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proprietor

proprietor

proprietor Sentence Examples

  • In 1893 he became proprietor of the Pall Mall Gazette, and afterwards started the Pall Mall Magazine.

  • In 1886 he became proprietor of the San Francisco Examiner, the first of a long chain of papers to come under his control.

  • As one is exhausted another is in full bearing, so that by a systematic arrangement a single proprietor will send to the surface from 300 lb to 3000 lb of mushrooms per day.

  • About 80% of holdings (amounting to about 6o% of the cultivated area) are cultivated by the proprietor; of the rest approximately 13% are let on lease and 7% are worked on the system known as mtayage (q.v.).

  • In the affitto, or lease, the proprietor furnishes seed and the implements.

  • Educated at Toronto University, he became a lecturer in English at the Toronto Collegiate Institute and held that post until 1885, when he gave up teaching for journalism, being editor and proprietor of the Lindsay Warder from 1885 to 1897.

  • The accumulation of debt upon it was prevented by the prohibition of interest, the release of debts every seventh year, and the reversion of the land to the proprietor, or his heirs, at each return of the year of jubilee.

  • In 1835 Sir William Molesworth founded the London Review with Mill as editor; it was amalgamated with the Wesminster (as the London and Westminster Review) in 1836, and Mill continued editor (latterly proprietor also) till 1840.

  • - The original lease in Scots law took the form of a grant by the proprietor or lessor.

  • - Under these leases, the term of which is usually 99 and sometimes 999 years, the tenant is to a certain extent in the position of a fee simple proprietor, except that his right is terminable, and that he can only exercise such rights of ownership as are conferred on him either by statute or by the terms of his lease.

  • He taught in a country school for a year, read law for a short time, worked in a newspaper office, and in 1884 became editor and proprietor of the Marion Star.

  • CR * AMER, Karl Von (1818-1902), Bavarian politician, had a very remarkable career, rising gradually from a mere workman in a factory at Doos near Nuremberg to the post of manager, and finally becoming part proprietor of the establishment.

  • The richest proprietor in the Holy Land,' but practically immune from any charges on its property, the Church helped, unconsciously, to ruin the kingdom which it should have supported above all others.

  • The original name of the Academy may have been Hecademia, from Hecademus, an early proprietor (but see Academy, Greek).

  • 1855), a prominent political leader, secretary of the interior in President Cleveland's cabinet in 1893-1896, and later governor of Georgia, was long the proprietor; and the Georgian (evening), founded in 1906 as a Prohibition organ.

  • ELSPETH BUCHAN (1738-1791), founder of a Scottish religious sect known as the Buchanites, was the daughter of John Simpson, proprietor of an inn near Banff.

  • The Roman colonus was originally a free person who took land on lease, contracting to pay to the proprietor either a fixed sum annually or (when a colonus partiarius) a certain proportion of the produce of the farm.

  • The coloni were inscribed (adscripti) on the registers of the census as paying taxes to the state, for which the proprietor was responsible, reimbursing himself for the amount.

  • He could not marry out of the domain; if he took for wife a colona of another proprietor, she was restored to her original locality, and the offspring of the union were divided between the estates.

  • In law these slaves were at first absolutely at the disposal of their masters; they had no property in the strict sense of the word, and could be sold to another proprietor and separated from their families.

  • Peter the Great imposed a poll-tax on all the members of the rural population, making the proprietors responsible for the tax charged on their serfs; and the " free wandering people " who were not willing to enter the army were required to settle on the land either as members of a commune or as serfs of some proprietor.

  • Should a proprietor of emiriye plant trees or vines, or erect buildings upon it, with the consent of the state, they are considered as mulk; an annual tax representing the value of the tithes on the portions of emiriye thus utilized is levied.

  • The effect of the original system was that a vakuf property became the inalienable property of the state, and the original proprietor a mere tenant.

  • If the clearance is effected without the necessary permit, the land is nevertheless granted on application, and on the payment of the tapu or sum paid by the proprietor to the state for the value of the land.

  • As to ancient coins, and all kinds of treasure of which the proprietor is unknown, reference must be made to the Dustur, No.

  • His father was a middle-class landed proprietor and a decurion, who is represented as living at a place called Bannauenta.

  • 3 1856, the son of a coach proprietor.

  • These two measures definitely marked off the aristocracy of birth from the aristocracy of wealth - the landed proprietor from the capitalist.

  • By the grant of an immunity to a proprietor the royal officers, the count and his representatives, were forbidden to enter his lands to exercise any public function there.

  • The duties which the count should perform passed to the proprietor, who now represented the government for all his tenants free and unfree.

  • Even in Roman days the proprietor had exercised a jurisdiction over the disputes of his unfree tenants.

  • Its proprietor, Maruyama Ryuhei, spared no expense to obtain news from all qerarters of tli world, and for the first time the Japanese public learned what stores of information may be found in the columns of a really enterprising journal.

  • Its home is sometimes a den under ground or beneath rocks, but oftener the hollow of a tree, and it is said to take possession of a squirrel's nest, driving off or devouring the rightful proprietor.

