Provost sentence example

provost
  • In 1547 he became provost of Eton and dean of Carlisle.

    6
    0
  • The town is governed by a council, with provost and bailies, and owns the gas and water supplies and the electric lighting.

    3
    0
  • Three weeks after the battle he, still provost of St Giles, was admitted a burgess of Edinburgh, his father, the "Great Earl," being then civil provost of the capital.

    2
    0
  • Douglas's literary work, now his chief claim to be remembered, belongs, as has been stated, to the period 1501-1513, when he was provost of St Giles.

    2
    0
  • The town is under the control of a provost, bailies and council, and, along with Hawick and Selkirk, forms the Hawick (or Border) group of parliamentary burghs.

    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • The college was to consist of a provost, io priests, 6 choristers, 25 poor and needy scholars, 25 almsmen and a magister infor mator "to teach gratis the scholars and all others coming from any part of England to learn grammar."

    1
    0
  • In October he appears dining in the hall there as a guest, and at Christmas 1442 he received a royal livery, five yards of violet cloth, as provost of Eton.

    0
    0
  • The chief part of Waynflete's duties as provost was the financing and completion of the buildings and establishment.

    0
    0
  • In the earliest Audit Rolls after the restoration of the college in 1467 there are many entries of visits of Provost Westbury to "the lord of Winchester," which in January1468-1469were for "beginning the work of the church" "and providing money for them."

    0
    0
  • He was provost of Edinburgh in 1437, and was otherwise distinguished.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • His eldest son Alexander, who succeeded him in 1 454, was provost of Edinburgh in 1 455, 1 457 and 1469; he was knighted and held various important court offices under successive monarchs; at the time of his death in 1473 he was master of the household to James III.

    0
    0
  • He also was provost of Edinburgh at various times, and it is a remarkable instance of the esteem in which the lairds of Merchiston were held that three of them in immediate lineal succession repeatedly filled so important an office during perhaps the most memorable period in the history of the city.

    0
    0
  • The pall-bearers were seven heads of colleges and the provost of Eton, all old pupils.

    0
    0
  • Born on the 25th of July 975 he was educated at Quedlinburg and at Magdeburg and became provost of Walbeck in 1002 and bishop of Merseburg seven years later.

    0
    0
  • The grammar school was founded by Dr Roger Lupton, provost of Eton College, in 1528, but as it was connected with a chantry it was suppressed by Henry VIII., to be refounded in 1551 by Edward VI.; it now takes rank among the important public schools.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Thomas Cornish, suffragan bishop in the diocese of Bath and Wells, and provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1493 to 1507, appointed him chaplain of the college of St Mary Ottery, Devonshire.

    0
    0
  • From 1553 to 1586 he was provost of St Andrews and a prominent figure in the national life.

    0
    0
  • The bishop induced his canons to follow the Rule of St Augustine and thus make themselves Augustinian Canons; and so Dominic became a canon regular and soon the prior or provost of the cathedral community.

    0
    0
  • He was the youngest son of Michel Etienne Turgot, "provost of the merchants" of Paris, and Madeleine Frangoise Martineau, and came of an old Norman family.

    0
    0
  • Of this institution Gerard became guardian or provost at a date not later than 110o; and here he organized that religious order of St John which received papal recognition from Paschal II.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He entered Trinity College, Dublin, in 1682, and after ten years' residence obtained a fellowship. In 1699 he was made provost of the college, and in the same year published his Letter in answer to a Book entitled "Christianity not Mysterious," which was recognized as the ablest reply yet written to Toland.

    0
    0
  • In Aberdeen the Quakers took considerable hold, and were there joined by .some persons of influence and position, especially Alexander Jaffray, sometime provost of Aberdeen, and Colonel David Barclay of Ury and his son Robert, the author of the Apology.

    0
    0
  • Brechin - which is controlled by a provost, bailies and council - unites with Arbroath, Forfar, Inverbervie and Montrose to return one member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • The town council, which has its headquarters in the Municipal Buildings in the Royal Exchange, consists of fifty members, a lord provost, seven baffles, a dean of guild, a treasurer, a convener of trades, seven judges of police, and thirty-two councillors.

