dispensed with, if we connect the air-space in B with an ordinary air pump, and by means of it do the greater part of the sucking and the whole of the lifting work.

  • In the pump generally attributed to Topler, but which was previously devised by J.

  • high, obviously act as efficient mercury-traps; but the already considerable height of the pump is thus multiplied by two.

  • A pump similar to Tdpler's construction was devised by Mendeleeff, and the original device has been much improved by Wiedemann, BesselHagen and others.

  • The best-known pump of this type was invented in 1865 by H.

  • 4), consists of a vertical capillary Pump. glass tube a of about 1 mm.

  • The great advantages of Sprengel's pump lie in the simplicity of its construction and in the readiness with which it adapts itself to the collecting of the gas.

  • P. Thompson, The Development of the Mercurial Air Pump (1888).

  • There are in addition some pearling grounds in the Mergui Archipelago, which have a very recent history; they were practically unknown before 1890; in the early 'nineties they were worked by Australian adventurers, most of whom have since departed; and now they are leased in blocks to a syndicate of Chinamen, who grant sub-leases to individual adventurers at the rate of £25 a pump for the pearling year.

  • It was probably suggested to Ctesibius by the Egyptian Wheel or Noria, which was common at that time, and which was a kind of chain pump, consisting of a number of earthen pots carried round by a wheel.

  • The "receiver" must be connected on the one side to the condenser, and on the other to the exhaust pump. A safety vessel and a manometer are generally interposed between the pump and receiver.

  • This vessel has two tubulures: through one the end of the condenser projects so as to be over one of the receiving tubes; the other leads to the pump. By rotating the disk the tubes may be successively brought under the end of the condenser.

  • Distillation in a vacuum is practised in two forms: - if the pump draws off steam as well as air it is termed a "wet" air-pump; if it only draws off air, it is a "dry" air-pump. In the glycerin industry the lyes obtained by saponifying the fats are first evaporated with "wet vacuum" and finally distilled with closed and live steam and a "dry vacuum."

  • A 10-12% solution of sodium chloride is caused to flow upwards through the apparatus and to overflow into troughs, by which it is conveyed (if necessary through a cooling apparatus) back to the circulating pump. Such a plant has been reported as giving 0.229 gallon of a liquor containing I% of available chlorine per kilowatt hour, or 0.171 gallon per e.h.p. hour.

  • The action of this mill is really more nearly analogous to that of a centrifugal pump, as no grinding action takes place in it.

  • in advance, so as to receive the detritus, which is removed by a shell pump of large size.

  • In dip workings the tail rope is often made to work a pump connected with the bottom pulley, which forces the water back to the cistern of the main pumping engine in the pit.

  • The cleaned coal is carried by a stream of water to a bucket elevator and delivered to the storage bunkers, or both water and coal may be lifted by a centrifugal pump into a large cylindrical tank, where the water drains away, leaving the coal sufficiently dry for use.

  • But as the air is withdrawn by the pump the sound decreases, and when the exhaustion is high the.

  • PLINLIMMON (Plynlimmon, Pumplumon, Pumlumon, Penlumon: Pumlumon is the name used locally: pump means five: lumon, chimney, flag or beacon; pen, head), a mountain of Wales of the height of 2463 ft., equidistant (about 10 m.) from Machynlleth and Llanidloes.

  • He began by experimenting with a pump on water placed in a barrel, but found that when the water was drawn off the air permeated the wood.

  • He then took a globe of copper fitted with pump and stopcock, and discovered that he could pump out air as well as water.

  • Taking two hollow hemispheres of copper, the edges of which fitted nicely together, he exhausted the air from between them by means of his pump, and it is recorded that thirty horses, fifteen back to back, were unable to pull them asunder until the air was readmitted.

  • The whole of the interior surface is washed with a fountain of alkali, kept in circulation by means of a small centrifugal pump. In this apparatus, and with about one horse-power utilized at the transformer, the absorption of gas is 21 litres per hour ("The Oxidation of Nitrogen Gas," Trans.

  • The pump drill with cords twisted round it was in Roman use.

  • For the remaining distance the brine is raised by a pump. The fresh water, however, as it descends rises to the surface of the salt, tending rather to dissolve its upper layers and extend superficially, so that after a time the superincumbent soil, being without support, falls in.

  • The space below the sieve thus formed is connected by means of an outlet tap with a closed tank, and this again communicates with a vacuum pump. By this means the filtration is quickened by the atmospheric pressure, and goes on very rapidly, as also does the subsequent washing.

  • AA, Tower; B, ammoniacal carbonate, which brine main; E, gas-inlet; Z, vacuum filter; always contains some V, pipe to air pump.

  • A double-acting Stirling engine of 50 horse-power, using air which was maintained by a pump at a fairly high pressure throughout the operations, was used for some years in the Dundee Foundry, where it is credited with having consumed only I�7 lb of coal per hour per indicated horse-power.

  • In this there is no compressing pump, and the main pressure of the working air is simply that of the atmosphere.

  • Cold air was compressed by a pump into a receiver, where it was kept cool during compression and from which it passed through a regenerator into the working cylinder.

  • Porth, a gate or harbour - perhaps a corrupt form of the Latin " porta " - Aberporth, Pump Porth (" the Five Gates ").

  • for irrigation, and develop also an electric power sufficient to pump underground water for an additional 50,000 acres at the lowest estimate' of lands lying too high for supply by gravity.