  • He acquired some property in the island, and married in 1799 the daughter of a great proprietor, M.

  • In the United Kingdom the ownership of coal, like that of other minerals, is in the proprietor of the soil, and passes with it, except when specially reserved in the sale.

  • Jackson, a hotel proprietor, from whose building Ellsworth had removed a Confederate flag.

  • A year later Pierce surrendered this and procured another, which in effect made him proprietor of the colony, but he was twice shipwrecked and was forced to assign to the adventurers his second patent.

  • His connexion with Ludendorff led to his becoming an influence behind the scenes in German politics, and, after the revolution, to his entering the Reichstag, as well as to his debut as a newspaper proprietor on a grand scale.

  • formally erected into a province the whole territory from the west side of the Connecticut river to the east side of Delaware Bay together with all of Long Island and a few other dependencies of minor importance, and granted it to his brother James, the duke of York and Albany, as its lord proprietor.

  • Besides rent, many of the tenants were required to render certain services to the proprietor, and in case a tenant sold his interest in a farm to another he was required to pay the proprietor one-tenth to one-third of the amount received as an alienation fine.

  • Stephen van Rensselaer, the proprietor of Rensselaerwyck, had suffered the rents, especially those of his poorer tenants, to fall much in arrears, and when after his death (1839) the agents of his heirs attempted to collect them they encountered violent opposition.

  • But in 1834 a law was passed providing for the union of the scattered lands belonging to each proprietor, and that may be considered the dawn of modern Saxon agriculture., The richest grain districts are near Meissen, Grimma, Bautzen,.

  • The first chamber consists of the adult princes of the blood, two representatives of the Lutheran and one of the Roman Catholic Church, a representative of Leipzig university, the proprietor (or a deputy) of the Herrschaft of Wildenfels, a proprietor of the mediatized domains, two of Standesherrschaften, one of those of four estates in fee, the superintendent at Leipzig, a deputy of the collegiate institution at Wurzen, 12 deputies elected by owners of nobiliar estates, ten landed proprietors and five other members nominated by the king and the burgomasters of eight towns.

  • FRANCOIS QUESNAY (1694-1774), French economist, was born at Merey, near Paris, on the 4th of June 1694, the son of an advocate and small landed proprietor.

  • The east side was platted in the summer of 1835, and very soon afterward the plat of a settlement on the west side was also recorded, Byron Kilbourn being the chief projector and proprietor of the latter.

  • In 1664 the duke of York became proprietor of the newly erected province of New York and by his grant in the same year to Berkeley and Carteret of all that portion which lay west of the Hudson river, Staten Island became properly a part of New Jersey, but in 1668 the duke decided that all islands within New York Bay which could be circumnavigated in twenty-four hours should be adjudged to New York.

  • No one found anything objectionable in this; investiture with a bishopric was parallel with the appointment by a territorial proprietor to a patronal church.

  • He studied in the schools of his native town; learned the printer's trade, which he followed several years; and became proprietor of the Daily News and the Daily Advance, the morning and evening papers of Lynchburg.

  • to grant a charter conveying almost unlimited territorial and governmental rights therein to George Calvert, first Lord Baltimore (1580?-1632), and styling him its absolute lord and proprietor.

  • In November 1633 two vessels, the " Ark " and the " Dove," carrying at least two hundred colonists under Leonard Calvert (c. 1582-1647), a brother of the proprietor, as governor, sailed from Gravesend and arrived in Maryland late in March of the following year.

  • Finally, the lord proprietor was deprived of his government from 1654 to 1658 in obedience to instructions from parliament which were originally intended to affect only Virginia, but were so modified, through the influence of Claiborne and some Puritan exiles from Virginia who had settled in Maryland, as to apply also to " the plantations within Chesapeake Bay."

  • Then the long continued unrest both in the mother country and in the province seems to have encouraged Josias Fendall, the proprietor's own appointee as governor, to strike a blow against the proprietary government and attempt to set up a commonwealth in its place; but this revolt was easily suppressed and order was generally preserved in the province from the English Restoration of 1660 to the English Revolution of 1688.

  • The proprietor was a Roman Catholic and probably it was his intention that Maryland should be an asylum for persecuted Roman Catholics, but it is even more clear that he was desirous of having Protestant colonists also.

  • Again, although the charter reserved to the proprietor the right of calling an assembly of the freemen or their delegates at such times and in such form and manner as he should choose, he surrendered in 1638 his claim to the sole right of initiating legislation.

  • When suffrage had thus come to be a thing really worth possessing, the proprietor, in 1670, sought to check the opposition by disfranchising all freemen who did not have a freehold of fifty acres or a visible estate of forty pounds sterling.

  • While the proprietor was absent defending his claims against Penn the English Revolution of 1688 was started.

  • The proprietor having become a Protestant, the proprietary government was restored in 1715.

  • The first great dispute between proprietor and people after the restoration of 1715 was with regard to the extension of the English statutes to Maryland, the popular branch of the legislature vigorously contending that all such statutes except those expressly excluded extended to the province, and the lord proprietor contending that only those in which the dominions were expressly mentioned were in force there.