    0
    0
  • The lord provost and magistrates offer to him the keys of the city, and levees, receptions and state dinners revive in some degree the ancient glories of Holyrood.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Further immunities and privileges were granted by James III.; and by a precept of 1482, known as the Golden Charter, he bestowed on the provost and magistrates the hereditary office of sheriff, with power to hold courts, to levy fines, and to impose duties on all merchandise landed at the port of Leith.

    0
    0
  • He sided with the party at Oxford which favoured university reform, but this did not prevent him from being appointed provost of his college in 1855.

    0
    0
  • The burgh is under the jurisdiction of a provost and council, and unites with Macduff, Elgin, Cullen, Inverurie, Kintore and Peterhead in returning one member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • He married Anne, daughter of Andrew Robertson of Stornoway, sometime provost of Dingwall.

    0
    0
  • Provost Robertson belonged to the Clan Donachie, and by this marriage the robust and business-like qualities of the Lowlander were blended with the poetic imagination, the sensibility and fire of the Gael.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The sympathies of the people, and even, it is said, of the clergy, throughout Scotland, were so unmistakably on the side of the rioters that the original stringency of the bill introduced into parliament for the punishment of the city of Edinburgh had to be reduced to the levying of a fine of 2000 for Porteous's widow, and the disqualification of the provost for holding any public office.

    0
    0
  • Towards the end of the 14th century the town gained a considerable trade owing to the permission given by the provost to the pirates known as "Viktualienbruder" to make it their market, after they had been driven out of Gothland by the Teutonic Order.

    0
    0
  • The New Brig was built in 1788, mainly owing to the efforts of Provost Ballantyne.

    0
    0
  • The town is governed by a provost and council, and unites with Irvine, Inveraray, Campbeltown and Oban in returning one member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • In 18J7 the pope, proprio motu, appointed him provost (or head of the chapter) of Westminster, and the same year he took up his residence in Bayswater as superior of a community known as the "Oblates of St Charles," an association of secular priests on the same lines as the institute of the Oratory, but with this difference, that they are by their constitution at the beck and call of the bishop in whose diocese they live.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A sermon which he preached before the Synod at St Andrews against the dissoluteness of the clergy gave great offence to the provost, who cast him into prison, and might have carried his resentment to the extremest limit had not Alesius contrived to escape to Germany in 1532.

    0
    0
  • It was undertaken in defence of Dr Christopher Potter, provost of Queen's College in Oxford, who had for some time been carrying on a controversy with a Jesuit known as Edward Knott, but whose real name was Matthias Wilson.

    0
    0
  • It is governed by a council with provost and bailies.

    0
    0
  • In 1767 Teller, whose attitude had made his position at Helmstedt intolerable, was glad to accept an invitation from the Prussian minister for ecclesiastical affairs to the post of provost of Kolln, with a seat in the supreme consistory of Berlin.

    0
    0
  • As provost of the "chapter" in that city he directly felt the pressure of events; for on the suppression of religious orders and corporations, he was constrained to retire into private life.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Protected by Duke Ulrich of Wurttemberg, he was appointed (January 15J3) provost of the collegiate church of Stuttgart.

    0
    0
  • While still a child he learned to speak Latin and French, and he was only eight years old when he was sent to Eton, of which his father's friend, Sir Henry Wotton, was then provost.

    0
    0
  • Francis matriculated as a fellow-commoner of King's College, Cambridge, of which Sir John Cheke was provost, in November 1548; and he continued studying there amid strongly Protestant influences until Michaelmas 1550, when he appears, after the fashion of the time, to have gone abroad to complete his education (Stahlin, p. 79).

    0
    0
  • On the following day Eric murdered Nils in his cell with his own hand, and by his order the other prisoners were despatched by the royal provost marshal forthwith.

    0
    0
  • The schools form a fine modern pile (1856), and other buildings are the provost's house (1760), printing house (1760), museum (1857) and the medical school buildings, in three blocks, one of the best schools in the kingdom.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It was endowed by Dr Francis Andrews, provost of Trinity College, was erected in 1785, and in 1791 was placed by statute under the management of the royal astronomer of Ireland, whose official residence is here.

    0
    0
  • The corporation consists of a provost, 7 senior fellows, 25 junior fellows and 70 scholars.

    0
    0
  • A vacancy among the fellows is filled up by the provost and a select number of the fellows, after examination comprised in five principal courses, mathematics, experimental science, classics, mental and moral science and Hebrew.

