How to use Prudence in a sentence

prudence
  • He was a friend of Pericles and a, man of prudence and moderation.

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  • This office he filled with great prudence and probity, removing many abuses in the administration of justice in Egypt.

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  • The truly happy man must have Opovna es (prudence), which alone can save him from falling a prey to mere passion.

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  • The captain said we ought to shorten sail anyway, out of common prudence.

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  • The right reason by which moral virtue is determined is prudence, which is determined in its turn by wisdom.

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  • He had learnt prudence and self-restraint in the troubled times of the regency, and did not lose his moderation in success.

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  • I'm glad, my dear, you have so much prudence left.

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  • His simplicity of life, foresight and prudence made him a power in the church.

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  • The prudence of their drift must be settled by external considerations.

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  • He seems to have acted with prudence and moderation during the conversion of his kingdom and did not countenance compulsory proselytism.

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  • Notably its treatment of prudence(4pov j aes) is a chaos.

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  • His conduct, judged not by a modern standard, but by the ideas of his age, will be found compatible with the highest Christian charity, as that of the duke with sound political prudence.

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  • The author, however, does not recommend dissipation, and does not mean to introduce a religious motive - he offers simply a counsel of prudence.

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  • Maine's temperament was averse from the labour of minute criticism, and his avoidance of it was no less a matter of prudence.

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  • While the Eudemian Ethics in a more theological vein emphasizes God, the object of wisdom as the end for which prudence gives its orders, the Nicomachean Ethics in a more humanizing spirit emphasizes wisdom itself, the speculative activity, as that end, and afterwards as the highest happiness, because activity of the divine power of intellect, because an imitation of the activity of God, because most dear to God.

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  • We can occasionally, however, discern traces of his tact and remarkable prudence; and, on the whole, his attitude, particularly with regard to the Union question, recommended him to James.

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  • His prudence, however, perpetually postponed the occasion, and Walachia enjoyed peace to his death in 1688.

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  • Regular trade - though rendered attractive by smuggling - and pearl gathering and similar operations which were spiced with risk, were open in vain to them, and in the absence of any domestic life, a hand-tomouth system of supply and demand rooted out gradually the prudence which accompanies any mode of settled existence.

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  • He maintains further, in opposition to most of the Cyrenaic school, that wisdom or prudence alone is an insufficient guarantee against error.

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  • In this way, the majority felt an interest in supporting the men who embodied their own opinions, and fell in turn under the influence of those who held them with greater prudence or ability than fell to the lot of the average members of the House.

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  • The influence of literature on Burke lay partly in the direction of emancipation from the mechanical formulae of practical politics; partly in the association which it engendered, in a powerful understanding like his, between politics and the moral forces of the world, and between political maxims and the old and great sentences of morals; partly in drawing him, even when resting his case on prudence and expediency, to appeal to the widest and highest sympathies; partly, and more than all, in opening his thoughts to the many conditions, possibilities and "varieties of untried being," in human character and situation, and so giving an incomparable flexibility to his methods of political approach.

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  • This short piece abounds richly in maxims of moral and political prudence.

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  • In instruction he gives the first place to " that which may direct us to heaven," and the second to " the study of prudence, or discreet conduct, and management of ourselves in the several occurrences of our lives, which most assists our quiet prosperous passage through this present life."

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  • These three Augustine (after St Paul) regards as the three essential elements of Christian virtue; along with these he recognizes the fourfold division of virtue into prudence, temperance, courage and justice according to their traditional interpretation; but he explains these virtues to be in their true natures only the same love to God in different aspects or exercises.

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  • The staryeshina may be the patriarch of the community, but is often chosen by the rest of the members on account of his prudence and ability; nor is his wife necessarily the domanyitsa.

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  • Gerard Cauvin was esteemed as a man of considerable sagacity and prudence, and his wife was a godly and attractive lady.

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  • A large proportion of the public officials and judiciary were also disaffected; their removal from their posts was a matter of elementary prudence for a Government engaged in a war of such magnitude.