  • Nevertheless, popular clamour against parliament on account of that measure was even greater than it had been against the proprietor.

  • As the contest against the proprietor had been nearly won, the majority of the best citizens desired the continuance of the old government and it was not until the Maryland delegates in the Continental Congress were found almost alone in holding back that their instructions not to vote for independence were rescinded.

  • In 1775, the year in which he was elected into the Stockholm Academy of Sciences, he left Stockholm for Kdping, a small place on Lake Malar, where he became provisor and subsequently proprietor of a pharmacy.

  • however, Robert Tufton Mason (a grandson of the original proprietor), who had become sole heir in 1655, began petitioning first parliament and later the king, for relief.

  • owing to insufficient knowledge of the geography of the coast - that both William Alexander, earl of Stirling, and Sir Ferdinando Gorges, proprietor of Maine, claimed Martha's Vineyard.

  • From 1843 to 1868 he was the chief of the Liberal party in Barcelona, and as proprietor and editor of El Conseller did much to promote the growth of local patriotism in Catalonia.

  • In 1800 " the landing " received the name Bogardus's Corners," from the proprietor of a local inn.

  • There, in 1809, he founded the sherry business of Ruskin, Telford & Domecq; Domecq being proprietor of a famous vineyard in Spain, Telford contributing the capital of the firm, and Ruskin having sole control of the business.

  • ANDREW MELVILLE (1545-1622), Scottish scholar, theologian and religious reformer, was the youngest son of Richard Melville (brother to Melville of Dysart), proprietor of Baldovy near Montrose, at which place Andrew was born on the 1st of August 1545.

  • From 1880 until his death he was editor and part proprietor of the Philadelphia Press.

  • Later with his small savings he opened a saloon, and as his business prospered became proprietor of several such establishments, in which he maintained good order.

  • He left the army, married a Japanese lady, and in 1881 founded the Japan Mail, of which he was proprietor and editor till his death.

  • grown upon the estate of the proprietor, such as wine, fruit, oil, &c., a practice that is still common in Italy.

  • During this time he also edited the St James's Chronicle, belonging to the same proprietor.

  • Allen, proprietor of the Newburyport Herald, to learn the trade of a printer.

  • The state, as ultimate proprietor, imposes a tax which is the equivalent of rent.

  • By this revolutionary method of land nationalization Mehemet Ali became proprietor of nearly all the soil of Egypt, an iniquitous measure against which the Egyptians had no remedy.

  • In 1866-1867 he was chief editor of the Detroit Post and then became editor and joint proprietor with Emil Praetorius (1827-1905) of the Westliche Post of St Louis.

  • From 1868 to 1870 she was the proprietor of a weekly paper, The Revolution, published in New York, edited by Mrs Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and having for its motto, "The true republic - men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights and nothing less."

  • ROBERT RAIKES (1735-1811), English educationist, the founder of Sunday schools, was the son of Robert Raikes, a printer in Gloucester and proprietor of the Gloucester Journal, and was born on the 14th of September 1735.

  • The prevailing system throughout the Madras presidency is the ryotwari, which takes the cultivator or peasant proprietor as its rent-paying unit, somewhat as the Bengal system takes the zamindar.

  • According to this system, an assessment is made with the cultivating proprietor upon the land taken up for cultivation year by year.

  • His father, who had made a large fortune as the inventor and proprietor of "Morison's Pills," settled in Paris till his death in 1840, and Cotter Morison thus acquired not only an acquaintance with the French language, but a profound sympathy with France and French institutions.

  • In 1833 he moved with his family to Belleville, Canada, where he finally became editor and proprietor of the Intelligencer.

  • Curtis (1813-1889), known by her pen name, " Mina Myrtle," and by Harriet Farley (1817-1907), who became manager and proprietor, and published selections from the Offering under the titles Shells from the Strand of the Sea of Genius (1847) and Mind among the Spindles (1849), with an introduction by Charles Knight.

  • Seiler died in 1891 he was proprietor of most of the great hotels in and around Zermatt.

  • Vaughan also became proprietor of the Tablet, and used its columns vigorously for propagandist purposes.

  • Lawrence was a son-in-law of William Fairfax, proprietor of the neighbouring plantation of Belvoir, and agent for the extensive Fairfax lands in the colony.

  • He induced the proprietor of The Times (London) to take two of these machines, and in 1814 that newspaper was printed with steam power at the rate of i roo impressions per hour, a great advance on the number produced up to that time.

  • The latter, however, also soon resigned, and was succeeded on the 10th of July 1891 by Erik Gustav Bostrom, a landed proprietor.

  • Next year he married Harriet Ann Taylor, whose father had been the founder and proprietor of the Manchester Guardian.

  • In 1819 Ricardo, having retired from business and become a landed proprietor, entered parliament as member for Portarlington.

  • Fenwicke, after his release by Andros, endeavoured to re-establish a government at Salem with himself as " Lord and Chief Proprietor " of West Jersey, but the duke's officers further contested his claims and in 1682 Penn effected a peaceful settlement with him.