  • long and 12,500 h.p. transmitted 29 m., 3000 h.p. being necessary to pump to a height of 50-90 ft.

  • The engines were then started and the pump set so as to deliver over 5000 lb of water per hour into the boiler.

  • The district council are also empowered to obtain an order of justices directing the closing of any well, tank or cistern, public or private, or any public pump the water from which is likely to be used for drinking or domestic purposes, or for manufacturing drinks for the use of man, if such water is found to be so polluted as to be injurious to health.

  • Deep wells owe their comparative immunity from pollution to the circumstances that the larger quantity of water yielded renders it worth while to pump that water and convey it by pipes from comparatively unpolluted areas; and that any impurities in the water must have passed through a considerable depth, and by far the larger part of them through a great length of filtering material, and must have taken so long a time to reach the well that their organic character has disappeared.

  • The object attained by the air-lift is precisely the same as that attained by putting a pump some distance down a borehole; but instead of the head being reduced by means of the pump, it is reduced by mixing the water with air.

  • Inter- cast-lead pipes, but they were regarded as luxuries, mittent supply, not as necessaries, and gave way to cheaper conduits made, as pump barrels had long been made, by boring out tree trunks, which are occasionally dug up in a good state of preservation.

  • The treatment consists in the prompt neutralization of the acid, by chalk, magnesia, whiting, plaster, soap or any alkaline substance at hand; emetics or the stomach pump should not be used.

  • The exhauster is practicall y a rotary gas pump which serves the purpose of drawing the gas from the hydraulic main through the condensers, and then forcing it through the purifying vessels to the holder.

  • Alloys prepared in this way, and known as phosphor bronze, may contain only about 1% of phosphorus in the ingot, reduced to a mere trace after casting, but their value is nevertheless enhanced for purposes in which a hard strong metal is required, as for pump plungers, valves, the bushes of bearings, &c. Bronze again is improved by the presence of manganese in small quantity, and various grades of manganese bronze, in some of which there is little or no tin but a considerable percentage of zinc, are extensively used in mechanical engineering.

  • Water at ordinary temperature, say 60°, is placed in an air-tight glass or insulated vessel, and when the pressure is reduced by means of a vacuum pump it begins to boil, the heat necessary for evaporation being taken from the water itself.

  • The earliest machine of this kind appears to have been made in 1 755 by Dr. William Cullen, who produced the vacuum by means of a pump alone.

  • In 1810 Sir John Leslie combined with the air pump a vessel containing strong sulphuric acid for absorbing the vapour from the air, and is said to have succeeded in producing I to 1 z lb of ice in a single operation.

  • Fleuss consists of a vacuum pump capable of reducing the air pressure to a fraction of a millimetre, the suction pipe of which is connected first with a vessel containing sulphuric acid, and second with the vessel containing the water to be frozen.

  • As soon as the pump has sufficiently exhausted the air from the vessel containing the water, vapour is rapidly given off and is absorbed by the acid until sufficient heat has been abstracted to bring about the desired reduction in temperature, the acid becoming heated by the absorption of water vapour, while the water freezes.

  • There are three principal parts, a refrigerator or evaporator, a compression pump, and a condenser.

  • The refrigerator, which, Refrigerator Condenser T, Compressor consists of a coil or series of coils, is connected to the suction side of the pump, and the delivery from the pump is connected to the condenser, which is generally of somewhat similar construction to the refrigerator.

  • The pressure in the refrigerator being reduced by the pump and maintained at such a degree as to give the required boiling-point, which is of course always lower than the temperature outside the coils, heat passes from the substance outside, through the coil surfaces, and is taken up by the entering liquid, which is converted into vapour at the temperature T i.

  • The vapours thus generated are drawn into the pump, compressed, and discharged into the condenser at the temperature T2, which is somewhat above that of the cooling water.

  • In the latter the vapour passes direct from the refrigerator to the pump, and power has to be expended merely in raising the temperature to a sufficient degree to enable condensation to occur at the temperature of the cooling water.

  • Sometimes an additional vessel is employed for heating liquor by means of the exhaust steam from the engine driving the ammonia pump. Absorption machines are also made without a pump for returning the strong liquor to the generator.

  • in width, through which cold brine is circulated by a pump. They are placed vertically in a tank, the distance between them being from 8 to 14 in., according to the thickness of the ice to be produced.

  • In the old days there was a hand pump in the kitchen and no hot water you didn't boil yourself.

  • If they succeeded, they'd stick your guy... or girl, in a box in McLean and pump 'em dry.

  • Pump gas and sign baseball cards?

  • Without a pump or two spares, they accomplished the same thing.

  • If the air is just let out of your tires, do you think a bicycle pump might be enough to get you running?

  • You have a pump?

  • Westlake twisted around the seat once more and after a struggle pulled out an old step pump.

  • The tire pump required an incredible length of time to fill the tires with the minimum air sufficient for the return trip.

  • I wouldn't tell that ninny if his shoes were on fire and he was standing at a leaky gas pump.

  • Dean continued to pump his rocker a few moments longer, trying to set up his response in some sequence of understandable order.

  • He must think she was as easy as a primed pump.

  • He took the opportunity to casually pump Hunter on the Byrne disappearance.

  • One was parked beside the building with its hood up, and an old mustang sat at the pump.

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