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  • When a strong Greek city threatens a weak one, and seeks to purchase Athenian connivance with the bribe of a border-town, Athens must remember that duty and prudence alike command her to respect the independence of all Greeks.

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  • But with her usual prudence she avoided every appearance of an open rupture.

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  • Upon his death the nobles assembled to elect a king; and Hugh the Great, Rudolphs brother-in-law, moved by irresolution as much as by prudence, instead of taking the crown, preferred to restore the Carolingians once more in the person of Charles the Simples son, Louis dOutremer, himself claiming numerous privileges and enjoying the exercise of power unenculnbered by a title which carried with it the jealousy of the nobles.

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  • Robert the Pious, a crowned monk, resembled his father in eschewing great schemes, whether from timidity or prudence; yet from 996 to 1031 he preserved intact the authority Robert he had inherited from Hugh, despite many domestic dis- the Pious turbances.

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  • His first proceedings had indeed given no We promise of the moderation and prudence afterwards to characterize him; he had succeeded in exasperating all parties; the officials of his father, the well-served, whom he dismissed in favor of inferiors like Jean Balue, Oliver le Daim and Tristan Lermite; the clergy, by abrogating the Pragmatic Sanction; the university of Paris, by his ill-treatment of it; and the nobles, whom he deprived of their hunting rights, among them being those whom Charles VII.

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  • But the disaffection of the court and the more extreme Catholics made it impossible for him as yet to enter upon a struggle against both Austria and Spain; he was only able to regulate the affairs of Italy with much prudence.

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  • Thanks to him, the duke of Enghien (Louis de Bourbon, afterwards prince of Cond), appointed commander-in-chief at the age of twentytwo, caused the downfall of the renowned Spanish infantry at Rocroi; and he discovered Turenne, whose prudence tempered Conds overbold ideas.

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  • She was of noble birth and seems to have attracted Sigismondo's notice as early as 1438, for at the age of twenty he produced verses of some merit in praise of her charms. She was indeed widely celebrated for her beauty and intellect, culture, firmness and prudence; and even Pope Pius II.

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  • As for your love sick associate, be it him or her, I only express prudence and caution, by everyone.

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  • The Path of Prudence There are, as Miss Reames points out, ways to avoid generic masculines without resorting to linguistic monstrosities.

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  • Fidelity to his own spirituality was always his, but political preferment went to those who followed the dictates of self-interested prudence.

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  • In such instances there is a need to exercise prudence in preparation of the financial statements.

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  • Is this a time to show prudence or seek justice?

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  • So a top priority for the next Conservative government should be to restore prudence to the management of the nation's finances.

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  • Strict fiscal policy Fiscal performance will be guided by prudence.

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  • Thanks to his extreme prudence this part of the journey was signalized by no incident whatever.

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  • Machiavelli conceived the strongest admiration for Cesare's combination of audacity with diplomatic prudence, for his adroit use of cruelty and fraud, for his self-reliance, avoidance of half-measures, employment of native troops, and firm administration in conquered provinces.

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  • In the Nicomachean as in the Eudemian Ethics the limit above moral virtue is right reason, or prudence, which is right reason on such matters; and above prudence wisdom, for which prudence gives its orders; while wisdom is the intelligence and science of the most venerable objects, of the most divine, and of God.

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  • Aristotle then wrote three moral treatises, which agree in the fundamental doctrines that happiness requires external fortune, but is activity of soul according to virtue, rising from morality through prudence to wisdom, or that science of the divine which constitutes the theology of his Metaphysics.

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  • But in Ethics a man's individual good is his own happiness; and his happiness is no mere state, but an activity of soul according to virtue in a mature life, requiring as conditions moderate bodily and external goods of fortune; his virtue is (I) moral virtue, which is acquired by habituation, and is a purposive habit of performing actions in the mean determined by right reason or prudence; requiring him, not to exclude, but to moderate his desires; and (2) intellectual virtue, which is either prudence of practical, or wisdom of speculative intellect; and his happiness is a kind of ascending scale of virtuous activities, in which moral virtue is limited by prudence, and prudence by wisdom; so that the speculative life of wisdom is the happiest and most divine, and the practical life of prudence and moral virtue secondary and human.