  • Ferdinando Gorges, a grandson of the original proprietor, brought before parliament his claim to Maine and in 1664 a committee of that body decided in his favour; but Massachusetts successfully resisted until 1677, when the king in council decided against her.

  • She then quietly purchased the Gorges claim for £1,250 and held the province as a proprietor until 1691, when by the new Massachusetts charter Maine was extended to the Saint Croix river, and was made an integral part of Massachusetts.

  • The state maintained, however, that the proprietor who exploits and sells the produce of his land is not engaging in commerce.

  • The down that " only Christians can become citizens of Jewish Rumania " - in other words, all Jews were excluded from the rights of citizenship; and as no foreigner could own land in Rumania outside the towns, no Jew could become a country proprietor.

  • JOAN OF ARC, more properly Jeanneton Darc, afterwards known in France as Jeanne D'Arc 1 (1411-1431), the " Maid of Orleans," was born between 1410 and 1412, the daughter of Jacques Darc, peasant proprietor, of Domremy, a small village in the Vosges, partly in Champagne and partly in Lorraine, and of his wife Isabeau, of the village of Vouthon, who from having made a pilgrimage to Rome had received the usual surname of Romee.

  • Society thus becomes sole proprietor, intrusting to social groups and social functionaries the management of the various properties.

  • Cornelius Vanderbilt was for several years the proprietor of the Bellona Hotel of New Brunswick, now a tenement house.

  • The ownership of the soil might be in any one, but the rights of the proprietor were limited by the laws made for the protection of the king's wild beasts.

  • In vain Sieyes remarked that in extinguishing tithes the Assembly was making a present to every landed proprietor.

  • The imports are almost entirely foodstuffs and other necessaries for the inhabitants, who form a patriarchal colony under a private proprietor.

  • The Protestant eldest son of a Catholic landed proprietor might make his father tenant for life and secure his own inheritance.

  • Only Protestant freeholders had votes, which encouraged leases for lives, about the worst kind of tenure, and the object of each proprietor was to control as many votes as possible.

  • "HENRY DU PRE LABOUCHERE (1831-1912), Radical politician and proprietor of Truth, was born in London Nov.

  • He began his journalistic career with the Daily News, of which he became part proprietor just before the Franco-German War, and he was himself the author of the Letters of a Besieged Resident, sent to that newspaper from Paris by balloon post during the siege, addressed to his wife in London.

  • It was in vain that the emperors tried to rivet the chains of the curia in this hereditary bondage, by attaching the small proprietor to his glebe, like the artisan to his gild and the soldier to his legion.

  • These various benefactions were, as a rule, merely the indirect methods which the great landowners employed in order to absorb the small proprietor.

  • In 1694 also, soon after the overthrow of the Catholic government of the lord proprietor, it was made the seat of the new government as well as a port of entry, and it has since remained the capital of Maryland; but it was not until 1708 that it was incorporated as a city.

  • In 1868 he became a leading editorial writer for the New York Tribune, in the following year was made managing editor, and in 1872, upon the death of Horace Greeley, became the principal proprietor and editor-in-chief.

  • His mother, Rachael Fawcett (Faucette), of French Huguenot descent, married when very young a Danish proprietor of St Croix, John Michael Levine, with whom she lived unhappily and whom she soon left, subsequently living with James Hamilton; her husband procured a divorce in 1759, but the court forbade her remarriage.'

  • Tilak conducted law classes till 1890, by which time he had become the sole proprietor as well as the editor of the two weekly papers, the Mahratta (in English) and the Kesari (" Lion " in Mahratti) which he and his friends had founded in 1880.

  • There was no exercise of discretion in favor of the registered proprietor.

  • absentee proprietor.

  • Mr Whitelaw is a nearby but not adjoining proprietor.

  • chef proprietor, Philip Blackburn prides himself on using the best of local seasonal produce to create a varied menu.

  • colliery proprietor near Wolverhampton, where he amassed considerable wealth.

  • distinguished from the proprietor 's personal affairs.

  • heritable proprietor of subjects at 11 Orchard Walk, Aberdeen (" the subjects " ).

  • Written by a pizza shop proprietor, the site offers impartial, honest advice.

  • inclosed waste land or a portion of the common forest to cultivate it, became hereditary proprietor of the same.

  • This is an alternative to the existing possibility of the proprietor amending the patent under the 1977 Act.

  • A squatter will be able to apply to be registered as proprietor after ten years ' adverse possession.

  • proprietor of a patent.

  • proprietor of the estate of Drum in Aberdeenshire, (pp.

  • proprietor of the soil is Henry Curwen, Esq., the lord of the manor.

  • proprietor of land persuaded the claimant to invest in his company.

  • If your arrival time is going to be delayed then please let the proprietor know so that the room can be kept for you.

  • The sole proprietor can transfer the business only by the sale of business assets.

  • Simon Hopkins is the registered proprietor of the practice.