    0
    0
  • The funds of the college, arising from lands and the fees of students, are managed solely by the provost and seven senior fellows, who form a board, to which and to the academic council the whole government of the university, both in its executive and its legislative branches, is committed.

    0
    0
  • The council consists of the provost and sixteen members of the senate elected by the fellows, professors, &c; the senate consists of the chancellor or his deputy and doctors and masters who keep their names on the books.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Waterford, whence he marched through the counties of Kilkenny and Wicklow, and subsequently arrived in Dublin, where he remained a fortnight, sumptuously entertained by the provost, as the chief magistrate of the city was then called, till intelligence of the invasion of his kingdom by Bolingbroke recalled him to England.

    0
    0
  • Elgin combines with Banff, Cullen, Inverurie, Kintore and Peterhead to return one member to parliament, and the town is controlled by a council with provost and bailies.

    0
    0
  • The most able of his opponents was William Law; others were Andrew Snape, provost of Eton, and Thomas Sherlock, dean of Chichester.

    0
    0
  • Perth is under the jurisdiction of a town council, with a lord provost and bailies, and returns one member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • From the violence of a multitude in which women of the worst class were more furious than the men she was sheltered in the house of the provost, where she repeatedly showed herself at the window, appealing aloud with dishevelled hair and dress to the mercy which no man could look upon her and refuse.

    0
    0
  • The baronetcy to which he had succeeded passed to the son of his brother John, provost of Edinburgh.

    0
    0
  • In 1776 the site began to be built upon, and in 1802 the town, named after Lady Helen, wife of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, the ground landlord, was erected into a burgh of barony, under a provost and council.

    0
    0
  • The corporation of the burghs consists of the provost (or lord provost, in the cases of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee), bailies and councillors, with certain permanent officials, of whom the town clerk is the most important.

    0
    0
  • Next year Gardiner, still in the service of Wolsey, was sent by him to Italy along with Edward Fox, provost of King's College, Cambridge, to promote the same business with the pope.

    0
    0
  • Graec. xlvii.-lxiv.); but this edition is greatly indebted to the one issued more than a century earlier (1612) by Sir Henry Savile, provost of Eton College, from a press established at Eton by himself, which Hallam (Lit.

    0
    0
  • Two years later Manning was appointed provost of Westminster and he established in Bayswater his community of the " Oblates of St Charles."

    0
    0
  • Cheke took a fairly active share in public life; he sat, as member for Bletchingley, for the parliaments of 1547 and 1 55 2-1 553; he was made provost of King's College, Cambridge (April 1, 1548), was one of the commissioners for visiting that university as well as Oxford and Eton, and was appointed with seven divines to draw up a body of laws for the governance of the church.

    0
    0
  • The town is under the control of a council with provost and bailies, and combines with Airdrie, Hamilton, Lanark and Linlithgow (the Falkirk group of burghs) to return a member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • Loftus, however, favoured the project of founding a university in Dublin, though on lines different from Perrot's proposal, and it was largely through his influence that the corporation of Dublin granted the lands of the priory of All Hallows as a beginning of the endowment of Trinity College, of which he was named first provost in the charter creating the foundation in 1591.

    0
    0
  • He had by this time aroused against him the full fury of the Jesuits, and at their instigation a royal provost was sent to Corbie to arrest him.

    0
    0
  • He was educated for the church, and began his clerical career at Halberstadt, where he attained to the dignity of provost.

    0
    0
  • In 1598 he was chosen provost of his college, and in 1606 was vice-chancellor of the university.

    0
    0
  • He was appointed provost of Paris in February 1437, and in 1438 he was made "judge and general reformer of the malefactors of the kingdom."

    0
    0
  • In 1483 he was chosen bishop of St Davids; in 1485 he was made bishop of Salisbury and provost of Queen's College, Oxford, and he became bishop of Winchester in 1493.

    0
    0
  • These yielded a remarkable extension of Pierre Provost's "Law of Exchanges," and enabled him to establish the fact that radiation is not a surface phenomenon, but takes place throughout the interior of the radiating body, and that the radiative and absorptive powers of a substance must be equal, not only for the radiation as a whole, but also for every constituent of it.