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  • Fortunately for Russia the autocratic power was now in the hands of a man who was impressionable enough to be deeply influenced by the spirit of the time, and who had sufficient prudence and practical common-sense to prevent his being carried away by the prevailing excitement into the dangerous region of Utopian dreaming.

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  • He was soon after, however, readmitted into the council of state, where he distinguished himself by the prudence and conciliatory tendency of his views.

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  • No period in the history of Methodism was more critical than this, and in none was the prudence and good sense of its leaders more conspicuous.

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  • The prisoners were released, and public thanks were rendered to the prince by the various provincial states for " his great trouble, care and prudence."

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  • Prudence is, therefore, the only real guide to happiness; it is thus the chief excellence, and the foundation of all the virtues.

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  • The khedive appears to have been aware of the risks to be incurred, and in a private letter he informed the general that I rely upon your prudence and ability not to engage the enemy except under the most favorable circumstances.

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  • It seems therefore consonant alike with prudence and reverence to refrain from attempting to combine afresh into a single picture the materials derivable from the various documents, and to endeavour instead to describe the main contents of the sources from which our knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ as an historical personage is ultimately drawn, and to observe the picture of Him which each writer in turn has offered to us.

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  • The supreme disgrace of the administration was the capture and partial destruction in August 1814 of the city of Washington - this was due, however, to incompetence of the military and not to any lack of prudence on the cabinet's part.

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  • According to Chilon, the great virtue of man was prudence, or well-grounded judgment as to future events.

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  • Setting aside those which are but occasional visitors to the British Islands, six species of terns may be regarded as indigenous, though of them one has ceased from ordinarily breeding in the United Kingdom, while a second has become so rare and regularly appears in so few places that mention of them must for prudence sake be avoided.

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  • Though Frederick failed to subdue the republics, the failure can scarcely be said to reflect either on his prudence as a statesman or his skill as a general, for his ascendancy was finally overthrown rather by the ravages of pestilence than by the might of human arms. In Germany his resolute will and sagacious administration subdued or disarmed all discontent, and he not only succeeded in welding the various rival interests into a unity of devotion to himself against which papal intrigues were comparatively powerless, but won for the empire a prestige such as it had not possessed since the time of Otto the Great.

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  • Llewelyn, utterly humbled, now behaved with such prudence that Edward at last sanctioned his marriage with Eleanor de Montfort (although such an alliance must originally have been highly distasteful to the English king), and the ceremony was performed with much pomp in Worcester Cathedral in 1278.

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  • In 370 Agesilaus tried to restore Spartan prestige by an invasion of Mantinean territory, and his prudence and heroism saved Sparta when her enemies, led by Epaminondas, penetrated Laconia that same year, and again in 362 when they all but succeeded in seizing the city by a rapid and unexpected march.

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  • Scaevola, following Panaetius, explained that the prudence of statesmen had established this public institution in the service of order midway between the errors of popular superstition and the barren truths of enlightened philosophy.

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  • His success, freedom of speech and reforming zeal had made him enemies on all sides, and only the intervention of the king prevented his expulsion from the Company of Jesus, so that prudence counselled his return to Brazil.

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  • She is much praised by historians for her modesty and prudence, and is said to have brought about by her example a considerable improvement in the morals of her nation.

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  • All through his life he navigated the Transcendental sea, piloted by a clear moral sense, warned off the rocks by the saving grace of humour, and kept from capsizing by a good ballast of New England prudence.

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  • Open war was averted only by Beaufort's prudence, and Bedford's hurried return.