  • Mr Whitelaw is a nearby but not adjoining proprietor.

  • Kate Bunce was the daughter of John Thackray Bunce who was Chairman of the City Art Gallery and a wealthy newspaper proprietor.

  • The principal proprietor of the soil is Henry Curwen, Esq., the lord of the manor.

  • Some years ago the deceased was a colliery proprietor near Wolverhampton, where he amassed considerable wealth.

  • In order to prove patent infringement, a patent proprietor will need evidence of the infringing acts.

  • Occasionally, a newspaper proprietor may step in a kill a story for their own reasons.

  • chef proprietor, Philip Blackburn prides himself on using the best of local seasonal produce to create a varied menu.

  • registered as proprietor.

  • registered proprietor.

  • Harry Nash (Tom Bell) is the proprietor of a waxworks in a rundown seaside resort.

  • Some said a retired tradesman; others, a foreign princess; others, the proprietor of a private lunatic asylum.

  • The proprietor applied to the Mayor who exercised himself to quell the tumult by swearing in two constables and reading the Riot Act.

  • uppermost in the thoughts of the proprietor at the time.

  • The opponent Mr Cook is the proprietor of a registration for the mark viper in respect of " Motor Vehicles " .

  • In 1893 he became proprietor of the Pall Mall Gazette, and afterwards started the Pall Mall Magazine.

  • The proprietor, in obedience to orders from Vienna (this seems the most probable account), took advantage of a dispute about salary to dismiss him.

  • "WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST (1863-), American newspaper proprietor, was born in San Francisco, Cal., April 29 1863.

  • In 1886 he became proprietor of the San Francisco Examiner, the first of a long chain of papers to come under his control.

  • He was likewise proprietor of the Cosmopolitan Magazine; Good-Housekeeping Magazine; Harper's Bazaar; Hearst's Magazine; Motor Magazine; and Motor-Boating Magazine.

  • In 1861 he joined Meredith Townsend as joint-editor and part proprietor of the Spectator, then a well-known liberal weekly, which, however, was not remunerative from the business point of view.

  • As one is exhausted another is in full bearing, so that by a systematic arrangement a single proprietor will send to the surface from 300 lb to 3000 lb of mushrooms per day.

  • About 80% of holdings (amounting to about 6o% of the cultivated area) are cultivated by the proprietor; of the rest approximately 13% are let on lease and 7% are worked on the system known as mtayage (q.v.).

  • Taxes are not sufficiently proportioned to what the land may reasonably be expected to produce, nor sufficient allowance made for the exceptional conditions of a southern climate, in which a few hours bad weather may destroy a whole crop. The Italian agriculturist has come to look (and often in vain) for action on a large scale from the state, for irrigation, drainage of uncultivated low-lying land, which may be made fertile, river regulation, &c.; while to the small proprietor the state often appears only as a hard and inconsiderate tax-gatherer.

  • In the affitto, or lease, the proprietor furnishes seed and the implements.

  • Educated at Toronto University, he became a lecturer in English at the Toronto Collegiate Institute and held that post until 1885, when he gave up teaching for journalism, being editor and proprietor of the Lindsay Warder from 1885 to 1897.

  • The accumulation of debt upon it was prevented by the prohibition of interest, the release of debts every seventh year, and the reversion of the land to the proprietor, or his heirs, at each return of the year of jubilee.

  • In 1835 Sir William Molesworth founded the London Review with Mill as editor; it was amalgamated with the Wesminster (as the London and Westminster Review) in 1836, and Mill continued editor (latterly proprietor also) till 1840.

  • - The original lease in Scots law took the form of a grant by the proprietor or lessor.

  • - Under these leases, the term of which is usually 99 and sometimes 999 years, the tenant is to a certain extent in the position of a fee simple proprietor, except that his right is terminable, and that he can only exercise such rights of ownership as are conferred on him either by statute or by the terms of his lease.

  • He taught in a country school for a year, read law for a short time, worked in a newspaper office, and in 1884 became editor and proprietor of the Marion Star.

  • CR * AMER, Karl Von (1818-1902), Bavarian politician, had a very remarkable career, rising gradually from a mere workman in a factory at Doos near Nuremberg to the post of manager, and finally becoming part proprietor of the establishment.

  • The richest proprietor in the Holy Land,' but practically immune from any charges on its property, the Church helped, unconsciously, to ruin the kingdom which it should have supported above all others.

  • The original name of the Academy may have been Hecademia, from Hecademus, an early proprietor (but see Academy, Greek).

  • 1855), a prominent political leader, secretary of the interior in President Cleveland's cabinet in 1893-1896, and later governor of Georgia, was long the proprietor; and the Georgian (evening), founded in 1906 as a Prohibition organ.

  • ELSPETH BUCHAN (1738-1791), founder of a Scottish religious sect known as the Buchanites, was the daughter of John Simpson, proprietor of an inn near Banff.

  • The Roman colonus was originally a free person who took land on lease, contracting to pay to the proprietor either a fixed sum annually or (when a colonus partiarius) a certain proportion of the produce of the farm.