    0
    0
  • The burgh, which is governed by a provost and council, unites with Dumbarton, Port Glasgow, Renfrew and Rutherglen in returning one member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • Having become senior moderator in mathematics and a fellow of Trinity, he took holy orders, and was appointed regius professor of divinity in Dublin University in 1866, a position which he retained until 1888, when he was chosen provost of Trinity College.

    0
    0
  • He was provost until his death on the 22nd of January 1904.

    0
    0
  • When Wykeham was provost of Wells, Wynford was retained as architect on the ist of February1364-1365at a fee of 40s.

    0
    0
  • On the 31st of October he was made a canon of York, and on the 15th of December provost of the fourteen prebends of Combe in Wells cathedral, while at some date unknown he obtained also prebends in Bridgenorth collegiate church and St Patrick's, Dublin, and the rectory of Menheniot in Cornwall.

    0
    0
  • Dumbarton is controlled by a provost and a council.

    0
    0
  • For a few years he was one of the tutors at Oriel, but the provost, Edward Hawkins, disliked his religious views, and in 1831 he resigned and left Oxford.

    0
    0
  • Greenock is under the jurisdiction of a town council with provost and bailies.

    0
    0
  • In the reign of Elizabeth they had furnished a secretary to Sir Philip Sidney and to Essex in Sir William Temple (1555-1627), afterwards provost of Trinity College, Dublin, whose son, Sir John Temple (1600-1677), was master of the.

    0
    0
  • The town is governed by a provost and council.

    0
    0
  • He was for some time bailiff of the cathedral chapter and then provost of Cambrai.

    0
    0
  • The town is governed by a provost, bailies and council, and unites with Selkirk and Galashiels (together known as the Border burghs) to send a member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • The city comprises eleven wards and eighteen ecclesiastical parishes, and is under the jurisdiction of a council with lord provost, bailies, treasurer and dean of guild.

    0
    0
  • The first and most important is the work of Bernard, provost and afterwards bishop of Pavia, namely, the Breviarium extravagantium, compiled about 1190; it included the decretals from Alexander III.

    0
    0
  • The town, which is governed by a provost, bailies and council, unites with Musselburgh and Portobello to send one member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • Among the Dominicans, Carmelites, Augustinians, &c., the superior was called Praepositus, " provost," and Prior; among the Franciscans, Custos, " guardian"; and by the monks of Camaldoli, Major.

    0
    0
  • At one time Newton's friends had nearly succeeded in getting him appointed provost of King's College, Cambridge, but the college offered a successful resistance on the ground that the appointment would be illegal, as the statutes required that the provost should be in priest's orders.

    0
    0
  • Stirling is under the jurisdiction of a council with provost and bailies, and, along with Culross, Dunfermline, Inverkeithing and Queensferry (the Stirling burghs) returns a member; to Parliament.

    0
    0
  • The place was laid out as a town in 1767 under the direction of Dr William Smith (1727-1803), at the time provost of the college of Pennsylvania (afterwards the university of Pennsylvania); and it was named in honour of the countess of Huntingdon, who had contributed liberally toward the maintenance of that institution.

    0
    0
  • The town is governed by a provost, bailies and council, and, with Stirling, Culross, Inverkeithing and Queensferry (the Stirling group), combines in returning a member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • On the r3th, when all was anarchy in Paris, they were joined by Flesselles, Provost of the Merchants, and other municipal officers.

    0
    0
  • He studied in Paris, where he took an especial interest in philosophy, is said to have been one of the first to introduce the philosophy of Aristotle into Germany, and he served as provost of a new foundation in Austria.

    0
    0
  • Being a member of the duke of Burgundy's party, he was appointed provost at Paris by John, duke of Bedford, on the 1st of December 1422.

    0
    0
  • The town is under the jurisdiction of a provost, bailies and council, and, with Brechin, Forfar, Inverbervie and Montrose, returns one member to parliament.

    0
    0
  • He returned to France in 1631, and two years later became provost of the cathedral church at Digne.

    0
    0
  • The government is in the hands of a board consisting uni_ of the provost and the senior fellows, assisted by a council in the election of professors and in the regulation of studies.

    0
    0
  • The council is composed of the provost (and, in his absence, the vice-provost) and elected members.

    0
    0
  • He has also been credited with The Whole Duty of Man, which must, however, be assigned to the royalist divine Richard Allestree (1619-1681), provost of Eton College, whose original was considerably altered by his literary executor, John Fell (1625-1686), bishop of Oxford.