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  • Sensible of the prudence of this advice, the emperor immediately entrusted Eugene with full powers to negotiate a treaty of peace, which was concluded at Rastadt on the 6th of March 1714.

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  • During the protracted minority she administered the affairs of the duchy with the greatest prudence, strengthening its resources and improving its position in spite of the troubles of the Seven Years' War.

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  • As regards moral sentiments generally, the view suggested by Mill is more definitely given by the chief living representative of the associationist school, Alexander Bain; by whom the distinctive characteristics of conscience are traced to " education under government or authority," though prudence, disinterested sympathy and other emotions combine to swell the mass of feeling vaguely denoted by the term moral.

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  • The next couple of years will be crucial for maintaining financial prudence to ensure school budgets are not overspent.

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  • Still, it is hard to believe that financial prudence is the real reason for his single status.

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  • Even the harvesting of the cocoa pods demands prudence as a stray machete chop could damage the delicate tree irreparably.

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  • The mutual ardour;gradually cooled; motives of prudence and decorum urged the discontinuance of the connexion; and disillusion changed insensibly to disgust.

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  • The more extreme climates of arid regions on the margins of the tropics, by the unpredictable succession of droughts and floods, confound the prevision of uninstructed people, and make prudence and industry qualities too uncertain in their results to be worth cultivating.

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  • Elizabeth, whose prudence and parsimony were averse to so formidable an undertaking as the complete subjugation of the powerful Irish chieftain, desired peace with him at almost any price; especially when the devastation of his territory by Sussex brought him no nearer to submission.

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  • Though reared in the height of luxury he at once determined to restore the traditional institutions of Lycurgus, with the aid of Lysander, a descendant of the victor of Aegospotami, and Mandrocleidas, a man of noted prudence and courage; even his mother, the wealthy Agesistrata, threw herself heartily into the cause.

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  • The thinker who sees man confronted by the infinite non-moral forces presumed by natural pantheism inevitably predominating over the finite powers of men may appear to the modern Christian theologian or to the evolutionist as a hopeless pessimist, and yet may himself have concluded that, though the future holds out no prospect save that of annihilation, man may yet by prudence and care enjoy a considerable measure of happiness.

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  • It was a legacy of immense responsibilities and perils, for France was bound in common prudence to endeavour to ruin a power which encircled her on every side save the sea and threatened her independence.

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  • The most cynical man of the world, he says, with whatever " sullen incredulity " he may repudiate virtue as a hollow pretence, cannot really refuse his approbation to " discretion, caution, enterprise, industry, frugality, economy, good sense, prudence, discernment "; nor again, to " temperance, sobriety, patience, perseverance, considerateness, secrecy, order, insinuation, address, presence of mind, quickness of conception, facility of expression."

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  • Thenceforward, partly from prudence and partly from penury, Vergerines cared only for the maintenance of peacea not too easy task, in opposition to the greed of Catherine II.

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  • Now I 'm the princess of prudence, I wanted to see how much I could shave off my phone bill.

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  • Examples of word jewelry include the seven virtues, which are faith, hope, charity, fortitude, justice, temperance, and prudence.

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  • Your method of rice grinding will depend on your time, tastes, and prudence.

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  • Learning by his own experience and errors, he wisely developed a sovereign prudence which nicely adjusted means to the end in view.

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  • His wife's prudence was a corrective to his own unpractical temperament, and his efforts in journalism became fairly profitable.

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  • Pamela was entrusted with all her husband's secrets and took an active part in furthering his designs; and she appears to have fully deserved the confidence placed in her, though there is reason to suppose that at times she counselled prudence.

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  • This glacial material is in the form of a till or boulder clay, but in the lowlands, and especially along Narragansett Bay, it is generally overlaid by stratified drift deposited by glacial streams. Within Narragansett Bay are the numerous islands characteristic of an area which has suffered comparatively recent depression, the largest being Rhode Island (or Aquidneck), Conanicut Island and Prudence Island.