  • The coloni were inscribed (adscripti) on the registers of the census as paying taxes to the state, for which the proprietor was responsible, reimbursing himself for the amount.

  • He could not marry out of the domain; if he took for wife a colona of another proprietor, she was restored to her original locality, and the offspring of the union were divided between the estates.

  • In law these slaves were at first absolutely at the disposal of their masters; they had no property in the strict sense of the word, and could be sold to another proprietor and separated from their families.

  • Peter the Great imposed a poll-tax on all the members of the rural population, making the proprietors responsible for the tax charged on their serfs; and the " free wandering people " who were not willing to enter the army were required to settle on the land either as members of a commune or as serfs of some proprietor.

  • Should a proprietor of emiriye plant trees or vines, or erect buildings upon it, with the consent of the state, they are considered as mulk; an annual tax representing the value of the tithes on the portions of emiriye thus utilized is levied.

  • The effect of the original system was that a vakuf property became the inalienable property of the state, and the original proprietor a mere tenant.

  • If the clearance is effected without the necessary permit, the land is nevertheless granted on application, and on the payment of the tapu or sum paid by the proprietor to the state for the value of the land.

  • As to ancient coins, and all kinds of treasure of which the proprietor is unknown, reference must be made to the Dustur, No.

  • His father was a middle-class landed proprietor and a decurion, who is represented as living at a place called Bannauenta.

  • 3 1856, the son of a coach proprietor.

  • These two measures definitely marked off the aristocracy of birth from the aristocracy of wealth - the landed proprietor from the capitalist.

  • By the grant of an immunity to a proprietor the royal officers, the count and his representatives, were forbidden to enter his lands to exercise any public function there.

  • The duties which the count should perform passed to the proprietor, who now represented the government for all his tenants free and unfree.

  • Even in Roman days the proprietor had exercised a jurisdiction over the disputes of his unfree tenants.

  • Its proprietor, Maruyama Ryuhei, spared no expense to obtain news from all qerarters of tli world, and for the first time the Japanese public learned what stores of information may be found in the columns of a really enterprising journal.

  • Others of interest are: Antee, revue mensuelle de litterature (1904); L'Art et la vie (1892); Cosmopolis (1896); L'Ermitage (1890); Le Mercure de France, serie moderne (1890), a magazine greatly valued in literary circles; La Revue de Paris, fortnightly (1894), and the Nouvelle Revue (1879) a compositor, and by translating from the English earned sufficient to purchase the moribund Revue des deux mondes, which acquired its subsequent position in spite of the tyrannical editorial behaviour of the proprietor.

  • Its home is sometimes a den under ground or beneath rocks, but oftener the hollow of a tree, and it is said to take possession of a squirrel's nest, driving off or devouring the rightful proprietor.

  • He acquired some property in the island, and married in 1799 the daughter of a great proprietor, M.

  • In the United Kingdom the ownership of coal, like that of other minerals, is in the proprietor of the soil, and passes with it, except when specially reserved in the sale.

  • Jackson, a hotel proprietor, from whose building Ellsworth had removed a Confederate flag.

  • A year later Pierce surrendered this and procured another, which in effect made him proprietor of the colony, but he was twice shipwrecked and was forced to assign to the adventurers his second patent.

  • His connexion with Ludendorff led to his becoming an influence behind the scenes in German politics, and, after the revolution, to his entering the Reichstag, as well as to his debut as a newspaper proprietor on a grand scale.

  • formally erected into a province the whole territory from the west side of the Connecticut river to the east side of Delaware Bay together with all of Long Island and a few other dependencies of minor importance, and granted it to his brother James, the duke of York and Albany, as its lord proprietor.

  • Besides rent, many of the tenants were required to render certain services to the proprietor, and in case a tenant sold his interest in a farm to another he was required to pay the proprietor one-tenth to one-third of the amount received as an alienation fine.

  • Stephen van Rensselaer, the proprietor of Rensselaerwyck, had suffered the rents, especially those of his poorer tenants, to fall much in arrears, and when after his death (1839) the agents of his heirs attempted to collect them they encountered violent opposition.

  • But in 1834 a law was passed providing for the union of the scattered lands belonging to each proprietor, and that may be considered the dawn of modern Saxon agriculture., The richest grain districts are near Meissen, Grimma, Bautzen,.

  • The first chamber consists of the adult princes of the blood, two representatives of the Lutheran and one of the Roman Catholic Church, a representative of Leipzig university, the proprietor (or a deputy) of the Herrschaft of Wildenfels, a proprietor of the mediatized domains, two of Standesherrschaften, one of those of four estates in fee, the superintendent at Leipzig, a deputy of the collegiate institution at Wurzen, 12 deputies elected by owners of nobiliar estates, ten landed proprietors and five other members nominated by the king and the burgomasters of eight towns.

  • FRANCOIS QUESNAY (1694-1774), French economist, was born at Merey, near Paris, on the 4th of June 1694, the son of an advocate and small landed proprietor.