    0
    0
  • He obtained many offices under the Commonwealth, among them that of provost of Eton College.

    0
    0
  • But under the leadership of Etienne Marcel, provost of the Parisian merchants and president of the third estate, and Robert le Coq, bishop of Laon, president of the clergy, a partisan of Charles of Navarre, the states refused any "aid" except on conditions which Charles declined to accept.

    0
    0
  • He owed the signal successes of his reign partly to his skilful choice of advisers and administrators, to his chancellors Jean and Guillaume de Dormans and Pierre d'Orgemont, to Hugues Aubriot, provost of Paris, Bureau de la Riviere and others; partly to a singular coolness and subtlety in the exercise of a not over-scrupulous diplomacy, which made him a dangerous enemy.

    0
    0
  • In 1665 he was appointed provost of Eton College, and proved himself a capable administrator.

    0
    0
  • The year following Newman supported and secured the election of Hawkins as provost of Oriel in preference to Keble, a choice which he later defended or apologized for as having in effect produced the Oxford Movement with all its consequences.

    0
    0
  • The Provost, splendidly attired, presented an address.

    0
    0
  • Twice he made bids to become lord provost of Glasgow, but without success.

    0
    0
  • The idea of a small ' cabinet ' or elected provost taking decisions and excluding most councilors is not appropriate.

    0
    0
  • He was appointed provost to the Diocese of Geneva, a significant post.

    0
    0
  • Dumfries had a Catholic provost, John Maxwell, at the insistence of James, the first since the Reformation.

    0
    0
  • It is governed by a provost, 4 bailies, a treasurer, and 10 councilors.

    0
    0
  • She is the former provost of Yale, part of the US Ivy League market-based system.

    0
    0
  • MacLellan's Castle A castellated town house, complete except for its roof, built by the then provost of Kirkcudbright.

    0
    0
  • The leader was termed ' provost ' (lord provost in the largest cities) equivalent to the position mayor.

    0
    0
  • A vise provost, who is also a fellow.

    0
    0
  • He became Provost of King's College Cambridge in 1905 and was then vice-chancellor of the University from 1913 to 1915.

    0
    0
  • In the 1530s, the provost, James Gentle, seems to have been a rather worldly character.

    0
    0
  • Hoadly himself wrote A Reply to the Representations of Convocation and also answered his principal critics, among whom were Thomas Sherlock, then dean of Chichester, Andrew Snape, provost of Eton, and Francis Hare, then dean of Worcester.

    0
    0
  • As provost, Waynflete procured the exemption of the college from archidiaconal authority on the 2nd of May,.

    0
    0
  • The Union with England was so unpopular that not only did the provost vote against the measure in the Scottish parliament, but the articles were burned (20th of November 1706) at the Market Cross by a body of Cameronians, amidst the approving cheers of the inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • Like other villes franches under the king, Paris was governed by a prevot (provost), but certain functions of self-government for the city were delegated to the company of the marchands de l'eau, mercatores aquae, also called mercatores ansati, that is, the gild of merchants whose business lay down the river Seine, in other words, a body naturally exclusive, not, however, to the citizens as such.

    0
    0
  • In the vestibule of the entrance corridor stands a suit of black armour believed to have been worn by Provost Sir Robert Davidson, who fell in the battle of Harlaw, near Inverurie, in 1411.

    0
    0
  • It had previously existed as a thoroughfare known as Gibson 's Wynd, after Walter Gibson, who was Provost in 1688.

    0
    0
  • He became Provost of King 's College Cambridge in 1905 and was then Vice-Chancellor of the University from 1913 to 1915.

    0
    0
  • The Provost Academic Achievers award is also open to incoming freshmen.

    0
    0
  • Among charitable institutions are the Royal Alexandra Infirmary, the Victoria Eye Infirmary (presented by Provost Mackenzie in 1899), the burgh asylum at Riccartsbar, the Abbey Poorhouse (including hospital and lunatic wards), the fever hospital and reception house, the Infectious Diseases Hospital and the Gleniffer Home for Incurables.

    1
    1
  • After studying in various monasteries he became provost of St Benedict at Capua, and in 1055 obtained permission from Victor II.

    1
    1