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  • Among the moral virtues which take the place of the beasts are Truth, Prudence, Wisdom, Law and Universal Judgment, and in the explanation of what these mean Bruno unfolds the inner essence of his system.

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  • Oddly enough the selfish prudence of Sigismund's rapacious consort, Queen Bona, did more for the national defence than the Polish state could do.

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  • It is true that pleasure is the summum bonum of Epicurus, but his conception of that pleasure is profoundly modified by the Socratic doctrine of prudence and the eudaemonism of Aristotle.

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  • As early as 1615 suspicions of sorcery began to be spread against her, which she, with more spirit than prudence, met with an action for libel.

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  • It threatens to destroy this government's reputation for economic prudence.

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  • His administration was embarrassed by constantly recurring disputes with the neighbouring Dutch settlements,especially after Stamford(Conn.) and Southold (Long Island) had entered the New Haven Jurisdiction, but his prudence and diplomacy prevented an actual outbreak of hostilities.

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  • In his ethical discussions (a full account of which is given under Ethics) Aquinas distinguishes theological from natural virtues and vices; the theological virtues are faith, hope and charity; the natural, justice, prudence and the like.

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  • Though a despot, as all Inonarchs were obliged to be at that date, he reigned with prudence, probity and zeal for the welfare of his subjects.

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  • Prudence, moreover, counselled avoidance of all action likely to serve the predominant anti-Italian party in France as a pretext for violent intervention in favor of the pope.

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  • Truth is the unity and substance which underlies all things; Prudence or Providence is the regulating power of truth, and comprehends both liberty and necessity; Wisdom is providence itself in its supersensible aspect - in man it is reason which grasps the truth of things; Law results from wisdom, for no good law is irrational, and its sole end and aim is the good of mankind; Universal Judgment is the principle whereby men are judged according to their deeds, and not according to their belief in this or that catechism.

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  • The determination of the limit of good fortune and of gentlemanliness by looking to the ruler, God, who governs as the end for which prudence gives its orders, and the conclusion that the best limit is the most conducive to the service and contemplation of God, presents the Deity and man's relation to him as a final and objective standard more definitely in the Eudemian than in the Nicomachean Ethics, which only goes so far as to say that man's highest end is the speculative wisdom which is divine, like God, dearest to God.

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  • Prudence, who at 29 is teetering at the edge of spinsterhood, is an attractive, educated working girl.

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  • Now is the moment for prudence to be joined by patience as the watchwords of economic policy.

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  • According to the Free Dictionary.com, the definition of discreet is "marked by, exercising, or showing prudence and wise self-restraint in speech and behavior; circumspect."

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  • John Adams declared his abhorrence of the practice of slaveholding, and said that " every measure of prudence ought to be assumed for the eventual total extirpation of slavery from the United States."

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  • She is the patroness and protectress of those heroes who are distinguished for their prudence and caution, and in the Trojan War she sides with the more civilized Greeks.

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  • The swellings on the palmar faces of the phalanges of the several fingers are also indicative, the 1st and and of the thumb respectively, of the logical faculty and of the will; the 1st, and and 3rd of the index finger, of materialism, law and order, idealism; those of the middle finger, humanity, system, intelligence; of the ring finger, truth, economy, energy; and of the little finger, goodness, prudence, reflectiveness.

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  • It is true that nobody could have foreseen coming events; but things kept on occurring which counselled prudence, and threatened the economic situation from without.

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  • Parsimony prevailed, as usual, over prudence, and when the Cossacks showed unmistakable signs of restiveness, the Poles irritated them still further by ordering the construction of the strong fortress of Kudak at the confluence of the Dnieper and the Samara, to overawe the Zaporozhian community.

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  • With Locke, the moral and practical qualities of virtue and prudence are of the first consideration.

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  • Both du Bellay and Ronsard laid stress on the necessity of prudence in these borrowings, and both repudiated the charge of wishing to latinize their mother tongue.

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  • In addition to all this confusion of speculative and practical knowledge, prudence is absent when it ought to be present; e.g.