  • The east side was platted in the summer of 1835, and very soon afterward the plat of a settlement on the west side was also recorded, Byron Kilbourn being the chief projector and proprietor of the latter.

  • In 1664 the duke of York became proprietor of the newly erected province of New York and by his grant in the same year to Berkeley and Carteret of all that portion which lay west of the Hudson river, Staten Island became properly a part of New Jersey, but in 1668 the duke decided that all islands within New York Bay which could be circumnavigated in twenty-four hours should be adjudged to New York.

  • No one found anything objectionable in this; investiture with a bishopric was parallel with the appointment by a territorial proprietor to a patronal church.

  • He studied in the schools of his native town; learned the printer's trade, which he followed several years; and became proprietor of the Daily News and the Daily Advance, the morning and evening papers of Lynchburg.

  • to grant a charter conveying almost unlimited territorial and governmental rights therein to George Calvert, first Lord Baltimore (1580?-1632), and styling him its absolute lord and proprietor.

  • In November 1633 two vessels, the " Ark " and the " Dove," carrying at least two hundred colonists under Leonard Calvert (c. 1582-1647), a brother of the proprietor, as governor, sailed from Gravesend and arrived in Maryland late in March of the following year.

  • Finally, the lord proprietor was deprived of his government from 1654 to 1658 in obedience to instructions from parliament which were originally intended to affect only Virginia, but were so modified, through the influence of Claiborne and some Puritan exiles from Virginia who had settled in Maryland, as to apply also to " the plantations within Chesapeake Bay."

  • Then the long continued unrest both in the mother country and in the province seems to have encouraged Josias Fendall, the proprietor's own appointee as governor, to strike a blow against the proprietary government and attempt to set up a commonwealth in its place; but this revolt was easily suppressed and order was generally preserved in the province from the English Restoration of 1660 to the English Revolution of 1688.

  • The proprietor was a Roman Catholic and probably it was his intention that Maryland should be an asylum for persecuted Roman Catholics, but it is even more clear that he was desirous of having Protestant colonists also.

  • Again, although the charter reserved to the proprietor the right of calling an assembly of the freemen or their delegates at such times and in such form and manner as he should choose, he surrendered in 1638 his claim to the sole right of initiating legislation.

  • When suffrage had thus come to be a thing really worth possessing, the proprietor, in 1670, sought to check the opposition by disfranchising all freemen who did not have a freehold of fifty acres or a visible estate of forty pounds sterling.

  • While the proprietor was absent defending his claims against Penn the English Revolution of 1688 was started.

  • Owing to the death of a messenger there was long delay in proclaiming the new monarchs in Maryland; this delay, together with a rumor of a Popish plot to slaughter the Protestants, enabled the opposition to overthrow the proprietary government, and then the crown, in the interest of its trade policy, set up a royal government in its place, in 1692, without, however, divesting the proprietor of his territorial rights.

  • The proprietor having become a Protestant, the proprietary government was restored in 1715.

  • The first great dispute between proprietor and people after the restoration of 1715 was with regard to the extension of the English statutes to Maryland, the popular branch of the legislature vigorously contending that all such statutes except those expressly excluded extended to the province, and the lord proprietor contending that only those in which the dominions were expressly mentioned were in force there.

  • Nevertheless, popular clamour against parliament on account of that measure was even greater than it had been against the proprietor.

  • As the contest against the proprietor had been nearly won, the majority of the best citizens desired the continuance of the old government and it was not until the Maryland delegates in the Continental Congress were found almost alone in holding back that their instructions not to vote for independence were rescinded.

  • In 1775, the year in which he was elected into the Stockholm Academy of Sciences, he left Stockholm for Kdping, a small place on Lake Malar, where he became provisor and subsequently proprietor of a pharmacy.

  • however, Robert Tufton Mason (a grandson of the original proprietor), who had become sole heir in 1655, began petitioning first parliament and later the king, for relief.

  • owing to insufficient knowledge of the geography of the coast - that both William Alexander, earl of Stirling, and Sir Ferdinando Gorges, proprietor of Maine, claimed Martha's Vineyard.

  • From 1843 to 1868 he was the chief of the Liberal party in Barcelona, and as proprietor and editor of El Conseller did much to promote the growth of local patriotism in Catalonia.

  • In 1800 " the landing " received the name Bogardus's Corners," from the proprietor of a local inn.

  • There, in 1809, he founded the sherry business of Ruskin, Telford & Domecq; Domecq being proprietor of a famous vineyard in Spain, Telford contributing the capital of the firm, and Ruskin having sole control of the business.

  • ANDREW MELVILLE (1545-1622), Scottish scholar, theologian and religious reformer, was the youngest son of Richard Melville (brother to Melville of Dysart), proprietor of Baldovy near Montrose, at which place Andrew was born on the 1st of August 1545.

  • From 1880 until his death he was editor and part proprietor of the Philadelphia Press.

  • Later with his small savings he opened a saloon, and as his business prospered became proprietor of several such establishments, in which he maintained good order.

  • He left the army, married a Japanese lady, and in 1881 founded the Japan Mail, of which he was proprietor and editor till his death.

  • grown upon the estate of the proprietor, such as wine, fruit, oil, &c., a practice that is still common in Italy.

  • Herr von Schorlemer-Ast, a Catholic landed proprietor from Westphalia, formed similar associations among the peasants.

  • During this time he also edited the St James's Chronicle, belonging to the same proprietor.

  • Allen, proprietor of the Newburyport Herald, to learn the trade of a printer.

  • The state, as ultimate proprietor, imposes a tax which is the equivalent of rent.

  • By this revolutionary method of land nationalization Mehemet Ali became proprietor of nearly all the soil of Egypt, an iniquitous measure against which the Egyptians had no remedy.

  • In 1866-1867 he was chief editor of the Detroit Post and then became editor and joint proprietor with Emil Praetorius (1827-1905) of the Westliche Post of St Louis.

  • From 1868 to 1870 she was the proprietor of a weekly paper, The Revolution, published in New York, edited by Mrs Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and having for its motto, "The true republic - men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights and nothing less."

  • ROBERT RAIKES (1735-1811), English educationist, the founder of Sunday schools, was the son of Robert Raikes, a printer in Gloucester and proprietor of the Gloucester Journal, and was born on the 14th of September 1735.

  • Morris now became sole manager and proprietor, although the other members of the old firm continued, in varying degrees, to give him the advantage of their assistance and advice. !; Meanwhile the epic mood had possessed Morris very strongly, and, in addition to his work upon the sagas, he had actually finished and (in 1875) published a verse translation of the Aeneid, which is interesting rather for its individuality than for any fidelity to the spirit of the original.

  • The prevailing system throughout the Madras presidency is the ryotwari, which takes the cultivator or peasant proprietor as its rent-paying unit, somewhat as the Bengal system takes the zamindar.

  • According to this system, an assessment is made with the cultivating proprietor upon the land taken up for cultivation year by year.

  • His father, who had made a large fortune as the inventor and proprietor of "Morison's Pills," settled in Paris till his death in 1840, and Cotter Morison thus acquired not only an acquaintance with the French language, but a profound sympathy with France and French institutions.

  • In 1833 he moved with his family to Belleville, Canada, where he finally became editor and proprietor of the Intelligencer.

  • Curtis (1813-1889), known by her pen name, " Mina Myrtle," and by Harriet Farley (1817-1907), who became manager and proprietor, and published selections from the Offering under the titles Shells from the Strand of the Sea of Genius (1847) and Mind among the Spindles (1849), with an introduction by Charles Knight.

  • Seiler died in 1891 he was proprietor of most of the great hotels in and around Zermatt.

  • Vaughan also became proprietor of the Tablet, and used its columns vigorously for propagandist purposes.

  • Lawrence was a son-in-law of William Fairfax, proprietor of the neighbouring plantation of Belvoir, and agent for the extensive Fairfax lands in the colony.

  • He induced the proprietor of The Times (London) to take two of these machines, and in 1814 that newspaper was printed with steam power at the rate of i roo impressions per hour, a great advance on the number produced up to that time.

  • The latter, however, also soon resigned, and was succeeded on the 10th of July 1891 by Erik Gustav Bostrom, a landed proprietor.

  • Next year he married Harriet Ann Taylor, whose father had been the founder and proprietor of the Manchester Guardian.

  • In 1819 Ricardo, having retired from business and become a landed proprietor, entered parliament as member for Portarlington.

  • Fenwicke, after his release by Andros, endeavoured to re-establish a government at Salem with himself as " Lord and Chief Proprietor " of West Jersey, but the duke's officers further contested his claims and in 1682 Penn effected a peaceful settlement with him.

  • Ferdinando Gorges, a grandson of the original proprietor, brought before parliament his claim to Maine and in 1664 a committee of that body decided in his favour; but Massachusetts successfully resisted until 1677, when the king in council decided against her.

  • She then quietly purchased the Gorges claim for £1,250 and held the province as a proprietor until 1691, when by the new Massachusetts charter Maine was extended to the Saint Croix river, and was made an integral part of Massachusetts.

  • The state maintained, however, that the proprietor who exploits and sells the produce of his land is not engaging in commerce.

  • The down that " only Christians can become citizens of Jewish Rumania " - in other words, all Jews were excluded from the rights of citizenship; and as no foreigner could own land in Rumania outside the towns, no Jew could become a country proprietor.

  • JOAN OF ARC, more properly Jeanneton Darc, afterwards known in France as Jeanne D'Arc 1 (1411-1431), the " Maid of Orleans," was born between 1410 and 1412, the daughter of Jacques Darc, peasant proprietor, of Domremy, a small village in the Vosges, partly in Champagne and partly in Lorraine, and of his wife Isabeau, of the village of Vouthon, who from having made a pilgrimage to Rome had received the usual surname of Romee.

  • Society thus becomes sole proprietor, intrusting to social groups and social functionaries the management of the various properties.

  • Cornelius Vanderbilt was for several years the proprietor of the Bellona Hotel of New Brunswick, now a tenement house.

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