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  • The mere reasonings of theoretical science leave no room for art, and practical prudence usurps the place of morality.

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  • It is in some such manner as these that the natural conditions of regions, which must be conformed to by prudence .and utilized by labour to yield shelter and food, have led to the growth of peoples differing in their ways of life, thought and speech.

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  • At this time, had the affairs of the Boer community been managed with prudence and sagacity they might have established an enduring state.

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  • John I., sometimes surnamed "the Great," and sometimes "father of his country," died on the iith of August 1433, in the forty-eighth year of a reign which had been characterized by great prudence, ability and success; he was succeeded by his son Edward or Duarte, so named out of compliment to Edward III.

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  • He showed statesmanlike qualities in steering a clear course between the exaggerated prudence of Baron Ricasoli, who wished to recall the troops from the frontier, and the impetuosity of Garibaldi, his second-in-command, who was anxious to invade Romagna prematurely, even at the risk of Austrian intervention.

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  • As the rational is either deliberative or scientific, either practical or speculative intellect, there are two virtues of the intellect - prudence of the deliberative or practical, and wisdom of the scientific or speculative, intellect.

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  • We have seen that in the latter's system the " moral sense " is not absolutely required, or at least is necessary only as a substitute for enlightened self-regard; since if the harmony between prudence and virtue, self-regarding and social impulses, is complete, mere self-interest will prompt a duly enlightened mind to maintain precisely that " balance " of affections in which goodness consists.

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  • In spite of his inferior education, the contemporaries of Boniface trusted his prudence and moral character; yet when in financial straits he sold offices, and in 1399 transformed the annates into a permanent tax.

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  • His marriage was one of those of which " magnanimity owes no account to prudence," and it did not turn out prosperously.

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  • Successful emendation requires a rare union of qualifications - insight, prudence, patience and familiarity with the author emended and the conditions of his text.

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  • In arranging his list, however, he defers to the established doctrine of the four cardinal virtues (derived from Plato and the Stoics through Cicero); accordingly, the Aristotelian ten have to stand under the higher genera of (1) the prudence which gives reasoned rules of conduct, (2) the temperance which restrains misleading desire, and (3) the fortitude that resists misleading fear of dangers or toils.

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  • In 1618 he attended the synod of Dort, and was soon after made dean of the Chapel Royal and translated to Winchester, a diocese which he administered with loving prudence and the highest success.

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  • After this, it can never be said that the earlier books of the Eudemian Ethics are so good a preparation as those of the Nicomachean Ethics for the distinction between prudence (Opov j ats) and wisdom (a001a), which is the main point of the common books, and one of Aristotle's main points against Plato's philosophy.

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  • On that subject there was wonderful unanimity, and the few persons who could not join in the chorus had the prudence to remain silent.

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  • By additional secret articles it was agreed that, in the event of the Porte not accepting the offered mediation, consuls should be established in Greece, and an armistice proposed to both belligerents and enforced by all the means that should " suggest themselves to the prudence " of the high contracting powers.

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  • According to Plato (Prot., 318 E), he endeavoured to communicate "prudence" (6130vXia) to his pupils, "which should fit them to manage their households, and to take part by word and deed in civic affairs."

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  • As soon as he had learnt the elements of reading and writing, he was sent as a page to the court of Ferdinand and Isabella; afterwards, until his twenty-sixth year, he took service with Antonio Maurique, duke of Nagera, and followed the career of arms. He was free in his relations with women, gambled and fought; but he also gave indications of that courage, constancy and prudence which marked his after life.

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  • On the 4th of January 1642, however, when the king entered the House of Commons to seize the five members, Lenthall behaved with great prudence and dignity.

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  • From those early days when a fond mother wrote of him as having been " truly converted to God," down to the verge of ninety years, he lived in the habitual contemplation of the unseen world, and regulated his private and public action by reference to a code higher than that of mere prudence or worldly wisdom.

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